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Socio-Economic profiling and livelihood mapping of Rishabhdeo Block, Udaipur, Ra

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PROJECT REPORT

Socio Economic Profiling of Rishabhdeo Block

By

Syed Ibad Raza Bilgrami (NIRD Batch-8)

Anshuman (NIRD Batch-8)

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

We would like to thank NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT and PANCHAYATI RAJ the head of department Mr. S.M.Iliyas and director ICICI Udaipur, Mr Sanjay Kumar Choudhary for unwavering support during the entire course of our field attachment.

We are very grateful to our coarse coordinator A Debapriya for regular follow up and providing us valuable guidelines.

We are thankful to Mr.Rahul Sharma project manager RSETI Udaipur, Mr. Vibhu Mishra projector manager RSETI Jodhpur for regular motivation towards work and support.

We are thankful to Ms. Anjali John and Ms. Shanu Singh Program Coordinator who helped to groom our mistakes and have made special contribution in the report.

We would also like to thank Kherwara satellite centre team and Mobilizers. And the various persons who participated in our FGD‟s and IDI‟s and market survey Respondents.

TABLE OF CONTENT

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p<>{color:#000;}. Content
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p<>{color:#000;}. Page No.
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LIST OF TABLES

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Table No. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Content |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Page No. | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Table1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Demographic indicator |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 5 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Table 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Employment parameters |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 5 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Table 3 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Classification of workforce as Marginal and main workers |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 6 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Table 4 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Classification of main workers |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 7 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Table 5 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Marginal Workers |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 8 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Table 6 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Gram Panchayat wise economic parameters |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 9 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Table 7 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Agricultural Sector |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 24 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Table 8 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Access to market in the rural areas of Rishabhdeo |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 29 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Table 9 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. The number of shops in the Rishabhdeo Town.

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p<>{color:#000;}. 35
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LIST OF FIGURES

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OBJECTIVE

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p<>{color:#000;}. To understand the Socio-economic profile of Rishabhdev block.

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p<>{color:#000;}. To understand the gaps between demand and supply of Services.

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p<>{color:#000;}. To identify the micro enterprises for cluster development.

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p<>{color:#000;}. To identify the services in which self-employment can be generated.

METHODOLOGY:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Primary Data

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p<>{color:#000;}. Schedules

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p<>{color:#000;}. Observation

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p<>{color:#000;}. Focussed Group Discussion(FGD)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Secondary Data

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p<>{color:#000;}. Sample Design

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p<>{color:#000;}. Probability Sampling

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p<>{color:#000;}. Non probability sampling

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p<>{color:#000;}. Stratified

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p<>{color:#000;}. Topographical

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p<>{color:#000;}. Resource

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p<>{color:#000;}. Settlement

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p<>{color:#000;}. Purposive

We have selected 13 gram panchayat out of 26 gram panchayat on the basis of topography, settlement, resources etc. Rishabhdeo block. The sample size is 202 house hold for data collection. Only Youth in the age of 18 to 35 years were targeted in in-depth interview. 25 FGD‟s were conducted. Rishabhdeo market survey was conducted where 20 in depth interviews were taken.

ABOUT THE BLOCK

Rishabhdeo

Name of the District: – Udaipur Distance from District HQ: – 67km.

No. of Panchayat: – 25 Area of the block: – 47940 Hector
No. of Villages: 100 Total agricultural Land: – 2872 Hector

 

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Total Population |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 172935 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Literacy rate- 63.6%, |<>/3.
p<>{color:#000;}. BPL-13146

 

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}. TotalWorker-73042 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Male |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 88216 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 78.75 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 42,344 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Female |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 84719 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 47.97%.
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 30,968

Source: Census 2011

Employment parameter

 

<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Persons
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Male
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Female
<>.
<>.
<>.

Source: Census 2011

Main Workers

 

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. S. No |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Parameter |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Persons |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Male |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Female | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Cultivator |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10,507 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 8,669 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1,838 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Agricultural Laborers |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1,763 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1,279 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 484 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Household Industries |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 487 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 414 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 73 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 4 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Other |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 11,710 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10,625 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1,445 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Total
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 24,467
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 20,627
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 3,840

Source: Census 2011

 

Marginal Workers

 

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. S. No |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Parameter |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Persons |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Male |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Female | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Cultivator |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 20,998 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10,003 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10,995 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Agricultural Laborers |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 16,435 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 5,837 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10,598 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Household Industries |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 836 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 405 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 431 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 4 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Other |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10,306 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 5,472 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 4,834 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Total
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 48,575
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 21,717
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 26,858

Source: Census 2011

Caste wise population:-

 

<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Population
<>.
<>.
<>.

Source: Census 2011

Educational Institutions

 

<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 144
<>.
<>.
<>.

Source: Census 2011

Financial Institutions:-

 

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Name of the financial institute |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. No. of Branches | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. ICICI Bank Ltd.

<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.

Major Crops

 

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p<>{color:#000;}. Season
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<>.
<>.
<>.

Industry in the block:-

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p<>{color:#000;}. Number of industries
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<>.
<>.

Migration

 

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p<>{color:#000;}. Purpose
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p<>{color:#000;}. Seasonality/Duration
<>.
<>.

ANALYSIS OF SECONDARY DATA

Rishabhdeo Block Socio-Economic-Demographic Indicators

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p<>{color:#000;}. Population
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p<>{color:#000;}. Persons
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Male
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Female
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Table 1 Source: Census Report, 2011

Figure 2 Figure 1

The main tribes found in Rishabhdeo are Meena, Garasia, Bhil and Damor. In the SC category Meghwal constitute in high number of the population.

Employment Parameters

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p<>{color:#000;}. Persons
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Male
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Female
<>.
<>.
<>.

Table 2

Figure 3

From the above table and graph we can deduce that the economy of Risahbhdeo Block is agrarian. Most of the households are engaged in subsistence farming. In the non- agricultural sector workers are engaged in daily wage labour in Marble mines and Mayur Textile Mill.

Moreover in the services sector people are employed in banking, transportation, education, restaurant, tailoring, automobile mechanic and electrician and motor rewinding services.

Classification of Workforce as Marginal and Main Workers

<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Parameter
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Persons
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Male
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Female
<>.
<>.
<>.

Source: Census Reports, 2011 Table 3

Figure 4

Total workforce of Rishabhdeo Block is 73,042. From the above graph we can deduce that 71% of the workforce comprises of marginal workers and 29% as main workers. This implies that only twenty nine per cent of the total workforce is working for six months or more than six months.

Classification of Main Workers

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. S. No |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Parameter |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Persons |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Male |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Female | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Cultivator |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10,507 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 8,669 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1,838 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Agricultural Labourers |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1,763 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1,279 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 484 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Household Industries |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 487 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 414 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 73 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 4 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Other |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 11,710 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10,625 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1,445 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Total
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 24,467
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 20,627
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 3,840

Source: Census Report, 2011 Table 4

Figure 5 Figure 6

The workforce of Rishabhdeo is primarily engaged in agriculture. The share of workforce involved in household industry is only 2%. People are involved in making broomstick and ropes and few sell in the Rishabhdeo market too. The broomstick and ropes are made from the leaves of Date Palm tree. The rest of the workforce is involved in factory work and services sector. Due to proximity with marble mines, majority of the workforce is engaged there. The factory workers are employed in Mayur Textile Mill located in the block. Most of the farmers grow more than one crop in a year. Therefore the farming activity is done for greater part of the year.

Marginal Workers

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. S. No |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Parameter |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Persons |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Male |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Female | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Cultivator |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 20,998 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10,003 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10,995 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Agricultural Labourers |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 16,435 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 5,837 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10,598 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Household Industries |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 836 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 405 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 431 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 4 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Other |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10,306 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 5,472 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 4,834 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Total
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 48,575
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 21,717
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 26,858

Table 5

Figure 7

In the agricultural sector, female marginal workers outnumber their male counterpart. Men are more involved in non-farm activities such as daily wage work in factory and marble mines. In agricultural labourer segment also female participation is double that of males. Females work in fields of farmers having large landholding. Especially during harvesting, there is rise in demand of labour.

Gram Panchayat wise economic parameters

<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. G.P Name
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Population
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. BPL Households
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Non-BPL households
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. BPL ST Household
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.

Table 6

BPL in Rishabhdeo

Figure 8

Main Reasons for Poverty in Rishabhdeo

The causes for poverty are partly explained by our primary data. With the help of PRA techniques of FGD’s and in depth interviews and our schedules, following points are worth mentioning in this context:

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Low levels of education: Our primary data reflects that seventy seven out of sampled 203 youths studied only till VIIIth standard. Out of 77, 42 studied only till class V. The remaining 35 studied in the “Middle”, i.e. V-VIII. This implies that 38% of the sampled youth studied only till class VIII.

In our Focused Group Discussion’s, we interacted with teachers of the primary and secondary schools. In general the highlighted the role of parents is negligible in child’s education. The parents want their ward to join the workforce as early as possible. The children are pushed into menial jobs in marble mines, work at construction sites. The location of the village is also an important factor affecting education. Especially in the case of girl education where due to remoteness of the village the time taken to reach to the school is more. The dependency ratio came out to be 4.30, implying that almost four people were dependent on one earning member. The dependents were mostly children, old aged people and housewives. Average family size of the sampled households came out be 5.9. Comparing this figure with All Indian figure of average household size i.e. 5.8 for Scheduled Tribes (Census, 2001).

2. Geographical factor

Due to undulating topography and hilly terrain, some of the Gram Panchayats like Sagwara and Jalpaka face problems in farming. There exists severe shortage of irrigation facilities, most of the households are located on hills. Therefore the water does not reach to the farm. Thereby reducing agricultural production. From our sampled twenty three households in Sagwara, 11 had no irrigation facility.

3. Satiation of wants

Psychological factor contributing to poverty in the rural areas of Rishabhdeo is satiation of wants. The people are contended with the lifestyle. For example, the markets at Gram Panchayat levels are undeveloped.

VARIABLES IN THE STUDY

In our study we have included numerous socio economic variables which directly or indirectly affect the attitude towards skill development viz.

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Literacy

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Migration

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Income earned by youth

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Household Income

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Income earned from agriculture(imputed value of produce is taken into account)

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Expenditure on services as proportion of income

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Household assets

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Capital Assets in agriculture(bore well)

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Access to financial Institutions(whether the respondent has a bank account or not and access to credit)

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Land

Coming to the in depth interviews with the youth, data on following variables was collected:

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Willingness to train or not

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Trade preference

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Received training earlier

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Employment status

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Literacy status

Feature of the sampled respondents:

Figure 9

One hundred and eighty six youth of 202 were ST. In the scheduled tribes, Meena was the major tribe. Average age of the sampled youth came out to be 24

SOCIAL FINDINGS

#

Level of education

Figure 10

85 of the respondents studied only till class VIIIth, 34 studied till Xth class, 40 studied till class XIIth, 30 were undergraduates and five were post graduates. In our study eight respondents were illiterate.

Reasons for low educational attainment:

From our Focused Group Discussion and In depth interview:

#

Lack of parent’s concern towards child’s education: Especially from our FGD’s with primary school teachers and principal of the primary school we got to know that the parents are not motivating their ward to pursue higher education. Alcoholism is the main issue. High dependency ratio, which came out to be 4.3 in our study was also a contributing factor, it compelled the children to drop out of the school and work in unorganized sector.

#

Location of the village: greater the distance of school from home greater the chance of drop out. Lack of transportation facilities due to sub-standard roads. Location plays a great role in influencing female literacy.

Financial Constraints: Due to a relatively large family size, average family size was 5.9 in our study as compared to nation average of rural areas 5.3 (Census, 2001). 136 out of 202 households had single earning member. Most of the children leave the school after failing the exams and go for jobs in Rishabhdeo or outside (mainly in Ahmedabad, Dungarpur and Udaipur).

Migration

Figure 11

Reasons for migration

A total of 85 people migrated from our sample of 202 households. Listed below are the main destinations for migration. Majority of the migrants go for work in Ahmedabad. For study purposes Kherwara block, Ahmedabad, Surat, Udaipur.

In international migration, Kuwait remained the favourite destination for the villagers. The villagers went to Kuwait to work as construction labourers and tailor etc.

Following are the causes of migration:

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Low wages: The wage differential in the urban areas stand out to be 150-200 Rs for construction work. For example, the current daily wage for a mason was Rs 250 in Rishabhdeo and in Udaipur and Ahmedabad was Rs 400. Higher wages motivated the youth to migrate. When we asked about cost of living, the majority of the masons responded that the contractor takes care of the housing needs.

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Lack of job opportunities: Especially in hotel business, some of the youths migrated to Ahmadabad as waiters. Therefore due to structural factors, there exists lack of job opportunities in Risabhdeo vis a vis Ahmedabad and Udaipur. Moreover some of the youths were involved in services such as cashier, therefore the scope exists in urban centres

#

Large family size: The average household size was 5.9 in our sampled households. For rural India it is 5.3(Census, 2001). Moreover 136 out of 202 households had single earning member. Since the villagers are practicing subsistence agriculture, there are no monetary gains from agriculture.

ECONOMIC FINDING

Income

Youth Income (18-35 Years)

Average annual youth income(income earned by respondents in our target group ,i.e. 18-35 years came out to be Rs 67,885s with standard deviation of 72,989. The reason for high standard deviation was unemployment. Median income came out be Rs 72,000, implying that fifty per cent of the households earned less than Rs72000 per year.

Figure 12

Figure 13

76% of the aggregate income of the youths is derived from services sector. Out of 202 sampled youths, 135 were employed. Out of 135, 110 were engaged in tertiary sector, 24 involved in manufacturing sector and only one respondent was engaged in agricultural sector. Out of 110 youths employed in services sector, a total of 67 were employed as mason and labour at construction sites. Mostly the labour were employed for period of 7-8 months. The daily wage for mason stood at Rs 250-300.

Figure 14

In the secondary sector, 19 youths out of 25 were working in marble mines. The wage rate in marble mines for a labourer is Rs 300/day.

Household Income

Average Household income came out to be Rs.74, 000 with standard deviation of 93,826. Household Income is inclusive of income earned by youth. The reasons for such a high standard deviation is unemployment in some households and in some households involve in administrative and Kirana shops

Figure 15

81% of the youth was involved in services sector. Most of the workers were employed as construction labourers. In the manufacturing sector, labour was working in the marble mines. Twenty youths were engaged in daily wage work on construction sites. The daily wage stood at Rs 250-300 for construction labour. In the marble mining the daily wage for labourer stood at Rs 250-300. Only one youth was involved in agriculture. This signifies that agriculture was not preferred by the youth as their livelihood. However, during the harvesting period (April) for wheat, youth helped their family in farming . A total of 71 youth migrated outside Rishabhdeo to do work. The most preferred location was Ahmadabad and Udaipur. In Ahmadabad wage level was 450-500 per day.

Self-employment and wage employment

Figure 16

Out of 135 employed, 105 were wage employed and thirty were self-employed. Through following diagram we can show the main reason for not taking up self-employment.

Financial Constraints: Taking up business even at a small scale assumes some risk. From our In depth interviews we found that since most of the families have a single earning member. Even when the people, mostly above 35 years of age are involved as agriculture labourers. The income is seasonal, as they only get income during the harvesting period, usually three months a year. Therefore the single earning member has to feed the family. Therefore, the capital required to start up business is inadequate. Out of the sampled 202 households, 136 had only single earning member in the house.

Figure 17

Lack of information: From our Focused group discussion, we discovered that the youth have limited information about the self-employment schemes targeted for them. There exists asymmetric information about the changing tastes and preferences of the consumers. For example, in the Rishabhdeo town there exists demand for computer hardware engineer but there is no single person in the town who provides the services. The opportunities lying at village level consisted of plumbing services and hand pump repairing.

Access to credit:

Figure 18

Most of the households did not have proper documents of the land. Often the youth did not have land on their name because the partition did not occur as yet. Out of our sampled youth of 203, 35 did not have a bank account. Moreover 81 per cent of the households have not taken a loan from formal sources. The people had a negative attitude towards credit. Credit from other informal sources also was minimal. Only 5% of the households had taken loan from moneylenders, family or friends. The rate of interest varied from Rs 6 to Rs 8 per Rs 100.

Figure 19 Figure 20

Satiation of wants: The villagers were satisfied their existing lifestyle. The desire for material advancement was non-existent.

Infrastructure: Some of the villages were still not electrified. As per our primary research the villages still not electrified were Somavat.

Expenditure Pattern

Figure 21

Expenditure Analysis

45% of the annual income is spent on services. In the services sector About 33% of the expenditure is done on clothing, 23% is done transportation and repairing, 6% of the total expenditure is on motor repairing of electronics 6% of the total expenditure is done on salon.

Attitude of youth towards training

Agricultural Sector

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p<>{color:#000;}. Parameters
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p<>{color:#000;}. Value
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<>.

Table 7

Average cultivable 1.15 acre, average uncultivable .5 acre, Average annual income from agriculture Rs 11,482.Though only 3 households out of sampled 202 were engaged in commercial farming (although at village level) of the respondents were engaged in the agricultural sector. Although Major crops grown in the area were Jowar, Bajra and Maize. Average landholding size was 1.32 Acre. Three respondents were landless and highest landholding was 2 Acre. Average cultivable land was 0.9 acre. Two respondents did not share their land holding details. All the respondents had access to irrigation facilities in the form of a pond. There were no capital assets in the field of agriculture. Average expenditure on food was Rs 2192 per month. Expenditure on livestock rearing came out be 110 per month. Four households owned no livestock from our sample. Average production expenditure on agriculture came out to be Rs 2423.

Figure 22

Willing to receive training

Out of our sample of 202, 161 youths were willing to receive training. Out of those 161 youths, 51 were unemployed, 100 were those who were employed, and 10 youths were students. In the 42 who were unemployed, 21 who were unemployed and were pursuing their studies. They wanted to work at the same time as well as continue with their study. However, we observed a positive attitude of the unemployed youth towards training as out of 51 unemployed youth, 42 were willing to get themselves trained at RSETI. The workers who were employed wanted to get themselves trained for a certificate. Most of the workers were non-certified. From our FGD’s, we found that most of the interested candidates were aspiring for better job opportunities and avenues for self-employment. Respondents pursuing their intermediate or graduation were also willing to join RSETI. Most of them were willing to join in the summer vacations. Their attitude was to earn a livelihood as well as studying at the same time.

Figure 23

Figure 24

Unwilling to receive training

36 youth out of sampled 203 were not interested in receiving training. Some of the respondents wanted to continue with their studies, while others wanted to continue with their occupation. As per our in depth interviews, those who were already working found that the opportunity cost of training is very high. Therefore they could not sacrifice their monthly income. 28 respondents were already employed. 5 respondents who were unwilling to receive training were unemployed. Out of those 3 were students who were seeking job in the past and they were currently available for work. Anyhow they wanted to continue with their studies. The remaining three respondents were interested in studies only.

Figure 25

Attitude towards Self Employment

Out of the total 203 sampled youths, 70 were unwilling to take up self-employment. Out of seventy of those unwilling to take up self-employment, 28 respondents were not willing to receive training. The rest 52 wanted to get them trained but were disinterested in taking up self-employment. Out of total of 167 youths who wanted to receive training from RSETI, 52 youths were unwilling to take up self-employment.

Figure 26

Figure 27

Reasons for not taking up self-employment

On the basis of our In depth interviews following reasons were responsible for not taking up self-employment:

Access to market in the rural areas of Rishabhdeo

The following table depicts the supply of services in our sampled Gram Panchayats. We selected twelve Gram Panchayats out of 26 on the basis of socio-economic, demographic and geographical factors.

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. S. No |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Gram Panchayat |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Electrician Shops |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Plumber |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Two Wheeler Mechanic |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Motor Rewinding shops |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Welder |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Tailor |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Beauty Parlour |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Computer

and photocopy |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Photographer

and videographer | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Sagwara |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 15 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Chikla |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Pipli |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 4 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Padheri |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 5 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Budhar |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 20 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 4 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 6 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Pandyawada |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 7 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Kanuwada |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 8 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Garnala Kotda |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 9 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Kikavat |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 10 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Somavat |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 11 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Rishabhdeo |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 28 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 17 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 14 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 28 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 15 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 5 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 2 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 12 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Kojawada |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 10 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 13 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Dhilana |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.  
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Total
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 29
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 4
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 22
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 16
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 4
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 112
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 19
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2

Table 8

The average distance to Rishabhdeo town market was 11km.

Graph showing distribution of shops in the rural areas of Rishabhdeo and Rishabhdeo town. The following graphs is made out of the survey conducted in 12 Gram Panchayats of Rishabhdeo

Figure 28

[Figure:29
Figure 30]

Estimating the demand for services

The aim of estimating the demand for different services is to explore the avenues for self-employment in different services. Through our FGD’s and

Gram Panchayat Wise

In different trades

Sagwara: Remotest Gram Panchayat in Rishabdeo Block. The distance to Rishabhdeo market is 35km. There exists severe shortage of services of motor rewinding mechanic and plumbing. Out of our sample of 23, fourteen households had irrigation facility. Therefore there does exist demand for motor rewinding services. Majority of the households depend on Risahbhdeo and Kherwara for getting their motor repaired. There are no plumbers in the entire Gram Panchayat. Even in the nearby villages, like Jalpaka there exists no supply of electrician and motor rewinding. From our in depth interviews and FGD’s we found that there are hardly two persons who know the skill of motor rewinding. But they have not set up their shops due dearth of finance. Although some of the villages in Sagwara are not electrified but under Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyuti Karan Yojana(RGGVY).There does not exist any plumbing services in the entire Gram Panchayat.

Pandyawada: The nearest market is Kalyanpur which is 8km. The distance to Rishabhdeo market is 25km. From our sampled 7 households in the village, we found that for agricultural purposes farmers are dependent upon the canal, only 2 households has the facility of bore well. Therefore the demand for services of motor rewinding is low in the Gram Panchayat. In case of plumbing, the story is similar to that of Sagwara.

Kikawat and Somawat: Both of the Gram Panchayats are adjoining each other. Both the Panchyats are dependent on Rishabhdeo for the all the service listed in the table, except for tailoring. The distance to Rishabhdeo is 6 from Kikawat and 7 from Somavat. In our sampled 14 households in Kikawat 8 had irrigation facilities in the form of tube well and bore well. Therefore, the demand for services for motor rewinding services does exist. On the other hand there exists zero supply of motor rewinding services in both the Panchayats.

Budhar: In comparison with other Gram Panchyats, Budhar has a developed market. The services of motor rewinding, electrician and tailoring, computer related and photocopy, beauty parlour etc. are available in the market. Moreover, there are two people who know plumbing and are working for a contractor. The demand for services like motor rewinding is met locally but for the services of photographer, welder and plumber is met from outside the Gram Panchayat.

Garnala: There was dearth of services of a plumber, electrician and motor rewinding in Garnala. The distance to nearest market was 5km which was Rishabhdeo. 13 households out of 21 possessed irrigation facilities in the form of tube well and bore well.

Considering the other Gram Panchayats from our sample, they are still underdeveloped. There exists shortage of services in other Gram Panchayats. From our IDI’s and FGD’S we found that there are few people in some Panchayats who knew the skill of plumbing, motor rewinding, electrician and carpentry but they either migrated outside Rishabdeo.

Pipli “A”: Motor rewinding, tailoring and salon services are available in the village. For rest of the services people go to Rishabhdeo town which is 7km away.

Kanuwara:Electrician, tailoring and services of a barber are available in Kanuwara. For other services they rely on Rishabhdeo town which is 6km away.

Trade Wise:

#

Motor Rewinding:

In our sample of 202 households, ninety households had irrigation facilities in the form of bore well and tube well. Out of 90 households, some of the household were lifting water using diesel and electric pump from the ponds. However the supply of motor rewinding services, measured in terms of the shops came out be 16. In Rishabhdeo town 14 motor rewinding shops were present, implying the shortage of services in other 11 Gram Panchayats sampled. From our household data average annual expenditure on motor rewinding services came out be Rs. 2470

2) Two Wheeler Repairing:

Coming to two wheeler mechanic service, total repair shops were 22. Out of 22, 17 were in Rishabhdeo town. Out of our sampled 202 households, total number of bikes were 79. A total of 70 household had a motor bike. Therefore there exists demand and supply gap in the services of two wheeler mechanic.

Figure 31

3) Tailoring:

There was no shortage of tailoring services in the rural areas. Average annual expenditure per household came out to be Rs 10,234 . There was abundant supply of tailoring services in rural areas as well as in the town.

4) Plumbing:

Based on our FGD’s, we found that there exists severe shortage of plumbing services in the rural areas. There was demand for plumbing services in case of hand pump repairing. In every Gram Panchayat there are 80-100 hand pumps. There is only one engineer in every two Gram Panchayat to repair the hand pump. The wage rate for repairing of hand pump is Rs300-500, depending upon the complexity of the work. From our In-depth interview with the contractor, there are usually two-three hand pump repairing cases every day. There exists demand for plumbing services but there is less supply.

5) Photography and videographer:

None of the sampled Gram Panchayats had photographer and videographer. Only two shops were present but they were located in the town. There is high demand of photographer and videographer in the marriage season. The peak season is the April-August. Moreover the demand was generated whenever there are important events in the Panchayat office like opening of bank accounts under Jan Dhan Yojna and Gram Sabha Meetings.

6. Welder

There were a total of four welder shops in Rishabhdeo. Out of the four one was in rural areas. From our In depth interview with the welder from Pandyawada Gram Panchayat, we found that weekly he gets order of 3-4 gates and windows from surrounding areas. But there is problem of electricity which impedes his work. Therefore the scope for self-employment in the rural areas is limited.

7. Electrician:

There is severe shortage of services of an electrician in the rural areas. However there were just five electricians in our sampled Gram Panchayats. For seven- eight months they were working outside Rishabdeo, for example in Udaipur and Rishabhdeo. From our FGD’s we found that under Rajiv Gandhi VidyutiKaran Yojana, there is an effort to provide 100% electricity in Rishabhdeo. Therefore there is huge demand in the rural areas for wire fitting.

Figure 32

MARKET SURVEY OF RISHABHDEO BLOCK

Enumeration of the shops:

Following table describes the number of shops in the Rishabhdeo Town.

<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Business
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Number of shops
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.

Table 9

From the table we can deduce that there exist no services of computer hardware. In our study, we inquired that all the computer hardware related issues, for example, repairing of a printer, motherboard, Xerox machine etc. the businesses and individuals, depend on engineers from Udaipur (70 km) or Dungarpur (30km). From our survey of the youth on their interests in training, out of a sample of 202, 9 individuals were willing to be trained in computer hardware. Therefore the demand and supply gap for computer hardware services can be bridged by providing training on computer hardware. There exists scope for self-employment as well as wage employment in the computer hardware.

Labour requirement and attitude towards training

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. S No |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Business |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Sample Size |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Numberof additional workers required |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Number of entrepreneurs willing to receive training | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Motor Rewinding |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 13 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Electrician |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Plumbing |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 30 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 4 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Carpentry |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 5 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Marble cutting |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 7 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 6 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Videographer |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 7 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Mobile repairing |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 8 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. AC and Fridge Repair |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 9 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Two Wheeler Repairing |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. TV Repairing |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 11 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Watch Repairing |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 12 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Beauty Parlour |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 13 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Welding |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 14 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Restaurant |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 15 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Photocopier and computer typing |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 7 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 16.

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Statue Maker |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 0 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 17.
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Four wheeler Mechanic
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 10
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 0

Table 11

Figure 33

The demand for labour in various sectors reflects the scope of wage employment. Implicitly it is also indicative of the self-employment opportunities. Out of our sample, additional labour requirement was in 12 enterprises only. The remaining 18 did not require any additional labour.

Training need assessment

Based on the findings of our study on willingness of youth in receiving training, market survey of the Rishabhdeo town and rural areas we have perceived that trainings should be conducted in following trades by RSETI.

(a)Marble Cutting and Polishing

One entrepreneur required seven additional workers for polishing. From our survey of the youth, 12 were willing to receive training in marble cutting and polishing. The owner of the firm said that there will be no wage difference between a certified worker and a non-certified worker. Hardly two-three days are required to learn the work. Therefore the training on marble polishing will be futile.

(b) Beauty Parlour

There are 15 beauty parlours in the town and 4 in the rural areas of Rishabhdeo. The peak season for this business from April-August. During this time maximum number of marriages take place in Rishabhdeo. However, there is no shortage of beauty parlour services. Therefore in the town, there exists no scope of training in beauty parlour because there will be excess supply.

©Plumbing Services:

We surveyed one contractor and he required 30 plumbers. He remarked that in the town skilled plumbers are in shortage. Therefore the services of plumber are required in the market. Out of our sample of 202 youth, 5 were willing to receive training in plumbing. Based on our FGD’s, we found that there exists severe shortage of plumbing services in the rural areas. There was demand for plumbing services in case of hand pump repairing. In every Gram Panchayat there are 50-60 hand pumps. There is only one engineer in every two Gram Panchayat to repair the hand pump. The wage rate for repairing of hand pump is Rs300-500, depending upon the complexity of the work. From our In-depth interview with the contractor, there are usually two-three hand pump repairing cases every day. There exists demand for plumbing services but there is less supply. Therefore, there does exist scope for self-employment in this area. It is feasible to conduct trainings in plumbing.

(d) Motor Rewinding

The demand for labour was thirteen in this trade. Motor rewinding has high growth potential because of the proximity with Marble mines. There is high labour attrition in this business because of the low wages. Only 2000-2500 was paid monthly to the labour. The master is paid 10,000 monthly. As per the survey of the target group (18-35 years), 15 youth were willing to receive training in motor rewinding. Therefore there exists both demand and supply of motor rewinding services in Rishabhdeo. In our sample of 202 households, 90 households had irrigation facilities in the form of bore well and tube well. Out of 90 households, some of the household were lifting water using diesel and electric pump from the ponds. However the supply of motor rewinding services, measured in terms of the number of shops for motor rewinding came out be 16. In Rishabhdeo town 14 motor rewinding shops were present, implying the shortage of services in other 11 Gram Panchayats sampled. Average annual expenditure on repairing of motor came out be Rs 2470.

(e) Mobile Repairing

From our sample, there was no demand for labour in this business. There were approximately 20-25 mobile sales and services shops. The shops only for mobile repairing were three only. The main reason for the no additional requirement were as follows

Most of the sales, especially in rural areas were low quality and spurious mobiles. These mobiles being low price (some as cheap as Rs 700). The customers do not prefer to repair them if there were any defects.

All the individuals having smart phones preferred to get the mobile checked at the service centre only. On the other side there were 9 youths willing to receive training in mobile repairing. There it is not feasible to conduct training in mobile repairing.

(f) Photocopier and Computer Typing

7 workers were required in this business, especially for documentation and online form filling purpose. Only one among the sampled youth is interested in receiving IT related training. Therefore the scope for training is limited in this field.

(g) Electrician

From our sampled enterprises, no additional workers were required in this area. However there is severe shortage of the services in the rural areas of Rishabhdeo. There also exist huge demand in the town, the new houses which are under construction; they have given contract to people from Udaipur. There is shortage of contractors from Rishabhdeo town. There exists demand in the rural areas. However there were just five electricians in our sampled Gram Panchayats. For seven- eight months they were working outside Rishabdeo, for example in Udaipur and Rishabhdeo. From our FGD’s we found that under Rajiv Gandhi VidyutiKaran Yojana, there is an effort to provide 100% electricity in Rishabhdeo. Therefore there is huge demand in the rural areas for wire fitting. From our sample of 202 youth, 15 were interested in receiving electrician training. Therefore the training in electrician trade is feasible in Rishabhdeo.

(h) Two wheeler and four wheeler services

Labour requirement in the four wheeler business is 10. However the youth willing to receive training in four wheeler mechanic stood out be 4. At the Gram Panchayat Level, there does not exist scope of the services of Car mechanic because, there are very few cars at village level. The demand has to be generated from the town. Therefore there does exist the scope for four wheeler mechanic in Rishabhdeo. Additional workers required in two wheeler repairing enterprises were three only. However at the village level there exists shortage of motor bike repairing and services.

There were 22, two wheeler repair shops. Out of 22, 17 were in Rishabhdeo town. Out of our sampled 202 households, total number of bikes were 79. A total of 70 household had a motor bike. Therefore there exists demand and supply gap in the services of two wheeler mechanic. There exists scope for training in two wheeler servicing in Rishabhdeo. The opportunities for self-employment exist at village level. The number of youth willing to receive training in two wheeler mechanic were 14. Training can be imparted in this sector.

(j) Videographer and Photography:

None of the sampled Gram Panchayats had photographer and videographer. Only two shops were present but they were located in the town. There is high demand of photographer and videographer in the marriage season. The peak season is the April-August. Moreover the demand was generated whenever there are important events in the Panchayat office like opening of bank accounts under Jan Dhan Yojna and Gram Sabha Meetings. On the basis of our In depth Interview with the photographer we found that, the videographer and the photographer are hesitant to travel to the interior areas of Rishabhdeo. There were 9 youths out of our sample of 202 who were willing to receive training in videographer. Therefore there exists the scope for training in Rishabhdeo for videographer. However the opportunities for self-employment is more in the town because in there is irregular supply of electricity in the villages.

(k) Mason:

There were 19 youths who were willing to receive training in Masonry. The main reason for receiving training was the expectation of a higher wage because most of them were non certified. There exists demand for mason services in Rishabhdeo as well as outside Rishabhdeo. Lots of construction work is going in the villages and there are vast opportunities lying in the cities due to ongoing as well as future infrastructure projects of Government. There is scope for self-employment and wage employment in masonry.

(l)Agro Consultancy:

There were 4 respondents who were willing to receive training in agro consultancy. Though the demand is much high if we take into consideration people outside our target group (18-35) years. Through our FGD’s we found that people were willing to receive information on latest seeds is the market and scope for crop diversification and also on improving livestock health.

Attitude towards skill enhancement

Figure 34

From our sample of 30, 8 businessmen were willing to receive training for skill advancement. The main reason for unwillingness to train was the time factor.

SMALL SCALE ENTREPRENEURSHIP

BRICK KILN

INTRODUCTION

The Indian brick industry is primarily an informal, or unorganised, sector composed of more than 100,000 brick kilns operating in clusters in rural and peri-urban areas in the country producing fired clay bricks.

Scope of Brick Kilns Industry in Rishabhdeo Block.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Availability of Soil

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Soil is a natural resource which is available everywhere but to make bricks, a specific type of soil is required i.e. Clay Soil.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Clay soil is not available everywhere in Rishabhdeo block. Clay soil can be found in

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Bed of the pond

In Rishabhdeo block in every Gram Panchayat there are average 2 Ponds.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Area where seasonal river flows

In every Gram Panchayat there is 1-2 Seasonal small river which flows during rainy season. These seasonal rivers erode upper layer of the soil from the rocks and that eroded soil settle down and form a thick layer soil which can be used to make Brick kilns

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Embankments made in the hilly terrain

Lot of embankments are made along the hill slopes of the Aravali hills. In rainy season water from the hill top and collected in the embankments, when these embankments dry the upper layer of the soil in the embankment area can be used for making brick kilns.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Along the Check dams built in flowing river

There are 3 major river Som , Kuwarika, and Budhar which are flowing in Rishabhdeo block. There are 6 check dams along these rivers, soils which these rivers are carrying settle down in and around the check dam area. This soil can be used to make brick kilns.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Availability Of Labour

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Rishabhdeo block is having total of 73,042 workers and 67524 are non workers. Availability of workers in Rishabhdeo block is quite large.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Availability Of Coal to Fire Brick

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Locally Charcoal is available in the market to fire clay bricks.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Coal is brought from Barmer to fire the Clay bricks.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Availability Of Tools And Machine

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Tools for making the brick kilns are available locally in the Rishabhdeo market. And some of the tools can be made locally.

PROCESS OF MAKING BRICKS

#
p<>{color:#413121;}. Clay Preparation

1a. Tempering

Tempering is adding water to the clay soil in order to make it more workable. Too much water added to the clay mix will decrease quality, though.

1b. Disintegration and Crushing

An alternative to tempering is disintegration or weathering, which involves allowing clay to dry in the sun and accept moisture from rain and dew. The repeated drying and moistening of clay will bring clay to a plasticity and workability appropriate for brick making. Crushing will make the mixture more homogeneous.

1c. Mixing

Mixing is done to make the clay soil homogeneous and smooth. There are different techniques that can be used to do this, including using animal power or letting humans mix the clay with their feet. Different admixtures such as coal or sawdust can be added to the clay for two beneficial reasons:

1) Reduce cracking during drying.

2) Reduce fuel usage during firing.

#
p<>{color:#413121;}. Molding

2a. Shrinkage

When determining the size of a mold for brick making, a necessary consideration must be shrinkage. Bricks will shrink when drying, so the mold size must be larger than the intended finished brick.

2b. Slop Molding

In slop molding, a wet clay mixture is used- the mix is put into a rectangular form without a top or bottom. A problem with this technique is that because the mix is so wet, the brick may deform under its own weight and the surface can be marked easily.

2d. Sand Molding

Sand molding utilizes a drier clay mix, formed into a wedge and thrown into a mold. A bow cutter will be used to smooth the top of the brick, and the form will can be released because of a hinged bottom. Since the clay is drier, the brick can be moved with wooden pallets which can reduce the amount of surface marks.

#
p<>{color:#413121;}. Drying

Water was added during clay preparation to increase workability of the mixture, but in drying it is removed for several reasons. First, there will be less cracking in fired bricks with less water content. Second, additional fuel is needed, beyond what is used for firing, to dry the bricks in the kiln. Proper drying of bricks will involved rotating the bricks for different exposures to ensure even drying rates.

For best results, drying should be done slowly. This will help with more even drying. Also, the best drying technique may change from location to location, so the brick makers must gain experience to determine the best way to dry bricks for each production process.

 

#
p<>{color:#413121;}. Firing

4a. Laying out and constructing a clamp

A clamp is a field kiln built from the green bricks that will be fired. Clamps vary with size and shape and must be oriented with respect to wind direction. Once a clamp is laid out and constructed, it must be insulated.

Finally, the process of firing the clamp will take place in several steps. First, pre-heating, or water-smoking, will remove the water leftover from the drying process. This process is still physical. The second stage is firing, where the clay bricks will vitrify through a chemical process. The temperature must remain constant at this stage. Finally, for the cooling stage, the temperature must be slow and steady. A clamp may take two weeks to cool.

Soil

Clay is most preferable soil to make brick kilns. Before beginning to make bricks for the first time, it is essential to know if the clay which intends to use is the right type for making good quality bricks. Although brick making clays are abundant in many areas, not all villages have a supply of good quality brick making clay nearby. Before beginning to organize a brick production site, we have to check very carefully that clay is the correct type.

So for that below are tests.

Test 1:

Moulding Take a handful of dry clay soil and begin mixing it with a small amount of water until it becomes soft and malleable. Do not add too much water as this will make it too soft and wet. Try making different shapes with the clay. The objective of this test is simply to see if the soil can be moulded easily and to get an indication of how difficult it may be to prepare the soil for brick making. If it is difficult to make any shape with the soil or if it keeps falling apart, the soil cannot be used to make bricks because it probably contains too much sand. If the soil holds its shape and can be moulded easily, continue with the following tests.

Test 2:

Forming and Drying Clay “Eggs” With the moist soil, mould it into a form about the size and shape of a chicken’s egg. Make 20 to 30 of these “eggs” and leave them in the sun to dry. After about a day or two, check the “eggs” to see if they have cracked or broken apart. If they have large cracks, the soil probably has too much clay and is not suitable for making bricks. This particular soil may need to have sand added to it in order to stop the cracking. It will be necessary to experiment with different proportions of sand and soil to determine the correct ratio. If they do not crack apart or if they have only very small cracks, try crumbling or breaking them in your hands. If they crumble easily, it probably means that the soil has too little clay in it and is unsuitable for making bricks. If they do not break or crumble easily, the soil has a potential for brick making.

For making 1000 bricks we need 1 Ton of

TOOLS

A brick making unit, it will need basic tools in order to make bricks. A group of 15 people producing 1,000 bricks per day will need the following minimum equipment:

6 Hoes= Rs 1500

2 Pick axes=Rs 800

4 Shovels= Rs 300×4 =Rs 1200

4 Axes= Rs80×4= Rs160

2 Wheelbarrows=Rs 2000

8 Pallets= Rs 640

FUEL

To fire the bricks well, you will need sufficient amounts of fuel; Area like Rishabhdeo, firewood is easily available. If we fire bricks with wood, we will need one ton of firewood for every 1,000 bricks. Because Rishabhdeo has forest area, so that can meet the demands of a brick producing unit, it will be necessary to establish a woodlot to supply firewood if we plan to fire many kilns every year.

Cost of Firewood – Rs5 per Kg

Cost of Firewood for Making 1000 bricks= 5×1000= Rs 5000

TRANSPORTATION

It is essential that a brick producing unit has some type of transport to fetch firewood or coal and possibly deliver the finished bricks to the customer. The transport used could be trucks, tractors with trailers, or oxen with suitable carts.

Cost of Transportation (Tractor) to bring Fire-wood- Rs 500

Cost of Transportation (Tractor) to 1ton Bring Clay- Rs 950

Cost of Transportation (Tractor) for 1000 bricks to Rishabhdeo Block =1000

WATER

Average Ground water level found in Rishabhdeo Block is 100 feet. To make1000 brick we require 600 litre of water.

Average Digging bore well cost – 30,000

SITE

The site should be smooth and level. A brick unit producing 1,000 bricks per day will need an area from 600 to 1,000 square metres and possible Gram Panchayat for the Location for Brick Kiln could be

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Budhar Gram Panchayat

Reason:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Good quality of Soil is found here

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Large plain area can be found

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Good Metallic Road

*
p<>{color:#000;}. It has its own market and it is away 7 km from the Rishabhdeo Market

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Availability water, 3 ponds where we can find abundant amount of clay

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Budhar has a large forest cover area firewood is easily available.

<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>\2.
<>\3.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>\2.

Table 11

MARKET

Nearest markets for selling Bricks is Rishabhdeo, Kherwara, Dhungarpur, Udaipur, Tidi etc.

<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Particulars
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Amount
<>.
<>.
<>.

Table 12

LEGAL REQUIREMENT

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Submit application for consent to establish/operate at the concerning Regional Office of the Board

*
p<>{color:#000;}. In the Alwar district must seek prior environmental clearance as prescribed under the Aravali Notification

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Clearance of ground water abstraction for various uses issued by the Central Ground Water Authority, Ministry of Water Resources.

PORTERS FIVE FORCE

Threat New entry

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Government barriers in making all sort of clearances from different Department

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mobilisation of village people

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Finding perfect location to establish Brick kiln Industry

Supplier Power

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Low supply as the demand of good quality bricks is high.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Few Brick Supplier

Buyer Power

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Buyers are high

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Volume of buying is high

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Have limited Supplier

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Price of the brick

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Substitute of Brick not available

Threat of substitutes

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Aerocon blocks now widely used in making residential and commercial building.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Different shape and size of Bricks used in Residential Building.

Competitive Rivalries

*
p<>{color:#000;}. There are existing five Brick Kilns in Rishabhdeo Block

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Price Competition

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Standard of the product

SMALL SCALE ENTREPRENEURSHIP

ALOE VERA

INTRODUCTION

.

SCOPE OF ALOE VERA PRODUCTION IN RISHABHDEO BLOCK

Availability of land:

Rishabhdeo block has 1875 hectares of uncultivable land. Aloe Vera can be produced abundantly in this region. Out of 1875 hectares of land 468.75 hectares of uncultivated land can be converted into Aloe Vera Cultivation.

From the sample size 202 people data collected. Average uncultivable is .5 acre which can be converted into Aloe Vera cultivation.

Availability of Water

Aloe Vera need limited amount of water approximately 150 ml of water per day. Rishabhdeo block have that much to provide water to Aloe Vera.

From the sample size of 13 Gram Panchayat total water resources came out to be 32 which include
Ponds, rivers, seasonal river, canals.

table<>. <>. |<>/2.
p<>{color:#000;}. S No.

<>/2.
p<>{color:#000;}. Gram Panchayat
<>\2.
p={color:#000;}. River
<>/2.
p<>{color:#000;}. Canal
<>/2.
p={color:#000;}. Pond
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.

Table 13

From our Sample size 202 people 90 were having Bore well and Tube well i.e. approximately 44.55%.

In one acre 5000 Aloe Vera plants can be grown. In one acre 750 litre of water required daily for Aloe Vera cultivation.

Availability of leaf

In Rishabhdeo block many people are growing Aloe Vera. We visited 202 households out of which 48 people were growing Aloe Vera for decoration purpose. But the drawback is that they don’t know the use of Aloe Vera.

Leaf can be available from different societies and Nurseries for the cultivation of Aloe Vera. Different societies sell leaf for Aloe Vera cultivation. Few of these are

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Karnika Agri-vison Private Limited, Ajmer

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Aci Agro Solution, Jaipur

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Shri Rala Agro Bio-tech, Jaipur

*
p<>{color:#000;}.

PROCESS OF MAKING ALOE-VERA

There are different processes for extracting Juice from Aloe Vera

table<>. <>. |<>\3.
p<>{color:#000;}. CAPITAL INVESTMENT

 

| <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. S No. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Particulars |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Amount | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Land(100 sq meter) |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 75000(per year) | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Building |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 70000 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Machinery |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 20000 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Bore well |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 40000 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 4 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Pump set |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 20000 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 5 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Pipeline |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 20000 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Total |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Rs 2,25,000 | <>. |<>\3. p<>{color:#000;}. WORKING CAPITAL

 

| <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Raw Material |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 410625 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Labour(annually) |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 18000 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Other Expenses |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 63000 | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Total |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.  
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 4,91,625

*Amount can vary Table 14

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Under Government Scheme 20% subsidy is available.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 8 people can work in this Enterprise.

SITE

Uncultivable land of Rishabhdeo is 1875 hectares which indicates that this uncultivable land can be utilised to cultivate Aloe Vera plant. Most Suitable Area is

1. Budhar

2. Kalyanpur

3. Rishabhdeo

Cost of Cultivation

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. S No. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Particulars(Per Acre) |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Cost (Rs) | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Cost Of Leaves |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 25000 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Fertiliser |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 925 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Plant protection Chemical |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 600 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 4 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Labour |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1000 | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Total |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 27500

Table 15

MARKET

The target market for this would be Pharmaceutical and Cosmetic Industry. And these markets will be contacted through formation of Cooperative Society.

<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Item
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Amount
<>.
<>.
<>.

Table 16

SWOT ANALYSIS

Strength

- Availability of Labour & Raw Material in the form of Aloe Plant.

- Since the processing facility is totally automated, there is less involvement of man power.

- The people would have their own raw material (Aloe Vera Plants) cultivation and harvesting facility.

Weakness

Non-availability of the Plant technical staff in the local market as there is no such totally automated processing unit.

Opportunities

-The competition in the Domestic Market is very limited in that region.

- Growing market of Pharmaceutical and Cosmetics industry which is creating the high consumption opportunities of Aloe Vera.

Threats

- In order to penetrate in and capture the market heavy promotional charges are expected to be incurred.

- The cultivation may be exposed to natural disaster.

CONCLUSION

From the finding scope for training in Rishabhdeo block are

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Plumbing

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Electrician

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Motor rewinding

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Videographer

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Agro consultancy

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Two-wheeler mechanic

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Four wheeler Mechanic

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mason

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Computer Related

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Agro Consultancy

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Driving

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Computer Hardware

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Dish Connection

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Carpentry

Demand for training in plumbing, videography, electrician came out to be highest as supply in the market in low.

Concept of Brick kiln for cluster development in Rishabhdeo can be possible. Special training for making bricks can be given to the people through Mobilisation. Both mobilisation and Training will be conducted by ICICI RSETI where 15 workers can work in one Brick kilns.

There will be a need to form a Cooperative Society for making Bricks and selling to the market to benefit the Rishabhdeo People.

Concept of Aloe Vera cultivation for cluster development in Rishabhdeo can be possible. Special training for Cultivation of Aloe Vera can be given to the people through Mobilisation. Both mobilisation and Training will be provided by ICIC RSETI.

People those who are having uncultivable land can make use of them in Aloe Cultivation.

There will be a need to form a Cooperative Society for Processing the Aloe Vera into product and Marketing that Product to benefit the farmers.

 

ANNEXURE

[SCHEDULE FOR HOUSEHOLD DATA AND TARGET GROUP
**
**]Q1. Household Detail

table<>. <>. |<>.
p={color:#000;}. S. No |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Name |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Age |<>\2.
p={color:#000;}. Sex |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Caste |<>\2.
p={color:#000;}. Tribe |<>\4.
p={color:#000;}. Education

(Primary, Middle, Higher secondary, Senior Secondary,

Undergraduate, Post graduate) |<>\2.
p={color:#000;}. Occupation |<>\4.
p={color:#000;}. Period (from-to) |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Migration (Yes/No) |<>\4.
p={color:#000;}. Destination |<>\2.
p={color:#000;}. Seasonal/Regular |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Income |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Received any training(Yes/No |<>\2.
p={color:#000;}. Was the training useful(Yes/No)

 

 

 

|<>\2. p={color:#000;}. Willing to take training(Yes/No) |<>. p={color:#000;}. In which

Sector |<>\2.
p={color:#000;}. Willing to take self-employment(Yes/No) | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 4 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 5 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 6 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 7 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 8 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 9 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 10 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>\2/2. p={color:#000;}. Landholding |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}. Size

(Acre) |<>\6.
p<>{color:#000;}. Cultivable (acre) |<>\3.
p<>{color:#000;}. Non Cultivable (acre) |<>\4.
p<>{color:#000;}. Crop Name |<>\5.
p<>{color:#000;}. Irrigation |<>\6.
p<>{color:#000;}. Yield

(bag/Quintal) |<>\5.
p<>{color:#000;}. Market Price

( Rs) |<>.

 

| <>. |<>\2. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\5. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\5. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\6. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\5. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>.

 

| <>. |<>\2/5. p={color:#000;}. Livestock |<>\5. p<>{color:#000;}. Name of Livestock |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}. No of Livestock |<>\5. p<>{color:#000;}. Milk/By Products(in Litres/Kg) |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}. Price of Milk/litre(Rs) |<>\10. p<>{color:#000;}. Selling Price Per livestock (in Rs) |<>\3. p<>{color:#000;}. Income |<>.

 

| <>. |<>\5. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\6. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\3. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\6. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\3. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>.

 

| <>. |<>\5. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\6. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\3. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\6. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\3. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>.

 

| <>. |<>\5. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\6. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\3. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\6. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\3. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>.

 

| <>. |<>\5. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\4. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\6. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\3. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\6. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>\3. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>.

 

|

table<. <. |<.
p<{color:#000;}. S. No |<\2.
p<{color:#000;}. Name |<.
p<{color:#000;}. Age |<.
p<{color:#000;}. When was the last time he/she worked(In months/days) |<\2.
p<{color:#000;}. Has he/she ever worked |<\2.
p<{color:#000;}. Activity |<\2.
p<{color:#000;}. How much did you earn (In Rs.) |<.

 

| <. |<. p<{color:#000;}. 1 |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<. p<{color:#000;}.   |<. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<.

 

| <. |<. p<{color:#000;}. 2 |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<. p<{color:#000;}.   |<. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<.

 

| <. |<. p<{color:#000;}. 3 |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<. p<{color:#000;}.   |<. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<.

 

| <. |<. p<{color:#000;}. 4 |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<. p<{color:#000;}.   |<. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<.

 

| <. |<. p<{color:#000;}. 5 |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<. p<{color:#000;}.   |<. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<\2. p<{color:#000;}.   |<.

 

| <. |<.

 

|<.

 

|<\2.

 

|<\2.

 

|<\2.

 

|<\2.

 

|<\2.

 

| <. |<.

 

|<.

 

|<\2.

 

|<\2.

 

|<\2.

 

|<\2.

 

|<\2.

 

| <. |<.

 

|<.

 

|<\2.

 

|<\2.

 

|<\2.

 

|<\2.

 

|<\2.

 

| Q2. Total Expenditure (In Rs) table<>. <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. S. No |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Expenditure |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Amount(In Rs) | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Agriculture |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 2. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Manufacturing |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 3. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Livestock Rearing |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 4. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Food |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 5 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Mobile Repairing |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 6 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Repairs of Machines/Electronics |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 7 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Tailoring and Clothing |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 8 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Transportation |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 9 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Computer Related |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 10 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Beauty Parlour |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 11 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Saloon |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 12 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Other |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |

Q3. Unemployment Details

Q4. Access to financial Institutions

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Name |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Bank Account(Yes/No) |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Has he/she ever taken loan from bank? |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Amount |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Purpose |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Other sources of credit |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Amount |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Willing to take loan For Entrepreneurship |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Amount | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |

Q5. Assets:

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Household |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Yes/No |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Quantity |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Capital Assets |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Yes/No |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Quantity | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Fan |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Tractors |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. TV |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Thrashers |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Radio |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Tube well |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Sewing Machine |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Diesel Pump |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Clock |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Electric Pump |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Mobile |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Others |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Computer |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Bicycle |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Fridge |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Automobile |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Kitchen Items |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Furniture |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |

Q6. Market Access to services (in metres)?

SCHEDULE AT GRAM PANCHAYAT LEVEL

Village: /_____________________________/ Gram Panchayat: /__________________________/

Block: /_____________________________/ District: /_________________________________/

table<. <. |<.
p<>{color:#000;}. S No.

|<. p<>{color:#000;}. PART A: Village Details |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<. p<>{color:#000;}. Remark | <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}. 1. |<. p<>{color:#000;}. Area |<. p<>{color:#000;}. /_________/ |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}. 1 |<. p<>{color:#000;}. Number of villages in the Gram Panchayat |<. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<. p<>{color:#000;}. Population of village (approx.) |<. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<. p<>{color:#000;}. Number of households (approx.) |<. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}. 4 |<. p<>{color:#000;}. Proportion (%) of Scheduled Castes in population (approx.) |<. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}. 5 |<. p<>{color:#000;}. Proportion (%) of Scheduled Tribes in population (approx.) |<. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}. 6 |<. p<>{color:#000;}. Proportion (%) of Other Backward Class in population (approx.) |<. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<. p<>{color:#000;}. Proportion (%) of General in population (approx.) |<. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}. 7 |<. p<>{color:#000;}. Proportion (%) of landless households (approx.) |<. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}. 8 |<. p<>{color:#000;}. Number of BPL |<. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}. 9 |<. p<>{color:#000;}. Number of People Above 18 Age |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<. p<>{color:#000;}. Local Economic Activity |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}. 10 |<. p<>{color:#000;}. Is this village served by the following?

[$1 = Yes; 2 = No; 3 = Unclear]

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Public transport (buses/trains)

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Private buses

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Other private transport (e.g., shared Jeeps, Auto)

|<. p<>{color:#000;}.  

 

/________/

/________/

/________/ |<.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

| <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}. 11 |<. p<>{color:#000;}. How many of the following does these villages have?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Kirana (grocery) shop

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mobile phone recharge/repairing

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Car/motorbike mechanic

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Flour mill

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Electrician Shop

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Plumber

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Tailor

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Beauty Parlor

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Computer Shop

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mason

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Barber

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Institution

|<. p<>{color:#000;}.  

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/ |<.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

| <. |<. p<>{color:#000;}. 12 |<. p<>{color:#000;}. How far (in km) is the nearest market? |<. p<>{color:#000;}. /________/ |<. p<>{color:#000;}.   | Investigator’s name(s): /_______________________________________________________________/ p<>{color:#000;}.

TRADE

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Product |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Trade In(quantity in kg/litre) |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Trade Out (quantity in kg/litre) |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Nearest place for trade in |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Nearest place for trade out (market) | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |

RESOURCES

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Natural resources |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Yes |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. No |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Remarks | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Cultivable land |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Water Resources |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Minerals |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Wood |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |

NTFP Product

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Product |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Yes |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. No |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Remark | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Honey |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Herbs |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Fruits |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Jatropha |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Others |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |

SCHEDULE AT BLOCK LEVEL

Block: /_____________________________/ District: /__________________________/

Investigator’s name(s): /_______________________________________________________________/

Name of respondent: /_______________________________/ Date: /________________________/

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. S No.

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}. BLOCK DETAIL |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Remark | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 1. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Area |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. /_________/ |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 2 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Number of Gram Panchayat in the Block |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 3 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Population of Block (approx.) |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 4 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Number of households (approx.) |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 5 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Proportion (%) of Scheduled Castes in population (approx.) |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 6 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Proportion (%) of Scheduled Tribes in population (approx.) |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 7 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Proportion (%) of landless households (approx.) |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. /__________/ |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Local Economic Activity |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 9 |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. How many of the following does these Blocks have?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mobile phone recharge/repairing

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Car/motorbike mechanic

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Manufacturing Industries

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Electrician Shop

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Plumber

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Tailor

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Refrigeration

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Type writing

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Computer/television repairing

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}.  

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/

/________/ |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

|

TRADE

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Product |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Trade In(quantity in kg/litre) |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Trade Out (quantity in kg/litre) |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Nearest place for trade in |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Nearest place for trade out (market) | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |

RESOURCES

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Natural resources |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Yes |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. No |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Remarks | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Cultivable land |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Water Resources |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Minerals |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Firewood |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |

NTFP Product

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Product |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Yes |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. No |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Remark | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Honey |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Herbs |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Fruits |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Jatropha |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Others |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |

Existing Self Employed in the Block

table<>. <>. |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Name |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Age |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Occupation |<>.
p={color:#000;}. No Of Customer Daily |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Delivery Of Service

(in Km) |<>.
p={color:#000;}. No Of Worker in Enterprise |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Bank Account

(Yes/No) |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Bank Loan(Yes/No) |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Other Source Of Credit |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Purpose |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Want to take loan(Yes/No) |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Amount |<>.
p={color:#000;}. No of worker required |<>.
p={color:#000;}. Would you like to receive advanced training in the same field?

(yes/no) | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.   |

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Socio-Economic profiling and livelihood mapping of Rishabhdeo Block, Udaipur, Ra

The real India resides in its villages. Rural development is important for nation’s development and achievement of principles of socio-economic- political equity. Rural development implies raising the standard of living of rural masses. In the era of rising economic inequalities, regional disparities, conflicts and nation wide discontentment regarding what has been done in the name of development since independence, there is a huge need to study critically the institutions working for the upliftment of rural people, the policy for rural roads, agriculture, industries, women, children, education, credit, health etc. Also there should be zeal among the youth to study rural development as part of pedagogy in colleges, universities. The awareness regarding the rural life has to increased by doing field work and more research in issues pertaining to rural development.

  • Author: Uni Click
  • Published: 2016-09-27 14:05:21
  • Words: 10487
Socio-Economic profiling and livelihood mapping of Rishabhdeo Block, Udaipur, Ra Socio-Economic profiling and livelihood mapping of Rishabhdeo Block, Udaipur, Ra