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What Will We Do Without Water?: Oklahoma

What Will We do Without Water?

OKLAHOMA

Ronny A. Vargas

 

Shakespir Edition

Copyright © 2017 Ronny A. Vargas

All rights reserved

www.ronnyavargas.com

 

Shakespir Edition, License Notes

This ebook is licensed for your personal enjoyment only. This ebook may not be re-sold or given away to other people. If you would like to share this book with another person, please purchase an additional copy for each recipient. If you’re reading this book and did not purchase it, or it was not purchased for your use only, then please return to Shakespir.com and purchase your own copy. Thank you for respecting the hard work of the authors.

 

It was Sunday morning in the town of Arnett. Cody had slept a little later than usual even though he and his wife would be attending mass at eleven o’clock that morning. Since the shocking news of the aqua phenomenon, the two of them had decided to start attending church again to join with others in praying for relief. Cody and his wife thought that the continually receding fresh water across the globe was a divine sign.

Awakened by the sounds of his home, Cody rolled over in bed to see his wife push into the room, their little one on her hip. His wife’s red hair made a braid that draped down the middle of her back. Freckles stood out in stark contrast to her pale cheeks. Her expression was one of fear.

“What the heck is goin’ on?” he said.

“It’s your brother, Luke,” she cried. “He’s at the gate, threatenin’ you. He can barely stand, but he’s got a shotgun and is screamin’ he’s here to kill you!”

Her distress filled the log rambler house, the red window frames vibrating with Luke’s hysterical screams outside.

Cody, walked barefoot across the living room floor, his wife on his heels. Arriving at the door, he told her to step back.

The two large windows on both sides of the front door were filled with sun, contrasting with the thickening air now present inside the house. He scratched his bald head with concern.

“Get your ass out here Cody, you coward!” Luke screamed from the farm gate. “Face me like a man!” Even from the window, Cody could see his brother’s wildly whiskered face, red with fury. Luke was drunk, his pupils contracted, filled with resentment that had lived in him for too long, the residual of what he saw as an unfair decision.

Their father, before he died, had divided the farm in half and left it written in the will, so there would be no misunderstandings. The portion Luke inherited did not have a well.

Luke had remained silent at what he saw as an injustice. The disappointment kept him from speaking to his brother for a long time. But, now, the news that water sources were quickly being depleted changed him. He had quenched his rage with alcohol for years. But now, silence was no longer a solution to what had become his anger.

The previous day, Cody had, unluckily, ran into Luke at the convenience store when he had stopped for gas. Cody parked his pick-up truck in front after filling up, and went inside to buy a gallon of milk. As he entered, he wiped off his cowboy boots on the green doormat that read, “You’re welcome if you don’t cause no trouble.”

When he saw Luke, shambling down the aisle toward the beer cooler, Cody turned the other way.

Decked out in a dirty sleeveless T-shirt, Luke was visiting the beer cooler for the second time that day to satisfy his thirst–the same thirst that made his dad give Cody the farm’s well, knowing that Luke might sell the farm to support his habit.

The store’s owner, Pete, had known the brothers since they were little boys. He fondly remembered the boys who grew up just down the road from his store. He hated what had happened to their relationship since their father had passed away.

“Great to see you guys!” he said, surprised as they both arrived at exactly the same moment at the cash register.

“Shut up, Pete!” Luke spewed, hatred dripping with his words.

“Listen Luke,” said Pete, “it’s obvious you been drinkin’. I don’t want no trouble in the store.”

“No. Not at all,” sputtered Luke, nodding toward his brother. “Go ‘head, take him first. He’s always been first in everythin’. Ain’t no need to change now.”

Cody kept silent, extending his arm with a hundred-dollar bill to pay.

“Oh, big man! Now you wanna let everybody know you got money, Cody?” Luke exclaimed a little too loudly with a malicious grin.

“Listen, Luke,” Pete tried to intervene.

“Shut up, Pete!” interrupted Luke. “I ain’t talkin’ to you.” He turned to his brother. “But ya’ know what? That’s the circle o’ life. Your water well will dry up before long. Your animals will die thirsty. Have you seen the news about the water phenomenon, brother? You will pay for this!”

Cody took his change and stared directly into his brother’s eyes as he picked up the milk from the counter. “Maybe . . . but . . . I’m not the first one on everything.”

“What do you mean?”

“Your livestock will die before mine.”

Taking advantage of the fact that Cody had a hand in his pocket and the other holding the gallon of milk, Luke delivered a blow to Cody’s chin. Cody dropped the milk, which splattered across the floor as he rushed toward Luke and the two fell to the tile like wrestlers.

There was a rush of expletives, a tangle of arms, legs, and torn, wet shirts as the brothers fought, until Pete took a baseball bat and managed to separate the two with threats of calling the police.

That was yesterday. Now Cody shook the memory of the fight from his head, then opened the door of the house slightly.

“Bring me the shotgun,” he told his wife as he stared through the gap.

“You can’t shoot him, Cody. He’s your brother.” She spoke gently, then turned to get the shotgun, the baby still on her hip.

Luke continued his barrage of screaming insults for a few seconds more, and then he raised the shotgun and fired twice. A bullet penetrated one of the house’s wooden columns. The other one shattered the window.

Behind Cody, a body dropped and the child cried out.

After taking cover behind the doorframe, Cody feared the worst. The body of his wife lay on the floor, the shot had found its mark in her neck. Their child was crying, not knowing he had just lost his mother.

Cody fell to his knees, screaming in despair.

 

The room was still and dark as Cody awoke. It was only a nightmare. Agitated, he took a deep breath, and gave thanks that it was just a dream.

Awakened by the sounds of his home, Cody rolled over in bed to see his wife push into the room, their little one on her hip. His wife’s red hair made a braid that draped down the middle of her back. Freckles stood out in stark contrast to her pale cheeks. Her expression was one of fear.

What the heck is goin’ on?” he said.

“It’s your brother, Luke,” she cried. “He’s at the gate, threatenin’ you. He can barely stand, but he’s got a shotgun and is screamin’ he’s here to kill you!”


What Will We Do Without Water?: Oklahoma

  • Author: Ronny A. Vargas
  • Published: 2017-09-24 20:20:30
  • Words: 1251
What Will We Do Without Water?: Oklahoma What Will We Do Without Water?: Oklahoma