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VoiceOver With the Brailliant Braille Display

 

VoiceOver with the Brailliant Braille Display

 

Copyright 2016 April Brown

 

All Rights Reserved

 

Other Books by April Brown

 

License Notice

 

This ebook is licensed for your personal use only. This ebook may not be re-sold or given away to other people. If you would like to share this book with another person, please purchase an additional copy for each recipient. If you’re reading this book and did not purchase it, or it was not purchased for your use only, then please return to your favorite ebook retailer and purchase your own copy. Thank you for respecting the hard work of this author.

This ebook is a work of fiction. All events, people, and places portrayed are a work of fiction. Any resemblance to real people, places, or events are coincidental and unintentional.

The author has made every attempt to provide up to date web addresses and resources. Due to the changing nature of the internet, they may be invalid before, or soon after, publication. The author is not aware of changes, additions, or deletions, from external websites past the website accessed date, and does not assume any liability for what is posted on them.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Back Cover Copy

Foundation to Using Screen Readers

VoiceOver Glossary

Accessibility Pane

VoiceOver Screen

App Store

Braille Display Basic Commands

Calculator

Calendar

Contacts

Dictionary

Finder Spotlight (Search)

Google Chrome

iBooks

iTunes

Launchpad

Libre Office

Mail

Messages

Microsoft Word

Pages

PDF

Printer

Safari

Scrivener

System Preferences

Text Edit

Braille Display Commands

VoiceOver Commands

About the Author

Other Books by April Brown

Connect with April Brown

Acknowledgements

I wish to thank my husband who has given me the time and opportunity to write, edit, and publish my works.

I wish to thank those who have encouraged my writing over the years, including Ms. M, Ms. O, Mr. N, and Ms. P from many years ago, along with various friends. Earliest among these would be J C and C M. Even further back in time are C C, T P, and E. Wherever you are today, may this, and future works, find you!

A special thanks to Aaron Coffman for buying me my very first cookbook.

More recently, Debi Vaught-Thelin, Jessica Collins, Johanna Harness, and Veronica Vance for drawing, photography and writing.

Angela Ackerman has also been a great encouragement the last few years as I continue through my journey into deafblindness while continuing writing, editing, and publishing.

 

I would like to send out a special acknowledgement to Tim Snifffen, author of Mastering the Mac with VoiceOver. His dedication to a full-fledged manual encouraged me to continue when I couldn’t hear and comprehend spoken VoiceOver. Hence, this manual.

Back Cover Copy

Learning VoiceOver on the Mac doesn’t have to be difficult. Improve your braille skills, while learning to navigate VoiceOver. With this manual, you’ll practice step by step processes and build the foundation to work with nearly any program on the Mac with either the Brailliant Braille Display, or spoken VoiceOver itself. This foundation can be built upon as the Mac adds more programs, changes apps and programs, and adapts Siri for the Mac.

Command combination lists are shared, as well as information to help the reader distinguish what many spoken VoiceOver commands translate to as braille display commands.

Mac VoiceOver and The Brailliant Braille Display

This particular guide is for using the Brailliant Braille display with the Mac’s VoiceOver screen reader program. It does not cover using the Brailliant Braille display with the iPhone, iPad, or any other screen reader.

 

Many of the commands available on the Mac will be available on the iPad and the iPhone.

 

Many people have asked: Why create this manual?

 

First, although most adults can use a computer, by the time their vision decreases to the point they need to rely on a screen reader, their minds aren’t as quick to jump through the hoops to learn it instantly. Learning a screen reader for the first time takes a lot of knowledge and recognition of definitions that are not normally used in any profession, not even in web development.

In fact, one of the main issues, is there is no known glossary of screen reader terms. What is a webspot? And how is a landmark (a building) on a webpage? A combo box? Is that something food and clothes are stored in? A rotor? That’s a gear rotating inside a machine. How is that in a screen reader? And the whole “Interaction” thing that VoiceOver centers itself around. If only a glossary existed, most people could potentially eventually figure out how, and where, to use most commands.

In general, you can find many lists of commands on the internet.

However, there is no guide of when, or where, to use those commands.

Nor is there any definition of what the terms in those commands mean.

They are just a random list of keyboard commands. And sometimes gestures.

Which leads to another point.

How does waving at the computer work?

Until two years ago, when iPhones and iPads added gestures, most people knew touching a screen would damage it.

 

Most of these questions will be answered. Some in more depth than others. Several programs will be thoroughly examined. Other programs at least in part.

 

A glossary is included. This glossary will include definitions to the best of my ability. And a list of keyboard commands that do not include the braille display as a backup.

 

Programs change regularly. These directions may be outdated by the time you receive this manual. With enough information presented, you should be able to figure out an updated workaround.

 

The goal of this guide is to create a foundation to build on. As programs change, commands may change. By building connections, communicating with your computer, and other people, will still be possible for newly blind, or newly deafblind adults.

Photos are included. Many people who will be using this manual may retain some sight. Family members, or friends, may assist in learning to use VoiceOver. Pictures will improve the process. And help fix glitches that the blind adult may not be able to find verbally, or with their new knowledge of braille.

Foundation to Using Screen Readers

What is a Screen Reader?

 

It is not what most people think. It’s not a matter of moving the mouse to a page, and having the screen reader read it aloud to you.

 

In fact, most people who use a screen reader regularly may not even have a mouse hooked to their computer. It simply doesn’t help them. And, it can cause issues with the screen reader bouncing if the mouse is bumped while the screen reader is talking.

 

Scary?

 

Yes. After spending a quarter of a century using drop down menus and mice to navigate a screen, even thinking about navigating with your ear and a keyboard sounds impossible. Especially if your hearing and comprehension of spoken words isn’t excellent.

 

Enter the braille display.

 

What does a braille display do?

 

A braille display allows the reader to read the screen in braille instead of by eye or ear. This is often closer to the way a person is more accustomed to viewing the screen with the eye. This will become even more true as braille displays begin to display entire pages, rather than a few words on the screen.

 

How does a braille display work?

 

There is a row of braille cells that change as the words on the screen change, a braille keyboard, and a variety of command keys that vary based on the particular display.

 

Can anyone learn to use a braille display?

 

Yes. However, learning braille is a prerequisite. Or, learn braille as you learn the braille display, and you may learn it faster as you can adjust what you read, and read clearer than on a paper braille page.

 

Is it difficult to learn braille?

 

It doesn’t have to be. Braille is a system of symbols created by raised dots, much as letters are symbols. Both sets of symbols are used to create words, sentences, and paragraphs, through the use of grammar and punctuation. Braille is typically taught by counting. Not the easiest method. It can be learned by symbol as well, though braille teachers do not teach braille as symbols. Learn it before you need it. Especially if you have moderate, or severe, hearing loss.

 

What is the whole Interaction thing that VoiceOver centers around?

 

The concept of Interaction would be simpler if it were called “start” and “stop.” After all, Interaction usually occurs in pairs.

 

As a previously visual person, your eye read the screen and skimmed the mouse across the page. If you wanted to click a button, you clicked it with your mouse and the button was pushed. With VoiceOver, you may, or may not, want to click each button the screen reader reads. Spoken VoiceOver moves very fast, and dances through buttons and links quickly. By the time the brain realizes VoiceOver has reached the link the listener wants to click on, the program may already be focused several links on down the list. If VoiceOver randomly clicked each link it came across, the listener would have great difficulty navigating the pages. So, Interaction makes sense in a way. It allows you to choose when you want to start, or stop, an action with a button, menu, or if you want to type in a text field.

 

Is automatic interaction a good idea?

 

Not necessarily.

On a login screen? Sure.

On a web page where it automatically interacts with the navigation? Not necessarily. One webpage in particular is set up to read every single link in the drop down menus of the navigation pane before it goes to the main body of the page. So, VoiceOver reads through about 30 links to go away from the page, before it gets to the actual page’s information.

 

How does a screen reader view the screen?

 

A screen reader doesn’t see the screen as text, images, and buttons as our eyes do. They see the screen as lines of code. And read it in the order the code is in. Which isn’t always helpful. It will read out of order, jumping all over the screen before getting to the place you want to go, and to where your eye would land as soon as the screen comes up. It may insist on giving you 100 ways to leave the page you purposefully landed on, before reading the text you went to the page to read.

 

Is there a way around that problem?

 

Yes. That is what the rotor is for. And a few other tools that allow you to skip sections you don’t want to read before what you went there to read. However, many of these are only accessible with a trackpad, NumPad, or keyboard.

 

Does that mean a braille display will not be an efficient way to read the screen and fully control the computer?

 

The computer will be fully accessible. It may take longer to access some areas, as some commands do not work on the braille display. Some braille displays will do better than others. Some don’t allow certain commands to be made by the braille display, such as select, copy, and paste. Or, they may be allowed on other devices, such as the iPad and iPhone, though not on the Mac itself.

 

Will this change?

 

Yes. Change is always occurring. Too fast to keep up with. If enough people ask for the ability to select, copy, and paste from the braille display, and to access the rotor, as well as other missing commands, eventually, they will be made available to all users on all devices.

 

What devices are braille displays compatible with?

 

Braille displays are compatible with many, though not all, tablets, phones, computers, CCTV’s (which enlarge or save text documents), and other devices for the blind and visually challenged to access text, and braille.

 

Can a person with low dexterity use VoiceOver?

 

A few years ago, the answer was no. VoiceOver primarily worked with the keyboard. At least three, and up to five keys, had to be pushed at one time to do anything with it.

Now, there are some command options to decrease the number of keys that have to be pressed simultaneously. As well as gestures on a trackpad.

 

How about low dexterity and the braille display?

 

Much easier than using VoiceOver with a regular keyboard. In fact, a gentle touch is best for the braille dots. Some displays are easier to use than others. Test a few to decide which one works best. And the number of braille symbols does make a difference. Too many, or too few, may make the display more difficult to use. Braille watches only show four characters. Or, a fifth to show morning or night. Some displays contain only 12 characters, so it may only show a few words. Others contain space for 80 characters. Which could be as many as sixteen words, or a whole line of text.

 

Can a person with poor memory learn to use a braille display and VoiceOver?

 

Yes. And with this manual, any forgotten information can be looked up anytime, easily. You won’t use every command every day. However, you will remember those you use most often, once you connect them to something you already know.

 

Can VoiceOver be turned on and off with the Brailliant braille display?

 

I have not found a command set that will turn it on and off on the braille display. A keyboard is required to turn it on and off. The keyboard command to turn VoiceOver on is CMD + F5. Until Siri is available on the Mac computer.

 

What does the Brailliant braille display look like?

 

The top half of the Brailliant braille display is almost like a braille writer. However, the keys are numbered a bit different. The 7 and 8 keys allow more key command options. They are on the outside of the braille typing keys. I’ll demonstrate below.

 

7 3 2 1 4 5 6 8

 

Next downward are two sets of command keys, downward in a line on each side. In between these, is the main braille display with router keys.

 

C1 (Command) 32, 40, or 80 router keys C4 (Command)

C2 (Command) C5 (Command)

C3 (Command) 32, 40, or 80 braille cells C6 (Command)

 

There are two centered space keys.

 

Space Space

 

On the lower side of the braille display are arrow keys.

 

Up Arrow Left Arrow Right Arrow Down Arrow

 

Putting the whole Brailliant braille display together:

 

7 3 2 1 4 5 6 8

C1 (Command) 32, 40, or 80 router keys C4 (Command)

C2 (Command) C5 (Command)

C3 (Command) 32, 40, or 80 braille cells C6 (Command)

Space Space

Up Arrow Left Arrow Right Arrow Down Arrow

 

Why am I offering this manual when there isn’t one available?

 

We all deserve hope and dignity.

Too many blind people for whom technology is second nature do not understand, or appreciate, people who actually need the foundation building of a training manual. Some of the comments received when I would ask questions on groups were rather rude, because I couldn’t figure it out on my own. The rudest of these, were younger generations, who had been blind from birth, or infancy, and relied on tech training as young children. Somehow, they didn’t think adults who had to change from sighted to unsighted would need a few pointers along the path to understanding the unique vocabulary of a screen reader.

Without ever having used a braille display.

Or a screen reader.

Some even said to look up terms online. Only, they never knew a link to define the VoiceOver specific terms, or a working VoiceOver glossary. Most of the terms are not able to be found by an online search. Or, if they are, they only relate to their more normal, expected meaning, not their VoiceOver definition.

 

Yes, some people need an actual trainer. Most, only need a foundation. Here is a foundation to build upon.

 

Good luck! You can learn it. You can use it. Whether vocally, or with a braille display. You can maintain your independence.

VoiceOver and Braille Display Glossary

This glossary is useful both to the new VoiceOver user, and any person helping a first time screen reader user. The average sighted person rarely thinks beyond links, tables, and maybe buttons on a website. Most sighted people don’t name these items. They are simply used. However, with VoiceOver, each one has to be used differently. A mouse click is no longer enough. There is no longer any visual information to help the user figure out if it is working or not.

 

Braille Keyboard (Braille Display)

 

Orientation: The eight Buttons at the top of the display.

 

Purpose: The inner six Buttons can be used to type in braille the same way as a braille writer. All eight together can be used in combination with the space Buttons and command Buttons to give commands to the computer from the braille display. Button 7, on the far left, can be used as a backspace Button. Button 8, on the far right, can be used as an enter Button, sometimes in place of the router Button. The Buttons on the braille keyboard are numbered out of order. Their order is: 7 3 2 1 4 5 6 8.

 

Interaction: Click keys as needed.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: None.

 

Button

 

Orientation: A Button may look like anything. It may actually look like a button.

 

Purpose: Most Buttons contain Links. These Links may go to other places on the same website, or to other websites.

 

Interaction: Click Dot above Button name on Braille Display to choose it. Occasionally, 8 + Space is required.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Control + Option + Space.

 

Checkbox

 

Orientation: A small box that will be empty if not selected. Or filled in with color, or even a checkmark, if selected. Usually followed by a text element description of what it turns off or on.

 

Purpose: Turns on or off a variety of options. May be used with a list of Checkboxes, in which any combination of them may be off and/or on.

 

Interaction: Click Dot above Checkbox title on Braille Display to choose it. Occasionally, 8 + Space is required.

 

On the braille display a Checkbox generally displays as:

( ) Empty Checkbox, or

(X) Checked Checkbox

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Control + Option + Space.

 

Command Keys (Braille Display)

 

Orientation: The three keys on each side of the display.

 

Purpose: Allow for a shorthand, single key click for the six most commonly used commands. Can also be used in combination with other keys.

 

Interaction: Click one or more command keys with, or without, other keys.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Varies.

 

Combo Box

 

 

Orientation: Sometimes look like a Button. Sometimes looks like a text field. May have one down arrow on the side.

 

Purpose: A drop down list. Or a combination of a drop down list and a text field.

 

Interaction: Very unpredictable. Sometimes this Interaction style works. Sometimes it doesn’t. Even on the very same Combo Box.

3 + 6 + Space to Open the Pop Down List of Items.

C5 to where it says empty Combo Box.

If it does not say empty Combo Box – click Combo Box once, and then repeat 3 + 6 + Space until it says empty Combo Box, or cycles through the Combo Box Options.

Click Combo Box on Braille Display.

Arrow through choices.

Click choice on display.

C4 to Exit Combo Box.

C4 to Exit Combo Box. (Yes twice).

 

It is possible to use the keyboard commands: Control + Option + Space, and then Right or Left Arrow through choices.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Control + Option + Space.

 

HTML Area

 

Orientation: Often the primary Web Page area. The area inside the navigation Tables that contains the heart of the website. This area may be accessible with the rotor.

 

Purpose: To display the main part of a web page. Pictures, Text, Links, and more.

 

Interaction: C6 to Enter (Interact) with HTML area.

Use arrow keys to navigate HTML area.

C4 to Exit (Interact) HTML area.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Control + Option + Space.

 

Interaction

 

Orientation: Invisible. A combination of commands that allow the individual to read, write, or click a Link or Button.

 

Purpose: Start and stop focusing on a page element. Interaction usually occurs in pairs.

 

Interaction: Multiple.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Multiple.

 

Image

 

Orientation: Primarily pictures. May be an icon. May contain links.

 

Purpose: A visual representation. May contain links to profiles, web pages, or more.

 

Interaction: Click Dot above Link on Braille Display to choose it. Occasionally, 8 + Space is required.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Unknown.

 

 

 

List

 

Orientation: A List of objects, often in a Table type format.

 

Purpose: Often include Links to more detailed information.

 

Interaction: Click Dot above List choice on Braille Display to choose it. Occasionally, 8 + Space is required.

 

Sometimes, usually in a Table, it automatically interacts. In which case, you C4 to exit the Table once you reach the item in the List you want.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Varies.

 

Link

 

Orientation: A Link is usually a different colored text, and may have a line under it.

 

Purpose: Links may go to other places on the same website, or to other websites.

 

Interaction: Click Dot above Link on Braille Display to choose it. Occasionally, 8 + Space is required.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Control + Option + Space.

 

 

Menu Button

 

 

Orientation: Appears to be a Button, often with a drop down menu.

 

Purpose: An opportunity to choose (usually) a single choice in a menu.

 

Interaction: Click Dot above Menu Button name on Braille Display to choose it. Occasionally, 8 + Space is required. Down arrow through choices. Click Dot above menu choice on Braille Display to choose it.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Control + Option + Space.

 

Pop Up Button

 

 

Orientation: Similar to a Menu Button. May contain an up and down arrow, often on the right hand side.

 

Purpose: An opportunity to choose (usually) a single choice in a menu.

 

Interaction: Click Dot above Pop Up Button on Braille Display to choose it. Occasionally, 8 + Space is required.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Control + Option + Space.

 

Radio Button

 

 

Orientation: Usually a group of round Buttons.

 

Purpose: Within the group of Radio Buttons – only one Button can be turned on at a time. When one is clicked on, the previous selected Button is clicked off automatically.

 

Interaction: Click Dot above Radio Button on Braille Display to choose it. Occasionally, 8 + Space is required.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Control + Option + Space.

 

Rotor

 

Orientation: A mini-app. Invisible until keyboard combination is clicked. Looks like a compass with words instead of directions. Not all options are available in all apps or programs.

 

Purpose: To allow navigation by varying elements such as Buttons, Headings, or Links.

 

Interaction: Unknown.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Control + Option + U.

 

Rotor Settings:

 

Auto Web Spots – Personally created link to a chosen place on a web page.

Buttons – Links to various places on the webpage or internet.

Checkboxes – Turn controls or options on or off.

Form Controls – Any modifiable aspect of a form, may include Checkboxes, Radio Buttons, Buttons, or text fields.

Frames – Help break the web page up into manageable areas.

Headings – Section titles.

Landmarks – Types of content – Banners, complementary (sidebar), content info (extras like copyright), main, navigation, search.

Links – Links to various places on the page, website, or internet.

Lists – A List may be a clickable group of items.

Lines – A single row of text.

Live Regions – Content refreshes without refreshing entire page.

Non-Visited Links – Links that have not been clicked.

Radio Groups – A group of radio Buttons.

Static Text – Unsure.

Tables – An element with rows and columns that may contain text, links, Checkboxes, menu Buttons, and more.

Text Fields – Places to type in text.

Visited Links – Links that have been clicked.

Webspots – Items that are grouped together.

 

Interaction: Unknown.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Arrow keys.

 

Router Keys (Braille Display)

 

Orientation: Tiny plastic dots above each braille cell. Same color as the majority of the braille display.

 

Purpose: Works like a mouse click to choose Buttons or Links.

 

Interaction: Click to choose an item.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Several.

 

Scroll Area

 

Orientation: A text area, often in text documents or composition programs.

 

Purpose: A place to write and edit text for others to read.

 

Interaction: C6 to Enter (Interact) with a Scroll Area.

Use arrow keys to navigate the Scroll Area.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Scroll Area.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Type. Or Control + Option + Shift + Down Arrow to enter and Control + Option + Shift + Up Arrow to exit.

 

Slider

 

 

Orientation: Usually a horizontal line.

 

Purpose: Increments to increase or decrease a setting. Often used in sound settings.

 

Interaction: Click the button above sld (slider) on the braille display, the slider will move up by increments.

Or, you may choose to use

C6 to Enter (Interact) with Slider.

Use arrow keys to navigate the increments.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Slider.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Control + Option + Shift + Down Arrow.

 

Slider Text Element

 

Orientation: Words, usually above or below the Slider.

 

Purpose: These words describe the increments, such as louder or softer for sound.

 

Interaction: Not Interactable.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: No Interactions.

 

Space Keys (Braille Display)

 

Orientation: The two long keys under the braille cells at the bottom of the display.

 

Purpose: Used with other keys in combination for commands. Also used for spacing when typing in braille.

 

Interaction: Click keys.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Space bar when typing words.

 

Stepper

 

 

Orientation: An up and down arrow by itself, usually beside a Button.

 

Purpose: The stepper allows the item to be increased or decreased by specific increments. These increments are not always visible on the braille display.

 

Interaction: C6 to Enter (Interact) with Stepper.

Use arrow keys to navigate the Stepper.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Stepper.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Control + Option + Shift + Down Arrow.

 

Tab

 

 

Orientation: Small Buttons in a row at the top of the page.

 

Purpose: Contain links to subpages of the current page.

 

Interaction: Click Dot above Tab name on Braille Display to choose it. Occasionally, 8 + Space is required.

Sometimes, Tabs require active interaction. C6 to interact with Tab. Arrow to the sections of the tab.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Control + Option + Space.

 

Table

 

Orientation: A usually visible element with rows and columns.

 

Purpose: May contain Text, Links, Checkboxes, Menu Buttons, and more.

 

Interaction: C6 to Enter (Interact) with Table.

Use arrow keys to navigate the Rows.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Table.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Control + Option + Shift + Down Arrow.

 

Text Element

 

Orientation: A line or more of unchangeable text.

 

Purpose: May be a definition, an explanation, or a label.

 

Interaction: C6 to Enter (Interact) with a Text Element.

Use arrow keys to navigate the Text Element.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Text Element.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: No Interaction.

 

Text Field

 

Orientation: A small area – often a line or a rectangle.

 

Purpose: A place to make notes, or change an element.

 

Interaction: C6 to Enter (Interact) with the Text Field.

Use arrow keys to navigate the Text Field.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Text Field.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Type. Or Control + Option + Shift + Down Arrow to enter and Control + Option + Shift + Up Arrow to exit

 

Thumb Keys (Braille Display)

 

Orientation: The four keys on the front side of the braille display, where the thumbs naturally land when the hand is on the braille display. The 80 cell braille display has 6 thumb keys.

 

Purpose: Arrow keys to go Up, Down, Right, or Left.

 

Interaction: Click keys.

 

VoiceOver Keypad/Keyboard Command: Arrow keys.

Accessibility Pane

The accessibility pane is likely the first place you will go to adjust settings on your Mac. The good thing about this is, you can practice most of the interaction styles, except those that are web browser dependent, without leaving these panes. Due to its complexity, VoiceOver Settings will be covered below the rest of the items in the main Accessibility Pane.

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Setting Choice on Braille Display to choose it.

 

Unless stated otherwise, navigation is done by clicking the right arrow, or left arrow to go back one item. The up and down arrows may not reach Buttons, or other parts of the screen in the same order as the right and left arrows.

 

If you click the button above sld (slider) on the braille display, the slider will move up by increments. Or, you may choose to use

C6 to Enter (Interact) with Slider.

Use arrow keys to navigate the increments.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Slider.

 

Each section will be gone into greater detail in a later screen. Screenshots will be available.

 

Locate

 

The icon for the Accessibility Panes is a blue circle with a person with arms and legs outstretched. It is inside System Preferences, which is a grey square with a grey gear.

 

C1 + C4 + C5 (Go to Dock).

Right Arrow to LaunchPad.

Click Dot above word Launchpad on Braille Display to choose it.

Right Arrow to System Preferences.

Click 3 + 6 + Space to choose System Preferences.

Press C6 to Start Interacting with Scroll Area.

Down Arrow to Accessibility.

Click Dot above Accessibility on Braille Display to choose it.

 

Or:

 

C1 + C3 + C4 – Go to Menu.

Down Arrow to System Preferences.

Click Dot above word System Preferences on Braille Display to choose it.

Press C4 to Stop Interacting with Toolbar.

Down Arrow.

Press C6 to Start Interacting with Scroll Area.

Right Arrow to desired Accessibility.

Click Dot above Accessibility on Braille Display to choose it.

Down Arrow to Desired Setting.

 

Orientation to the Accessibility Pane

 

Table

C6 to Enter (Interact) with Table.

Use arrow keys to navigate the rows.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Table.

 

Vision (Text Element)

Displays (Image and Text Element – no need to Interact. Choose by C6 to Exit the Table.)

Zoom (Image and Text Element – no need to Interact. Choose by C6 to Exit the Table.)

VoiceOver (Image and Text Element – no need to Interact. Choose by C6 to Exit the Table.)

 

Media (Text Element)

Descriptions (Image and Text Element – no need to Interact. Choose by C6 to Exit the Table.)

Captions (Image and Text Element – no need to Interact. Choose by C6 to Exit the Table.)

 

Hearing (Text Element)

Audio (Image and Text Element- no need to Interact. Choose by C6 to Exit the Table.)

 

Interacting (Text Element)

Keyboard (Image and Text Element – no need to Interact. Choose by C6 to Exit the Table.)

Mouse & Trackpad (Image and Text Element – no need to Interact. Choose by C6 to Exit the Table.)

Switch Control (Image and Text Element – no need to Interact. Choose by C6 to Exit the Table.)

Dictation (Image and Text Element – no need to Interact. Choose by C6 to Exit the Table.)

 

On every Accessibility Pane:

Show Accessibility status in the menu bar – Checkbox (Click Dot above word Accessibility on Braille Display to choose it.)

Help – Button (Click Dot above word Help on Braille Display to choose it.)

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Setting Choice on Braille Display to choose it.

 

If you click the button above sld (slider) on the braille display, the slider will move up by increments. Or, you may choose to use

C6 to Enter (Interact) with Slider.

Use arrow keys to navigate the increments.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Slider.

 

Brailliant Display Accessibility Pane

 

 

Display Screen

 

Invert Colors – Checkbox

Increase Contrast – Checkbox

Use grayscale – Checkbox

Reduce Transparency – Checkbox

Differentiate without color – Checkbox

 

Display Contrast – Slider

Normal – Slider Text Element (No need to Interact.)

Maximum – Slider Text Element (No need to Interact.)

 

Cursor Size – Slider

Normal – Slider Text Element (No need to Interact.)

Large – Slider Text Element (No need to Interact.)

 

Shake Mouse pointer to locate – Checkbox

Open Display Preferences – Button (Opens Display Preferences Pane in System Preferences.)

 

 

Zoom Screen

 

Use keyboard shortcuts to zoom – Checkbox

Toggle Zoom – Text Element (No need to Interact.) Option + Command + 8

Zoom in – Text Element (No need to Interact.) Option + Command + =

Zoom out – Text Element (No need to Interact.) Option + Command + -

Toggle Smooth images – Text Element (No need to Interact.) Option + Command + \

Toggle keyboard focus – Text Element (No need to Interact.) Unassigned

 

 

Use scroll gesture with modifier keys to zoom – Checkbox.

Gesture Choice – Combo Box.

A note about combo boxes. They do not appear accessible by braille display. If you know the options, you can interact (C6) and type the change in the box, and then C4 to exit.

 

Smooth Images – Checkbox.

Zoom follows the keyboard focus – Checkbox.

 

Zoom Style – Pop Up Button.

 

More Options – Button.

 

 

Descriptions Screen

 

Definition – Text Element.

Play audio descriptions when available – Checkbox.

 

 

Captions Screen

 

Definition – Text Element.

(C6 to Enter (Interact) with Table.

Use arrow keys to navigate the rows.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Table.)

Default.

Classic.

Large Text.

Personalized Subtitles.

 

Plus – Button – Allows you to create your own Subtitle set. Use your knowledge of pop up boxes and Checkboxes to complete these screens.

Minus – Button.

Prefer closed cations and SDH.

 

If you click on the Plus Button it brings up a new pane which includes the following:

Style Name – text field in a scroll area.

Etched divider – image.

 

Background Color – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Allow Video to override – Checkbox.

Background Opacity – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Allow Video to override – Checkbox.

 

Etched Divider – Image.

Text Color – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Allow Video to override – Checkbox.

Text Size – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Allow Video to override – Checkbox.

Font – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Allow Video to override – Checkbox.

Text Opacity – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Allow Video to override – Checkbox.

Text Edges – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Allow Video to override – Checkbox.

Highlight Color – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Allow Video to override – Checkbox.

Highlight Opacity – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Allow Video to override – Checkbox.

 

Etched Divider – Image.

Mono spaced serif – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Proportional serif – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Mono spaced – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Proportional – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Casual – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Cursive – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

Small Capital – Pop Up Button inside of a scroll area.

 

Cancel – Button.

Okay – Button.

 

 

Audio Screen

 

Flash the Screen when an alert sound occurs – Checkbox.

Test Screen Flash – Button.

Play Stereo as Mono – Checkbox.

(Open Sound Preferences – Button – Opens Sound Preferences in System Preference.).

 

 

Keyboard Screen

 

Enable Sticky Keys – Checkbox.

Options – Button.

Press the Shift key five times to toggle Sticky Keys – Checkbox.

Beep when a modifier key is set – Checkbox.

Display pressed keys on screen – Checkbox and Pop Up Menu (Click Button on Display).

Cancel – Button.

OK – Button.

 

Enable Slow Keys – Checkbox.

Options – Button.

Use click Key Sounds – Checkbox.

Acceptance Delay – Slider.

Short – Slider Text Element.

Long – Slider Text Element.

Cancel – Button.

OK – Button.

Open Keyboard Preferences – Button – (Opens Keyboard Pane in System Preferences.)

 

 

Mouse & Trackpad Screen

 

Enable Mouse Keys – Checkbox.

Options – Button.

Press the Option key five times to toggle Mouse Keys – Checkbox.

Ignore built-in trackpad when Mouse Keys is on – Checkbox.

Initial Delay – Slider.

Short – Slider Text Element.

Long – Slider Text Element.

Maximum Speed – Slider.

Slow – Slider Text Element.

Fast – Slider Text Element.

Cancel – Button.

OK – Button.

 

Double Click Speed – Slider.

Slow – Slider Text Element.

Fast – Slider Text Element.

Spring-loaded delay – Checkbox and a Slider.

Short – Slider Text Element.

Long – Slider Text Element.

Ignore built-in trackpad when mouse or wireless trackpad is present – Checkbox.

Trackpad Options – Button Opens Regular System Preferences Trackpad Pane.

Mouse Options – Button Opens Regular System Preferences Mouse Pane.

 

 

Switch Control – 3 Tabs

 

Not going to cover this one. I do not have any knowledge of switch control. Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

General Tab

 

Enable Switch Control – Checkbox.

Hide Panel after inactivity – Checkbox, Text Field, and Stepper.

Open Panel Editor – Button.

 

Switches Tab

 

Table.

Buttons.

Checkboxes.

 

Navigation Tab

 

Pop Up Buttons and Button.

 

 

Dictation Screen

 

Dictation Commands – Button.

 

Opens into a

Search Field – Text Field.

Table of Commands -

(C6 to Enter (Interact) with Table.

Use arrow keys to navigate the rows.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Table.)

Enable Advanced Commands – Checkbox.

Select – Text Element.

Plus – Add a command – Button.

Minus – Delete a Command – Button.

Done – Button.

 

Enable dictation keyword phrase – Checkbox and Text Field.

Play sound when command is recognized – Checkbox.

Mute audio output while dictating – Checkbox.

VoiceOver Screen

Locate

 

The icon for the Accessibility Panes is a blue circle with a person with arms and legs outstretched. It is inside System Preferences, which is a grey square with a grey gear.

 

C1 + C4 + C5 (Go to Dock).

Right Arrow to LaunchPad.

Click Dot above word Launchpad on Braille Display to choose it.

Right Arrow to System Preferences.

Click 3 + 6 + Space to choose System Preferences.

Press C6 to Start Interacting with Scroll Area.

Down Arrow to Accessibility.

Click Dot above Accessibility on Braille Display to choose it.

C6 to Start Interacting with the Table.

Down Arrow to VoiceOver.

C4 to Stop Interacting with the Table.

Right Arrow to VoiceOver tab to begin working with VoiceOver.

 

Or:

 

C1 + C3 + C4 – Go to Menu.

Down Arrow to System Preferences.

Click Dot above word System Preferences on Braille Display to choose it.

Press C4 to Stop Interacting with Toolbar.

Down Arrow.

Press C6 to Start Interacting with Scroll Area.

Right Arrow to desired Accessibility.

Click Dot above Accessibility on Braille Display to choose it.

C6 to Start Interacting with the Table.

Down Arrow to VoiceOver.

C4 to Stop Interacting with the Table.

Right Arrow to VoiceOver tab to begin working with VoiceOver.

 

Orientation to the VoiceOver Pane

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Setting Choice on Braille Display to choose it.

 

Unless stated otherwise, navigation is done by clicking the right arrow, or left arrow to go back one item. The up and down arrows may not reach Buttons, or other parts of the screen in the same order.

 

If you click the button above sld (slider) on the braille display, the slider will move up by increments. Or, you may choose to use

C6 to Enter (Interact) with Slider.

Use arrow keys to navigate the increments.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Slider.

 

VoiceOver on Accessibility Screen

 

 

Explanation of VoiceOver – Text Elements

Toggle VoiceOver: Command F5 – Text Element

Enable VoiceOver – Checkbox.

Open VoiceOver Training – Button.

 

Open VoiceOver Utility – Button.

 

Show Accessibility status in the menu bar – Checkbox

Help – Button

 

VoiceOver Utility

 

 

C6 to Start Interacting with the Table.

Down Arrow to Section.

C4 to Stop Interacting with the Table.

Right Arrow to Tab to begin working with VoiceOver sections.

 

General

Verbosity

Speech

Navigation

Web

Sound

Visuals

Commanders

Braille

Activities

 

General Screen

 

Speak the following greeting after login – Text Element.

Welcome box – Edit Text Field. Type your desired welcome message. Right arrow to accept it. Changed text does not appear in zoom pane.

 

Display welcome dialog when VoiceOver starts – Checkbox.

Keys to use as VoiceOver modifiers – Pop Up Button.

Portable Preferences – Image and Text Element.

Set up – Button.

Allow VoiceOver to be controlled with Apple Script – Checkbox.

 

 

Verbosity Screen – 5 tabs – Click Tab on Display to choose it

 

 

Speech Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

Default Speech Verbosity – Pop Up Button.

Additional Speech Verbosity Settings – Arrow – Checkbox.

(C6 to Enter (Interact) with Table.

Use arrow keys to navigate the rows.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Table.)

Control – Text Fields.

Verbosity – Menu Buttons.

Description – Text Field.

 

 

Braille Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

Default Speech Verbosity – Pop Up Button.

Up Arrow – Additional Speech Verbosity Settings – Checkbox

(C6 to Enter (Interact) with Table.

Use arrow keys to navigate the rows.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Table.)

Control – Text Fields.

Verbosity – Menu Buttons – (Click Dot above word Verbosity on Braille Display to choose it.)

Description – Text Field.

 

 

 

Text Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

Punctuation – Pop Up Button.

Repeated Punctuation – Pop Up Button.

While typing speak – Pop Up Button.

When moving the cursor – Pop Up Button.

When text attributes change – Pop Up Button.

When encountering a misspelled word – Pop Up Button.

When encountering a link/attachment – Pop Up Button.

Read numbers as – Pop Up Button.

When reading a capital letter – Pop Up Button.

When deleting text – Pop Up Button.

Words are separated by – Pop Up Button.

 

 

Announcements Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

Announce when mouse cursor enters a window – Checkbox.

Announce when a modifier key is pressed – Checkbox.

Announce when the Caps Lock key is pressed – Checkbox.

Speak header when navigating across a Table row – Checkbox.

Automatically speak text in dialog boxes – Checkbox.

Append phonetic pronunciation to single characters – Checkbox.

When status text changes under VoiceOver cursor – Pop Up Button.

When progress indicator changes under VoiceOver cursor – Pop Up Button.

Speak size and position in – Pop Up Button.

Speak under mouse after delay – Checkbox.

Slider.

(C6 to Enter (Interact) with Slider.

Use arrow keys to navigate the Slider.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Slider.)

Short – Slider Text Element.

Long – Slider Text Element.

 

 

Hints Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

Speak instructions for using the item in the VoiceOver cursor – Checkbox.

 

When an item has a help tag – Pop Up Button.

 

Speak hints after delay – Slider.

(C6 to Enter (Interact) with Slider.

Use arrow keys to navigate the Slider.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Slider.)

Short – Slider Text Element.

Long – Slider Text Element.

 

Speech Screen – Two Tabs

 

 

 

Voices Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

Mute Speech – Checkbox.

 

Top Line:

Category – Text Element.

Voice – Text Element.

Rate – Text Element.

Pitch – Text Element.

Volume – Text Element.

Intonation – Text Element.

 

Default – Text Element.

Voice Name – Pop Up Button, opens into a Menu Button.

 

Interaction information for the following Steppers:

(C6 to Enter (Interact) with Stepper.

Use arrow keys to navigate the rows.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Stepper.) Numbers are not visible on Braille Display.

 

Rate Number – Edit Text and Stepper.

Pitch Number – Edit Text and Stepper.

Volume Number – Edit Text and Stepper.

Intonation Number – Edit Text and Stepper.

Down Arrow (Leads to more options) – Checkbox.

 

The following Table Rows contain the same steppers:

 

Content

Status

Type

Attributes

VoiceOver Menu

 

 

Pronunciation Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

(C6 to Enter (Interact) with Table.

Use arrow keys to navigate the rows.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Table.)

 

Text – Text Field.

Substitution – Text Field.

Application – Pop Up Button. (Allows you to choose which application this pronunciation is valid in.)

Ignore Case – Checkbox.

 

Rows contain a punctuation mark, word, All Apps (Menu Button), and a Checkbox.

 

Plus – Add a word or symbol – Button.

Minus – Remove a word or symbol – Button.

 

 

Navigation Tab

 

The Navigation Tab is very important. There are times when some settings have to be changed. In general, to use the braille display easily, all checkboxes will be checked. And the Mouse will follow the VoiceOver cursor.

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Setting Choice on Braille Display to choose it.

 

Initial position of VoiceOver cursor – Pop Up Button.

Grouping behavior – Pop Up Button.

Keyboard focus follows VoiceOver cursor – Checkbox.

VoiceOver cursor follows keyboard focus – Checkbox.

 

Insertion point follows VoiceOver cursor – Checkbox.

VoiceOver cursor follows insertion point – Checkbox.

 

Mouse pointer – Pop Up Button.

 

Allow cursor wrapping – Checkbox.

Skip redundant labels – Checkbox.

Automatically interact when using tab key – Checkbox.

 

Enable fast searching – Pop Up Button.

 

Web Screen – Three Tabs

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

 

 

 

Navigation Tab

 

This page is also very important to get the correct settings for the braille display to work well with Safari. DOM order is the preferred choice.

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Setting Choice on Braille Display to choose it.

 

Navigate webpages by

DOM order – Radio Button 1 of 2.

Grouping Items – Radio Button 2 of 2.

 

When navigating web Tables

Group items within – Checkbox.

Speak column and row numbers – Checkbox.

 

Navigate images – Pop Up Button.

 

Enable live regions – Checkbox.

Always allow keyboard commands to navigate websites – Checkbox.

 

 

Page Loading Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Setting Choice on Braille Display to choose it.

 

When loading a new webpage

Speak webpage summary – Checkbox.

Automatically speak the webpage – Checkbox.

 

While a webpage loads – Pop Up Button.

 

 

Web Rotor Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Setting Choice on Braille Display to choose it.

 

Directions on how to order the Table – Text Element.

 

Table can be ordered in a personal format using the command key and the up or down arrow. Must be done on a standard keyboard.

 

Links – Checkbox.

Headings – Checkbox.

Form Controls – Checkbox.

Webspots – Checkbox.

Landmarks – Checkbox.

Auto Web Spots – Checkbox.

Lists – Checkbox.

Visited Links – Checkbox.

Buttons – Checkbox.

Text Fields – Checkbox.

Non-Visited Links – Checkbox.

Radio Groups – Checkbox.

Checkboxes – Checkbox.

Tables – Checkbox.

Frames – Checkbox.

Lines – Checkbox.

Live Regions – Checkbox.

Static Text – Checkbox.

 

 

Sound Panel

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Setting Choice on Braille Display to choose it.

 

Mute sound effects – Checkbox.

Enable audio ducking – Checkbox.

Enable positional audio – Checkbox.

 

Output device – Pop Up Button.

 

Visuals Panel – Five Tabs

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

 

VoiceOver Cursor Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Setting Choice on Braille Display to choose it.

 

Show VoiceOver cursor – Checkbox. This tab creates a clear box that shows where the VoiceOver cursor is. It shows a magnified level of text. This helps semi sighted people, or those who have sighted helpers follow VoiceOver as it skips through a page.

 

VoiceOver magnification – Slider.

(C6 to Enter (Interact) with Slider.

Use arrow keys to navigate the Slider.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Slider.)

Small – Slider Text Element.

Large – Slider Text Element.

 

When reading text, move VoiceOver cursor by – Pop Up Button. (Sentence or word)

 

 

Caption Panel Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Setting Choice on Braille Display to choose it.

 

(C6 to Enter (Interact) with Slider.

Use arrow keys to navigate the Slider.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Slider.)

 

Show caption panel – Checkbox. The caption panel is another great tool. It creates a black box with white words that display what VoiceOver is reading. It also displays the vital statistics (verbosity) of each item. For instance, it can state checkbox, or combo box, giving the listener, or braille display reader, an idea of how to interact with each item VoiceOver reads. And, after a short delay, hints are provided for spoken VoiceOver Interaction. Which is why I include them in the glossary, to help the reader figure out which braille display commands are most likely to correspond to spoken VoiceOver commands.

 

Caption Panel Font Size – Slider.

Small – Slider Text Element.

Large – Slider Text Element.

 

Rows in Caption Panel – Slider.

1 – Slider Text Element.

10 – Slider Text Element.

 

Caption Panel Transparency – Slider.

0% - Slider Text Element.

100% - Slider Text Element.

 

 

Braille Panel Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Setting Choice on Braille Display to choose it.

 

(C6 to Enter (Interact) with Slider.

Use arrow keys to navigate the Slider.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Slider.)

 

Show Braille Panel – Pop Up Button. The Braille Panel is another great tool. It creates a black box with neon words that display what VoiceOver is sending to the braille display. It also displays truncated vital statistics (verbosity) of each item. For instance, it can state checkbox, or combo box, giving the listener, or braille display reader, an idea of how to interact with each item VoiceOver reads.

 

 

Braille Font Color – Pop Up Button. Only a few neon colors available.

 

Braille Panel Font Size – Slider.

Small – Slider Text Element.

Large – Slider Text Element.

 

Braille Panel Transparency – Slider.

0% - Slider Text Element.

100% - Slider Text Element.

 

 

Touch Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

This Tab is not visible when the Trackpad is not connected to the Mac.

 

Background Transparency – Slider.

(C6 to Enter (Interact) with Slider.

Use arrow keys to navigate the Slider.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Slider.)

0% - Slider Text Element.

100% - Slider Text Element.

 

 

Menus Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

(C6 to Enter (Interact) with Slider.

Use arrow keys to navigate the Slider.

C4 to Exit (Interact) with Slider.)

 

VoiceOver Menus Font Size – Slider.

Small – Slider Text Element.

Large – Slider Text Element.

 

VoiceOver Menus Transparency – Slider.

0% - Slider Text Element.

100% - Slider Text Element.

 

Commanders Panel – Four Tabs

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

 

Trackpad Tab

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Tab Name on Braille Display to choose it. Right Arrow to Body of Tab.

 

Unless stated otherwise, Click Dot above Setting Choice on Braille Display to choose it.

 

The Trackpad Tab is not visible if the Trackpad is not connected.

 

***

Visit: http://www.Shakespir.com/books/view/645689 to purchase this book to continue reading. Show the author you appreciate their work!


VoiceOver With the Brailliant Braille Display

Learning VoiceOver on the Mac doesn't have to be difficult. Improve your braille skills, while learning to navigate VoiceOver. With this manual, you'll practice step by step processes and build the foundation to work with nearly any program on the Mac with either the Brailliant Braille Display, or spoken VoiceOver itself. This foundation can be built upon as the Mac adds more programs, changes apps and programs, and adapts Siri for the Mac. Command combination lists are shared, as well as information to help the reader distinguish what many spoken VoiceOver commands translate to as braille display commands. This manual does not cover how to use the Brailliant Braille Display, or VoiceOver, on the iPhone or iPad. Online opportunities exist to hear podcasts for braille displays in general with VoiceOver on the iPad and iPhone. There is even an online list of VoiceOver commands for general braille displays for iPad and iPhone.

  • ISBN: 9781310177545
  • Author: April Brown
  • Published: 2016-06-24 17:40:15
  • Words: 38266
VoiceOver With the Brailliant Braille Display VoiceOver With the Brailliant Braille Display