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SPAZAZZ! Massage Add-Ons for Fun & Profit

SPAZAZZ!

Massage Add-Ons for Fun & Profit

A Continuing Education Course for Massage Therapists

by Andrea Lipomi, LMT

NCBTMB CE Provider # 451780-11

Shakespir Version Copyright 2016

READ FIRST

This document contains the text, instructions, and hard copy of the multiple choice quiz for the NCBTMB approved CE course entitled SPAZAZZ! Massage Add-Ons for Fun & Profit. This download is provided FREE, but you must submit payment at http://confidentmassage.com if you’d like to have your quiz answers processed and a certificate emailed to you.

INSTRUCTIONS:

FIRST, take this quiz online at http://bit.ly/spazazz.

SECOND, submit payment through this course’s page at http://confidentmassage.com.

Your answers will be reviewed and your certificate and transcript will be sent to the email address you provide with your quiz answers within 48 hours of receiving your payment or answers, whichever takes longer. NOTE: The email address you enter with your quiz answers must match the email address you use to submit payment, or you must include BOTH email addresses with your quiz answers and payment info. This policy exists to protect you from would-be payment thieves.

FOR MTS IN NEW YORK STATE: Please refer to the instructions on the FOR MTS IN NEW YORK STATE tab at http://confidentmassage.com as they differ from the general NCBTMB instructions.

Questions? Please don’t hesitate to contact Andrea at [email protected]tmassage.com, or text or call (702) 468-5886.

Thank you!

Although this book is intended to be educational, it is not intended to take the place of a proper education in the subjects of massage therapy and health care. The information herein should not be used in place of advice from a medical professional, and is not intended to treat or cure any medical conditions. The reader is responsible for following all safety precautions. The author disclaims all liability regarding the use or misuse of all information contained herein.

INTRODUCTION

Effleurage. Petrissage. Tapotement. Friction. Vibration.

For most massage therapists, these techniques are our bread and butter. We learned all about them in school and we’re expected to perform them when we work on clients – sometimes five, six, or ten hours per day.

Sadly, the same repetition that hones our killer massage stroke skills can oftentimes lead to problems. Boredom and repetitive strain injuries top this list, and both can lead to career burnout. How do I know this? Because I’ve been there!

Thankfully, I’ve found that adding elements of esthetics (skin care) and nail care services to my practice – even during massage-centric services – has made a huge difference in my life: I no longer hurt after completing my third treatment of the day, and my clients enjoy the extra pampering they’ve come to expect when they book with me.

To be clear: I’m certainly not trying to convince you to go back to school for six months. Maybe massage school was your most recent (or final) excursion into the world of career college certificate programs, and the last thing you want to do is go back for more. That’s totally cool!

In the interest of career longevity and inspirational hoopla, we’ll spend the next several pages exploring the world of spa-inspired massage add-ons* that we can use to enhance our treatments and increase our earning potential. My goal is to keep things simple, inexpensive and fun.

Enjoy!

Andrea Lipomi, LMT

Ultimately we’re each responsible for making sure we’re operating within our scope of practice at all times. The add-ons I’m about to delve into will be acceptable for most massage therapists to incorporate into their treatments without additional licensure. (Again, it’s up to *you to familiarize yourself with your state or local government’s rules and regulations regarding massage therapy. Read ‘em, understand ‘em, follow ‘em. Thanks!)

STEAMED TOWELS

They didn’t teach us about steamed towels in massage school. I learned about their magical ways when I found employment at a day spa right after graduation. Once my co-worker ( a massage therapist with five years more experience than I) showed me how they could be used to pamper and further relax pretty much every area touched during a full body massage, I was hooked!

What you’ll need:

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p<>{color:#000;}. hand towels

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p<>{color:#000;}. a towel cabi (cabinet), towel warmer or microwave

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p<>{color:#000;}. fresh water

What you’ll do:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Fold your hand towels into quarters and roll them up

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p<>{color:#000;}. Run the rolled towels under fresh water until saturated then wring them out

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p<>{color:#000;}. Place rolled towels in the hot cabi until warm (or microwave for 1 – 2 minutes until warm)

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p<>{color:#000;}. When ready to use, remove a towel from the cabi or microwave

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p<>{color:#000;}. Open the towel up and allow excess steam to escape (THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT!)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Test the temperature of the towel on the anterior side of your forearm (ALSO VERY IMPORTANT -- it should be warm but not scalding or uncomfortable)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Fold the towel up into quarters or eighths (depending on surface area to be covered)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Undrape and (gracefully, gently, gradually) place the steamed towel on area to be treated

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p<>{color:#000;}. Cover steamed towel with multiple layers of dry towels (for insulation…I suggest 2 – 4 layers)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Leave them on while you massage other areas

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p<>{color:#000;}. To remove, apply compression strokes over the towels and slowly drag them from your client’s body (lifting or removing the towels too abruptly can lead to surprise and chills)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Redrape the treated area

Common areas on which to place steamed towels using the protocol above:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Upper back

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p<>{color:#000;}. Lower back

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p<>{color:#000;}. Both the upper AND lower back at the same time

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p<>{color:#000;}. Shoulder

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p<>{color:#000;}. Forearm

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p<>{color:#000;}. Calf

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p<>{color:#000;}. Glute

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p<>{color:#000;}. Vastus lateralis/ITB

Other fun ways to use steamed towels:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Roll a steamed towel back up with a dry towel encasing it and place the roll behind your client’s neck while they’re supine

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p<>{color:#000;}. Before you start massaging your client’s back, place a single- or 2-ply steamed towel on their back and apply compression strokes before dragging the towel from their body

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p<>{color:#000;}. If your client runs hot and would prefer not to have steamed towels placed on their body for an extended period of time, you can use the previous technique to remove residual massage lubricant post-back massage (keeping your client’s clothing and your sheets less greasy)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Before or after massaging your client’s feet, wrap each foot in a steamed towel and insulate by wrapping with 1 or 2 dry towels

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p<>{color:#000;}. After performing facial massage, drape a steamed towel across your client’s chin, cheeks and forehead (making sure their mouth and nostrils remain uncovered)…apply slight pressure with your fingertips while dragging the towel from these areas to remove massage lubricant

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p<>{color:#000;}. Fold a steamed towel in quarters the long way and place across upper pecs while applying compression strokes (this technique can then easily transition into the facial technique described above using the same towel)

Things to keep in mind while using steamed towels:

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p<>{color:#000;}. You shouldn’t apply steamed towels to areas where the skin’s integrity is compromised: no scabs, cuts, sores, blisters, etc.

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p<>{color:#000;}. You shouldn’t apply steamed towels to areas that are inflamed: no burns, sunburn, infections, areas that exhibit signs of inflammation, etc.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Areas that are contraindicated for massage are also contraindicated for steamed towel application

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p<>{color:#000;}. Some clients “run warmer” than others and may prefer fewer towels, or towels of a cooler temperature

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p<>{color:#000;}. Towels applied over topical analgesic products can enhance the cooling effect the products have on skin…redrape these areas quickly upon towel removal

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p<>{color:#000;}. I usually keep insulated steamed towels on specific areas for 15 – 30 minutes at a time…they will cool off on their own; just be aware that they can become cool rather quickly if insufficiently insulated

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p<>{color:#000;}. I usually apply insulated steamed towels AFTER I massage an area: it keeps the localized muscle relaxation going after you move on to another area, it keeps your client toasty, and it helps to remove excess product

Specific steamed towel supplies I’ve used and loved:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Paragon towel cabi with UV bulb

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p<>{color:#000;}. Colorsafe towels from Universal Companies

Steamed towel application is extremely versatile and customizable. Have fun playing around and you’ll find the protocols that work best for you.

AROMATHERAPY

Lord knows there are a million books and websites dedicated to aromatherapy out there, but I’d be remiss in my massage add-on duties if I didn’t touch on a few simple, inexpensive ways to enhance our spa services through the creative use of delightful scents.

Before we use essential oils in any service, we need to ask our clients if they have allergies, sensitivities or strong feelings related to any specific products, ingredients or scents (because someone can detest the scent of lavender without being allergic to it). Once that’s out of the way, we should also inquire if they would prefer we use scented or unscented products during their service -- because reeking of patchouli during a 3 PM business meeting can be a dead giveaway that your client’s “dentist appointment” excuse used to get out of work earlier in the day was actually devoted to an office visit of a slightly more enjoyable nature.

A few basic essential oils to keep on hand:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Eucalyptus – refreshing when diffused, gives a room that “classic” spa aroma

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p<>{color:#000;}. Peppermint – invigorating when diffused, has a “cooling” effect when applied to skin

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p<>{color:#000;}. Lavender – relaxing when diffused, a crowd favorite

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p<>{color:#000;}. Orange – uplifting when diffused, an unexpected and fun aromatherapy option

Some ideas on how to add aromatherapy to your services:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Diffuse essential oils into the air using a diffuser, or by putting a few drops on a cotton round or on the bottom massage sheet in an inconspicuous area near your table’s face cradle

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p<>{color:#000;}. Add a few drops of essential oil to your massage lubricant

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p<>{color:#000;}. Add a few drops of essential oil to your steamed towels before you heat them

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p<>{color:#000;}. Add a few drops of essential oil to any other products you use during your treatments: body creams, scrubs, etc.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Spread a few drops of essential oil between your palms before you perform a scalp massage or pressure point facial massage

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p<>{color:#000;}. Dilute essential oils with water in a spray bottle to use as a room spray or linen spray

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p<>{color:#000;}. A trend at hair salons: massage some “perfume oil” (usually a synthetic scent in a thick carrier oil) into a client’s hair before styling (obviously we won’t be styling hair unless we’re licensed to, but we can apply perfume oils during scalp massage too)

Important things to keep in mind when using essential oils:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Many essential oils (especially “spicier” scents, i.e. oregano, cinnamon, etc.) can irritate the skin if applied “neat” (without dilution). In the interest of client safety you should always dilute all of your essential oils in a carrier lubricant before applying them to your client’s skin; always keep some extra carrier oil handy in case you need to further dilute an essential oil on the spot

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p<>{color:#000;}. Topical use of certain oils may be contraindicated during pregnancy; do your research and perform a thorough intake

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p<>{color:#000;}. Topical application of certain oils can increase sun sensitivity (beware of citrus oils in particular!)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Applying certain essential oils to skin that has been compromised (sunburn, eczema, etc.) can be very irritating; educate yourself on proper use and contraindications

Aromatherapy products that make me happy:

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p<>{color:#000;}. doTERRA essential oils, especially the Citrus Bliss blend, wild orange, lavender, eucalyptus, and peppermint (these are also among their more affordable oils)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Kuumba Made perfume oils, especially Vanilla Bean, Egyptian Musk, and Black Coconut (available from their website, from Whole Foods, or from any number of hippie boutiques)

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p<>{color:#000;}. The reference book The Complete Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy by Valerie Ann Worwood

Approximate value (whether you charge extra or not; dependent on location):

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p<>{color:#000;}. $5 – $25

Aromatherapy should be fun for you and for your clients; if you don’t like a scent, don’t offer it! Feel free to make your own blends and experiment…your practice’s signature scent could be just a bottle away!

FOOT TREATMENTS

When I’m not working on CE courses I’m pampering (mostly) feet at my office. I love having my feet massaged and I love massaging feet, but I understand that enduring extensively long foot massages isn’t for every therapist or every client. Sometimes it just takes some creative foot treatment ideas to make things more interesting, fun, and less taxing on our hands.

This chapter includes ideas for foot pampering that I’ve collected over the years as a massage therapist, nail technician, and client of more foot spas than I can count. Incorporate as many into your treatments as your foot pampering heart desires!

Ideas for foot treatment add-ons:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Soak your client’s feet in a foot bath prior to their massage, using a clean sanitizable tub or tub lined with a plastic single-use liner

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p<>{color:#000;}. Add a fizzy bath bomb or some essential oils to the warm water in the foot bath

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p<>{color:#000;}. Wash your client’s feet in the foot bath using antibacterial soap

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p<>{color:#000;}. Exfoliate your client’s feet and lower legs using body scrub or foot scrub (in the foot bath or on the massage table)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Massage your client’s feet using a moisturizing and/or minty foot balm

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p<>{color:#000;}. Spray a refreshing mist of water and essential oils onto your client’s feet using a spray bottle with a fine/mist setting

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p<>{color:#000;}. Before or after massaging your client’s feet, wrap each foot in a steamed towel and insulate by wrapping with 1 or 2 dry towels

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p<>{color:#000;}. Perform pressure point massage on your client’s feet through the top sheet or towel

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p<>{color:#000;}. Insert each foot into a heated bootie (microwavable or electric) and leave on while you massage other body parts

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p<>{color:#000;}. Apply paraffin-filled booties to your client’s feet (taking care to check the temperature of the wax first – hot paraffin can burn!)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Spray your client’s shoes with shoe deodorizer and allow it to dry during their massage (ask first, and watch your tone as to avoid insulting your client)

Important things to keep in mind during foot treatments:

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p<>{color:#000;}. If you’re using a reusable tub for foot soaks, it should be sanitized between clients using a hospital grade disinfectant in accordance with the manufacturer’s directions

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p<>{color:#000;}. Always check the temperature of the foot bath water before your client immerses their feet

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p<>{color:#000;}. Check in with your client regarding water and paraffin temperature as soon as their feet make contact

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p<>{color:#000;}. Adjust temperature accordingly – it can be helpful to keep a cup or small bowl handy so you can add warm or cool water to the foot bath as needed

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p<>{color:#000;}. It’s a good idea to ask your client if they prefer an application of cooling, minty foot balm over regular massage lubricant – some clients may not enjoy the tingly effect

Foot treatment products I use all the time:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Deep Cleansing Hand Soap from Bath & Body Works (this comes in a wide variety of scents and works really well when used to cleanse and deodorize the feet)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Bon Vital Foot Balm (tingly, good glide)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Belava Pedicure Tub and Disposable Liners (affordable and more convenient than jetted foot spas)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Footlogix Shoe Deodorant (not cheap but more effective and pleasant-smelling than most drugstore brands)

Approximate value (whether you charge extra or not; dependent on location):

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p<>{color:#000;}. $5 (foot soak only) – $125 (hour-long foot treatment with the works)

BACK TREATMENTS

Back massage makes up so much of what we do day-to-day. A solid 95% of my clients report some kind of back discomfort prior to receiving their treatment. Your percentage may be even higher. We’ve got our back massage game down…but what if we could add some variety to our back treatments, giving our clients even more benefits, our tools a break, and our bank accounts a little extra love?

Back treatment add-ons your clients will adore:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Steamed towel placement before, during or following your client’s back massage (see the STEAMED TOWEL chapter for details)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Apply a body scrub and performing some gentle exfoliation before or after your client’s back massage

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p<>{color:#000;}. Apply a hydrating mask to your client’s back and letting it absorb while you massage other body parts (always follow the manufacturer’s instructions)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Apply a deep-cleansing clay or mud mask to your client’s back and letting it set while you massage other body parts (always follow the manufacturer’s instructions); remove with steamed towels and follow with moisturizer application

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p<>{color:#000;}. Perform the massage using a rich moisturizing cream or body butter if your client is suffering from really dry skin

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p<>{color:#000;}. Dry brush your client’s back prior to applying lubricant using an exfoliating mitt or brush (but do not reuse porous supplies on multiple clients)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Place heat packs or heated buckwheat pillows on your client’s draped back while you massage other body parts

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p<>{color:#000;}. Apply a topical analgesic (BioFreeze, doTERRA’s Deep Blue Rub, etc.) to any sore areas following your client’s back massage

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p<>{color:#000;}. Apply a lotion containing sun protection (SPF) if your client is going to spend time outdoors and virtually topless following their massage

Always keep the following in mind:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Topical analgesics can have a strong scent and a chilly or warming sensation to them; always ask your client if it’s OK to use one prior to application

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p<>{color:#000;}. Again, never reuse a porous implement (brush, glove, sponge, etc.) on multiple clients, even if you wash the tool with antibacterial soap. Porous materials can still harbor illness-spreading nastiness. Throw the tool away or give the used tool to your client so they can use it at home!

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p<>{color:#000;}. It’s a good idea to test scrubs and masks out on yourself before you start using them on clients; that way you’ll know how they feel on the skin and how to accurately describe them to clients

Back add-on products I’m a big fan of:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Body scrubs from Perfectly Posh

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p<>{color:#000;}. Skindelicious body butters from Perfectly Posh

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p<>{color:#000;}. Powdered clay and mud body masks from Lotus Touch (affordable products that you mix with water)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Deep Blue Rub from doTERRA

Approximate value (whether you charge extra or not; dependent on location):

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p<>{color:#000;}. $5 (analgesic application) – $60 (scrub and mask combo add-on)

FACIAL MASSAGE

Most massage schools don’t spend much time teaching students about facial massage, therefore a lot of massage therapists never feel truly confident when it comes time to perform a facial massage. How much pressure is too much? Or too little? Should the strokes go up or down? Which products are the best to use? Why does this feel so awkward?!?

I’ll do my best to demystify a good facial massage in the following text, but I’ll also post a video on confidentmassage.com in case you do better with visuals. Simply click on the SPAZAZZ tab to watch a demo video of the techniques described in this chapter. (The video is totally optional and has nothing to do with this course’s quiz, FYI.)

Facial massage can be included as part of a basic massage (sans add-ons), or it can be offered as a stand-alone service or upgrade (while touting the benefits of the high quality products you’ll be using, of course). Whichever way you choose to offer facial massage, this chapter should come in handy.

Pro Tips (because I’m also a licensed esthetician and it’ll bug me if I don’t share):

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p<>{color:#000;}. Facial massage is best performed on clean skin. Eye makeup isn’t a big deal because we won’t be rubbing on eyelids and lashes, but oily, dirty or makeup-encrusted facial skin won’t do as well during the process. While operating within your state’s scope of practice for massage therapists, you should first remove any preexisting residue with a steamed towel OR with a little facial massage using a gentle facial cleanser that you’ll remove with a steamed towel prior to lubricant application.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Lubricants should be gentle. Unless you’re a trained esthetician, do not use facial lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) or other exfoliants as they can be irritating to clients with sensitive skin, sunburn, or to those who are using certain prescription medications. Also, use of facial moisturizers that contain sunscreen can sometimes result in irritation and breakouts, so avoid using SPF-containing products during facial massage. It’s generally best to use a massage lubricant specifically made to be used on the face, a gentle moisturizer that doesn’t absorb into the skin super quickly, or a high quality oil such as coconut or jojoba.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Generally speaking, facial massage strokes should be applied in an upward direction. This creates a lifting sensation and feels lovely. If your client has a beard or significant 5 o’clock shadow, it’s OK to use downward strokes that go with the direction of hair growth.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Don’t get pokey. Use the broad, palmar sides of your hands and fingers to perform strokes on larger areas of your client’s face. Avoid using just your fingertips.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Pressure-wise, deep/hard/aggressive work is not appropriate during general facial massage. Massaging the masseter using a bit more pressure than what’s used in other areas of the face may be acceptable due to the thickness of the muscle tissue here, but until you’re comfortable performing specific work on your client’s face, let’s keep things light and relaxing.

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p<>{color:#000;}. If you are licensed to perform massage therapy, perform massage therapy. Don’t pick at pimples or poke at blackheads. Steer clear of any inflamed, injured or infected areas.

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p<>{color:#000;}. After you’ve completed your facial massage it’s usually a good idea to remove any excess lubricant from your client’s face using a steamed towel. As always, shake out any excess steam and test the towel’s temperature on the anterior side of your forearm before you apply it to your client’s skin. Hot towels can burn!

Facial massage products I use and love:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Delish Facial Cleanser from Perfectly Posh

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p<>{color:#000;}. Skin Smoothing Cream from Dermalogica (a moisturizer meant to be left on the skin)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Massage Cream from Dermalogica Professional (thicker and oilier than Skin Smoothing Cream; it should definitely be removed with a steamed towel post-facial massage)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Soothing Additive Oil from Dermalogica Professional (I add a few drops to the unfragranced Skin Smoothing Cream and Massage Cream)

Approximate value (whether you charge extra or not; dependent on location):

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p<>{color:#000;}. $10 – $30

SCALP ADD-ONS

It’s easy to transition from facial massage to scalp massage: change up your products, shift into the cranial zone, and there you go! Scalp massage itself is pretty straightforward so I won’t bore you here with techniques, but let’s talk about adding value to your basic scalp massage.

Massage therapists can use many different products during scalp massage that fall within our scope of practice. Obviously we won’t be using chemicals designed to color, curl or straighten hair, but moisturizing creams and oils are acceptable lubricants to use on the scalp. (Again, when in doubt, please check with your state and local jurisdiction.)

Here are some scalp massage product options:

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p<>{color:#000;}. A few drops of diluted essential oils distributed on your palms

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p<>{color:#000;}. Jojoba oil (scented or unscented)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Coconut oil (scented or unscented)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Argan oil (scented or unscented)

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p<>{color:#000;}. A conditioning product containing any of the oils listed above

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p<>{color:#000;}. A few drops of perfume oil distributed on your palms

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p<>{color:#000;}. No product at all!

Things to keep in mind:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Please ask your client what type of lubricant or conditioning product they’d prefer (if any); they may not have time to wash their hair before their next commitment

Products that I like very much:

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p<>{color:#000;}. HobaCare jojoba oil

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p<>{color:#000;}. doTERRA fractionated coconut oil

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p<>{color:#000;}. doTERRA essential oils (especially lavender and peppermint)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Moroccanoil hair treatment oil

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p<>{color:#000;}. KuumbaMade perfume oil (especially black coconut scent)

Approximate value (whether you charge extra or not; dependent on location):

*
p<>{color:#000;}. $10 – $30

SEAMLESSLY ADDING ADD-ONS TO YOUR EXISTING SERVICE MENU

You know your business best, so far be it from me to give you a one-size-fits-all strategy when it comes to introducing your clients to your spectacular new add-on services. If you’re wondering how to implement the change, ask yourself the following questions:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Do I want to charge extra for these add-ons? Or should they be included with my existing services at no extra charge?

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p<>{color:#000;}. Will they be available as stand-alone services? Or only as add-ons to existing/longer services?

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p<>{color:#000;}. If I charge extra for these add-ons, am I prepared to inform my clients of the additional charge? Does my clientele bat an eye at upgrades/additional costs in general?

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p<>{color:#000;}. Will I be able to train my reception staff to describe these add-ons in a manner that will entice clients to book them? Will I be able to train my team of massage therapists to perform these add-ons in a top notch fashion?

Personally speaking, it’s not my style to ambush clients with upgrade choices (and charges) when all they want to do is relax on my table. In my world, it usually makes more sense for clients to schedule the services they want (add-ons and all) in advance; this saves time and eliminates confusion.

I have found it best to include small upgrades (aromatherapy, steamed towel applications, scalp treatments, etc.) with my existing basic services at no extra charge. My clients appreciate the fact that they get to make choices regarding their aromatherapy, and they appreciate that they don’t have to pay extra for it. Steamed towels just take a few minutes to moisten and throw in a towel cabi, yet including an add-on like steamed towels at no charge will set you apart from the base model massage clinic down the street. Clients love steamed towels, and I love using them!

When it comes to more involved add-ons, I typically include them in specialized stand-alone services. I offer a basic back treatment in which aromatherapy oils are massaged into a client’s back, neck and shoulders, and I offer a deluxe back treatment that includes a back scrub, mask, and moisturizer application. A 30 minute basic back treatment is $59, and a 60 minute is $89. A 30 minute deluxe back treatment is $65, and a 60 minute is $95. As you can see there’s a small bump in price, but all those bumps add up!

IN CLOSING

This course contains many simple add-ons that I employ at my office on a regular basis. From the time I type these words to the time you read them I will have likely come up with a handful of new add-ons…and in just as much time I bet you will too!

Massage add-ons are great because they:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Set our services apart from our competitors’ services

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p<>{color:#000;}. Increase the value of our services

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p<>{color:#000;}. Allow us to charge more for our services

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p<>{color:#000;}. Introduce clients to products we have available for sale

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p<>{color:#000;}. Provide enhancements that benefit our clients

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p<>{color:#000;}. Give us the ability to customize our services for each individual client

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p<>{color:#000;}. Give our tools a break

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p<>{color:#000;}. Add variety to our work day

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p<>{color:#000;}. Allow us to be creative and come up with new ideas

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p<>{color:#000;}. Are fun to perform!

Thanks again for taking this course. If at any point you have any questions about anything, please feel free to contact me directly at [email protected], or text or call (702) 468-5886.

See you next time!

Andrea Lipomi, LMT

SPAZAZZ QUIZ

INSTRUCTIONS:

FIRST, take this quiz online at http://bit.ly/spazazz.

SECOND, submit payment through this course’s page at http://confidentmassage.com.

Your answers will be reviewed and your certificate and transcript will be sent to the email address you provide with your quiz answers within 48 hours of receiving your payment or answers, whichever takes longer. NOTE: The email address you enter with your quiz answers must match the email address you use to submit payment, or you must include BOTH email addresses with your quiz answers and payment info. This policy exists to protect you from would-be payment thieves.

FOR MTS IN NEW YORK STATE: Please refer to the instructions on the FOR MTS IN NEW YORK STATE tab at http://confidentmassage.com as they are different from the general NCBTMB instructions.

Questions? Please don’t hesitate to contact Andrea at [email protected], or text or call (702) 468-5886.

Thank you!

THE FOLLOWING QUIZ QUESTIONS ARE PROVIDED BELOW AS A COURTESY TO THOSE INTERESTED IN PREVIEWING THE QUIZ. Actual quiz answers must be submitted online at http://bit.ly/spazazz.

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p<>{color:#000;}. One of the most important things to do when you first remove a steamed towel from the hot cabi is to:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Let the steam escape so it doesn’t burn your client

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p<>{color:#000;}. Add lavender essential oil to the towel

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p<>{color:#000;}. Roll the towel into a tight ball

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p<>{color:#000;}. Turn off the hot cabi

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p<>{color:#000;}. A useful area upon which to place a steamed towel would be the:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Upper back

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p<>{color:#000;}. Lower back

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p<>{color:#000;}. Calf

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. Dry towels can be used to:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Insulate steamed towels wrapped around your client’s feet

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p<>{color:#000;}. Roll up with a steamed towel and place behind your client’s neck

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p<>{color:#000;}. Both of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. None of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. Steamed towels shouldn’t be placed on the following areas EXCEPT:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Healthy tissue

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p<>{color:#000;}. Cuts

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p<>{color:#000;}. Burns

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p<>{color:#000;}. Blisters

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p<>{color:#000;}. It’s important to ask our clients about their aromatherapy preferences:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Because they may have an allergy

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p<>{color:#000;}. Because they may not want to spend the rest of their day wearing scented lubricant

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p<>{color:#000;}. Because they may dislike a scent

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. Eucalyptus essential oil is a popular aromatherapy choice because it is:

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p<>{color:#000;}. A refreshing, “classic” spa aroma

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p<>{color:#000;}. Extracted from fruit rind

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p<>{color:#000;}. One of the most expensive essential oils on the market

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. Peppermint essential oil is a popular aromatherapy choice because it is:

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p<>{color:#000;}. A heavy, woodsy scent

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p<>{color:#000;}. Invigorating when diffused

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p<>{color:#000;}. Has a “cooling” effect when applied to the skin

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p<>{color:#000;}. B and C

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p<>{color:#000;}. Lavender essential oil is a popular aromatherapy choice because it is:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Energizing

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p<>{color:#000;}. Relaxing

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p<>{color:#000;}. Fruity

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p<>{color:#000;}. Spicy

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p<>{color:#000;}. Orange essential oil is a popular aromatherapy choice because it is:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Uplifting

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p<>{color:#000;}. Fruity

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p<>{color:#000;}. Inexpensive

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. We can incorporate aromatherapy into our services by:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Diffusing essential oils into the air

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p<>{color:#000;}. Adding a few drops of essential oils to massage lubricant

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p<>{color:#000;}. Adding a few drops of essential oils to steamed towels

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. For client safety it is important to:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Use only citrus essential oils

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p<>{color:#000;}. Dilute essential oils prior to application

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p<>{color:#000;}. Use extra essential oils on pregnant clients

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p<>{color:#000;}. Apply essential oils directly to damaged skin

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p<>{color:#000;}. Aromatherapy should be:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Fun

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p<>{color:#000;}. Difficult

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p<>{color:#000;}. Expensive

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p<>{color:#000;}. Aggressive

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p<>{color:#000;}. Foot treatment add-ons can include:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Foot baths

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p<>{color:#000;}. Foot scrubs

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p<>{color:#000;}. Foot balm

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. Foot soaks should be performed in a:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Clean, sanitizable tub or tub lined with a plastic single-use liner

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p<>{color:#000;}. Porous, wooden bowl

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p<>{color:#000;}. Bamboo basket

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p<>{color:#000;}. Metal tub that hasn’t been properly sanitized between uses

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p<>{color:#000;}. Before applying paraffin-filled booties to your client’s feet it’s important to:

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p<>{color:#000;}. File their calluses

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p<>{color:#000;}. Check the temperature of the wax

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p<>{color:#000;}. Paint their nails

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p<>{color:#000;}. A and C

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p<>{color:#000;}. When using a reusable tub for foot soaks it’s important to:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Sanitize the tub between clients with a hospital grade disinfectant

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p<>{color:#000;}. Clean the tub using a bar of soap

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p<>{color:#000;}. Spray the tub with window cleaner

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p<>{color:#000;}. Wipe the tub down with a hand towel

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p<>{color:#000;}. Always check in with your client regarding:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Water and paraffin temperature

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p<>{color:#000;}. Their preference regarding tingly foot balm or regular massage lubricant

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p<>{color:#000;}. Any topical allergies

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. The approximate value of foot treatment add-ons can range from:

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p<>{color:#000;}. $100 – $300

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p<>{color:#000;}. $1 – $5

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p<>{color:#000;}. $5 – $125

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p<>{color:#000;}. $300 – $500

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p<>{color:#000;}. Back treatment add-ons may include:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Dry brushing

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p<>{color:#000;}. A hydrating mask

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p<>{color:#000;}. Steamed towel placement

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. Back treatment add-on products may include:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Topical analgesics

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p<>{color:#000;}. Lotions containing SPF

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p<>{color:#000;}. Body butter

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. Never reuse a _______ on multiple clients.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Porous implement

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p<>{color:#000;}. Lotion bottle

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p<>{color:#000;}. A and B

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p<>{color:#000;}. None of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. It’s a good idea to test products out on yourself before you use them in your practice because:

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p<>{color:#000;}. They’re expensive

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p<>{color:#000;}. You’ll know how they feel on the skin

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p<>{color:#000;}. They’re ineffective

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p<>{color:#000;}. They’re too cold

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p<>{color:#000;}. Facial massage is best performed on:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Makeup

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p<>{color:#000;}. Dirty skin

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p<>{color:#000;}. Clean skin

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. It’s best to avoid including the following ingredients in your facial massage lubricant:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Alpha hydroxy acids

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p<>{color:#000;}. Beta hydroxy acids

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p<>{color:#000;}. SPF

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. _________ is an ideal facial massage lubricant.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Jojoba oil

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p<>{color:#000;}. Coconut oil

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p<>{color:#000;}. Facial massage lotion

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. Generally speaking, facial massage strokes should be applied:

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p<>{color:#000;}. In an upward direction

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p<>{color:#000;}. Side-to-side

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p<>{color:#000;}. Upside down

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p<>{color:#000;}. Using an exfoliant

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p<>{color:#000;}. Avoid ____ strokes.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Relaxing

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p<>{color:#000;}. Soothing

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p<>{color:#000;}. Pokey

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p<>{color:#000;}. Gentle

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p<>{color:#000;}. Massage therapists should avoid:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Picking at blackheads

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p<>{color:#000;}. Picking at whiteheads

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p<>{color:#000;}. Picking at inflamed areas

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. Scalp massage product options include:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Diluted essential oils

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p<>{color:#000;}. Jojoba oil

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p<>{color:#000;}. Perfume oils

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

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p<>{color:#000;}. Massage add-ons are great because they:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Are fun to perform

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p<>{color:#000;}. Give our tools a break

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p<>{color:#000;}. Increase the value of our services

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the above

SURVEY QUESTIONS

Please rate each one on a scale of 1 – 5, 1 meaning “not at all” and 5 meaning “absolutely”. Thanks!

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p<>{color:#000;}. Did you enjoy this course?

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p<>{color:#000;}. Do you feel like you learned something?

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p<>{color:#000;}. Was this course pretty simple to complete?

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p<>{color:#000;}. Would you take more courses written by this author?

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p<>{color:#000;}. How did you find out about this course? ________________


SPAZAZZ! Massage Add-Ons for Fun & Profit

This is the full text, including a quiz and survey, for the NCBTMB approved continuing education course for massage therapists called SPAZAZZ! Massage Add-Ons for Fun & Profit, by Andrea Lipomi, LMT. This download is available for free. If you'd like to receive a certificate of achievement, please refer to www.ConfidentMassage.com for more info (as there is a charge for this).

  • Author: Andrea Lipomi, LMT
  • Published: 2016-01-26 07:40:08
  • Words: 5409
SPAZAZZ! Massage Add-Ons for Fun & Profit SPAZAZZ! Massage Add-Ons for Fun & Profit