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Write What Sells: Write nonfiction Kindle books that sell! How to find top selli

WRITE WHAT

SELLS!

Write nonfiction Kindle books that sell!

How to find top selling categories

and genres for Kindle writing.  

Come up with best selling book ideas to write about!

Alex Foster

This book is designed to provide information, education and motivation to readers. It is sold with the understanding that the publisher and author are not engaged to render any type of psychological, legal, or any other kind of professional advice. The content of each article is the sole expression and opinion of its author. No warranties or guarantees are expressed or implied. Neither the publisher nor the author shall be liable for any physical, psychological, emotional, financial, or commercial damages, including, but not limited to, special, incidental, consequential or other damages. You are responsible for your own choices, actions, and results.

Copyright ©  2016 Alex Foster  All rights reserved. [email protected]

You are encouraged to share all, or in part, any of the content of this book in the name of helping others as long as credit is given to Alex Foster and the book title.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Categories

Research Fun

Niche Time!

Check Demand

IDEAS!

Publishing and Marketing Formula

Conclusion

[] Introduction

Successful Kindle writers learn quickly to write in book categories that sell well for self-publishers. Publishers are able to create their own market through advertising, but the self-publisher must target markets that are accessible based on popularity.

A self-publisher relies on keyword searches and other forms of marketing to generate sales.  Being a self-publisher or a small writer means you have a passion for writing as well as wanting to provide value to your readers. You need to make money with your craft to continue doing it.  This book shows you how to follow your passion for writing in a more targeted way, a target that also allows you to make a living doing what you love.

The focus is on nonfiction; however, many of the concepts can be applied to fiction.

I have a five-step process before writing a book, a formula perfected over time and it happens to be my go-to tool for writing a new book.  My ratio of success has gone up since I first implemented this system. By success, I mean that 80% of the books I write with this system earn at least $100 a month, with some books exceeding this number by a few hundred, making up for the loss I have with the other failed 20%.

As you can see by my figures, my writing model does not mirror the publisher model.  The publisher model is built around complexity (in writing that takes a lot of time) and large sums of money (in marketing budgets to promote the book).  My self-publishing model for writing doesn’t rely on billboards or complexity. There are outliers, of course, but a self-publisher has a hard time writing a complex book over the long term that turns a high profit without the backing of a publisher with their network, connections, and marketing budget.  A different kind of book needs to be written to be profitable as a self-publisher.

My model relies on popularity and pain.  Pain, in the sense that there is a need people have that a book would help. My writing looks for a ‘popular unmet need’ in the market.  If it’s popular there are buyers.  If the pain isn’t being answered then it’s a specific niche that can be profitable.

A publisher creates a market with awareness of the book through marketing, where my self-publisher model is about writing a book people are already looking for.  Realistically, the profits are low compared to the millions seen by the publisher.  However, the complexity is low allowing for much faster writing.

My model is about writing many low profit books over the long term.

You will learn to do the following in order:

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p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. How to pick a general category that sells well for self-publishers;

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p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. How to research the topic and generate additional ideas within the topic;

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p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. How to use the gathered research to find a niche in the topic;

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p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. How to check the demand for the niche to ensure it will sell; and

*
p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. How to hit the ground running when you publish.

I am all about following your bliss and passion in life.  Often, what we are passionate about doesn’t translate 100% to a profitable book.   The magic is combining what is profitable with passion.

[] Categories

Most self-published Kindle books don’t make it to the review critics.  The radio stations, podcasts, magazines and other media aren’t talking about your book.  You aren’t backed by a publisher that promotes your book and gets people looking for your book by name.  A Kindle self-publisher mainly relies on keyword searches.

Women make up about 80% of the Kindle reading base.  The openness to new books is heavily influenced by this fact.  As a self-publisher you need to know what the best categories are to sell in.  Here they are:

Advice

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Relationships

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Dating

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Weddings

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Parenting

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Family

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Aging Parents/Death and Grief

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Fertility

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Sex

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Mental Health

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Safety

Nutrition/Diet

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Diet

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Cooking

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Weight Loss

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Alternative Medicine

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Personal Health

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Exercise and Fitness

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Fitness

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Health

How to Make Money

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Internet business

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Blogs

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Writing

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Hobbies

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Art

Pets

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Breeds, Cats and Dogs

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Care

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p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. Diet

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Children-Related to Pets

Religious

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Specific issues or topics

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Specific category like Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, or Judaism

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Overcoming (religious inspiration themes for life issues)

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Study Material

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. How-To

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Fiction-Based

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Children’s Books

Romance

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Fantasy

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Love Stories

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Mystery

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Erotica

Children

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Picture Books

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Educational Books

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Ages 2 and younger

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Ages 3 to 5

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p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. Ages 6 to 8

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Action and Adventure

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Science, How Stuff Works

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Nature

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Growing Up

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Animals

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Religion

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Activities and Crafts

You may look at this list and think about other great selling categories like business or sci-fi.  You may even have a few great selling books in a category not listed.  A great book can still do well outside these rules.

The list is a guide not a rule.  For example, let’s say you wrote a book titled How to Lose Weight.  You used the list as a rule (incorrectly) and wrote in a giant, popular book category and got zero sales. Why? Because there are millions of generic weight loss books. The list is used to guide you to niches and not be used as a rule to write general books.

[*General books don’t sell, specific books do.  *]A specific book is specific on a pain.

You need to know your target buyer.  For example, dog food and dog products are made to appeal to people because the dogs aren’t the ones buying.  It’s the same with books that fall into categories, like children’s books.  A book that appeals to a child won’t necessarily appeal to a parent, but you need to appeal to that parent or it won’t get purchased.  Appealing in some way, shape, or form in the above categories to a female buyer is in your best interest.  If it’s a book on pet care, for example, your cover art should include a relatable and real female (not a supermodel) and the pet.  Books about advice should be given from the female’s perspective, if appropriate.  Diet and nutrition books should appeal to women, such as losing weight or easy recipes for the busy mom type of books.  Not every book has a clear angle for appealing to women, but just the awareness that the majority of buyers are female will help you angle your books better.  Unless your book is clearly targeted toward males, always favor females in your writing.  It’s just better statistically.

You may be lucky enough to be profitable with what you are passionate in writing about already.  For everyone else you must combine what you are passionate about with what is profitable.

Take some time before you move to the next section and go over this list again.  Find the categories and topics that you have knowledge in or some interest.  I must stress, from repeat mistakes, that writing about something you have no interest in is an unpleasant experience.  I have many books I completed that I couldn’t even read past the second draft they bored me so much.  They were written from a purely profitability standpoint and lacked heart.  Make sure you pick topics you can get behind with energy and interest.

[] Research Fun

Here is the litmus test:  Is researching the book fun?  If it’s not, then start over at step one and pick another category.  If you aren’t excited to learn about your topic you will likely end up running in circles screaming your first day of writing.

Once you narrow down a category to write, it’s time to narrow in and do some heavy research.  You want to find key information you can add to your book and make your own.  This section is about the bulk of the work you will do before you start writing.  Let’s say you really like the nutrition category.

I typically start out by going to Amazon and taking a look at the top sellers in the category.  Take notes and write down anything that sticks out for you: some diet books, some education books, some fad diets.  This is the start of forming a book idea.  Take notes on everything that pops out for you.  These notes will be reviewed later as you construct an outline and start writing your book.

Let’s say you like to cook, you are always reading up and studying the latest fad diets and studies.  Perhaps you want to make a book on the low-carb craze.

First, take your new category topic to adwords.google.com.  Make an account if you don’t have one.  You need an account to gain access to the Keyword Planning Tool.  Find the tool and go to “Search for new keyword and ad group ideas.”  Type in your topic (low-carb diets) and run a search.  What you are looking for are the top search listings based on the number of searches a month.  You want to find out what people are searching for the most.

For our topic of low-carb diet we get high ranked words like the following:

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Atkins diet

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. How to lose weight fast

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Hcg diet

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. How to lose weight

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Lose weight fast

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Weight loss

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Dukan diet

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Low-carb recipes

Most of the “buzz” around low-carb diets are all about losing weight.  You also want to take a look under the tab called “Ad group ideas.”  You are going to get a list of suggested keywords based on average monthly searches that rank high in adword campaigns.  You won’t be running an adword campaign, but these would be keywords that people are using to attract similar searches with great success. In this example you will find the following adword campaigns ranked the highest with the following keywords:

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Diet foods

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. High protein diet

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Lean muscle diet

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. What to eat to lose weight

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Hcg diet

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. No carb recipes

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. No white diet

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Dukan diet

There’s also a neat little addon that you can use a Traffictravis.  There is a paid version, but the free one works well.  It’s a much better interface when researching keywords.

You also want to take your topic idea and start searching the keywords on Amazon.  You will notice that as you type out your topic, Amazon tries to autocomplete your search based on popular book searches from customers.  For this low-carb diet example you get:

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Low-carb cookbook

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Low-carb food and snacks

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Low-carb diet plan

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Low-carb diet pills

A lot of these popular searches are for other things related to low-carb diets that aren’t necessarily people looking for books.  Take note of these popular searches so that you can optimize your book to appear to people searching for these keywords.  A customer looking for “low-carb snacks” would also be interested in your low-carb diet book, making the following great keywords to add to your KDP listing:

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. food

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. snack

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. plan

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. pills

Select a few of the Amazon assisted searches and look for books that appear.  Click on a few top books and take a look at the sales ranking.  Sales ranking is found under the Product Details area.  It would look like this:

Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #194,227 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store) #92 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Health, Fitness & Dieting > Reference

The above example is from the book, “Low-Carb Dieting for Dummies.”  It sells 1 to 0 copies a week.  Based on my experience a ranking of 190K means it’s selling three to five copies a month on average.  The “general” low-carb books don’t seem to be doing well.  General doesn’t sell except during a fad period when people want to learn about it.  The “For Dummies” series does a great job on writing on fads that transition into general information for the remainder of their life cycle.  This book sold a ton back in the day.  It’s still listed high on page ranking.   Now all the general information for low-carb diets can be found online easily.  The low-carb diet category is still relevant but not in this form.  Take a look around the category topic that you picked and find out what people are interested in.

Take your research to www.ezinearticles.com.  This is a site with articles about every category you can think of.  They are short information type articles that people can rank.  You can find the most popular articles in any category.  Take a look at what people are showing interest in about low-carb diets:

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p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. Low-Carb Diet Side Effects

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p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. Low-Carb – No Thanks!

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h3<>{background:transparent;}. Low-Carb Fast Food Menu Choices

The top ranked articles for low-carb diets are really heavy anti-carb diet.  Interesting.  They also are pretty heavy in what to eat and how to find low-carb options at restaurants.  This is very useful information.

Do a search on Google on your topic and read up on the latest information and what other social media has to offer.  You will find that with low-carb diets the info found on Ezinearticles echoes almost parallel to blogs and social media found on the internet.

So far we have learned the following:

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p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. Low-carb diets fall under one of the above listed categories that sell well for self-publishers (nutrition, diets);

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Low-carb diets are heavily searched for;

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Basic information on low-carb diets doesn’t sell well;

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. People are interested in the danger of low-carb diets as well as how to eat a low-carb diet yet there aren’t any books about the topic (pain).

[] Niche Time!

You started with a category of interest and worked your way down to niche topics of mass interest.  The rest of this is downhill.

Take a look at the books available on the market.  What is missing?  Anything?  The data you gathered should show you popular subtopics in the low-carb diet.  Is there a book that addresses any of this?  Often a very popular blog post or article makes a great book start.  Check to see if there are any popular topics that don’t run parallel with any books.  Look at the trending popularity of topics in any mixed media site (news, podcasts, forums) for ideas.

You’re looking for a niche into your topic.  You want to slant or angle your book in a way that appeals to the topic, yet stands out from the rest.  You want to be listed in a profitable category,  rank well and stand apart.

You are looking for a gap in the information that is popular in your research, yet missing in the rankings at Amazon.  As your ideas start to form, look for similar competitors.  Are they well received or could their books do better or be improved?  Did they get a lot of bad reviews because the book lacked info, or maybe the title is a disaster as well as the cover?  With both of these, you may be able to come in and do better.  That’s the goal after all, right?  Do better than the other guy and take their sales.  Don’t be shy about it, a self-publisher takes market share.  A general buyer searching for low-carb diet books picks from the list they see.  A self-publisher becomes profitable from a sale that they got instead of it going to a competitor, opposed to a publisher that creates a market.  People search for the publisher’s book by name.  There’s no shame in outdoing the other guy when you do so with better value to the reader.

In our mock research, we noticed a lot of blogs and topics talking about some of the dangers with low-carb diets. There were studies and doctors explaining dangers and corrections to the popular fad.  What about a book about those dangers?  You could jump on the bandwagon, but come in with updated and newer information.  You could correct the mistakes of the other top sellers while promoting a healthier version of the low-carb diet.

This would be a niche in the low-carb diet topic.  You would benefit from the popularity with high ranking and sales while providing new value to readers.

Since I publish a lot, I will often take this step in the system to generate at least four other niche titles within the main topic.  I like to focus on a topic until I run out of value for the reader.  For the low-carb diet example, I might make the following books:

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p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. Low-Carb Diets Suck! A Look at How to Add Healthy Low-Carb Snacks and Variety to Your Diet;

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p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. Low-Carb Dangers:  How to Use the Low-Carb Diet in a Healthier Way and Avoid Pills;

*
p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. Low-Carb + Busy Mom: Easy Recipes for a Healthy Low-Carb Diet for the Whole Family

*
p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. Restaurant-Style Low-Carb Meals: Written for Restaurant Owners and Chefs, But Can be Used by All!

*
p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. [*Low-Carb GO!:  *]How to Maintain a Low-Carb Diet on the Go!

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p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. 10 Low-Carb:  10 Steps to Lose More Weight Using the Low-Carb Diet

Notice that the main title is relatively short, while the extended subtitle is filled with keywords based on the research we did previously.  Writing all these books back-to-back will be easy since it’s in the same subject.  I would start by making a pen name for this line of books and writing for about a month and a half.  I would create an Author Central account at www.authorcentral.com and link all my books to each other at the end of every book.  The covers would all appeal to females and images of appetizing food.

How do you find how a book is trending?  You can track past performance on Amazon books by going to sites like www.novelrank.com and www.rankforest.com.  These services allow you to see trends. I prefer www.rankforest.com , but most features are restricted to a paid service.  Some of the data is tricky and probably not 100% accurate at any given time.  But it gives you a feel for the market.  There are low-carb diet books still trending well, even though it was a fad many years ago.  The top sellers in the topic are moving 150 to 200 copies a month.  But I wouldn’t enter a market that has a downward trend.  With a little research you can easily see that less and less people are entering the low-carb market to buy.  Look for new trends not old.  Realistically the low-carb books wouldn’t work due to the steady downward trend.

Another great way to find a niche is to find a pain within the topic.  People want value and value comes in one form or another by solving a problem.  What in the topic is causing problems and pain?  If it’s a pain or problem that few know about then it’s all the better, much like writing books on the low-carb diet that point out healthy and newer information to avoid dangers.  Bring it to life in full detail and how to solve it.  Most people aren’t aware that low-carb diets can cause health risks and future problems.  People looking into the diet would find your book interesting before they got started.

[] Check Demand

Your niche should be either one of a kind or closely similar to a few others, yet still stand apart.  When I move from doing research to finding a niche, I often go too far and leave the topic that I originally started with.  To stay on track, make sure you are going to write about something that people are searching for.  Again, you aren’t relying on a publisher to back your book and create a market.  The market needs to already exist. A publisher can generate a market for a book, a self-publisher needs to generate a book for a market.  As a self-publisher you are heavily relying on that search bar.

Take the name of your book and search for it on Google.  What comes up?  Any concerns?  Look for the name being associated with anything “negative.”  Are you finding people searching for some form of your book title in forums and blogs?  Or, are you finding your title to generate random nothing?  Remember Amazon book titles show up in Google searches.   Getting your title to mirror those searches is a huge boost to sales.

Using the Keyword Planner in Adwords search for your title and see how many global searches occur.  Are we talking millions (or close to a million) or a few hundred?  The Keyword Tool will give other similar keywords people are searching for.

Write your book name so it make sense but use popular keywords when you can.  Your title should be one word to a few words followed by a lengthy subtitle filled with keywords.

Maybe you wanted to call your book “Carb Diet Poison,” but with a little research you find “Toxic Carb Diet” ranks much better. This simple name change could be the difference between 3 sales a month or 300.  People can’t buy what they can’t find.  Make changes to your title, keyword box, description, and the first few pages of your book based on popular keywords.  Search engines from Amazon to places like Google and Yahoo search the content found in those places to rank your book.

[] IDEAS!

There are a million ways to come up with an idea that will fill you with energy and passion when writing.  The magic happens when you can align what is profitable with what you are passionate about.

If there is only one tip you get out of this book, let it be that you must have both factors at play (profit and passion).  If you just write about your passion without angling it to be profitable you won’t make any money.

If you already know what you want to write about, skip this section.  In this chapter we get those creative juices flowing and look at some big ideas on how to find the perfect topic to write about. If an idea sticks out for you while reading this section, try to relate it to one of the top profitable categories we talked about earlier.

Make a list of the things that you enjoy.  Is it a sport?  Does it relate to your job or to your education?  Is it a hobby?  Is it about your family or kids?  What do you like to do during your day and how can you turn that topic into a book to help other people, to entertain them or provide value to them in some way?  This is the question I asked myself when I first started writing.  I found that I got great practice in writing and started learning what worked and what didn’t by writing sales and business books.

Writing is a creative outlet that allows you to channel your life’s purpose, calling and passion.  To make a living doing so is a dream come true.  Bear in mind it’s often a trial and error process before you find how to merge both passion and profit together.  Rewards come to those who are optimistically persistent.

Nothing beats a good old-fashioned bookstore.  Find one that’s still around and spend some time walking around looking at what interests you.  What categories seem to draw you in?  What titles are pulling you over?  The books you find yourself picking up are the books you have interest in and may make a great similar book to write about over a specific pain.

If you are chasing trends and looking to capitalize on the new craze or fad,  which, by the way, is a great way to make a lot of money in the short-term, watch popular “educational” talk shows (TV and radio/podcast).

When they promote some new herb or gadget, you’d better believe there’s a rush of people searching for more information about it.  Chasing trends is a great way to make a profit, but you need to write quickly.  Popular teen vampire movie coming out?  Teen vampire books will be all the rage.  Piggybacking off politics and news is another way to follow trends.  Writing summary books on new best sellers for book clubs and fast reads is very profitable (be sure not to violate copyright with summary books).

Ever get interested in something, but can’t seem to find a book on it?  Well there’s a really good chance there are a lot of other people just like you.  Write a book for yourself.  If you happen to be obsessed with dancing naked in public for example, there are sure to be others equally crazy.  I mean interested.  Be sure to research demand before committing to it.

Make a list of the things you would like to learn more about.  How to cook a specific food category, or how to build this or that.  A person who researches and studies material they have an interest in becomes an expert in it.  Writing a book about what you have mastered is valuable to others since it saves people time and your readers can learn from your experience.

George Plimpton was this type of author.  He would climb a mountain, compete in boxing tournaments, play professional football, perform standup comedy, and then write about it.  He would become interested in something, master it, do it, then write about it.

Do people seem to come to you needing specific help or advice?  Maybe they see something you don’t see.  If others come to you because you are good at something, then that would be a good topic for a book.  You can help others by writing a book about it.

Take a look at the newspaper or websites like www.eventguide.com.  You will find  large followings of people that attend fairs or events with a similar interest.  Write a book for these people.  You already know it has a huge following if local groups are gathering about it.

Re-purpose material.  A lot of books out there are pretty old.  Spice up and update a topic with new information and improve on the original content while making it your own.  Books based on old regulations, old technology, old rules and laws can use a good cleaning and updating.  Step in and be the new source of information for people looking for the topic.  Often an old, outdated book is for a reason.  People aren’t buying them anymore.  So try to bridge a gap between the old information and something similar and more popular.

I frequently visit http://www.answers.yahoo.com.  It’s a site where people can post questions and get them answered by other people.  The answers get ranked by usefulness, but the more answers a topic gets, the more popular the question.  That’s really what a nonfiction book is, answers to a question, right?  It’s a great way to come up with ideas for a book that people want.

Check out all the popular news feeds to find what people are interested in.  Repeat subjects and stories tend to be proof of interest.  Any mixed form of media (news, podcasts) will note what’s trending or popular.

[] Publishing and Marketing Formula

Amazon has a algorithm running in the background that ranks your book.  A search for “alien horror” is going to list the top selling books on the first page.  If your book doesn’t do well in the beginning (after just publishing it), it sinks in ranking over time.  Recovering a book that has sat at the bottom of the Amazon sea for an extended period of time is very hard to revive.

When a new book is published its data is new.  It gets given a chance to succeed and gets thrown into front page listings to compete with the big guys (most of the time).  If the book does well it can hang on and stay with a strong seller ranking (page listing).  If it doesn’t, it starts to sink.

This time frame is around a month (based on personal experience).  It is very important that the first month of a new book is a stellar hit.

Mix and match what you like but here is my formula:

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Price the book at $0.99 for the first month.

*
h3<>{background:transparent;}. Use all five days of the KDP Select free promotion.

*
p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. Use ShareGoblin alongside your KDP free promotion.

*
p<>{color:#000;background:transparent;}. Promote your book on at least one (or more) of the following (in order of cost benefit ratio): BookBub, BookCaliber, StoryCartel, BookGorilla, TheFussyLibrarian, Amazon Advertising,  Goodreads.

A book bought for free is considered a sale by Amazon’s algorithm.  The goal is to show Amazon that the book is a huge success.  You won’t make any profits.  In fact, a well launched book will be at cost rather than profit the first month.

There are other sites like HugeOrange that offers book services.  They can help you get Amazon approved reviews, send your manuscript to the top reviewers, get a professional cover design, professional edit, beta readers, and much more.  Check out UpWork for similar services.

An old lost at sea book can be marketed back to life but expect a lot of work and time involved in the commitment.  It’s almost always better to unpublish a dead book and republish it from the ground up (in the same KDP account).

[] Conclusion

The methods shared in this book are the closest I have come to giving a book the best chance it can get to be profitable from the self-publisher’s standpoint for nonfiction books.

A great idea is just a great idea.  They are a dime a dozen.  If you sat down for an hour you could probably have hundreds of great ideas.  So can everyone else.  What sets the people who make money on Kindle apart from the ones who don’t are the people that put their ideas to work.  Get writing!

Do your research and get writing.  Don’t get stuck coming up with great idea after great idea.  That’s worthless. The highest form of laziness a writer can have is to keep ‘preparing’ to write.

Good luck with your writing career and remember, have fun!

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Write What Sells: Write nonfiction Kindle books that sell! How to find top selli

A beginner’s guide to Kindle writing helping you write in categories that sell while finding niche topics that stand out. Focused mainly on nonfiction, many of the tips are valuable for fiction titles, as well. Learn how to: Find categories that are profitable for self-publishers. Research the potential of a book before you commit to writing it. Find niches that will stand out from the competition. Find great ideas to write great books. Publish and use marketing and promotion effectively.

  • ISBN: 9781311695925
  • Author: Alex Foster
  • Published: 2016-02-29 18:05:27
  • Words: 5141
Write What Sells: Write nonfiction Kindle books that sell! How to find top selli Write What Sells: Write nonfiction Kindle books that sell! How to find top selli