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Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook-60 Quick, Easy, and Healthy Pressure Cooker Re

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Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook

60 Quick, Easy, and Healthy Pressure Cooker Recipes for Electric Pressure Cookers

Vanessa Olsen

© Copyright 2016 by Vanessa Olsen- All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1 – What Is Pressure Cooking?

Chapter 2 – The Benefits of Pressure Cooking

Chapter 3 – Electric Pressure Cooker Basics

Chapter 4 – How to (Safely) Use an Electric Pressure Cooker

Chapter 5 – How to Maintain an Electric Pressure Cooker

Chapter 6 – Breakfast

—Coconut Oats

—Red Quinoa + Brown Rice Breakfast Cereal

—Cheesy Grits w/ Ham

—Apple-Cranberry Risotto

—Crustless Quiche

—Tortilla Breakfast Casserole

—Sweet Potato + Sausage Hash

—Apple-Maple Oatmeal

—Sausage Gravy

—Chestnut Spread

—Amaranth Porridge w/ Banana

—Hot Barley Cereal w/ Fresh Raspberries

Chapter 7 – Beef + Pork

—Deli-Style Brisket

—Jalapeno Meatballs

—Top Round w/ Potatoes, Bacon, and Bourbon

—Beef Stew w/ Carrots and Figs

—Sesame Short Ribs w/ Brown Sugar and Peanut Butter

—Pulled Pork w/ Dried Fruit

—Thick-Cut Pork Chops w/ Dill and Carrots

—Pork Ribs w/ Honey + Ginger Beer

—Pork Loin w/ Red Onions and Apples

—Pineapple-Pork Taco Meat

Chapter 8 – Poultry

—Chicken Ragu

—Bacon-Wrapped Drumsticks

—Southwestern Chicken Ziti

—Honey-Lemon Chicken

—Turkey Sausage + Rice Casserole

—Turkey Breast w/ Fennel, Sage, and Prosecco

—Turkey Thighs w/ Sage, Maple Syrup, and Parsnips

—Turkey Stew w/ Thyme and Apples

—Sour Cherry-Duck w/ Port Wine

—Ginger-Spiced Duck w/ Dried Apples

—Duck w/ Blackberry Jam and Brandy

Chapter 9 – Soups + Sides

—Coconut Chicken Soup

—Carrot-Ginger Soup

—Chicken + Lime Soup

—Shrimp Bisque

—Pinto Beans w/ Chile, Bacon, + Pecans

—Lemony Risotto w/ Peas

—Spicy Cauliflower Citrus Salad

—Buttery Cabbage w/ Bacon

—Lemoned Broccoli

—Curried Red Kidney Beans

Chapter 10 – Vegan

—Vegetable Ragu

—Lentil Sloppy Joe’s

—Ratatouille

—Eggplant + Potato Stew

—Collard Green Wraps w/ Farro + Black-Eyed Peas

—Zucchini Pesto

—Mushroom + Barley Soup

—Warm Red Potato + Green Bean Salad

—Brussels Sprouts in a Maple-Mustard Sauce

—Smashed Sweet Potatoes w/ Ginger and Pineapple

[+ Chapter 11- Desserts +]

—White Chocolate Lemon Pudding

—Classic Rice Pudding

—Cinnamon-Raisin Bread Pudding

—Chocolate-Espresso Pudding

—Cherry-Almond Pudding Cake

—Maple Cheesecake w/ a Gingersnap Crust

—Dried Figs in White Wine Syrup

Epilogue

Index 1 – Converting Slow-Cooker Recipes to Pressure Cookers

[+ Index 2- Time Charts For Electric Pressure/Stove Top Cookers +]

Please go to happyhealthycookingonline.com to avail these 4 eBooks for FREE.

[] Introduction

In today’s world, healthy and easy cooking is a rare thing to find. It’s just so easy to find food outside of our own kitchens, like at drive- thru`s, restaurants, and in packages at the grocery store. Combine that with the fact that the American work ethic has spiraled out of control to the point where we’re so busy, we can’t even find time to properly feed ourselves and our families. The results of bad eating include low energy, obesity, heart problems, risk of serious illnesses, insomnia, and just general unhappiness. What’s the solution? Cooking with an electric pressure cooker.

Electric pressure cookers are one of the few kitchen appliances anyone can benefit from. Even if you aren’t a great cook, you can whip up fantastic meals by just tossing ingredients in the cooker and closing the lid. The pressure cooker does all of the work for you and can make even tough cuts of meat mouth-watering and delicious. The other major benefit is that pressure cooking preserves nearly all of an ingredient’s nutritional value. This is especially important when it comes to food like vegetables, which frequently lose nearly all of their nutrition through cooking methods like microwaving or even steaming.

This book will provide you with more information about the many benefits of owning an electric pressure cooker, as well as how to properly use one and keep it clean. Once you have a better handle on the basics, you are ready to tackle any of the 60 recipes covering breakfast, beef, pork, chicken, turkey, vegan food, soups, side dishes, and dessert. I’ve done my best to choose simple recipes without any unusual and hard-to-find ingredients, so those with a budget in mind won’t have a problem with any of the dishes. Happy (pressure) cooking!

[] Chapter 1 – What Is Pressure Cooking?

Before you start diving into some recipes for your pressure cooker, it’s worth it to learn a bit about what pressure cooking actually is and where it started. The first pressure cooker was invented in 1679 by a French physicist, Denis Papin, who wanted to create a cooking vessel that cooked food quickly and could reach temperatures hot enough to turn bone into jelly. His intent was to provide people who couldn’t afford much meat with an appliance that would turn tough, but cheap cuts meat into nutritious eating. Papin called it the “bone digester,” which sounds like a fantastic name for a professional wrestler. Papin was relatively successful, earning a spot in the Royal Society of London after serving the king a meal made with his invention.

But his cooker wasn’t widely-used because it was large and expensive. It would be centuries before his original dream to help the poor would be fulfilled.

Other pressure cooker variations popped up over the next few centuries, many making adjustments to Papin’s first design to prevent explosions. One version was the pressure canner, which was developed in France in 1795. Napoleon Bonaparte’s army needed food supplies that could be carried without refrigeration, and offered 12,000 francs for an invention. A confectioner, Nicolas Appert, finally came up with a winning canning process in 1810, where he packed food into glass jars and boiled them to seal in the freshness. With the award money, he opened the first commercial cannery in the world. He patented his method and also released a book on his methods, which is considered the first cookbook on modern food preservation. Another Frenchman, received a patent for employing Appert’s method using tin cans. Pressure canners and pressure cookers were manufactured and used hand-in-hand and were virtually indistinguishable from each other, until the mid 20th-century.

In 1939, the first incarnation of the pressure cooker we know today was shown at the World’s Fair. The company that created the cooker was called Northwestern Steel and Iron Works, which originally made 50-gallon pressure canners. When it was determined that the only way to preserve low-acid food was to can it, the company’s sales skyrocketed, and they changed their name to the National Pressure Cooker Company. Considering their expertise and status as the largest manufacturer of pressure canners in the world, it makes sense that they created the first-ever saucepan-style pressure cooker. Until that time, all pressure cookers were very large, about the same size as pressure canners, so this was the first appearance of a more convenient cooker for stove top use. The cooker was called “Presto,” and it did so well that the company changed their name for a third time to become synonymous with their most popular product.

The Presto cooker became very popular during the Great Depression in the United States. Money and resources were scarce for just about everyone, and the pressure cooker allowed people to draw out every bit of nutrition from the worst cuts of meat and saddest vegetables. It also allowed people to can their own food for the future, so they wouldn’t have to worry about reliable refrigeration. Other companies besides Presto jumped on board and began creating their own pressure cooker models with more safety features, pressure settings, and easier handling.

During World War II, pressure cooker sales lagged somewhat, because much of the aluminum needed to make cookers was going to the war effort. People still wanted pressure cookers however, so the War Production Board set aside specific rations of steel for making cookers. This philosophy of being as economical as possible and canning home-grown food fit right into the concept of urban Victory Gardens. While pressure canning with cookers had been going on for decades in more rural areas, World WWII was really the first time urban gardening and food preservation had been encouraged so intently. Canning became political, and if you wanted to be a good American, you would learn how to can food. In 1942, 66,000 pressure cookers were sold, and in the next year, that number leapt to 315,000.

After the war, dozens of new manufacturers jumped into the pressure-cooker game and began selling poorly-made cookers to make some cash. The consequence was that by the 1950’s, pressure cookers had a bad reputation for being dangerous. Also, the era of processed and fast-food had begun. Companies had begun extensive experiments with artificial preservatives and ingredients to create food for soldiers, and once they were back home, all those lab results were released into the general public. The healthy, natural eating of old were replaced by TV dinners, artificial colors, and far-out expiration dates.

All but the best pressure-cooker manufacturers gave up on pressure cookers. This was actually a good thing, because it removed dangerous, poorly-designed cookers from the market. As a concept, the pressure cooker never lost its customer base, especially in Europe and Asia. This is why a lot of recipes for pressure cookers have strong ties to India, Japan, and the Middle East. Even today, pressure cookers are often the most-used appliance in an Indian kitchen, where you might likely find a wide selection of pressure cookers intended for different kinds of meals. In India, pressure cookers have a very simple design and even the large ones are made from lightweight stainless steel. What really separates Indian pressure cookers from ones in the US, however, is the whistle. Indian pressure-cooker recipes often measure time in whistles. For example, you know the cooker has reached full pressure when it emits a sharp whistle, like with a tea kettle. After that, you rely on whistles every 5-6 minutes, so a recipe that says the time is “three whistles” is about 15 minutes. However, every cooker is different, and whistles are often unreliable, so Indian manufacturers are adopting more timers.

Since we are constantly learning about the impact of processed food, more and more people are returning to the pressure cooker. Because of the nutrition benefits of pressure cooking, which we will discuss at more length in the next chapter, pressure cookers have become increasingly popular as more people embrace the concepts of clean eating and veganism in an attempt to eliminate or at least avoid processed, packaged meals. Pressure cookers also tend to rise in popularity when the economy is doing poorly.

So, how does a pressure cooker work?

The secret to how pressure cookers work can be found in the form of the airtight seal on the pressure cooker lid. This seal prevents steam from escaping like it does in a regular pot. The trapped steam allows pressure to build inside the container. This increase in pressure actually raises the boiling point of water, which is usually 212-degrees Fahrenheit. You aren’t able to get water any hotter than that by non-pressure cooker means, because once water is boiling, it can’t get hotter than boiling. However, in a stove top pressure cooker, water can reach a temperature of 250-degrees F. With a higher boiling point, food cooks faster.

Useful Tip:

For those who live at higher altitudes, water boils at a lower temperature, because the atmospheric pressure is lower. For example, in Denver, Colorado, which has an elevation of about 1-mile, water boils at 203-degrees. For every 1000 feet above 2000-feet elevation (sea level is 0-feet), you have to increase the cooking time by 5%.

The “power” of a pressure cooker is measured in PSI, which stands for pounds per square inch. For that 250-degree boiling point, the PSI on most stove top pressure cookers is 15, while electric pressure cookers usually have a max range between 10-12 PSI, which is 239-245 degrees F. Most pressure cooker recipes have you choose from either “low” or “high” pressure. Low pressure is anywhere from 6-8 PSI while high pressure is 10-15 PSI, depending on the maximum PSI of your particular cooker. Some cookers also have “medium” pressure, but most recipes require low or high.

[] Chapter 2 – The Benefits of Pressure Cooking

Now that you know more about what pressure cooking is and its evolution through the centuries, how does it stack up compared to other cooking methods, like baking, slow-cooking, or steaming? How about any disadvantages compared to the stove top version? You’ll be happy to know pressure cooking with an electric cooker is one of the best ways to cook just about anything for four main reasons:

1. Energy-efficient

First off, using a pressure cooker is a lot more energy efficient than other cooking methods, like multiple burners, the oven, and slow cookers. A lot of that has to do with its speed, so even though you’re still using electricity, you’re using it for a significantly shorter time than when you use a slow cooker.

2. Time-saving

That pressure-cooker speed saves a lot of time in the kitchen. Instead of hours and hours, even longer-cooking meals usually take a max of an hour or so. Meals like short ribs and simmering soups get done in half the time compared to the oven or stove, so you spend more time eating and hanging out with your family than you do cooking. This allows you to prepare home-cooked meals even if you have long work days and usually rely on takeout and other fast food. Not having much time is not a problem when it comes to pressure-cooking.

3. More nutritious meals

A pressure cooker’s effect on meal ingredients is arguably its greatest benefit. As foods cook, their nutrition gradually seeps out into the cooking water. The longer something cooks, the more nutrients are lost. Unless you ingest that water with your meal, which would be gross for most ingredients, all those nutrition just gets thrown away. Because pressure cookers are so fast, there is less time for food to give up their nutrients, so more vitamins and minerals are retained.

Pressure cooking is actually the best method in terms of nutrition retention. Vegetables like broccoli can hold onto up to 80% of their nutritional value with pressure cooking, which is quite a bit more than the next best method, which is steaming. Pressure cooking also makes commonly-troublesome ingredients like beans, lentils, and certain grains more digestible, so if you’re sensitive, you can eat more of those foods without problems.

4. Versatile

As you will see in the recipe portion of this book, you can cook anything from steel-cut oats to pork loin to cheesecake in a pressure cooker. Pressure cookers are extremely versatile, and with the right accessories (steamer baskets, a trivet, etc.), you could make all your meals and sides using just that one piece of equipment if you really wanted to.

You can also preserve small amounts of food like jam and jellies in a pressure cooker, though if you want to preserve larger quantities and more types of food, you’d have to use a pressure canner. As a note, this cookbook doesn’t cover food preservation.

Who benefits most?

There are lots of people who benefit from a pressure cooker’s speed, nutritious results, and versatility. If you have a busy schedule and frequently find yourself home late at night, hungry and exhausted, a pressure cooker can whip up a healthy, satisfying meal in very little time. If you think of yourself as a health nut or just want to add more healthy meals to your cooking repertoire, a pressure cooker is a relatively affordable, fast, and extremely efficient way to prepare healthy meals.

Other people who would love a pressure cooker include novice home chefs who really only know how to sauté, brown, and mix; people with small kitchens who need multi-purpose tools; and big families. A pressure cooker’s convenient one pot allows you to forgo a bunch of extra pots and pans, and the large size options lets you prepare large meals easily and quickly.

[] Chapter 3 – Electric Pressure Cooker Basics

Before 1991, all pressure cookers were used on the stove. No one knows for sure who came up with the first electric pressure cooker, but it is likely that China made that innovative leap – scientist Yong Guang Wang holds the first patent for electric pressure cookers.

The first generation of electric pressure cookers had a timer and could be used on a counter, plugged into an electrical socket. It was not nearly as powerful as a stove top cooker, so meals took longer. The second generation let users delay cooking time and see recipe time count down, which made planning on other aspects of a meal easier. The third generation, which is the generation we are on now, uses all sorts of neat technologies, like meal, ingredient, and cooking function pre-sets such as “Poultry” and “Sauté.” A good electric pressure cooker gives you complete control over the cooker’s pressure and temperature. In terms of size, most families (3-4 people) are satisfied with a 6-quart EPC, though if you want to do cook really big meals or can at all, 8 quarts is preferable.

Why you should go with an electric pressure cooker

Before we say anything else, let’s stop and think about why you should choose an electric pressure cooker instead of a stove top one. There are lots of reasons:

• They’re easier to use

Because electric pressure cookers are programmable and monitor the pressure for you, you don’t have to stand over the stove and turn the burner up or down to maintain a certain pressure. You also don’t have to keep your eye on the time – an electric pressure cooker turns off by itself when time is up, like a slow cooker. This makes electric cookers very easy to use, and your meals are more likely to turn out perfectly even if it’s the first time you’re making a recipe.

• They’re easier to clean

Cleaning up is the worst part of cooking, at least for me, so the fact that electric pressure cookers are easier to clean than stove top ones is important. It’s easy to take an electric pressure cooker apart and clean each piece (some of which are dishwasher-safe) thoroughly, which means the cooker will last longer.

• They save on energy

Pressure cookers in general are energy-efficient, but electric pressure cookers are better than stove top ones. In fact, an electric pressure cooker can be as much as 60% more efficient than a stove top cooker! This is thanks to the insulated, heat-retaining structure that companies have made standard for EPCs.

• They’re safer

The last reason why an EPC is the way to go is because they are safer than stove top cookers. Companies have put a lot of time and money into updating their EPCs with a myriad of safety features that keep you safe from accidental hot-steam exposure and explosions. Stove top cookers are just not there yet, safety-wise.

Are there any downsides to EPCs?

Electric pressure cookers are not perfect, and stove top cookers do have at least one major advantage over EPCs: they are more powerful. Stove top cookers are able to get a PSI of 15, as opposed to the 10-12 max PSI that EPCs can reach. That means cooking time for EPCs is slightly longer than for stove top cookers. While this doesn’t affect too many foods, it does mean that certain meals (barbequed ribs, thick cuts of meat, slow-cooking stews) can take between 10-20 minutes longer to cook than if you were using a stove top cooker.

Another potential issue with EPCs is that while they don’t get larger than 6-8 quarts, they tend to be big because of their housing. Think of how large a slow cooker is, even if you can only cook about six helpings in the pot. This makes storage a problem, especially if you do have other large appliances like blenders, a slow cooker, and lots of pots. If you’re going to buy an EPC, have a storage place in mind, and maybe donate that bulky slow cooker.

The last consideration isn’t inherently a “downside,” but it is something that could become a problem. Many EPCs will switch to a “keep warm” mode when it senses there isn’t enough liquid in the pot. This can be an issue if you put too little liquid in at the beginning of a recipe. Instead of alerting you or shutting down completely, the cooker switches to “keep warm” once too much evaporation has occurred, and stays there until you notice it, potentially ruining a meal. To avoid this, be very careful about liquid measurements for longer-cooking recipes like big cuts of meat.

How electric pressure cookers work

When you’re shopping for an electric pressure cooker, it helps to understand what the parts are and what they do. Here is a detailed image of a basic Instant-Pot brand electric pressure cooker:

There are three major parts – the inner pot (where the food goes), the locking lid (that ensures the airtight seal), and the electrical base. You program the cooker using the buttons control panel, which controls the brain of the cooker, also known as the control box. The locking lid on the diagram to the right consists of two parts. Most of those parts are safety features that keep you from burning yourself on the hot steam. The white ring above the inner pot is called the gasket, which provides that extremely tight seal.

[] Chapter 4 – How to (Safely) Use an Electric Pressure Cooker

Let’s get into actually programming and using an electric pressure cooker. The first step is to plug it in and look over your recipe. It’s best to use recipes written for EPCs, but you can convert stove top recipes for electric cookers if you have to. Index 1 provides a comprehensive method for conversion. A pressure cooker recipe will tell you what pressure to use, though as we said earlier, they often will say something like “low” or “high” pressure. An EPC will have a low and high setting, so you just press that button when you’re ready.

Prepare your ingredients and do any prep work like browning or sautéing. Use a very little coat of oil for this cooking step; too much oil can result in frying, which is very dangerous because of how hot a pressure cooker gets. Many EPCs have settings for basic cooking functions like “sauté” and “brown,” and you do not need to close the pressure lid for this. You should also know that every EPC recipe will require some liquid. Cookers need liquid like water or broth in order to work – that liquid is what generates the hot steam. There is always a minimum amount of liquid you need to use, usually 1/2-cup to 1-cup, depending on the cooker’s size.

Cooking Tip:

No matter what you’re cooking, it’s best to fill the cooker only 2/3 of the way full. This way, foods that froth up (pasta, oatmeal, beans) won’t block the steam valve, which needs to be clear to prevent explosions.

You will see that many recipes talk about steamer baskets and/or trivets. A steamer basket is a much-needed accessory that you use for ingredients that should not actually touch the bottom of the cooker, like veggies. Touching the actual bottom of the cooker would result in the delicate veggies cooking too fast and burning. You also use steamer baskets to lower in foil-covered containers of scrambled eggs or cake batter to “bake,” though often a trivet is all that’s necessary to keep the container off the pot bottom.

When it’s time to seal the lid, make sure the lid is in the locked position. Most EPCs won’t even work if the lid isn’t sealed, which is an important safety feature to make sure your cooker has.

Time passes, and your meal is ready. Refer back to your recipe, because how you release the pent-up pressure is important. Do not try to open the pressure cooker before the pressure is released. There are two options: quick-release or natural release. Quick-release requires you to turn the steam-release handle (refer back to the diagram if necessary) to “vent.” The steam comes out quickly, but not too quickly, so de-pressurizing the cooker takes about 60-90 seconds. Remember to turn your face away from the cooker when it vents; that steam is hot, hot, hot.

The natural-release method is when you unplug the cooker and let the cooker de-pressurize on its own. This takes 8-25 minutes, though many recipes call for a natural release of about 10 minutes, and then you vent the rest of the pressure using a quick-release. If you need to release all the pressure naturally, just look at the float valve (sometimes called a pin lock). When it has descended back into the cooker, it means the cooker is safe enough to open.

Troubleshooting common problems with an EPC

You may come across some problems when you use an EPC, but there’s a reason and answer for just about anything:

• Pressure cooker won’t reach pressure

There are several things that might be wrong. First, check to see that the gasket, valve, and lid are in the correct position. If you’ve been using the pressure cooker for a while, the gasket might be too worn, and will need to be replaced. As a general rule, the gasket should be replaced every 18 months.

Another problem might be the ingredients. If there’s not enough liquid or the liquid is too thick, the pressure cooker won’t reach pressure. To ensure the liquid is not too thick, don’t add flour or other thickeners before locking the lid. Another reason might be that you have too many ingredients, so make sure you are filling the cooker with a max of 2/3 full. If you are using frozen or very cold ingredients, it will take the pressure cooker longer than normal to reach pressure, around 20-3o minutes.

• Pressure cooker won’t maintain pressure

If your pressure cooker won’t hold pressure, the problem might be with the valve and gasket again. Make sure the valve is closed correctly, and that the gasket is sealed tight. If the gasket isn’t sealed, too much steam will leak out, resulting in loss of pressure.

• Food is undercooked/overcooked

The main reason this happens is because you are using the wrong cooking time. Check the recipe again, compare recipes online to see if the recipe you are using is on the low side, or just cook the food in the pressure cooker for a few more minutes if it’s undercooked.

• The pressure cooker valve sprays out foam or food

If this is happening, make sure the cooker isn’t too full. Though 2/3 of the way full is the standard, meals that are primarily made of grains, fruit, and legumes get extra foamy. If this describes your recipe, fill only 1/2 full. Also, make sure to use the natural-release method when you release the pressure.

[] Chapter 5 – How to Maintain an Electric Pressure Cooker

After using your EPC, you will need to clean it. It’s best to clean the cooker right away in order to keep all the parts in good shape so the cooker lasts as long as possible. You don’t have to clean every part of the cooker every time, but you do need to clean the actual pot part after each use, for obvious reasons. Most inner pots are aluminum or stainless steel, and are washed just like regular pots. You can also run it through the dishwasher, though that will degrade the pot faster than a gentler hand-washing with hot water and soap.

The other parts you need to clean pretty much every time are the gasket and actual lid. Wash the gasket, which is made from rubber or silicone, by hand. If there are deeper stains, soak it in hot water mixed with soap for at least 15 minutes. Over time, gaskets need to be replaced, because they hold on to smells. Many people have found cleaning success with baking soda and vinegar, but gaskets are relatively cheap, so it’s easier to just buy a new one if it’s really gross and old.

The last part to clean is the exhaust valve. You should clean it at least every time you make rice or pasta, because the starch creates foam that sticks and dries inside the valve. Remove the valve cover and clean, and then clean out the actual valve with something thin and solid, like a needle.

Important Cleaning Tip:

Something wooden like a toothpick won’t work, because it might snap off in the valve. It may seem unnecessary, but cleaning out the valve ensures it doesn’t clog.

When you’re putting your pressure cooker away, leave the lid off. This can help air out any lingering odors. While cleaning any type of kitchen appliance is a drag, with a pressure cooker, at least that’s all you’ll really have to clean. Do take the time to do a good job, because a clean pressure cooker is a happy pressure cooker, and will allow you to prepare delicious, healthy meals for years to come.

Troubleshooting cleaning problems with an EPC

Time degrades pressure cookers, even if you take care to clean yours well. There are several problems that might pop up, so it’s good to be prepared:

• Warping

If your cooker is made of aluminum, it will eventually warp and wear. However, you can avoid warping for a long time if you’re careful not to drop or be rough with the cooker and the lid.

• Scratching/dents

Don’t use sponges with abrasive surfaces, or anything stronger than just water and soap.

• Discolored aluminum

Mix 2 tablespoons of cream of tartar in 1 quart of water and pour into the cooker. Bring to a boil before simmering for 10 minutes. Rinse out with soap and water, and dry. You can also prevent discoloration by mixing a few tablespoons of lemon juice into the liquid you use for cooking.

[] Chapter 6 – Breakfast

[]Coconut Oats

Serves: 4
Time: About 12 minutes

Rich coconut milk, brown sugar, and ground cinnamon add richness and sweetness to these creamy oats, which are quick and easy. While steel-cut oats can take as long as 20 minutes in a saucepan, they cook in just 2 minutes in a pressure cooker.

Ingredients:
2 cups water
1 cup steel-cut oats
1 cup coconut milk
1/2 cup unsweetened coconut flakes
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 pinch of salt

Directions:
1. To toast the coconut, add the flakes to the pressure cooker (no oil) and sauté for a few minutes, stirring so the flakes don’t burn.
2. When they’re beginning to brown, take out half.
3. Add the steel-cut oats and toast.
4. When the oats are golden fragrant, pour in the rest of the ingredients.
5. Mix well.
6. Close the pressure cooker lid.
7. Cook on high pressure for 2 minutes.
8. When ready, unplug the cooker and wait 10 minutes for the pressure to go down.
9. Open the cooker and scoop out the oats into four bowls.
10. Serve with the rest of the toasted coconut.

[Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
++]Total calories – 248
Protein – 6
Carbs – 38
Fat – 9
Fiber – 4

[]Red Quinoa + Brown Rice Breakfast Cereal

Serves: 6-8
Time: 15 minutes

Red quinoa and brown rice are both extremely healthy grains that aren’t used as often as they should be in breakfasts. The maple syrup helps keep things sweet, and adding fresh fruit and a little milk also gives the cereal more of a breakfast vibe.

Ingredients:
5 1/2 cups water
2 cups brown rice
1 cup red quinoa
1/3 cup coconut oil
1/4 cup maple syrup
A pinch of salt

Directions:
1. Pour in the brown rice, quinoa, water, and salt into the pressure cooker.
2. Secure and lock the lid.
3. Cook on high pressure for 12 minutes.
4. Unplug the cooker.
5. Wait for the pressure to go down on its own.
6. Open the cooker and mix in the maple syrup and coconut oil.
7. Stir in some milk and top with fresh fruit.

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 247
Protein – 3
Carbs – 31
Fat – 13
Fiber – 4

[]Cheesy Grits w/ Ham

Serves: 4
Time: Less than 30 minutes

Cheesy grits is basically savory oatmeal, with the addition of cheese, which makes everything better. These grits also include ham for some extra protein, which is important to start the day off right.

Ingredients:
4 cups water
1 cup stone-ground grits
3/4 cup cream
5 ounces precooked, organic ham
4 ounces cheddar cheese
1 tablespoon coconut oil
2-3 tablespoons butter
2 teaspoons salt

Directions:
1. Heat the pressure cooker on “sauté” or “brown” before adding the oil.
2. Add the grits and stir to toast in the oil for about 3 minutes.
3. Turn off the pressure cooker.
4. Add the rest of the ingredients, except the ham.
5. Close the lid.
6. Cook on high for 10 minutes.
7. Wait 15 minutes with the cooker unplugged to release the pressure.
8. Open the cooker and add the ham to warm up.
9. Scoop into four bowls.
10. Serve and enjoy!

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 406
Protein – 18
Carbs – 32
Fat – 24
Fiber – 1

[]Apple-Cranberry Risotto

Serves: 4
Time: About 10 minutes

Apples and dried cranberries remind me of all the things I love about fall. This risotto uses both fresh apples and apple juice, along with tart dried cranberries and plenty of cinnamon. Who says risotto is only good for dinner?

Ingredients:
3 cups milk
1 cup apple juice
1 1/2 cups arborio rice
2 cored and diced apples
1/2 cup dried cranberries
1/3 cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions:
1. Begin by heating the butter in your pressure cooker for 2-3 minutes.
2. Add the rice and stir until the rice becomes clear.
3. Toss in the spices, brown sugar, and apples.
4. Pour in the juice and milk.
5. Close the lid.
6. Cook on high for 6 minutes.
7. When time is up, quick-release the pressure.
8. Stir in the dried cranberries and any other toppings, like sliced almonds.

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 439
Protein – 4
Carbs – 94
Fat – 6
Fiber – 3

[]Crustless Quiche

Serves: 4
Time: About 40 minutes

This crustless quiche for four is cheesy, meaty, and eggy in all the right ways. It’s a great option for brunch on a weekend, as well as a way to use up leftover sausage and ham.

Ingredients:
6 big, beaten eggs
4 cooked and crumbled bacon slices
2 chopped green onions
1 cup cooked ground sausage
1 cup shredded cheddar cheese
1/2 cup diced ham
1/2 cup milk
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper

Directions:
1. Place a trivet in the bottom of the pressure cooker.
2. Pour in 1 1/2 cups water.
3. In a bowl, add the beaten eggs, milk, pepper, and salt.
4. Add the meat, green onions, and cheese into a 1-quart soufflé dish.
5. Mix everything and pour the beaten egg mixture over the meat.
6. Stir.
7. Cover the soufflé dish with loose foil.
8. Lower the dish into the pressure cooker, so it rests on the trivet.
9. Close the cooker.
10. Cook on high for 30 minutes.
11. When time is up, unplug the cooker and wait 10 minutes.
12. Quick-release any remaining pressure.
13. Open the lid.
14. Take out the soufflé dish and take off the foil.
15. Serve and enjoy!

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 409
[_ Protein- 30 _]
Carbs – 3
Fat – 33
Fiber – 0

[]Tortilla Breakfast Casserole

Serves: 4-6
Time: 25 minutes

This hearty casserole is like a breakfast lasagna with tortillas instead of noodles, and a filling of black beans, cheese, and chiles. It will give you a boost of energy and keep you full all morning.

Ingredients:
4 (6-inch) flour tortillas
1 cup whole milk
2 big room-temperature eggs
1 cup drained and rinsed black beans
1 cup shredded cheese
1/2 cup chopped, mild green chiles
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
Salt
Pepper

Directions:
1. Grease a 2-quart baking dish.
2. In a bowl, mix the cheese, chiles, beans, and oregano.
3. Put a tortilla in the baking dish and layer 1/2 cup of the bean mix.
4. Place another tortilla on top of this, and layer another 1/2 cup.
5. Keep going until you end with the last 1/2 cup of the bean mix.
6. In a bowl, whisk eggs and milk.
7. Pour over the casserole.
8. Cover the dish with a piece of parchment paper, and then seal with aluminum foil.
9. Place the casserole dish in a 6-quart pressure cooker on top of a rack or trivet.
10. Pour in 2 cups of water.
11. Close the lid.
12. Cook on high pressure for 18 minutes.
13. Quick-release the pressure.
14. Take out the casserole and unwrap.
15. Wait 5 minutes for the dish to cool before serving.

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 324
Protein – 17
Carbs – 30
Fat – 16
Fiber – 1

[]Sweet Potato + Sausage Hash

Serves: 4-6
Time: 17-20 minutes

Sweet potatoes are a fantastic food. They are sweet, slightly nutty, and packed with antioxidants. The hash also has savory turkey sausage, green pumpkin seeds, and sweet-tart dried cranberries.

Ingredients:
2 medium-sized peeled and halved sweet potatoes
2/3 pound mild Italian turkey sausage
1/2 cup chicken broth
1/2 cup dried cranberries
1/4 cup shelled green pumpkin seeds
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/2 chopped small red onion
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon mild paprika
1/2 teaspoon dried sage

Directions:
1. Cut the sweet potatoes into 1/2-inch slices and set aside.
2. In a 6-quart pressure cooker, melt the butter on the “brown” setting.
3. Add in the sausage and onion.
4. Cook and stir for about 5 minutes, until the meat has browned and onion softens.
5. Add in the herbs, spices, pumpkin seeds, and cranberries.
6. After about 1 minute, add the sweet potatoes and cook for another minute.
7. Close the lid.
8. Cook on high pressure for 8 minutes.
9. When time is up, quick-release the pressure.
10. Turn the “browning” setting on again.
11. Cook until the liquid has evaporated, which is about 3-4 minutes.
12. Serve and enjoy!

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 336
Protein – 15
Carbs – 35
Fat – 17
Fiber – 4

[]Apple-Maple Oatmeal

Serves: 4
Time: 28-30 minutes

Quaker Oats has a packaged apple oatmeal, but this homemade, pressure-cooker version with steel-cut oats is so much healthier and tastier! If you aren’t a huge apple fan, you can substitute with any other dried fruit.

Ingredients:
1/2 cup steel-cut oats
1/2 cup chopped, dried apples
1/4 cup sliced almonds
1/4 cup maple syrup
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions:
1. Pour 2 1/4 cups of water into a 6-quart pressure cooker.
2. Mix all the ingredients, except the almonds, in the pressure cooker.
3. Close the lid.
4. Cook on high pressure for 18 minutes.
5. When time is up, unplug the cooker and wait 10-12 minutes until the pressure comes down.
6. Serve right away with the almonds on top, and enjoy!

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 193
Protein – 4
Carbs – 36
Fat – 5
Fiber – 2.7

[]Sausage Gravy

Serves: 6
Time: 10-15 minutes

Sausage gravy is decadent and delicious. It can be served on top of warm biscuits, toast, or even eggs. This isn’t a low-calorie (or low-fat) breakfast, so plan accordingly.

Ingredients:
1 1/2 pounds lean ground pork
2 1/4 cups whole milk
6 tablespoons flour
3/4 cup chicken broth
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried sage
1 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon celery seeds
1/4 teaspoon cayenne

Directions:
1. Break up the pork in a 6-quart pressure cooker.
2. Turn on the “brown” setting and cook for 4 minutes, stirring.
3. Add in the herbs and spices and cook for 1 minute.
4. Pour in the chicken broth.
5. Close the pressure cooker lid.
6. Cook on high for 6 minutes.
7. When the timer goes off, quick-release the pressure.
8. Open the cooker and turn on the “brown” setting again.
9. In a separate bowl, mix the flour and milk together.
10. When the gravy is simmering, pour in the flour and milk mixture.
11. Keep whisking until the gravy has thickened to your liking.
12. Serve!

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 284
Protein – 27
Carbs – 10
Fat – 14
Fiber – 0

[]Chestnut Spread

Makes: 1 1/2 cups
Time: About 30 minutes

Chestnuts have an earthy, slightly sweet taste, like a yam or sweet potato. This makes them the perfect nut for a spread, which you can use in place of jam on toast and other baked goods.

Ingredients:
1 1/2 pounds of fresh chestnuts
11-ounces of water
11-ounces of white sugar
1/8 cup rum liquor

Directions:
1. Peel and cut the chestnuts in half.
2. Put the chestnuts in the pressure cooker, along with the sugar and water.
3. Secure the lid.
4. Cook on high pressure for 20 minutes.
5. When time is up, unplug the cooker and wait for the pressure to come down on its own.
6. Pour in a splash of rum.
7. Puree.

Nutritional Information (1/8 per serving):
Total calories – 320
Protein – 1
Carbs – 77
Fat – 1
Fiber – 4.2

[]Amaranth Porridge w/ Banana

Serves: 4
Time: 13 minutes

Amaranth is considered a superfood, and has a myriad of health benefits including anti-inflammatory properties, a high protein content (it’s a complete protein), fiber, and tons of minerals. It has a nutty flavor that goes well with the sweetness of banana.

Ingredients:
2 1/2 cups unsweetened almond milk
2 sliced bananas
1 cup uncooked amaranth
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions:
1. Mix the almond milk, amaranth, and bananas in a pressure cooker.
2. Close the lid.
3. Cook on high for about 3 minutes.
4. Unplug the cooker and wait.
5. When the pressure is gone, open the lid.
6. Serve with cinnamon.

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 262
Protein – 8
Carbs – 43
Fat – 5
Fiber – 4.5

[]Hot Barley Cereal w/ Fresh Raspberries

Serves: 4
Time: 13 minutes

This simple hot cereal uses barley flakes, which fills you up. Barley is a very healthy grain, and has been shown to lower blood pressure and control blood sugar. You can use any toppings you like, but I love fresh raspberries and some cinnamon.

Ingredients:
2 cups of vanilla almond milk
1 cup of barley flakes
1 cup fresh raspberries
2 tablespoons butter
A dash of cinnamon

Directions:
1. Pour the milk and barley flakes in the pressure cooker, filling only 1/2 way.
2. Close the pressure cooker lid.
3. Cook on high pressure for 3 minutes.
4. Unplug the cooker and wait 10 minutes or so for the pressure to come down.
5. Add the butter and mix to melt.
6. Serve with the raspberries and cinnamon on top.

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 188
Protein – 4
Carbs – 29
Fat – 8
Fiber – 3.5

[] Chapter 7 – Beef + Pork

[]Deli-Style Brisket

Serves: 6
Time: About 2 hours

I love this brisket for sandwiches on rye bread. Brisket is tender, juicy, and in a pressure cooker, only takes about 2 hours from prep to consumption.

Ingredients:
3 pounds trimmed brisket
3 cups water
1 big yellow onion, halved and sliced
1/4 cup tomato paste
2 tablespoons minced garlic
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon onion powder

Directions:
1. Lay the brisket flat on a cutting board for seasoning.
2. In a bowl, mix the mustard, onion powder, and garlic.
3. Rub over the one side of the meat.
4. Layer the sliced onion on the bottom of a 6-quart pressure cooker.
5. Put the brisket, seasoned side-up, in the cooker.
6. In another bowl, mix 3 cups of water with the tomato paste.
7. Pour into the cooker.
8. Pour in enough water so the liquid comes up the meat sides halfway.
9. Close the lid.
10. Cook on high pressure for 80 minutes.
11. When time is up, unplug the cooker.
12. Wait until the pressure has reduced naturally.
13. Remove the brisket and rest for 10 minutes.
14. Cut 1/4-inch slices and eat!
15. If you aren’t eating the whole thing, cut only as many slices as you need, and wrap the rest of the brisket and store in a fridge for up to 4 days.

Cooking Tip:

You can throw away the onions in the cooker, or serve with the brisket if you’re eating it right away.

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 379
Protein – 49
Carbs – 5
Fat – 17
Fiber – 0

[]Jalapeno Meatballs

Serves: 4-6
Time: 10 minutes

These little guys pack a kick! If you want to make a killer appetizer or make meatballs the star of your spaghetti, try these pork-and-beef meatballs spiced with jalapeno rings, red pepper flakes, and cinnamon.

Ingredients:
1 pound lean ground beef
3/4 pound ground lean pork
1 big, room-temperature egg
1/2 cup panko breadcrumbs
1/2 cup loosely packed, finely-chopped cilantro leaves
1 medium-sized yellow onion
1 (28-ounce) of crushed red tomatoes
1 1/2 tablespoons minced pickled jalapeno rings
2 teaspoons jalapeno-ring brine
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1 1/4 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions:
1. In a bowl, mix the beef and pork with the egg, breadcrumbs, jalapeno, jalapeno brine, cinnamon, and cumin.
2. Wash and dry your hands.
3. Form the meat into 12, 2-inch meatballs.
4. Take the yellow onion and grate.
5. Squeeze the onion strips to get rid of the excess liquid.
6. Throw in a 6-quart pressure cooker.
7. Mix in the canned tomatoes, garlic, red pepper flakes, and cilantro.
8. Lay the meatballs in the sauce and close the lid.
9. Cook on high pressure for 8 minutes.
10. When time is up, quick-release the pressure.
11. Stir before serving the meatballs as is or with rice or pasta.

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 413
Protein – 46
Carbs – 24
Fat – 14
Fiber – 1

[]Top Round w/ Potatoes, Bacon, and Bourbon

Serves: 6
Time: 99 minutes

The bourbon really makes this meal. It adds both a sweetness and smokiness that compliments the bacon and tender potatoes. This is one of those meals that get better as time goes on, so eat up those leftovers!

Ingredients:
3-pound beef top round roast
1 1/2 pounds small yellow potatoes
1 stemmed, cored, and chopped green bell pepper
4 thick-cut chopped bacon slices
1 1/2 cups beef broth
1/4 cup bourbon
2 teaspoons black pepper
One, 6-inch rosemary sprig

Directions:
1. Sprinkle the black pepper on a cutting board.
2. Roll the roast to coat in pepper.
3. Cook the chopped bacon in a 6-quart pressure cooker on the “browning” setting.
4. With a slotted spoon, move the bacon to a bowl.
5. Put the roast in the cooker and brown all over for 6 minutes.
6. Move the meat to the bowl with the bacon.
7. Put the green pepper in the cooker and cook for 3 minutes, stirring.
8. Pour the broth into the cooker, along with the bourbon, and deglaze.
9. Let the sauce simmer before adding the rosemary.
10. Put the roast and bacon in the pot.
11. Close the lid.
12. Set the cooker to cook on high pressure to 55 minutes.
13. When time is up, quick-release the pressure.
14. Take off the lid and throw in the potatoes.
15. Close the lid again and cook on high pressure for 15 minutes.
16. When ready, unplug the cooker.
17. Let the pressure reduce naturally.
18. Open the cooker and take out the meat.
19. Let rest for 5 minutes.
20. Pick out the rosemary sprig.
21. Cut the roast into 1/2-inch thick slices.
22. Serve with the potatoes and sauce.

*Deglazing is when you pour a cooking liquid (like wine or stock) into a pot/pan you have cooked in, and scrap off any bits of food that have stuck to the pot/pan.

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 487
Protein – 58
Carbs – 26
Fat – 12
Fiber – 2

[]Beef Stew w/ Carrots and Figs

Serves: 6
Time: About an hour

This rich beef stew tastes like it’s been cooking all day, but it only takes an hour from start to finish. Earthy flavors from the rosemary and thyme, sweetness from figs, and bright carrots make the stew complex and delicious.

Ingredients:
3 pounds boneless beef chuck, cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
1 pound baby carrots, cut into 2-inch pieces
2 cups thawed pearl onions
6 stemmed, dried figs
1 1/2 cups dry red wine
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
One fresh rosemary sprig (about 6-inches)
One fresh thyme sprig (about 4-inches)
Salt
Pepper

Directions:
1. Heat the olive oil in a 6-quart pressure cooker on the “browning” setting.
2. Brown the beef, stirring, for about 10 minutes.
3. Move the beef to a bowl.
4. Toss in the onions and stir until clear, for 5 minutes.
5. Pour in the wine and deglaze the pan.
6. Stir in the carrots, rosemary, figs, thyme, salt, and pepper.
7. Put the beef back in the cooker and close the lid.
8. Cook on high pressure for 30 minutes.
9. When the timer goes off, unplug the cooker.
10. Wait for the pressure to come down by itself.
11. Pick out the herb sprigs.
12. Turn the cooker to the “browning” setting and simmer.
13. In a bowl, mix the cornstarch with 2 teaspoons of water.
14. Pour into the stew to thicken.
15. Serve hot!

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 597
Protein – 57
Carbs – 15
Fat – 29
Fiber – 3.3

[]Sesame Short Ribs w/ Brown Sugar and Peanut Butter

Serves: 8
Time: 45 minutes

This Thai-inspired dish is sweet and salty. You can serve the ribs by themselves, or with rice or Udon noodles for a more complete meal. Short ribs cook beautifully in a pressure cooker and become fall-off-the-bone tender.

Ingredients:
3 pounds trimmed, boneless beef short ribs
1 large leek, the white and pale green parts only, cut in half and sliced
1/2 cup beef broth
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup packed dark brown sugar
3 medium-sized scallions, green parts only, sliced
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
2 tablespoons smooth peanut butter
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon white sesame seeds
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Directions:
1. Heat the sesame oil in a 6-quart pressure cooker on the “browning” setting.
2. Lay in enough short ribs so they aren’t crowded in the cooker, and brown on all sides. This should take about 8 minutes.
3. Move browned ribs to a plate.
4. When all the ribs are browned, add garlic, red pepper flakes, ginger, and the leeks into the cooker.
5. Cook for about 3 minutes.
6. Add in the brown sugar and cook until melted.
7. Pour in the broth, soy sauce, and peanut butter in the pot, deglazing any stucked-on pieces.
8. When the PB is melted, add the ribs into the cooker.
9. Close the lid.
10. Cook on high for 50 minutes.
11. When time is up, unplug the cooker.
12. Wait for the pressure to go down.
13. When the pressure is down, move the ribs to a serving platter.
14. Skim any excess fat from the sauce before spooning over the meat.
15. Garnish with toasted seeds and the sliced scallions.

Cooking Tip:

You can toast your own sesame seeds. Pour the seeds into a dry skillet and cook on medium-low heat. Stir so they don’t burn and when they smell nutty, sprinkle on top of ribs.

Nutritional Information (1/8 of recipe):
Total calories – 665
Protein – 58
Carbs – 24
Fat – 37
Fiber – 1

[]Pulled Pork w/ Dried Fruit

Serves: 6
Time: 85-90 minutes

This pulled pork has a sweeter, fruitier taste than most pulled pork recipes, which rely on BBQ sauce. It’s a fresh, almost tropical take on a backyard classic. Serve the meat with corn chips or tortillas for tacos.

Ingredients:
One, 3-pound skinless bone-in ham
1, 28-ounce can of whole drained tomatoes
1/2 cup whole-berry cranberry sauce
2/3 cup dried apricots
1/4 cup golden raisins
1/4 cup packed dark brown sugar
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon Worcestershire
1 tablespoon sweet paprika
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon celery seeds
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon dry mustard

Directions:
1. Pour cranberry sauce, tomatoes, brown sugar, paprika, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, allspice, coriander, salt, celery seeds, cloves, and dry mustard into a blender.
2. Puree until smooth.
3. Pour into a 6-quart pressure cooker.
4. Add apricots, raisins, and pork.
5. Stir well.
6. Lock the lid.
7. Cook on high pressure for 78 minutes.
8. When time is up, unplug the cooker and let the pressure come down by itself.
9. Take out the pork and let rest on a cutting board for 5 minutes.
10. Slice the meat off the bone and chop into small pieces.
11. Spoon off any excess fat before stirring the meat back into the sauce.
12. Serve and enjoy!

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 468
Protein – 51
Carbs – 39
Fat – 13
Fiber – 1

[]Thick-Cut Pork Chops w/ Dill and Carrots

Serves: 4-6
Time: 35 minutes

Pork chops can be tricky to get right. You don’t want to undercook them, for obvious reasons, but you don’t want dry pork, either. That isn’t a problem with a pressure cooker. With this meal, you get juicy pork chops with tender carrots and fresh dill.

Ingredients:
Four 1 1/4-1 1/2-inch bone-in trimmed pork loin chops
16 baby carrots
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup chicken broth
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon minced fresh dill
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Directions:
1. Melt 1 tablespoon of butter with the olive oil in a 6-quart pressure cooker.
2. Season the pork chops with salt and pepper.
3. Brown two chops for 2 minutes on each side, and plate.
4. Repeat with the other two chops, so all the chops are out of the cooker.
5. Add the carrots, dill, and other tablespoon of butter.
6. Stir for 1 minute.
7. Add in the wine and deglaze the pot.
8. Pour in the broth.
9. Put the meat back in the cooker.
10. Close the lid.
11. Cook on high pressure for 18 minutes.
12. When time is up, unplug the cooker and wait for 8 minutes.
13. Quick-release the rest of the pressure.
14. Open the pot and take out the meat.
15. Serve with the carrots and sauce!

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 250
Protein – 24
Carbs – 5
Fat – 15
Fiber – 1

[]Pork Ribs w/ Honey + Ginger Beer

Serves: 6
Time: 45 minutes

I love the ginger beer in this recipe. The sugars caramelize in the sauce, creating lip-smacking flavors. The rosemary adds earthiness, while the red pepper flakes generate a little heat to counter the overall sweetness of the ribs.

Ingredients:
3 pounds boneless, trimmed country-style pork ribs
12-ounces bottled ginger beer
4 large, halved shallots
4 large garlic cloves
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
One, 6-inch rosemary sprig
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Directions:
1. Melt butter with the olive oil in a 6-quart pressure cooker.
2. Add the ribs and brown on all sides, 4 minutes each side.
3. Toss in the shallots and stir for 5 minutes.
4. Add in the garlic.
5. After a few seconds, add in the rosemary and honey.
6. Cook and stir for 10 seconds.
7. Pour in the ginger beer and deglaze.
8. Toss in the salt and pepper.
9. Put the ribs in the cooker.
10. Lock the lid.
11. Cook on high pressure for 30 minutes.
12. When time is up, unplug the cooker.
13. Let the pressure fall on its own.
14. Pick out the rosemary sprig and serve!

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 237
Protein – 14
Carbs – 12
Fat – 14
Fiber – 0

[]Pork Loin w/ Red Onions and Apples

Serves: 6-8
Time: 46 minutes

Pork and apples is a classic comfort-food combo. Pork has a mild, slightly sweet flavor that goes perfectly with tart green apples and the acidic red onions. If you aren’t a fan of tart apples, you can substitute a sweeter variety, like Gala.

Ingredients:
One 3-pound boneless pork loin roast
1 big halved and sliced red onion
2 medium-sized green apples
1/2 cup sweet white wine
1/4 cup chicken broth
2 tablespoons butter
4 thyme sprigs
2 bay leaves
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Directions:
1. Melt the butter in a 6-quart pressure cooker on the “brown” setting.
2. Add the pork and brown on all sides, 4 minutes on each side.
3. Move to a plate.
4. Toss in the onion and stir-cook for 3 minutes.
5. Add the apples, bay leaves, and thyme.
6. Pour in the wine and deglaze the pot.
7. Pour in the broth and toss in the pepper and salt.
8. Add the pork back into the cooker.
9. Close the lid.
10. Cook on high pressure for 30 minutes.
11. Quick-release the pressure.
12. Pick out the bay leaves.
13. Move the pork to a boarding board and rest for 5 minutes.
14. Spoon sauce into serving bowls.
15. Slice the pork into 1/2-inch thick rounds.
16. Lay over the sauce and serve!

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 621
Protein – 62
Carbs – 6
Fat – 36
Fiber – 1.3

[]Pineapple-Pork Taco Meat

Serves: 15
Time: 40 minutes

Pork tacos are awesome any time of year, but especially in the summer, when mix-ins like fresh veggies are in peak season. This recipe uses lots of great flavors like pineapple, pomegranate, and three kinds of chile powder.

Ingredients:
3 pounds boneless pork shoulder, cut into 1-inch cubes
12 smashed, whole garlic cloves
1 diced Spanish onion, medium-sized
2 cups chicken stock
1 cup pineapple juice
1 cup pomegranate juice
1 cup diced fresh pineapple
3 tablespoons ancho chile powder
2 tablespoons ground cumin
2 tablespoons New Mexican chile powder
2 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon arbol chile powder

Directions:
1. Season the pork with the dry spices.
2. Put the pork in your pressure cooker.
3. Add the garlic, onion, pineapple, juices, and stock.
4. Lock the lid.
5. Cook on high pressure for 25 minutes.
6. When time is up, quick-release the pressure.
7. With a slotted spoon, take out the pork and put into a large bowl.
8. Cover with foil.
9. Pour the liquid from the pressure cooker in a saucepan and reduce for 15-20 minutes.
10. Skim off any excess fat.
11. When the sauce is reduced to your liking, mix a tablespoon or so into the pork.
12. Serve meat with corn tortillas and any desired mix-ins.

Nutritional Information (1/15 of recipe):
[Total calories – 282
Protein – 23
Carbs – 7
Fat – 17
Fiber – 0]

[] Chapter 8 – Poultry

[]Chicken Ragù

Serves: 6
Time: 17-20 minutes

This chicken ragù combines rich flavors like white wine with sweet raisins, herbs, and meaty pancetta. It’s a great pasta sauce that’s so much better than anything in a can.

Ingredients:
2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs, chopped
1 pound cooked and drained spaghetti
1 1/2 cups chicken broth
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 medium-sized diced carrot
1 diced medium-sized yellow onion
6 tablespoons golden raisins
1/4 cup tomato paste
2 tablespoons minced, loosely packed fresh sage leaves
One, 8-ounce chopped pancetta chunk
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon butter
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg

Directions:
1. Melt the butter in a 6-quart pressure cooker on the “brown” setting.
2. Toss in the carrot, onion, and pancetta until the onions becomes soft.
3. Add the chicken and stir until it’s brown.
4. Deglaze with the wine.
5. Pour in the broth, raisins, tomato paste, cloves, sage, pepper, and nutmeg.
6. Stir until the tomato sauce has dissolved.
7. Lock the lid.
8. Cook on high pressure for 7 minutes.
9. Quick-release the pressure.
10. Turn the cooker back on the “brown” setting.
11. Let the sauce simmer and thicken for 5 minutes.
12. Serve over the cooked spaghetti.

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 741
Protein – 44
Carbs – 87
Fat – 34
Fiber – 1

[]Bacon-Wrapped Drumsticks

Serves: 4-6
Time: 25 minutes

Eat like a Viking with bacon-wrapped drumsticks. Removing the skin helps the chicken absorb the smoky goodness of the bacon, while a sauce made from balsamic vinegar, chicken broth, and seasoned with rosemary and garlic brings it all together.

Ingredients:
3 pounds of chicken drumsticks, skin removed
8 bacon slices
1/2 cup chicken broth
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon fresh, packed rosemary leaves
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt

Directions:
1. Season the drumsticks with salt and pepper.
2. Wrap a slice of bacon around each drumstick.
3. Put half in a 6-quart pressure cooker.
4. Turn on the “browning” setting and cook the drumsticks all over until they’re brown.
5. Transfer to a plate.
6. Brown the other half of the drumsticks.
7. Add the first batch back into the cooker.
8. Sprinkle in garlic and rosemary.
9. Pour over the vinegar and broth in a corner, so you don’t wash off the spices.
10. Close the lid.
11. Cook on high pressure for 15 minutes.
12. When time is up, unplug the cooker.
13. Wait for the pressure to come down naturally.
14. Move the legs to a platter.
15. Stir the sauce before spooning over the drumsticks.

Nutritional Information (1/4 recipe):
Total calories – 396
Protein – 47
Carbs – 1
Fat – 21
Fiber – 0

[]Southwestern Chicken Ziti

Serves: 4
Time: 8 minutes

This creamy, nutritious pasta is probably one of the easiest meals for a weekday dinner. You just throw everything in a cooker and in less than 10 minutes, you’re ready to eat!

Ingredients:
1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breast, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
One, 14-ounce can of diced tomatoes
One, 4.5-ounce can chopped mild green chiles
8-ounces dried whole-wheat ziti
1 1/2 cups chicken broth
1 cup drained and rinsed pinto beans
1/3 cup chopped, loosely-packed fresh cilantro leaves
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Directions:
1. Mix all the ingredients in a 6-quart cooker.
2. Lock the lid.
3. Cook on high for 8 minutes.
4. When time is up, quick-release the pressure.
5. Open the lid and stir.
6. Serve with cheese!

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 222
Protein – 17
Carbs – 29
Fat – 4
Fiber – 10.7

[]Honey-Lemon Chicken

Serves: 4-6
Time: 26 minutes

Honey and lemon are a great combination. The thick sweetness is cut by the tart acid, enticing the flavors with sweet and sour. Remember to keep the chicken carcass! You can use it to make homemade broth.

Ingredients:
One 3 1/2-4-pound whole chicken, cut into 8-9 parts with the giblets and neck removed
2 cups flour
1/2 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon minced loosely-packed fresh oregano leaves
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon honey
1 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Directions:
1. In a bowl, mix the salt, pepper, and flour together.
2. Coat the chicken pieces.
3. Heat the olive oil in a 6-quart cooker on the “browning” setting.
4. Add half of the chicken pieces and brown.
5. Brown the other half of the chicken.
6. Pour in the vinegar and lemon juice, and deglaze the pot.
7. Toss in the honey, oregano, and red pepper flakes.
8. Pour in the broth and put the chicken in.
9. Close the lid.
10. Cook on high pressure for 18 minutes.
11. When time is up, quick-release.
12. Unlock the lid.
13. Serve!

Cooking Tip:

If you want a sweeter sauce, double the honey.

Nutritional Information (1/5 recipe):
Total calories – 767
Protein – 80
Carbs – 37
Fat – 32
Fiber – 0

[]Turkey Sausage + Rice Casserole

Serves: 4-6
Time: About 40 minutes

Casseroles make great dinners and leftovers because they’re so easy and tasty. This casserole is made from lean turkey sausage, rice, and mushrooms. Other flavors like sage, fennel, and fruity white wine add depth and earthiness.

Ingredients:
1 pound mild Italian turkey sausage
8-ounces of sliced white button mushrooms
2 3/4 cups chicken broth
1 1/2 cups basmati rice
1/4 cup finely-grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup Pinot Grigio
1/4 cup packed chopped fresh parsley
1 chopped yellow onion
2 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon dried sage
1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Directions:
1. Melt the butter in a 6-quart pressure cooker and add the onion.
2. Cook for about 4 minutes or until the onion becomes soft.
3. Toss in the mushrooms and stir-cook for 5 minutes.
4. Add the turkey sausage and brown for 4 minutes.
5. Add the fennel seeds, sage, salt, and pepper.
6. Add the rice and stir for about 1 minute.
7. Pour in the wine and deglaze the pot.
8. Add the broth and stir.
9. Close the lid.
10. Cook on high for 15 minutes.
11. When time is up, quick-release the pressure.
12. Leave the lid on, and wait 10 minutes for the rice to finish cooking.
13. Open the pot.
14. Stir in the parsley and cheese before serving.

Nutritional Information (1/4 recipe):
Total calories – 481
Protein – 33
Carbs – 56
Fat – 13
Fiber – 1

[]Turkey Breast w/ Fennel, Sage, and Prosecco

Serves: 6
Time: 53 minutes

Turkey isn’t just for Thanksgiving, though this recipe would be a fantastic way to serve sliced turkey breast on that holiday. With only a few herbs and sparkling Italian wine, the turkey becomes sweet, yet rustic, that’s brightened by the fennel.

Ingredients:
One, 2-2 1/2-pound boneless turkey breast
1 big fennel bulb, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch slices
1 1/2 cups Prosecco
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon minced fresh sage
2 teaspoons lemon zest
1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
1. Heat olive oil in a 6-quart electric cooker on the “browning” setting.
2. Prepare the chicken breast with salt and pepper.
3. Brown in the cooker for about 3 minutes on each side.
4. Arrange the slices of fennel around the breast.
5. Add the lemon zest, fennel seeds, and sage.
6. Pour the Prosecoo into the cooker, but not directly on top of the turkey.
7. Close the lid.
8. Cook on high pressure for 37 minutes.
9. When time is up, unplug the cooker and let the pressure decrease naturally.
10. Take out the turkey and slice.
11. Serve with the sauce on top.

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 326
Protein – 37
Carbs – 6
Fat – 11
Fiber – 1

[]Turkey Thighs w/ Sage, Maple Syrup, and Parsnips

Serves: 4
Time: About 37 minutes

There are a lot of delicious flavors going on in this dish – juicy turkey, sweet maple syrup, earthy thyme, and sweet-yet-nutty parsnips. Turkey thighs are cheap, and the pressure cooker ensures they are cooked perfectly every time.

Ingredients:
Two, 1 1/4-1 1/2-pound bone-in turkey thighs
4 big peeled parsnips
1 medium-sized halved and sliced red onion
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons minced fresh sage
1/4 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup maple syrup
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions:
1. Melt the butter in your pressure cooker.
2. Add the turkey thighs to brown.
3. Brown for three minutes on each side, or until the skin is very brown.
4. Move to a bowl.
5. Add the onion and cook, stirring, for 4 minutes.
6. Add in the sage, salt, pepper, and cinnamon.
7. After 30 seconds, pour in the broth and maple syrup to deglaze the pot.
8. Put the meat back in the cooker.
9. Secure the pressure cooker lid.
10. Cook on high pressure for 22 minutes.
11. Quick-release the pressure.
12. Open the pot and put the parsnips in the cooker.
13. Close the lid again.
14. Cook on high pressure for another 15 minutes.
15. Quick-release.
16. Move the turkey to a plate and slice in half.
17. Serve with sauce and parsnips.

Nutritional Information (1/4 recipe):
Total calories – 412
Protein – 47
Carbs – 43
Fat – 14
Fiber – 4.9

[]Turkey Stew w/ Thyme and Apples

Serves: 4
Time: About 45 minutes

This chunky stew combines all the best flavors of autumn – turkey, apples, and thyme. It’s a great option for chilly evenings and a great way to use up fresh apples.

Ingredients:
Two, 1 1/4-1 1/2 pounds of bone-in turkey thighs
1 1/4 cups chicken broth
2 big peeled, cored, and quartered green apples
2 tablespoons apple jelly
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon flour
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon butter
1 chopped red onion
2 fresh thyme sprigs
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Directions:
1. Whisk the flour and broth together until smooth in a bowl.
2. Melt the butter in your pressure cooker.
3. Prepare the turkey thighs with salt and pepper.
4. Lay in the pressure cooker and brown for 3 minutes on each side, until deep brown.
5. Move to a bowl.
6. Cook the onion in the pressure cooker for about 2 minutes.
7. Stir in the thyme and jelly.
8. When bubbly, pour in the broth/flour mixture.
9. Put the meat back in the cooker and toss in the apples.
10. Pour in the vinegar on top.
11. Close the lid.
12. Cook on high pressure for 37 minutes.
13. When time is up, quick-release the pressure.
14. Unlock the cooker and move the thighs to a cutting board.
15. After a few minutes of cooling, pull off the skin and slice.
16. Put the chunks back in the cooker and stir.
17. Serve!

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 341
Protein – 45
Carbs – 17
Fat – 17
Fiber – 2

[]Sour Cherry-Duck w/ Port Wine

Serves: 4
Time: About 1 hour

Duck with cherries is a classic combination, but the spice paste with fresh ginger, cardamom, cinnamon, cumin, and coriander kicks things up a notch.

Ingredients:
4 duck leg-and-thigh quarters
4 tablespoons butter, cut into chunks
2 small halved and sliced red onions
2/3 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup tawny port
1/4 cup dried sour cherries
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

Directions:
1. In a bowl, mash the garlic, ginger, vinegar, and dry spices into a paste.
2. In your pressure cooker, melt the butter.
3. Brown the duck, skin-side down, for 4 minutes on each side.
4. Set aside.
5. Pour out the fat, leaving about 1-2 tablespoons in the cooker.
6. Toss the onion and cherries in the pot and cook for 10 minutes.
7. Add the paste from the first step and stir for 2 minutes.
8. Put the duck back in the cooker, skin-side down, and pour in the port and broth.
9. Lock the cooker.
10. Cook on high for 37 minutes.
11. Quick-release the pressure.
12. Serve!

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 413
Protein – 28
Carbs – 15
Fat – 23
Fiber – 2

[]Ginger-Spiced Duck w/ Dried Apples

Serves: 4
Time: About 48 minutes

This meal has ginger coming from two sources: ground ginger and candied ginger. That lovely sweet-spicy contrast goes so well with duck, and is enriched even further with acidic onion and chewy, sweet dried apples.

Ingredients:
4 duck leg-and-thigh quarters
1 medium-sized, chopped yellow onion
1 cup packed, chopped dried apples
1 1/4 cups dry, fruity white wine
2 tablespoons minced candied ginger
1 tablespoon peanut oil
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

Directions:
1. Heat the peanut oil in your pressure cooker.
2. Prepare the duck meat with salt, pepper, and ground ginger.
3. Brown in the cooker for 4 minutes on each side.
4. Move to a platter and drain all but a few tablespoons of the fat from the pressure cooker.
5. Cook the onion for 3 minutes.
6. Pour in the wine and deglaze.
7. Toss in the apples and candied ginger.
8. Put the meat back into the cooker, skin-side up.
9. Close the lid.
10. Cook on high pressure for 37 minutes.
11. When time is up, quick-release the pressure.
12. Serve!

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 388
Protein – 28
Carbs – 26
Fat – 15
Fiber – 1

[]Duck w/ Blackberry Jam and Brandy

Serves: 4
Time: About 47 minutes

If you want a rich winter meal, this duck recipe is perfect. It calls for decadent ingredients like heavy cream, brandy, and blackberry jam. Fruity flavors go exceptionally well with duck, while the addition of spices like cloves and allspice help keep things from being too sweet.

Ingredients:
4 duck leg-and-thigh quarters
2 medium-sized, halved and sliced shallots
1 sliced carrot
1/2 cup brandy
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup blackberry jam
1/4 cup chicken broth
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon butter
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

Directions:
1. In your cooker, melt the butter.
2. Prepare the duck with salt and pepper.
3. Brown with the skin-side facing down, for 4 minutes on each side.
4. Move to a bowl and pour out the fat in the cooker, leaving 1-2 tablespoons.
5. Toss in the carrot and shallots, stirring until the shallots are tender.
6. Deglaze the pot with the brandy.
7. Add in the broth, cloves, thyme, jam, and allspice.
8. Put the duck back in the cooker, skin-side up this time, and close the lid.
9. Cook on high pressure for 37 minutes.
10. When the timer goes, quick-release the pressure.
11. Move the duck to a platter to a rest.
12. Turn the cooker back on to its “browning” setting and heat the sauce till it bubbles.
13. Add in the cream and stir for 2 minutes.
14. When it has reduced and the cream is all blended in, serve over the duck.

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
[Total calories – 516
Protein – 29
Carbs – 24
Fat – 23
Fiber – 1]

[] Chapter 9 – Soups + Sides

[]Coconut Chicken Soup

Serves: 6
Time: Under 10 minutes

Classic chicken soup gets an Asian twist with coconut milk, bamboo shoots, and ginger. Add in a serrano chile and you get a delicious sinus-clearing experience that’s great for when you’re sick.

Ingredients:
2 sliced boneless, skinless chicken breasts
4 cups chicken broth
1 1/2 cups coconut milk
1 stemmed, cored, and chopped medium-sized red bell pepper
One, 15-ounce can of drained and rinsed straw mushrooms
One, 8-ounce can of drained and rinsed sliced bamboo shoots
1/4 cup fresh lime juice
1/4 cup loosely-packed, chopped cilantro leaves
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
1 stemmed and sliced serrano chile
2 teaspoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt

Directions:
1. Mix the chicken, broth, bell pepper, coconut milk, bamboo, mushrooms, ginger, chile, and salt in a 6-quart pressure cooker.
2. Close the lid.
3. Cook on high pressure for 8 minutes.
4. Quick-release the pressure.
5. Turn the cooker on to the “brown” setting.
6. Mix in the sugar and lemon juice.
7. Simmer for a minute, stirring, so the flavors blend.
8. Top with cilantro and enjoy!

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 357
Protein – 29
Carbs – 7
Fat – 25
Fiber – 1

[]Carrot-Ginger Soup

Serves: 6
Time: About 30 minutes

This smooth, spicy-sweet soup is a great alternative to chicken noodle if you’re feeling under the weather. The ginger livens up the senses, while the carrots and sweet vermouth balance out the spiciness.

Ingredients:
1 1/2 pounds peeled and chopped medium-sized carrots
3 1/2 cups chicken broth
1 cup plain yogurt
1/2 cup dry vermouth
3 tablespoons candied ginger
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Directions:
1. Mix the broth, ginger, and carrots in your pressure cooker.
2. In a separate bowl, whisk the flour and vermouth together.
3. Stir into the cooker.
4. Close the lid.
5. Cook on high pressure for 10 minutes.
6. When time is up, unplug the cooker, so the pressure comes down gradually on its own.
7. When the pressure is gone, open the pot.
8. Stir in the yogurt, salt, and pepper.
9. Using an immersion blender or regular blender, puree.
10. Serve!

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 112
Protein – 4
Carbs – 15
Fat – 2
Fiber – 1

[]Chicken + Lime Soup

Serves: 4
Time: 22 minutes

Summer flavors like lime, avocado, and jalapeno really brighten up this soup. You also get a really strong chicken flavor, because you cook the chicken with the skin-on and remove it later. If you aren’t a big fan of spicy, make sure to scoop out the jalapeno chile seeds.

Ingredients:
2, 1-pound bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts
6 cups chicken broth
2 halved, pitted, peeled, and diced avocados
1/2 cup fresh lime juice
1 chopped yellow onion
Up to 1 medium-sized stemmed and minced jalapeno chile
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon minced oregano
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon black pepper

Directions:
1. Heat the oil in a 6-quart pressure cooker.
2. Prepare the chicken by seasoning with salt and pepper.
3. Put in the cooker and brown for 2 minutes per side.
4. Both to a bowl.
5. Toss in the onion to cook until clear.
6. Add in the jalapeno, oregano, and garlic.
7. Stir for about 1 minute.
8. Deglaze the pot with the broth.
9. Put the chicken back into the pot.
10. Secure the lid.
11. Cook on high pressure for 18 minutes.
12. When time is up, quick-release the pressure.
13. Open the lid and remove the chicken.
14. After it rests for a few minutes, take off the skin.
15. Debone and chop into bite-sized pieces.
16. Return to the pot, along with the lime juice and avocados.
17. Serve hot!

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 290
Protein – 31.5
Carbs – 10.5
Fat – 13.7
Fiber – 4.1

[]Shrimp Bisque

Serves: 6
Time: 22-25 minutes

This creamy, aromatic bisque takes some hands-on work, but it’s mostly just whisking. The liquid part of the soup uses leftover shrimp shells, so you get a really good shrimp flavor as a base in addition to the actual shrimp meat. Brandy and heavy cream make this soup particularly decadent.

Ingredients:
1 1/2 pounds of shrimp
4 cups chicken broth
1 halved yellow onion
1 halved carrot
1 large halved, washed, and sliced leek (white and pale green parts only)
1 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup brandy
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 tablespoon minced garlic

Directions:
1. Clean the shrimp by peeling them and removing the veins.
2. Save the shells.
3. Chop up the shrimp meat and chill in the fridge.
4. While that chills, mix the broth, carrot, onion, and shrimp shells in your pressure cooker.
5. Close the lid.
6. Cook on high pressure for 15 minutes.
7. Quick-release the pressure.
8. Strain the liquid through a seive.
9. Throw out any solids and keep the liquid in a bowl for later.
10. Heat the butter and olive oil on the “browning” setting in your cooker until the butter melts.
11. Add the leek and garlic, and stir until they are soft and aromatic.
12. Whisk the flour in the pot so the veggies are coated.
13. Slowly pour the soup liquid into the pot, whisking quickly, so the flour dissolves.
14. Add the brandy, tomato paste, and heavy cream.
15. Mix well until smooth.
16. Keep whisking for 2 minutes.
17. Add the shrimp and turn off the cooker.
18. Put the lid on the cooker, but do not lock it.
19. Wait 5 minutes while the trapped, residual heat cooks the shrimp.
20. When they are pink and firm, serve!

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 367
Protein – 24
Carbs – 4
Fat – 22
Fiber – 0

[]Pinto Beans w/ Chile, Bacon, + Pecans

Serves: 4
Time: 25-30 minutes (not counting an overnight bean soak)

Beans are packed with fiber, protein, and antioxidants. The pressure cooker is the best way to cook beans, because it retains all that nutrition, but makes the beans easier to digest. This recipe uses bacon, because everything is better with bacon, tasty green chiles, and pecans.

Ingredients:
1 cup pinto beans (soaked overnight in a bowl of water for at least 12 hours)
3 slices chopped bacon
1 medium-sized, chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped mild green chiles
1/2 cup chopped pecans
1 tablespoon butter
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon ground coriander

Directions:
1. Drain your soaked beans in a colander.
2. Pour into a 6-quart pressure cooker.
3. Add just enough cool water until the beans are covered by 2 inches.
4. Secure the lid.
5. Cook on high pressure for 18 minutes.
6. Quick-release the pressure.
7. Scoop out 1 cup of the liquid in the pot and set aside.
8. Drain the beans and discard the rest of the liquid.
9. Melt your butter in the pot on the “browning” setting.
10. Add the pecans and bacon and brown for about 3 minutes, stirring.
11. Put in the onion and continue to stir-cook for another 3 minutes.
12. Add the oregano, cumin, and coriander.
13. When they become fragrant, put the beans, 1/4 of the cooking liquid, and chiles in the cooker.
14. Keep cooking and stirring until the beans are heated through.
15. When the dish starts to get too dry, keep adding the reserved liquid 1/4-cup at a time.
16. Serve!

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 240
Protein – 9
Carbs – 17
Fat – 16
Fiber – 4.3

[]Lemony Risotto w/ Peas

Serves: 7
Time: 15 minutes

Risotto is a delicious side to meat entrees, like a nice steak or pork tenderloin. This risotto is flavored with fresh lemon and studded with baby peas.

Ingredients:
3 1/2 cups vegetable broth
1 1/2 cups arborio rice
1 1/2 cups frozen baby peas
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese
1 medium-sized chopped onion
1 tablespoon olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
1. Melt 1 tablespoon of the butter with the oil in your pressure cooker.
2. Add the onion and cook for 3-4 minutes until clear.
3. Add the rice and stir for 3 minutes.
4. Pour in the lemon juice and 3 cups of the broth.
5. Secure the lid.
6. Cook on high pressure for 5 minutes.
7. Quick-release the pressure.
8. Turn the cooker back to the “browning” setting.
9. Simmer and add the last 1/2 cup of broth.
10. Stir for 2 minutes.
11. Lastly, add the cheese, last tablespoon of butter, parsley, and lemon zest.
12. Season with salt and pepper.
13. Serve!

Nutritional Information (1/7 of recipe):
Total calories – 278
Protein – 6.2
Carbs – 62
Fat – 2.1
Fiber – 3.3

[]Spicy Cauliflower Citrus Salad

Serves: 4
Time: Under 10 minutes

If you’re tired of salads that use lettuce, try this cauliflower-broccoli salad. You use two kinds of cauliflower, one of which is a Romanesco cauliflower. This cauliflower is nuttier than regular cauliflower, so it helps add some more depth to the salad. The vinaigrette is a real winner and combines sweet, spicy, and salty.

Ingredients:
1 pound of broccoli florets
1 small cauliflower with florets broken up
1 small Romanesco cauliflower with florets broken up
2 sliced, seedless oranges
The juice and zest of one orange
1 chopped hot pepper
4 anchovies
4 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon capers
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
1. Put all the ingredients from the second list into an airtight container and shake. This is your vinaigrette for the salad.
2. Pour in 1 cup of water into your pressure cooker.
3. Lower in the steamer basket.
4. Put the cauliflower florets in the basket.
5. Close the lid.
6. Cook on low pressure for 6 minutes.
7. Quick-release the pressure.
8. Remove the florets to a platter and top with orange slices.
9. Pour over the vinaigrette and serve!

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 260
Protein – 6
Carbs – 33
Fat – 14
Fiber – 11

[]Buttery Cabbage w/ Bacon

Serves: 8
Time: About 15 minutes

Tender cabbage leaves cook with butter and bacon in a pressure cooker for a low-calorie, low-carb side dish that would be perfect with pork tenderloin. Cabbage is cheap, but rich in vitamins, which is the best combination in my mind.

Ingredients:
1 head cored cabbage
2 cups chicken broth
1/4 cup butter
3 slices of bacon, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
1. Chop the cabbage into 1-2 inch bits.
2. Cook the bacon in a dry pressure cooker on the “brown” setting for 4-5 minutes.
3. Add the butter and melt.
4. Pour the cabbage into the pot along with the chicken broth.
5. Season with salt and black pepper.
6. Toss the cabbage, so it’s evenly-coated.
7. Close the lid.
8. Cook on high pressure for 3 minutes.
9. When the timer goes off, quick-release the pressure.
10. Open the cooker.
11. Serve!

Nutritional Information (1/8 of recipe):
Total calories – 140
Protein – 3.4
Carbs – 8.9
Fat – 10.8
Fiber – 3.7

[]Lemoned Broccoli

Serves: 4-6
Time: 15 minutes

Fresh and ready for spring, this vegetable side dish is anything but boring. Even kids will eat up their broccoli when it’s seasoned with fresh lemon and plenty of salt and pepper.

Ingredients:
4 slices of lemon
Just under 4 cups of broccoli florets
1/2 cup water
Salt and pepper

Directions:
1. Pour the water into your pressure cooker.
2. Squeeze the lemon slices over the broccoli.
3. Put the broccoli in the cooker.
4. Sprinkle on salt and pepper.
5. Secure the pressure cooker lid.
6. Cook on high pressure for 2 minutes.
7. When time is up, unplug the cooker and wait for the pressure to come down naturally.
8. Serve!

Nutritional Information (1/4 recipe):
Total calories – 141
Protein – 2
Carbs – 21
Fat – 5
Fiber – 2.4

[]Curried Red Kidney Beans

Serves: 6
Time: Under 20 minutes (not counting overnight bean soak)

Ingredients:
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups dried red kidney beans (soaked overnight)
4 tablespoons butter
1 medium-sized, chopped red onion
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
1 tablespoon cumin seeds
Up to 1 stemmed, seeded, and minced serrano chile
1/4 cup tomato paste
1/4 cup minced fresh cilantro
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric

Directions:
1. Drain your soaked beans.
2. On the “browning” setting, melt the butter in a 6-quart pressure cooker.
3. Add the onion and cook until they become soft.
4. Toss in the chile, garlic, and ginger.
5. Stir until they become aromatic.
6. Pour in the broth, tomato paste, cumin seeds, turmeric, and salt.
7. Stir well.
8. Add the beans and stir again.
9. Secure the lid.
10. Cook on high pressure for 15 minutes.
11. When the timer goes off, quick-release the pressure.
12. Before serving, stir in the cilantro.

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 142
Protein – 5
Carbs – 12
Fat – 7
Fiber – 3.2

[] Chapter 10 – Vegan

[]Vegetable Ragù

Serves: 4
Time: About 10 minutes

This vegetable ragù has curry-like flavors, but if your family isn’t into spicy, it won’t be strong at all. The dish cooks in less than 10 minutes, so it’s great for a fast weekday dinner. For a more complete meal, serve over pasta or rice.

Ingredients:
1 big, chopped yellow onion
1 3/4 cups crushed tomatoes
1 cup of halved baby zucchini
1 cup of trimmed and halved sugar snap peas
1 cup of peas
1/3 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

Directions:
1. Heat the olive in a 6-quart pressure cooker.
2. When hot, add the onion and stir-cook until it softens.
3. Add in the ginger, coriander, cumin, garlic, cinnamon, salt, and cloves and cook for less than a minute.
4. Add the zucchini, tomatoes, and brown sugar.
5. Stir until the sugar dissolves.
6. Close the lid.
7. Cook on high pressure for 3 minutes.
8. Quick-release the pressure.
9. Open the lid and turn the cooker back to the “browning” setting.
10. When the sauce is simmering, add the peas and sugar snaps.
11. Simmer for 2 minutes, stirring, until the peas are tender.
12. Serve!

Cooking Tip:

If you’re using frozen peas, make sure they’re thoroughly thawed so they don’t cool the sauce.

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 301
Protein – 5
Carbs – 63
Fat – 19
Fiber – 4.8

[]Lentil Sloppy Joe’s

Serves: 6
Time: About 50 minutes

Instead of meat, this recipe uses lentils, which are rich and get a “meaty” flavor from the soy sauce. Dark brown sugar adds an element of sweetness, but if you want sweeter, serve with ketchup.

Ingredients:
3 cups vegetable broth
2 cups green lentils
One, 14-ounce can of crushed tomatoes
1 medium-sized, chopped yellow onion
1 medium-sized stemmed, cored, and chopped red bell pepper
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon packed dark brown sugar
1 teaspoon black pepper

Directions:
1. Heat the oil in a 6-quart pressure cooker.
2. When hot, add the bell pepper and onion until soft and clear.
3. Pour in the veggie broth.
4. Add the tomatoes, soy sauce, lentils, mustard, brown sugar, and black pepper.
5. When the sugar has dissolved, secure the lid.
6. Cook on high pressure for 27 minutes.
7. When time is up, unplug the cooker.
8. Let the pressure come down on its own. This should take about 18-22 minutes.
9. Open the cooker and stir before serving.

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 164
Protein – 9
Carbs – 38
Fat – 3
Fiber – 5.3

[]Ratatouille

Serves: 6
Time: 12-15 minutes

This dish from France is a great way to use fresh summer vegetables. In this pressure cooker version, you cook everything together in one pot instead of individually cooking the veggies and layering them later.

Ingredients:
2 pounds chopped Roma tomatoes
1 pound eggplant, stemmed and cut into 1-inch cubes
2 medium-sized stemmed, cored, and chopped red bell peppers
2 medium-sized chopped zucchini
1 chopped red onion
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons dry vermouth
1 tablespoon canned tomato paste
1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Directions:
1. In a small bowl, whisk the tomato paste and vermouth together.
2. Heat the oil in a 6-quart pressure cooker on the “browning” setting.
3. Toss in the onion and cook for 4 minutes, or until soft.
4. Add the garlic and cook for about a minute.
5. Add the bell peppers, eggplant, and zucchini.
6. Cook and stir for a minute.
7. Toss in the tomatoes, thyme, rosemary, salt, and pepper.
8. Stir for 2 minutes.
9. Add the vermouth mixture and coat the vegetables.
10. Secure the lid.
11. Cook on high pressure for 6 minutes.
12. Quick-release the pressure.
13. Open the cooker and stir before serving.

Nutritional Information (1 cup):
Total calories – 154
Protein – 1.7
Carbs – 11.9
Fat – 12
Fiber – 3.2

[]Eggplant + Potato Stew

Serves: 4
Time: 10-12 minutes

For a stew, this recipe comes together in a snap. Velvety eggplant and fresh tomatoes give the stew the bulk of its flavor, while potatoes add hardiness.

Ingredients:
3 large beefsteak tomatoes
2 big Yukon gold potatoes
1 big stemmed eggplant, cut into 1-inch chunks
1 medium-sized chopped yellow onion
1/2 cup veggie broth
1/2 cup packed, chopped celery leaves
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons canned tomato paste
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Directions:
1. Heat the olive oil in your pressure cooker.
2. When hot, toss in the onion and sauté for 3 minutes.
3. Add the garlic and red pepper flakes and stir for 30 seconds.
4. Using a box grater, grate the tomatoes into the cooker.
5. Pour in the broth and tomato paste.
6. Stir until the paste has dissolved and the sauce begins to simmer.
7. Toss in the eggplant, tomatoes, celery leaves, and salt.
8. After stirring, close the lid.
9. Cook on high pressure for 7 minutes.
10. When the timer goes off, quick-release the pressure.
11. Stir before serving.

Nutritional Information (1/4 recipe):
Total calories – 182
Protein – 3.2
Carbs – 23.7
Fat – 9.4
Fiber – 7.6

[]Collard Green Wraps w/ Farro + Black-Eyed Peas

Serves: 4
Time: 12 minutes

Farro is one of the trendy ancient grains right now. It has a very nutty flavor and is packed with fiber and protein. Both the farro and black-eyed peas re infused with delicious flavors from the sweet basil, soy sauce, and pepper sauce.

Ingredients:
4 washed Collard greens
2 cups semi-pearled farro
1 cup vegetable sock
1 cup black-eyed peas
3 minced garlic cloves
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 medium-sized diced yellow onion
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon sweet basil
1/2 teaspoon thyme
1/2 teaspoon pepper sauce

Directions:
1. Put the farro in a dry pressure cooker and toast.
2. Add the olive oil, basil, thyme, onion, and garlic.
3. Stir-cook for about 2 minutes.
4. Pour in the vegetable stock, 1 cup of water, and the peas.
5. Close the lid and cook for 10 minutes on high pressure.
6. When time is up, unplug the cooker and wait 10 minutes.
7. Quick-release the rest of the pressure.
8. Pour in the soy sauce and pepper sauce.
9. Stir well.
10. Serve on the collard greens and enjoy!

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 297
Protein – 12.8
Carbs – 44
Fat – 7.8
Fiber – 6.1

[]Zucchini Pesto

Serves: 4
Time: 10 minutes

This easy pesto is made with just six ingredients and is a great alternative to regular ol’ pasta sauce. It’s also a great way to use up zucchini, which is in season in the summer.

Ingredients:
1 1/2 pounds chopped zucchini
1 bunch basil leaves
2 minced garlic cloves
1 tablespoon olive oil (plus another tablespoon)
1 chopped onion
1 1/2 teaspoons of salt

Directions:
1. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in your pressure cooker.
2. Cook the onion until it softens.
3. Toss in the zucchini, salt, and 3/4 cup water.
4. Secure the lid.
5. Cook on high pressure for 3 minutes.
6. When time is up, quick-release the pressure.
7. Take off the lid.
8. Stir in the basil leaves and garlic.
9. Puree with an immersion blender or regular blender.
10. Serve with pasta and olive oil.

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 108
Protein – 3
Carbs – 9
Fat – 7
Fiber – 1.5

[]Mushroom + Barley Soup

Serves: 4-6
Time: 30 minutes

Earthy and tasty, this mushroom + barley soup is perfect for autumn and winter nights. It uses both dried and fresh mushrooms, as well as the classic combination of celery, onions, and carrots.

Ingredients:
6 cups boiling vegetable stock
1/2 pound fresh sliced mushrooms
1/2-ounces sliced dried mushrooms (soaked 20-30 minutes)
2 cups chopped onions
1/2 cup pearl barley
2 diced celery stalks
1 bay leaf
1 thinly-sliced carrot
1 1/2 teaspoons dried dill
2 teaspoons water
1 teaspoon minced garlic
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
1. Pour 2 teaspoons of water into your pressure cooker.
2. Cook the garlic and onions for 1 minute.
3. Add the rest of the ingredients and lock the lid.
4. Cook on high pressure for 18 minutes.
5. When the timer goes off, unplug the cooker.
6. Wait 10 minutes.
7. Quick-release the rest of the pressure.
8. Open the cooker and pick out the bay leaf.
9. Add more seasonings if necessary before serving.

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 208
Protein – 6
Carbs – 32
Fat – 8
Fiber – 5

[]Warm Red Potato + Green Bean Salad

Serves: 6
Time: About 10 minutes

This vegan side dish is easy to throw together and is served with a mustardy vinaigrette that includes bittersweet tarragon and plenty of olive oil.

Ingredients:
2 1/2 pounds small red potatoes, cut in half
3/4 pound of trimmed green beans, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
6 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons packed, minced fresh tarragon leaves
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Directions:
1. Put the potatoes in a 6-quart pressure cooker and cover with cool water until they’re submerged by 1 inch.
2. Secure the lid.
3. Cook on high pressure for 4 minutes.
4. When time is up, quick-release the pressure.
5. Open the cooker.
6. Drain the potatoes over the green beans, so the hot water runs over them and through the sieve.
7. Wait 5 minutes for the potatoes to steam the beans.
8. In a bowl, mix the vinegar, tarragon, mustard, salt, and pepper together.
9. Slowly whisk in the olive oil in a steady stream.
10. Put the potatoes and green beans in the bowl and toss.
11. Serve!

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 271
Protein – 4
Carbs – 36
Fat – 14
Fiber – 5.9

[]Brussels Sprouts in a Maple-Mustard Sauce

Serves: 3-4
Time: 5 minutes

Brussels sprouts can be a hard item to enjoy, even with their nutritional value. However, a spicy-sweet dressing made from Dijon and maple syrup overwhelms any of the sprout’s bitterness.

Ingredients:
3 cups of Brussels sprouts
1/2 cup diced onion
1/2 cup veggie stock
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon maple syrup
2 teaspoons pure sesame oil
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
1. Pour the sesame oil in your pressure cooker and heat.
2. Add the onion and cook until soft.
3. In a bowl, mix the mustard and veggie stock together until smooth.
4. Pour into the pressure cooker.
5. Add the Brussels sprouts and stir.
6. Drizzle the maple syrup on top and close the lid.
7. Cook on high pressure for 2 minutes.
8. Quick-release the pressure.
9. Move the Brussels sprouts and sauce to a serving bowl.
10. Season with salt and pepper.

Nutritional Information (1/3 recipe):
Total calories – 87
Protein – 4
Carbs – 15
Fat – 4
[_ Fiber -3.3 _]

[]Smashed Sweet Potatoes w/ Ginger and Pineapple

Serves: 8
Time: 13-15 minutes

If you’re looking for a great autumn or Thanksgiving side dish, this is it. Sweet potatoes cook perfectly in a pressure cooker, and become moist and sweet-spicy with pineapple juice, ground ginger, nutmeg, and cinnamon.

Ingredients:
4 pounds medium-sized sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 1/2-inch chunks
3 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons frozen, thawed pineapple juice concentrate (unsweetened)
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions:
1. Pour 3 cups of water in a pressure cooker with the sweet potatoes.
2. Close the lid.
3. Cook on high pressure for 12 minutes.
4. Quick-release the pressure.
5. Drain the sweet potatoes and set aside for now.
6. Turn the cooker on its “browning” setting and melt the butter.
7. Add the ginger, nutmeg, and cinnamon and stir for 1 minute.
8. Pour in the pineapple juice concentrate and salt.
9. Turn off the cooker.
10. Add the potatoes and smash with a wooden spoon.
11. Serve!

Nutritional Information (1/8 of recipe):
Total calories – 241
Protein – 4
Carbs – 48
Fat – 5
[_ Fiber -6.8 _]

[] Chapter 11- Desserts

[]White Chocolate Lemon Pudding

Serves: 6
Time: 25-30 minutes

This rich pudding is great during the summertime. It’s very creamy, but the lemon zest and extract help brighten up the richness. If you prefer warm pudding, eat your ramekin right away after a few minutes of cooling.

Ingredients:
4 big room-temperature, whisked egg yolks
6-ounces of chopped white chocolate
1 cup half-and-half
1 cup heavy cream
1 tablespoon finely-grated lemon zest
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon lemon extract

Directions:
1. Put the white chocolate in a bowl for later.
2. In a saucepan, mix the half-and-half and cream on low-heat until bubbles form around the pan’s edges.
3. Pour this over the white chocolate and quickly whisk until melted.
4. Add the whisked egg yolks, zest, extract, and sugar.
5. Pour into six 1/2-cup ramekins you know are safe for a pressure cooker, and cover tightly with foil.
6. Pour 2 cups of water into your pressure cooker.
7. Lower in a steamer rack.
8. Put the ramekins in the rack, being sure you don’t stack them directly on top of each other.
9. Close the lid.
10. Cook on high pressure for 15 minutes.
11. When time is up, unplug the cooker.
12. Wait for the pressure to come down on its own.
13. Carefully remove the ramekins to a cooling rack.
14. Take off the foil and let rest for a few minutes before serving, or chill in the fridge for up to 3 days.

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 369
Protein – 6
Carbs – 19
Fat – 30
Fiber – 1

[]Classic Rice Pudding

Serves: 8
Time: 13 minutes

Rice pudding is a classic dessert right alongside Grandma’s apple pie. It can be served hot or cold (I like cold), with mix-ins like nuts and raisins.

Ingredients:
2 cups whole milk
1 1/2 cups water
1 cup arborio rice
2 eggs
3/4 cup raisins
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions:
1. In your pressure cooker, mix the water, rice, and salt.
2. Lock the lid.
3. Cook on high pressure for 3 minutes.
4. When time is up, unplug the cooker.
5. Wait 10 minutes for the pressure to come down.
6. Quick-release any leftover pressure.
7. Pour in 1 1/2 cups of milk and sugar into the pot.
8. In a bowl, mix the eggs with 1/2 cup milk and vanilla.
9. Pour through a strainer (fine-mesh) into the cooker.
10. Choose the “sauté” setting and cook until it starts to boil.
11. Turn off the cooker again.
12. Carefully remove the inner pot from the cooker.
13. Mix in the raisins.
14. As the pudding cools, it thickens. Serve right away, or refrigerate for a thick, cold treat.
15. Serve with a dash of cinnamon.

Nutritional Information (1/8 of recipe):
Total calories – 272
Protein – 7
Carbs – 52
Fat – 5
Fiber – 1

[]Cinnamon-Raisin Bread Pudding

Serves: 4-6
Time: About 45 minutes

Rich, buttery bread pudding with plump raisins and caramel sauce is a great dessert for brunch, and can be served hot or cold. I highly recommend sticking the pudding in the oven to get a crispier top when it’s done.

Ingredients:
7 slices of cubed and toasted cinnamon bread
4 tablespoons butter, melted
3 cups whole milk
3 beaten eggs
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 cup raisins
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions:
1. Mix the melted butter, sugar, eggs, milk, vanilla, salt, and cinnamon in a big bowl.
2. Fold in the bread and raisins.
3. Wait 20 minutes until the bread absorbs the milk. 4. When this is ready, put the pudding into a greased 1 1/2 -quart baking dish that you know fits into your pressure cooker.
5. Cover with foil.
6. Prepare the cooker with 1 1/2 cups water and lay down a trivet inside.
7. Put the dish on the trivet.
8. Close the lid.
9. Cook on high for 20 minutes.
10. Quick-release the pressure.
11. Take out the bread pudding. If you want a crispier top, put in the oven at 350-degrees for 5 minutes.

For the caramel pecan sauce:

3/4 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup toasted, chopped pecans
1/4 cup corn syrup
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons heavy cream
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
A dash of salt

Mix the corn syrup, heavy cream, salt, butter, and brown sugar in a
saucepan. Keep on medium-heat, stirring, until the sauce starts to boil.
Turn down the heat to a simmer until the sauce becomes smooth. Add in
the vanilla and pecans before serving on top of the pudding.

Nutritional Information (1/4 of recipe):
Total calories – 620
Protein – 13
Carbs – 91
Fat – 23
Fiber – 3

[]Chocolate-Espresso Pudding

Serves: 6
Time: 25-30 minutes

Chocolate and espresso are delicious together. This pudding is like a fancy drink from a coffee shop. Because espresso powder has a very distinct coffee flavor, save this dessert for coffee-lovers.

Ingredients:
1 big, room-temperature egg
4 big, room-temperature, whisked egg yolks
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup half-and-half
1/2 cup sugar
1 tablespoon instant espresso
A pinch of dark cocoa powder

Directions:
1. In a bowl, whisk the half-and-half, espresso powder, and cream together.
2. Once the espresso has dissolved, whisk in the sugar, egg yolks, and whole egg.
3. Pour or ladle into six 1/2-cup ramekins and cover tightly with foil.
4. Sprinkle each ramekin with some dark cocoa powder.
5. Pour 2 cups of water into your pressure cooker.
6. Set the ramekins in the steamer basket and lower into the cooker.
7. Make sure the ramekins aren’t directly on top of each other.
8. Cook on high pressure for 15 minutes.
9. Reduce the pressure naturally by unplugging the cooker and waiting 10-14 minutes.
10. Open the lid and move the ramekins to a cooling rack.
11. If you want a soft, warm pudding, serve right away. For a set pudding, cool in the fridge.

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 264
Protein – 5
Carbs – 10
Fat – 22
Fiber – 1

[]Cherry-Almond Pudding Cake

Serves: 6
Time: 45-50 minutes

As a pudding cake, the texture of this dessert is beautifully moist, but slightly chewy. Sweet cherry jam, Amaretto, and ground almonds are an awesome flavor combination. For a non-alcoholic version, substitute almond-flavored syrup for the Amaretto.

Ingredients:
2 big, room-temperature eggs
8 tablespoons butter
3/4 cup finely-ground almonds
1/3 cup cherry jam
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup white sugar
1/4 cup packed dark brown sugar
3 tablespoons Amaretto (or almond-flavored syrup)
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions:
1. Grease the inside of a 2-quart, high-sided baking dish with butter.
2. Spread the cherry jam on the bottom of the dish.
3. Pour in 2 cups of water into the pressure cooker and lower in the rack.
4. Using a mixer, cream the butter and both sugars together for 5 minutes.
5. Add in the eggs one at a time until smooth.
6. Pour in the vanilla and Amaretto.
7. Toss in the almonds, flour, and salt on low speed.
8. Pour the batter into the baking dish.
9. Butter one side of a 12-inch square of foil and seal it butter-side down over the baking dish.
10. Lower the dish into the cooker.
11. Close the lid.
12. Cook on high pressure for 35 minutes.
13. Let the pressure come down naturally.
14. Open the lid and carefully remove the baking dish to a cooling rack.
15. After 5 minutes, turn the dish over on a serving platter.
16. Serve warm!

Nutritional Information (1/6 of recipe):
Total calories – 382
Protein – 5
Carbs – 39
Fat – 22
Fiber – 2

[]Maple Cheesecake w/ a Gingersnap Crust

Serves: 8
Time: 40 minutes (not counting chill time)

You have to wait at least 9 hours or overnight to enjoy this cheesecake, but the preparation is pretty easy, and the wait is totally worth it. The crust is made from melted butter and gingersnaps, while the cake itself is sweetened with maple syrup.

Ingredients:
1 pound regular cream cheese
1 1/4 cups gingersnap crumbs
5 tablespoons melted and cooled butter
1/2 cup maple syrup
2 big, room-temperature egg yolks
1 big, room-temperature egg
2 tablespoons flour
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions:
1. Mix the gingersnap crumbs and melted butter together in a small bowl.
2. Grease the inside of a 2-quart, high-sided baking dish that fits in a pressure cooker, or a 7-inch springform pan, if you have one.
3. Pour in the crumb/butter mixture and press down to create a crust on the bottom and halfway up the dish’s sides.
4. In a food processor, pulse the maple syrup and cream cheese together.
5. When smooth, continue running the processor and add in the egg yolks and whole egg one at a time.
6. Make sure the mixture is evenly-mixed before adding in the vanilla, flour, and salt.
7. Keep processing until totally creamy and smooth.
8. Pour the batter into the baking dish.
9. Prepare the pressure cooker by pouring in 2 cups of water.
10. Put the baking dish in the cooker.
11. Cook on high pressure for 25 minutes.
12. When time is up, unplug the cooker and wait 12-16 minutes for the pressure to come down.
13. Carefully remove the dish.
14. Cool for 1 hour before putting in the fridge for another 3 hours.
15. Turn the cheesecake over on to a serving platter, but do not slice yet.
16. Refrigerate for another 6 hours before cutting.

Nutritional Information (1/8 of recipe):
Total calories – 480
Protein – 7
Carbs – 20
Fat – 42
Fiber – 0

[]Dried Figs in White Wine Syrup

Serves: 8
Time: 25 minutes

This adult dessert made from white wine and sweet Turkish figs will transport you to the Mediterranean. It’s a great summertime dessert when you don’t want something heavy.

Ingredients:
1 1/2 pounds dried, white Turkish figs
2 1/2 cups sweet white wine
3/4 cup sugar
One, 4-inch cinnamon stick
1 halved vanilla bean

Directions:
1. Mix the cinnamon stick, wine, sugar, and vanilla bean in a 6-quart pressure cooker.
2. When the sugar has dissolved, pour in the dried figs.
3. Close the lid.
4. Cook on high pressure for 8 minutes.
5. Quick-release the pressure.
6. Open the cooker and let cool for 15 minutes.
7. Pour the contents of the cooker into a large bowl and cover.
8. Refrigerate for at least 6 hours and no longer than 4 days.
9. Pick out the vanilla bean and cinnamon stick before eating.
10. Serve with a dollop of plain Greek yogurt.

Nutritional Information (1/8 of recipe):
Total calories – 311
Protein – 5
Carbs – 73
Fat – 0
Fiber – 2.5

[] Epilogue

Now that you’ve read this book, I really hope you’re excited to explore more of the world of electric pressure cooking! There are so many benefits for every type of person. If you’re a health nut or want to become one, a pressure cooker is the best cooking method in terms of preserving essential vitamins and minerals. If you’re someone who is always busy and never has time to stand over a stove, pressure cooking with an EPC is also the fastest and most convenient way to cook delicious meals. An EPC is also great if you don’t think of yourself as a much of a cook and have relied on slow cookers because they’re so easy. An EPC is basically a slow cooker, but fast!

Since electric pressure cookers are so useful, you want to make sure you’re using yours safely and taking care of them, so it lasts as long as possible. Remember that a pressure cooker gets very hot, including the steam, so when you’re releasing pressure manually, turn away from the cooker. Always use oven mitts when removing dishes from a cooker, and never try to fry anything in a cooker. Chapter 4 included these and other safety tips, as well as common problems that might come up. To take care of your cooker, be sure to review Chapter 5 again, so you know how to properly clean your cooker. This also makes the electric cooker safer, in addition to making it last.

The last thing I have to say about cooking with electric pressure cookers is to take full advantage of whatever veggies and fruits are in season at any given time! An electric pressure cooker allows you to make the most out of every fresh piece of produce in terms of both taste and nutrition. In the warmer months, enjoy fresh beets, blackberries, corn, cucumbers, eggplant and green beans; and in the winter, feast on butternut squash, pears, sweet potatoes, kale, and clementine`s. You’ll be shocked at how delicious food can be when you use an electric pressure cooker!

[] Index 1 – Converting Slow-Cooker Recipes to Pressure Cookers

There are four factors you need to consider when converting a slow cooker recipe into a pressure cooker one:

• Aromatic ingredients
• Liquid
• Cooker capacity
• Cooking time

The first step is to find all the aromatic ingredients in your slow cooker recipe, and plan on sautéing them first in your pressure cooker. Aromatics include onion, garlic, carrots, ginger, herbs, and celery. Sautéing these ingredients first will make the meal richer.

When thinking about liquid, figure out the amount of liquid that the slow cooker contains when the meal is ready? Because pressure cookers evaporate so little, the amount of liquid at the beginning of the recipe is the same as what is left at the end, plus about 1/2 cup.

Slow cookers usually hold more than pressure cookers, so you might have to cook your meal in two batches. This is especially true if you’re only filling the pressure cooker 1/2 of the way.

The last step is to figure out how long to cook your meal. Look at how long the meal is in the slow cooker, and reduce it by 2/3. The prep time (chopping, sautéing, browning, etc.) will probably be about the same. Once you’ve followed the four steps, you’re ready to make the pressure-cooker version of any slow-cooker meal!

Cooking Tip:

Slow cookers don’t use trivets or steamer baskets like pressure cookers do. There are many ingredients that can’t touch the bottom of an EPC, because it’s simply too hot. If you aren’t sure if you need a trivet or steamer basket, look up a similar pressure-cooker recipe and see what it says to do.

[] Index 2- Time Charts For Electric Pressure/Stove Top Cookers


Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook-60 Quick, Easy, and Healthy Pressure Cooker Re

  • Author: Vanessa Olsen
  • Published: 2016-05-25 08:50:12
  • Words: 18055
Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook-60 Quick, Easy, and Healthy Pressure Cooker Re Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook-60 Quick, Easy, and Healthy Pressure Cooker Re