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Prettier by the Plate: Nutrition for Natural Beauty

 

Prettier by the Plate

Nutrition for Natural Beauty

Jenny Yelle, MHNE

Disclaimer

The information and opinions expressed herein are intended for educational purposes only. Perusal of this information or related guides, notes, websites, conversations, or products does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, suggestions, treatment, or a call-to-action. The author/owner claims no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the information presented herein. Always consult your personal healthcare professional regarding any medical condition or before beginning any new dietary, supplement, or lifestyle regimen.

Copyright

Prettier by the Plate Nutrition for Natural Beauty

© 2017 Copyright Jenny Yelle and Au Naturale Nutrition

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

The information provided here can be saved in electronic or printed form for personal use only. No part of this eBook may be reproduced, copied, transmitted, or distributed in any form whatsoever, for any commercial or non-commercial purposes.

If you enjoyed this book, please encourage your friends to download their own copy at www.AuNaturaleNutrition.com. Thank you.

Table of Contents

Introduction

The Many Facets of Beauty

Outer Beauty

Inner Beauty

Natural Beauty

Prettier by the Plate

Whole Foods 101

Nutrition for Natural Beauty

Healthy Fats & Oils

Antioxidants

Fat-Soluble Vitamins

Complete Proteins

Minerals

Water

The Whole Pretty Picture

About the Author

Introduction

Hello, my lovelies!!

I want this little book and my website, Au Naturale Nutrition, to be the first source of information you think of when it comes to the relationship between nutrition and beauty. That is my mission statement. I like to think I bring some glamor to the realm of holistic health and nutrition. You may have noticed that my tag line is “Radiate Beautiful Health”. My wish is that everyone can feel beautiful, look beautiful, and live a beautiful, vibrant life. I believe the best approach to beauty is by harnessing the power of nutrient-rich whole foods and living a holistic lifestyle. I want you to positively glow from the inside out!

Frankly, I like feeling beautiful. While some may think that the pursuit of beauty is not important or purely superficial, I disagree. While some may value beauty more than others, I know we all can appreciate the beauty in nature, art, and music. It’s why you make your bed in the morning; it just makes you feel “put together” and ready to embrace the world. I also think we like to be happy about our own appearance when we look in the mirror; that it’s natural and normal. We all want to be attractive in some way to someone else (and also loved for who we are deep down).

Beauty is a multi-billion-dollar business. And that’s just for the products that either decorate or disguise you on the outside. I’ll be the first to admit that it’s fun and creative to play with different colors and styles. But, where the industry misses the mark is that true beauty stems from your inner health and well-being. If we first pursue to be the healthiest we can be, beauty will most assuredly be a happy consequence. I can personally testify that I have made many unwise food choices in the pursuit of my media-influenced definition of outer beauty, only to have them backfire and cause real health issues. I wish I had valued my health, considered the long-term effects of my choices, and possessed the right information about nutrition. I did learn this eventually, and now it’s my life’s passion. It is my hope that someone new will come across my work looking for beauty tips, but also learn about the amazing power that nutrition has on beauty and overall well-being. If you’ve come across my work because you feel your beauty is diminishing with age, let me guide you with nutrition. And bring your lipstick, too. ;-)

The Many Facets of Beauty

Beauty isn’t simple to define. Just like a brilliant diamond, it has many facets. When a person is characterized as “beautiful”, it’s often based on some combination of inner beauty (i.e. personality, intelligence, and charisma) and outer beauty (i.e. physical attractiveness). Natural beauty goes even deeper and is based on your health, vitality, and well-being.

Outer Beauty

Beauty appears differently across cultures, locales, and eras of time, and I encourage you to embrace that. We’re all very different and beauty is very individual. However, the common threads across all varying definitions of outer beauty include having facial symmetry, supple skin, lustrous hair, straight teeth, bright eyes, an hourglass figure in women (which implies fertility), a muscular body composition in men, and good posture.

Youthfulness is also a common trait in physical attractiveness. However, we can feel youthful (or not) at any age. Beauty can be absolutely timeless. We will all get older – if we’re lucky. Aging gracefully is the goal.

Sometimes our ideas of outer beauty can be unhealthy when they morph into the vanity type of beauty (style without substance). Or the kind that compares you to a ridiculous standard perpetuated by the media or advertising. This usually involves judgment or perfectionism. What’s missing here is self-love and individuality.

The food and lifestyle choices you have made thus far, whether healthy or unhealthy, are reflected in your body and noticeable on your skin. They may be “written all over your face” or have given you a “muffin top” belly. Going forward, you can make healthy choices that manifest in real visible improvements, plus help you avoid accelerated aging and modern-day diseases.

Inner Beauty

Inner beauty reflects who you really are beyond the physical. It reveals what’s in your soul. It’s the basis of true friendships and love. It’s how you’ll be remembered no matter how pretty you looked. Are you kind? Cheerful? Compassionate? Generous? Honest? How you choose to behave, interact with others, and react to life can either support or hinder your inner beauty.

Outer beauty and inner beauty are intricately connected. The thoughts you think and your attitudes and emotions have the power to change your gene expression, affect your health, and eventually be reflected on the outside. So, without inner beauty, outer beauty is fleeting. The expression “being ugly”, which is used in the southern US to describe someone who is acting rude or unkind, is very, very fitting.

Natural Beauty

Natural beauty includes having outer and inner beauty, but a whole lot more. It’s a total lifestyle supportive of health and well-being. It means controlling chronic stress, and getting plenty of sunshine, exercise, and sleep. Fun and laughter are required. It means having deep connections with others and with God and nature. It means pursuing your dreams and putting your best foot forward. It means nourishing your body with food to thrive. Natural beauty is a holistic concept that supports your physical, mental, and spiritual health on the inside – and it unmistakably shows on the outside, too.

This book is designed to help you feel abundantly healthy, appear nourished, burst with energy, feel grounded in yourself, and radiate a confident, positive attitude. That’s my definition of natural beauty. It’s about caring for your body so it will take care of you in return.

Prettier by the Plate

This is a simple nutrition concept: what nourishes your body to help it be healthy within will also be evident in your outward appearance. When your body is nourished and healthy, homeostasis is evident. This means you are balanced and feel radiant, strong, resilient, and can enjoy life the way you want to. For example, it shows up as balance in your various hormones, weight distribution, and body composition. Nourishment also shows in your energy levels, brain chemistry, and mental and emotional well-being. You will look and feel youthful for your age. It will be evident in your skin, hair, nails, teeth, and eyes if your body is detoxifying properly, if your body is utilizing ample nutrients, and if your digestion is good. The condition of your skin, especially, is a great reflection of the health of your body and is the outward manifestation of how well you are aging on the inside.

The opposite is also true when your diet is unhealthy. Poor nutrition and unhealthy lifestyle practices cause inflammation, oxidation, nutritional deficiencies, acidity, unstable blood sugar, weight issues, depleted enzymes, mental issues, hampered digestion, hormone imbalance, toxin overload, and chronic stress. These will rob your body of health, energy, vitality, and beauty. They cause the progression of disease, accelerate aging and wrinkles, and make you feel far less than pretty.

Whole Foods 101

The foods that are the best for natural beauty are whole foods. They are the simple, complete foods that are found in nature. They are nourishing foods because they’re full of very important nutrients in proper proportions as nature intended. These whole foods contain vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, amino acids, fatty acids, antioxidants, and enzymes that are necessary for optimum nutrition. The nutrients work in synergy, helping each other in complex ways to nourish you.

A diet that fosters health and beauty should include a bountiful supply of vegetables and fruits, fresh spices and herbs, unrefined sea salt, raw/sprouted nuts and seeds, starchy tubers, healthy fats, pastured eggs, grass-fed meats, raw dairy, wild-caught fish, free-range pork and poultry, fermented foods, and organ meats.

In contrast, refined, over-processed foods will rob your body of its health, youth, and beauty. They have had the nutrients mechanically or chemically removed and have little or no nutritional value. Unfortunately, they are also quite common in the standard American diet. Refined foods can actually be a negative energy source in your body because your body has to use its stored nutrients to process the junk ingredients.

To be healthy and feel pretty, food toxins should be avoided. These include chemical additives, preservatives, herbicides, pesticides, artificial sweeteners, flavorings and colorings, irradiated foods, and genetically modified foods (GMOs). In the holistic nutrition world, these are often called “economic poisons”. Refined sugars, refined and gluten-containing grains, conventional dairy, most legumes, and industrial “vegetable” oils should also be eliminated because they are inflammatory for many reasons and deplete your health.

The transition to a healthier diet doesn’t have to be stressful. The first step is to completely remove and permanently eliminate the zero-nutrient-density foods from your diet (margarine, for example). Next, you develop new habits by making creative and more nutrient-dense food substitutions (mineral water replaces soda pop, for example.) In the third phase, you enjoy shopping for and cooking whole foods, and you have a real appreciation for how much they nourish your body. By phase four, you’re a health rockstar! It involves fine tuning your diet plan every day with small touches for continuous improvement.

And I’ll bet you’ll feel more beautiful, too!

Nutrition for Natural Beauty

To become “prettier by the plate”, you need to eat a wide variety of foods and a rainbow of colors. This will hopefully provide your body many types of necessary nutrients. So, even though this section discusses many single nutrients that specifically enhance your natural beauty, they are intended to be obtained as a part of a comprehensive whole-food diet. No one nutrient or type of food is meant to be isolated out – they are all important.

Open your world to the abundance of real, nourishing foods!

Healthy Fats & Oils

If there is only one thing you do to improve your diet, getting your fats right should be priority number one. They make you pretty inside and out. Every cell in the human body has a lipid (fat) layer around it, and the structural integrity of that membrane is dependent upon the quality of the fats you eat. So, as far as fats go, the saying “you are what you eat”, has never been so important.

The benefits of healthy fats are numerous. Good fats are a wonderful source of long-burning fuel for your muscles, particularly the heart. Your brain is mostly fat; it keeps your thinking clear and puts you in a good mood. Fats help regulate healthy hormone levels. They allow you to absorb nutrients from food, especially vitamins A, D, E, and K. Fats are important for maintaining healthy blood lipid levels and for healthy liver and gallbladder function. Healthy fats make your complexion glow. Without them, your skin would be as arid and cracked as the Sahara Desert. Fats keep you feeling full after a meal. Eating healthy fats will not make you fat – just more beautiful!

Saturated fats are skin superfoods because their chemical bonds are very stable and they aren’t prone to oxidation (cellular damage). They can help prevent wrinkles, dryness, and sagging skin. The saturated fats to enjoy in cooking include butter, ghee, tallow and suet from grass-fed beef and lamb, lard from pigs, chicken, goose and duck fat, coconut oil, and palm oil.

Omega-3 fats are a type of fats known for their incredible ability to fight inflammation. However, your body cannot make these, so they are considered “essential” and must be obtained from food sources. Increasing Omega-3 fats, especially in place of Omega-6 fats, is very healthy for the skin, too. Omega-3 fats are quite abundant in cold water fatty fish such as sardines and salmon. They are also found in grass-fed and pasture-raised meats, egg yolks, algae, nuts, and seeds such as chia and flax.

Omega-9 fats are relatively stable, like the saturated fats, and good for use in cooking at low temperatures. The most common is olive oil, as well as the oils from macadamias, almonds, pecans, cashews, peanuts, and avocados.

The fats to avoid completely are those that contain mostly Omega-6 fats. They are very unstable and extremely likely to become oxidized (rancid). They are highly processed and a recipe for inflammation and loss of natural beauty. Stay away from safflower oil, canola/rapeseed oil, margarine, sunflower oil, corn oil, vegetable oil, vegetable shortening, soybean oil, grapeseed oil, cottonseed oil, and any fake butter or vegetable oil products. If you have any in your house, throw them away now. And be very wary of restaurant foods – most of them are cooked in these beauty-stealing oils.

Antioxidants

You’ve seen rust on a car or an old nail, right? That’s a chemical reaction called oxidation; and it can happen inside your body and your skin, too. It’s one of the main reasons why your body ages. Oxidation is due to lifestyle and environmental factors such as pollution, pesticides, ionizing radiation, alcohol intake, smoking, poor nutrition, obesity, and sun exposure – and many of these are under your control.

Antioxidants thwart oxidation. A diet rich in antioxidants will help protect and stabilize your cell membranes and thereby prevent cellular and tissue damage. These nutrient powerhouses have the ability to counteract many disease processes, combat stress, and slow aging. Antioxidants also protect your skin from sun damage and wrinkles.

Plant foods are very high in antioxidants. These antioxidants are the thousands of phytonutrients responsible for the color, taste, smell, and unique characteristics of plants. A rainbow of natural colors at every meal is a great sign of a healthy, antioxidant-rich diet that will nourish you and protect your skin. Yet another way you can become prettier by the plate!

Spices and herbs are the most potent antioxidant foods. They are ultra-concentrated sources of phytonutrients. For example, curcumin, a component of the spice turmeric, is often touted as “nature’s ibuprofen.” It has many antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antifungal properties. In addition, it’s also known to inhibit collagenase and elastase, the infamous enzymes that break down the skin’s collagen and elastin structure and consequently cause sagging and wrinkles.

Berries, fruits, nuts, seeds, sprouts, dark chocolate (YES!!!), and vegetables from the land and sea are additional common foods that get an A+ for their high antioxidant values. The beverages including green and herbal teas, red wine, coffee, fruit nectars, and fresh juices receive honorable mention, too.

A high-quality green powder is a good way to supplement with antioxidants, but whole foods should come first.

Vitamin C is probably the most well-known antioxidant. It is a water soluble vitamin found in many plants. Higher vitamin C intakes are associated with less wrinkles and skin dryness. Vitamin C also plays a very crucial role in the building and regulation of collagen (the framework of your skin). It has a very important role in wound healing, too, which is important because skin becomes much more thin and fragile with age. The best plant sources of vitamin C include bell peppers, guava, dark leafy greens, broccoli, brussels sprouts, kiwi, citrus fruits, and strawberries. Fresh herbs such as cilantro, chives, thyme, basil, and parsley are also high in vitamin C. The best vitamin C supplements are from plant sources like berries, not synthetic.

Did you notice that the plant foods that are the healthiest, most colorful, and highest in antioxidants are also naturally low in sugar and high in fiber? They’re the healthy carbohydrates! Refined carbs and starches, on the other hand, are usually beige in color and have no nutritional value – think bagels, pasta, cereal, donuts, chips, etc. They are high-glycemic and cause blood sugar dysregulation, which is a major player in weight issues, chronic diseases, and in the aging of the skin.

Fat-Soluble Vitamins

The fat-soluble vitamins include the vitamins A, D, E and K, which are found in the lipid components of both plant and animal foods. They are all antioxidants, too, and can be stored in the body’s tissues for future use.

Vitamin A stimulates the growth and integrity of your skin cells. Rough, dry skin is a common sign of vitamin A deficiency. Preformed vitamin A (the active form) comes from animal sources. It is found in liver, fish liver oil, kidney, egg yolks, and full-fat milk products like butter. Beta-carotene is the precursor of vitamin A found mostly in yellow, orange, and green vegetables. It is considered less preferable because it needs to be converted to vitamin A.

Vitamin D is known as the “sunshine vitamin” because it is manufactured in your skin when in direct contact with the sun’s ultraviolet rays. It acts like a hormone in your body. There are numerous benefits to vitamin D, including making strong bones and teeth, strengthening the immune system, plus decreasing cancer, heart disease, the flu, infections, seasonal affective disorder, depression, lethargy, and aches and pains. While the sun is the best source of vitamin D, it occurs naturally in some foods including salmon, sardines, mackerel, herring, egg yolks, butter, and liver. Plant foods like mushrooms and dark leafy greens have lesser amounts.

A quality cod liver oil supplement is considered a food, which provides a natural balance of vitamin A and vitamin D. It is also a good way to get in more anti-inflammatory Omega-3 fats.

Vitamin K2 tells the body to put calcium where it belongs, like into your bones and teeth instead of your arteries. It also prevents calcium from being deposited in your skin’s elastin fibers; keeping them from hardening and causing saggy wrinkles. Butter and other high-fat dairy products from grass-fed cows are the best sources of vitamin K2.

Vitamin E is the most abundant fat-soluble antioxidant found in the skin. It is a light yellow oil that keeps your body youthful by stabilizing the cell membranes and protecting the tissues most sensitive to oxidation, including your skin. It’s secreted on the skin’s surface through the sebum, an oily substance that coats the epidermis. Vitamin E is most plentiful from plant sources, especially in the oil from grains, seeds, and nuts (and fortunately where high levels of oxidative fats are found.) Whole food sources of vitamin E include spinach, turnip greens, chard, sunflower seeds, almonds, bell peppers, asparagus, collards, kale, broccoli, and brussels sprouts.

Complete Proteins

Protein is what makes up the structural components of your body, including the cells, blood, muscles, organs, skin, and even bone. The protein you eat gets broken down during digestion into individual amino acids. The amino acids are then re-assembled as parts of a new protein structure in your body. Once again, here’s a great example of how “you are what you eat”. So, the quality of your protein matters. The most nutrient-rich sources of protein are eggs, meats, nuts and seeds, seafood, legumes, and grass-fed dairy.

There are 22 amino acids, but 8 are considered “essential” (your body cannot make these on its own). Animal sources contain all 8. Plant sources contain some, but must be combined strategically to obtain all 8 essential amino acids. So, contrary to popular belief, beans as a protein source are second-rate. Having a healthy body and robust skin is dependent on eating complete proteins from animal products. Older adults with low protein intakes and vegetarians have more fragile skin and more wrinkles.

Meats from healthy, grass-fed animals are high in many nutrients, including easily absorbable iron, essential and non-essential fats, zinc, calcium, selenium, vitamin A, and many B vitamins – especially B12. But, as well as eating the muscle meats, you should consider adding in more organ meats into your diet, like liver, heart, and kidney. Organ meats are the most concentrated, densely packed food source of vitamins, minerals, and healthy fats. Ideally, you should enjoy them twice a week. If you can’t stomach liver, it comes in a desiccated (dried) form in capsules.

The main connective tissue protein in your body is collagen (there are at least 16 different types). In addition to your skin, collagen is in your eyes, heart, ligaments, tendons, and blood vessels. A healthy way to improve collagen status in your body is to add gelatin into your diet in the form of gelatin-rich bone broth used in soups, stews, and sauces. Beyond improving skin quality, it is well known for improving digestion and arthritis. Gelatin/collagen also comes in powdered supplement form.

Minerals

Minerals are elements that come from the earth’s soil and water. They are often overlooked, however, minerals are absolutely necessary for a healthy body and to maintain youthful, vibrant skin. They are needed for both pH and electrolyte balance, proper nerve conduction, the movement of muscles, and enzyme function.

Magnesium is a mineral that’s necessary for over 300 biochemical reactions in your body. Unfortunately, most Americans are deficient in it. And you can’t be healthy (or very pretty) without it. Magnesium is particularly crucial for maintaining normal muscle and nerve functions; it keeps your heart rhythm steady and promotes normal blood pressure. Magnesium also supports a healthy immune system, keeps bones and teeth strong, helps to regulate blood sugar levels, and is involved in energy metabolism and protein synthesis. It promotes restful sleep, muscle relaxation, and helps calm anxiety. Magnesium is also required to make hundreds of your enzymes work. If farm soils are well-mineralized, then leafy green vegetables, seeds, tree nuts, and whole grains are fairly good sources of magnesium. Real, unrefined sea salt is a nice source of magnesium and many other trace minerals. Kelp and sea vegetables are great sources, too. Magnesium supplements are often needed for adequate levels. Magnesium glycinate is highly absorbable in pill form. Epsom salt baths and magnesium oils for the skin are excellent options, too.

Zinc is necessary for the body to use vitamin A. It is also necessary for DNA repair. In the skin, it improves wound healing. Organ meats and muscle meats have the highest amounts. Pumpkin seeds and other nuts can also be high in zinc as well.

Selenium works in synergy with vitamin E to forestall aging by helping to retain youthful elasticity in body tissues. Brazil nuts are especially high in selenium. Animal sources of selenium include liver, butter, eggs, most fish (especially salmon, snapper, and halibut), seafood, and lamb.

Silica is a trace mineral that is necessary for collagen health. It also helps produce the water-containing components of the skin that keep it plump, such as hyaluronic acid. Food sources of silica include leeks, green beans, garbanzo beans, strawberries, cucumber, mango, celery, asparagus, and rhubarb.

Sulfur also significantly affects the production of collagen in the skin. It is also required for the synthesis of glutathione, one of the most important antioxidants your body produces for itself. Sulfur is found in animal foods such as egg yolks, meat, poultry, and fish. Plant foods include garlic, onions, brussels sprouts, and asparagus. Sulforaphane is a sulfur compound found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, bok choy, garden cress, cauliflower, and some dark leafy greens.

A food known to be high in minerals is maca root (a vegetable similar to a radish). This nutritional dynamo contains the minerals iron, magnesium, iodine, copper, zinc, sodium, potassium, and calcium. It also has vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, C, and D, 20 free fatty acids, and unique compounds called macaenes and macamides . It is 13-16% protein (including 19 amino acids) and 8.5% fiber. Maca is one of only a handful of foods considered to be an "adaptogen" and is able to support and rejuvenate overwhelmed, tired adrenal glands and other aspects of the hormonal system. Maca has maintained a reputation for boosting energy, supporting athletic performance, increasing libido, balancing hormones, elevating mood and mental clarity, improving blood circulation, stimulating thyroid function, and enhancing skin tone. Maca is usually taken as a supplement in dried, powdered form.

Water

Water isn’t a nutrient in itself, but it deserves special recognition because it’s the most healing substance on the planet. Water is the primary component in all the bodily fluids and involved in nearly every bodily function, so it’s absolutely necessary for good health and natural beauty. It allows nutrients and electrolytes to flow throughout your body and promotes proper elimination of toxins. It’s needed for energy and clear thinking. Hydration is vital to have supple, plump skin. Lack of adequate hydration has been linked to many chronic diseases, too.

On average, an adult requires about 12 cups worth of water per day, some of which can come from the food you consume. Physical activity level, body size, diet, climate, and diuretics all impact the amount of water needed.

Clean water, directly from a spring or well, can be rich in many lovely minerals. Unfortunately, tap water is commonly contaminated with harmful chemicals such as chlorine and fluoride. It’s best to treat it with a carbon filter.

The Whole Pretty Picture

Hello again, my lovelies! Are you feeling prettier yet? Was this little book what you expected? I hope you learned a lot and enjoyed it.

Hairstyles, makeup, and fashion are definitely fun and glamorous on the surface, but that’s not where beauty begins. True beauty starts from deep within and it is multifaceted. Your natural beauty is intricately tied to your health and well-being. And your skin is a good window of what’s going on inside.

Neither nutrition nor beauty has to be complicated if you simply eat many types of nutritious whole foods. That’s how to become “prettier by the plate”. Focus on your health by eating a nutrient-rich diet, doing exercise you enjoy, avoiding stress, and getting plenty of sunshine and sleep. A holistic, healthy lifestyle and natural beauty go hand in hand – at every age. Love, Jenny

References & More Info:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Make a Fresh Start with Whole Foods (transition to a healthy diet)

[+ http://www.aunaturalenutrition.com/make-a-fresh-start-with-whole-foods-free-e-book.html+]

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p<>{color:#000;}. Jenny’s Favorites (where to buy supplements)

http://www.aunaturalenutrition.com/jennys-favorites.html

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p<>{color:#000;}. Maca Root: Miraculous for Many Reasons!

[+ http://www.aunaturalenutrition.com/articles/maca-root-miraculous-for-many-reasons-energy-libido-skin-stress-and-hormones+]

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p<>{color:#000;}. Health & Nutrition 101

[+ http://www.aunaturalenutrition.com/articles/health-nutrition-101-for-smarties-why-your-food-choices-matter+]

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p<>{color:#000;}. The Au Naturale Nutrition Guide to Choosing Fats & Oils

http://www.aunaturalenutrition.com/articles/3

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p<>{color:#000;}. The Au Naturale Nutrition Guide to Carbs

[+ http://www.aunaturalenutrition.com/articles/the-au-naturale-nutrition-guide-to-carbs+]

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p<>{color:#000;}. The Au Naturale Nutrition Guide to Healthy Meats and Seafood

[+ http://www.aunaturalenutrition.com/articles/guide-to-choosing-meats-and-seafood+]

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p<>{color:#000;}. Be Beautiful with Antioxidants

[+ http://www.aunaturalenutrition.com/articles/be-beautiful-with-antioxidants+]

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p<>{color:#000;}. Bone Broth Makes You Beautiful! (recipe)

[+ http://www.aunaturalenutrition.com/articles/bone-broth-makes-you-beautiful+]

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p<>{color:#000;}. Nourishing Traditions book by Sally Fallon

http://nourishingtraditions.com/

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p<>{color:#000;}. The Weston A. Price Foundation

http://www.westonaprice.org/

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p<>{color:#000;}. Magnificent Magnesium

[+ http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/abcs-of-nutrition/magnificent-magnesium/+]

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p<>{color:#000;}. Nutrition for Healthy Skin series

[+ https://chriskresser.com/nutrition-for-healthy-skin-silica-niacin-vitamin-k2-and-probiotics/+]

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p<>{color:#000;}. Everything Vitamin C!

http://www.aunaturalenutrition.com/articles/everything-vitamin-c

About the Author

Jenny Yelle, MHNE, is a Holistic Wellness Educator with a master’s degree in Health and Nutrition Education from Hawthorn University. Jenny brings glamor to holistic wellness and believes in taking a nutritional approach to beauty and aging gracefully. Her wish is that everyone can feel and look beautiful, and live a beautiful, vibrant life; simply by using the power of nutrient-rich foods and living a natural lifestyle. Radiating Beautiful Health!

Jenny is also the founder of the popular website Au Naturale Nutrition, where she shares her delicious whole-food recipes and healthy living articles. Jenny lives in the Nashville, TN, area with her husband. Together they have raised two children. Jenny enjoys yoga, community volunteer work, and is an avid tennis player.

Website: http://www.aunaturalenutrition.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuNaturaleNutrition

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/aunatnutrition/

Instagram: https://instagram.com/aunaturalenutrition/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/AuNaturaleNut

 


Prettier by the Plate: Nutrition for Natural Beauty

Real beauty is synonymous with the appearance of vitality, nourishment, and health. In Prettier by the Plate, you will learn all about the connection between your diet and beauty. Special attention is paid the condition and health of your body and how it relates to your skin. You will understand how to use foods to age gracefully, which foods and nutrients are best for boosting your natural beauty, which supplements are worth a try, and the differences between outer, inner, and natural beauty. True beauty is achieved when you feel abundantly healthy, burst with energy, feel grounded in yourself, and radiate a positive attitude; all by using the power of nutrient-rich whole foods and living a holistic lifestyle. ​It naturally shows on the outside, too. Your whole body, including your skin, hair, nails, teeth, and eyes are a reflection of how healthy you are on the inside. ​This book is a great resource for holistic nutrition, plus you'll learn how to become prettier - plate by plate!

  • ISBN: 9781370497393
  • Author: Jenny Yelle, MS
  • Published: 2017-04-18 00:05:20
  • Words: 4765
Prettier by the Plate: Nutrition for Natural Beauty Prettier by the Plate: Nutrition for Natural Beauty