Loading...
Menu

Armour Battles: World War Two Wargame Rules

Armour Battles

Introductory World War Two Wargame Rules

Jim Bambra

First published in 2015 by Wargames Design.

© 2015 Jim Bambra. All rights reserved.

Jim Bambra has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, 1988, to be identified as the author of this book.

Distributed by Shakespir

Shakespir Edition, Liscense Notes

Thank you for downloading this ebook. This book remains the copyrighted property of the author, and may not be redistributed to others for commercial or non-commercial purposes. If you enjoyed this book, please encourage your friends to download their own copy from their favourite authorized retailer. Thank you for your support.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Gaming Gear

Armour Battles Basics

Unit Statistics

The Game Turn

Movement

Terrain

Line of Sight

Unit Morale

Command Orders

Staff Orders

Direct Fire

Opportunity Fire

Indirect Fire

Smoke Missions

Minor Obstacles

Hidden Units

Special Rules

US Units

German Units

Mission Briefings Explained

Battle 1 – Meeting Engagement

Battle 2 – Attack/Defend

Battle 3 – Counter-Attack

Rules Summary

Play Aids

Armour Battles Expansion

Credits

About the Author

Introduction

Armour Battles is an introductory set of World War Two wargame rules. Based on the larger Combat HQ rules, Armour Battles is a fully playable game.

Armour Battles features three armoured battles set in Lorraine, France in 1944 as Patton’s 3rd Army advances towards the Rhine. The first battle is a small meeting engagement between US and German tanks. The next battle has the Americans attacking the Germans. This is followed by the Americans attempting to break through the German positions as the Germans counter-attack with a Tiger I platoon.

Game Facts

Game Length: 2-3 hours.

Unit Scale: The Platoon is the basic unit in the game and is represented by a model vehicle.

Ground Scale: 1” equals 50 yards.

Figure Scale: Plays equally well with 2mm, 6mm, 10mm, 15mm and 20mm figures. 28mm figures are possible, but a large table is required.

Bases: No bases are required for vehicles. If you have based vehicle models, just make all measurements to the vehicle chassis and ignore the bases.

Armour Battles Design Goals

Armour Battles grew out of my desire to play a fast-moving World War Two miniatures game that not only required players to make decisions as army commanders, but also contained sufficient detail to capture the intricacies and complexities of World War Two armoured combat in a tense but fun game.

My goal was to create a game that didn’t follow a predictable “I Go, You Go” structure without having to rely on random cards or dice rolls to activate units. Alternate Command Pulses and the threat of a Command Failure make each turn different. During your turn you may not have enough Command Dice to do everything you want, and your opponent may also be using your own dice against you!

Back to Contents

Gaming Gear

To play Armour Battles you need an opponent and some model vehicles. For the first battle nine US tanks and seven German tanks are required. This increases to 12 US vehicles and 10 German vehicles for the second battle. For the third battle 15 US vehicles and 13 German vehicles.

Although model vehicles are always best, you can try out the game with homemade cardboard counters. Grab a few pictures from the Internet and mount them on thin card roughly 40mm wide and 60mm long (or as needed).

Essentials

Tape Measures

A tape measure for each player marked in inches and/or centimetres to measure movement and weapon ranges.

Model Terrain

You need a few hills, woods and hedges to play Armour Battles. These can be model terrain or be cut from coloured card or paper.

Standard Dice

Six-sided dice numbered from 1–6 are used for firing, checking reactions to fire, and rallying. Eight to twelve dice per player should cover most situations, but it never hurts to have more.

Dice are referred to as D. When the rules state that you need to roll a single dice or multiple dice it is shown in this formAT: xD. One dice is shown as 1D, two dice as 2D, three dice as 3D, four dice as 4D, and so on.

Command Dice

Command Dice are standard six-sided dice used to determine how many orders a player can issue in a Command Turn.

You don’t need any special dice, but bigger dice, or dice of a different colour, or preferably both, will help avoid any confusion in the heat of battle.

D3

You need to roll a D3 each time a unit is Dispersed. You can buy special dice numbered 1, 2, 3. Or you can use a six-sided dice and half the result (rounding up): with a roll of 1–2 = 1, a roll of 3–4 = 2, and a roll of 5–6 = 3.

Deviation Dice

A special six-sided dice marked with “Hit” and directional arrows is used to check the accuracy of off-table artillery. Its use is not essential; the artillery section provides an alternative method for checking artillery accuracy.

Markers

Markers help keep track of information during the game.

Disruption Markers

Disruption Markers show the effects of combat on a unit. You can use micro dice, coins, coloured counters or glass beads to show a unit’s current number of Disruption Points. Alternatively, Disruption Points can be tracked with pen and paper.

Suppression Markers

A Suppression Marker is placed on or next to a unit following an adverse Reaction result. A Suppression Marker can be as simple as a coloured counter or glass bead (red is good), or can be a specially created marker modelled to look like an explosion. Alternatively, a prone or dead figure works well.

Fire Markers

A Fire Marker shows that a unit has fired this turn. Cotton balls work very well, as do coloured beads or counters.

Staff Order Markers

You can use counters or dice to keep track of Staff Orders. Alternatively, you can use Staff Figures and/or vehicles that are removed when orders are issued.

Artillery Impact Markers

Artillery Impact Markers show where your Staff Officers have targeted artillery missions. Use counters or other markers modelled to represent shell craters or explosions.

Smoke

Markers: Similar to an Impact Marker, a Smoke Marker is used to show where a smoke mission has been plotted. White cotton wool glued to a washer or coin works well.

Back to Contents

Armour Battles Basics

Basic game concepts are described in this section.

Measuring

To measure the distance between units take the closest point of a vehicle’s hull to the closest point of another vehicle’s hull.

Using Dice

Armour Battles uses similar game mechanics for all actions (command, movement, combat and rallying).

Success Rolls

When determining whether an action is successful or not, between one to ten dice are rolled. Each dice needs to score the Target Number or more. The Target Number is referred to as TN.

Most rolls start with a 4+ TN and are adjusted up or down from there. With a 4+ TN each roll of 4, 5 or 6 is a success; rolls of 1, 2 or 3 are failures. If the TN was 5+, then only those dice that score 5 or 6 are successes.

Opposed Rolls

Most rolls are opposed. Which means that your opponent rolls dice at the same time as you and the results are compared.

With direct fire combat, you roll to hit your opponent’s unit, and then he rolls to see how it reacts. If he gets the same or more successes, his unit isn’t hit.

When calling an artillery mission, you roll your Artillery Response Dice against dice rolled by your opponent. If you achieve more successes than your opponent, your artillery immediately fires for effect.

Playing in Centimetres

If you want to use centimetres when playing with 15mm or larger models, it’s relatively easy to do so. The most accurate way of converting is to multiply all distances by 2.5, but this can be a pain in the middle of a game. It’s easier to multiply all distances by x2 – units move slightly less than they would when you measure in inches, but it doesn’t make a lot of difference as all units move at the same relative speed.

For example, a unit is Forced Back 6”+1D”. A x2 multiplier converts this to 12cm +1Dx2cm.

Ranges are easy to convert – just double them. A M4 75mm has a range of 7/14/28  in inches; this is increased  to 14/28/56 when using centimetres.

Alternatively you can multiply by x3 if you’d like a bit more movement in your game and have a larger table.

2mm and 6mm Models

Armour Battles assumes that you are using 15mm or 20mm models. When playing with 2mm or 6mm models you have two options available: individual vehicles or multiple vehicles.

Individual Vehicles

You can use them as individual models and substitute centimetres for inches. A single model moving at average speed would move 6cm +1Dcm. A M4 75mm would have a range of 7/14/28cm.

Multiple Vehicles

You can mount 2–4 models on a base and play in inches as normal. This has the advantage of looking more like a real platoon. A base of multiple models would move 6”+1D”. When using multiple models, all measurements should be taken from the edge of the base, not from the models themselves.

10mm Models

10mm sits happily between 6mm and 15mm and the larger scales. For a more visually true scale you can play in inches, or you can convert all distances into centimetres – useful if you have a small table.

Back to Contents

Unit Statistics

Unit statistics are explained using the Sturmgeschütz III Assault Gun as an example.

What Each Statistic Means

Units have statistics that determine their performance. Some units have special abilities and these are listed in the notes section.

Cohesion: All units in Armour Battles have a Cohesion of 3. They are Dispersed (removed from the table) when they have three Disruption Points.

Training: All vehicles are Regular units.

Type: The unit type and weight – AFV or Off-Table Artillery.

Move: Move is how far a unit can move in inches in a single activation. Move comprises a Fixed Move and a Variable Move.

A unit with a move of 6+1D” moves 6” plus the result of 1D added to the 6 for a move of between 7” and 12”.

A unit with a move of 6+1Dx2”, moves 6” plus the result of 1D doubled and added to the 6 for a move of between 8” and 18”.

Reaction: Reaction represents how well a unit is likely to respond in combat. Whenever a unit is hit, it makes a Reaction Check. The more armour a vehicle has, the more Reaction Dice it has.

For example, a Panther tank has a 7D Reaction while the less armoured Panzer IV has 5D. The StuG III has the same armour as the Panzer IV, but has a low profile which makes it a harder target and gives it an extra Reaction Dice against Direct Fire.

Weapon: This lists the main weapon carried by the unit. Although most vehicles were also equipped with machine guns, no separate rating is given as the effects are included in the Fire rating. When using its Fire Dice the tank is firing its main gun and machine guns together.

AT: AT is short for Anti-Tank Fire and shows the number of dice rolled when firing at armoured targets. All targets are armoured in Armour Battles.

Range: These are the weapon’s range bands in inches: short/effective/long. Short range fire is more accurate and units receive a –1 TN modifier. Effective range fire is unmodified. At long range units fire with a +1 TN penalty.

Notes: Any additional information regarding a unit is listed here. For example, the Sturmgeschütz III is restricted to 180° fire arc as it does not have a turret, it can only fire to its front. It also has a low profile which makes it harder to hit than other vehicles. This increases its Reaction Dice to 6 against direct fire. Against artillery fire (the number in brackets) the StuG III has 5 Reaction Dice.

Back to Contents

The Game Turn

A turn consists of a variable number of Friendly and Enemy Command Pulses. Each turn players alternate using their Command Dice to issue orders. As the Command Dice results vary each turn, players have to adjust to the changing fortunes of war. The turn ends after both players have used all of their Command Dice.

Start of the Turn

At the start of each turn, both players roll their Command Dice to determine the number of orders available.

Command Failure

If you roll more 1s than 6s, a Command Failure occurs. A Command Failure is a temporary breakdown in the army’s dissemination of orders. It reduces the number of Command Dice available this turn and increases the enemy’s Command Dice by an equal amount. All the 1s you rolled are given to your opponent who adds them to his Command Dice as Wild Dice. He gives the dice back to you at the end of the turn.

A Command Failure also cancels Artillery and Smoke Missions (see the Indirect Fire section). It also prevents you from issuing Commit Reserves orders.

Both Sides Roll a Command Failure

If both players roll a Command Failure, the turn ends immediately. It doesn’t matter how many 1s were rolled by either player, both failed to press the battle this turn. Both players’ artillery and smoke missions are cancelled.

Rolls of Equal or Less 1s Than 6s

If you roll the same or less number of 1s than 6s you avoid a Command Failure, but the 1s are discarded until next turn. While this is not as disastrous as a Command Failure, it reduces the number of available orders. Think of these discarded dice as orders you didn’t have time to issue or orders that didn’t get through.

Dice Chains

Dice Chains are made up of Command Dice of the same number. A Dice Chain therefore consists of one or more dice. The size of a Dice Chain is referred to by the number of dice it contains. One dice is a Single Dice Chain. Two dice form a Double Dice Chain. Three Dice form a Triple Dice Chain, and so on. The larger the Dice Chain, the more you can do with it.

Laying Out Dice Chains

After any 1s have been discarded the dice are arranged into Dice Chains and placed on the table where your opponent can see them. Dice Chains are formed by placing all dice with the same number together. If you rolled 6, 5, 5, 4, 3  you have four Dice Chains. Place the Dice Chains as shown here:

If you rolled 5, 4, 3, 1, 1 you trigger a Command Failure and give your opponent the two 1s. You then have three Dice Chains available:

The First Command Pulse

If a player rolled a Command Failure, his opponent automatically has the first Command Pulse. Otherwise, the player with the most 6s goes first. If both players have the same number of 6s, then the player with the most 5s goes first. If this is also tied, continue by comparing the number of 4s, then 3s, and if that fails 2s. If the result is still tied, both players re-roll all Command Dice again including any discarded 1s.

The Command Pulse

On your Command Pulse, you choose a Dice Chain to issue orders with. You are free to select any Dice Chain, but you must choose one; you cannot pass the Command Pulse to your opponent.

If you choose a Single Dice Chain, you issue one order and your Command Pulse ends. If you choose a Double, Triple or larger Dice Chain, you must use all of the dice in the Chain.

How you use a Dice Chain is up to you. With a Triple Dice Chain you could issue three single orders, or a double order and a single order, or use all three to issue a triple order. You may also use a multiple Dice Chain to increase your number of Staff Orders.

Once you have used all of the dice in the Dice Chain, your Command Pulse ends, and your opponent now chooses a Dice Chain. Command Pulses alternate between players until all Command Dice have been used. Where one player has used all of his Dice Chains before his opponent, his opponent continues to choose and use Dice Chains until he has used them all.

End of Turn

The turn ends after all Dice Chains have been used. Fire Markers are now removed from all units.

The Turn Sequence

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Both Players Roll Command Dice

*
p<>{color:#000;}. The Player who rolls the most 6s goes first

*
p<>{color:#000;}. First Friendly Command Pulse

*
p<>{color:#000;}. First Enemy Command Pulse

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Second Friendly Command Pulse

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Second Enemy Command Pulse

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Command Pulses alternate until all Command Dice are used

End of Turn

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Remove Fire Markers

 

Command Failure

*
p<>{color:#000;}. More 1s Rolled Than 6s

*
p<>{color:#000;}. A player who rolls a Command Failure automatically goes second

*
p<>{color:#000;}. If both players roll Command Failures the turn ends

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Artillery and Smoke Missions are cancelled

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Staff Orders may be used to maintain them

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Commit Reserves orders cannot be used

Back to Contents

Movement

Units move at varying speeds over different types of terrain. While it’s possible to calculate how far a platoon of tanks would move over firm, level ground under normal conditions, in the middle of a battle movement is far more uncertain. The ground may be softer than it looks or covered in rocks.

Also, units move as fast as they consider appropriate. A tank platoon could cross the ground at full speed, but it runs the risk of some of its vehicles throwing their tracks or failing to spot enemy units.

As battle commander you can order units to their destination, but you can’t accurately predict when they’ll get there. If you want your units to move quickly, give them a double or triple move order.

Fixed and Variable Moves

How far a unit can move is a combination of its Fixed and Variable Move distances. When calculating movement add the Variable Move to the Fixed Move.

Average vehicles move 6+1D” for a move of 7–12”.

Fast vehicles move 6+Dx2”. Roll a dice and double the result before adding it to the Fixed Move of 6” for a move of 8–18”.

Command Groups: A Command Group moves at the speed of its slowest unit. For example, fast vehicles moving with average vehicles move at the average speed of 6+1D”.

Suppressed Units: Move at their Variable Move rate only.

For example, Max’s Panther platoon is suppressed. He activates it and moves it 1D”.

Multiple Moves

When using a Dice Chain, total the Fixed Move distances and then roll the Variable Move dice.

Average vehicles moving with a Double Dice Chain move 12” (6”+6”), plus the results of 2D”, for a movement distance of 14–24”.

Fast vehicles moving with a Triple Dice Chain move 18” (6”+6”+6”), plus the results of 3Dx2” for a movement distance of 24–54”.

A Dice Chain is allocated before dice are rolled for movement. You cannot wait to see how far a unit moves and then allocate more dice to it.

Movement Orders

A unit may move as part of an activated Command Group, but it’s not required to move when other units in the Command Group move.

For example, a Panther tank has been activated along with three Panzer IVs. The player decides that the Panther will remain stationary and fire at a M4 platoon before the Panzer IVs move.

To issue a movement order indicate which units are moving and how many Command Dice are being used. You then place the Command Dice at the intended destination.

For example, “the Panthers will move up to the edge of these woods.”

You can also nominate a specific point on the table and declare that your units are heading there. “The Panzer IVs are moving up to here.”

Once you’ve declared your movement orders, the units move the full rolled distance towards their objective. The units halt upon reaching their destination regardless of any movement remaining. You cannot decide to move somewhere else or not move at all if you don’t like the results of the Variable Move.

Command Group units that move must end their move within 6” of each other. You cannot activate a Command Group and have its units move in different directions.

Movement orders are only in effect for the current turn.

Moving and Firing

Units may make a single move and fire with no penalty. If they use a Double Dice Chain, they fire with a -1D penalty, and if they use Triple Dice Chain they fire with a -2D penalty.

For example, a Panzer IV has 8D AT. If it makes a double move this is reduced by -1D to 7D, and to 6D if it makes a triple move.

Moving and Facing

A unit faces the direction it moves in. When using opportunity fire, your opponent may be able to fire at the side or rear of your unit depending on the direction it faces during its move. A unit may change direction and facing any number of times to get to its destination. Once at its destination it may face in any direction desired.

A Panzer IV has been ordered to move from the south of the wood to the north. It is currently facing east. The German player rolls his movement dice 6+1D” for a total move of 11”. More than enough to reach its destination. The Panzer IV first turns to face north and then moves 5” to the edge of the wood. It then faces north-east and moves 3” to its destination. The German player now changes the Panzer IV’s facing from North-east to North.

Sideways and Backwards Movement

Vehicles move backwards at their Variable Move. They cannot move sideways without changing their facing. A Multiple Dice Chain cannot be used to move backwards without changing a unit’s facing.

Back to Contents

Terrain

Terrain affects how quickly units move across the battlefield.

Open Ground: Open ground provides a firm surface for movement. It includes grasslands, fields, pavements, orchards, and other hard surfaces.

Units move normally over Open Ground.

Broken Ground: In Armour Battles Broken Ground includes woods and hills.

Units move at half speed over Broken Ground. Roll the Variable Dice, add it to the Fixed Dice then divide the total by 2.

Moving In and Out of Terrain Types

When moving from Open Ground to Broken Ground, move the unit to the edge of the Open Ground and then apply the movement penalty to any remaining movement. Similarly, when moving out into Open Ground, first apply any movement penalties, and then move the unit normally with its remaining movement.

For example, a M4 platoon 9” from the edge of a wood (Broken Ground) is ordered to enter the wood and then move through it. It rolls a 5 (6+5 = 11”) and moves 9” to the edge of the wood. It then moves 1” into the wood (half of the remaining 2”). If the unit had rolled a 3, it could only have moved 9” and would have halted at the edge of the wood.

Later the platoon is ordered to move through the wood (Broken Ground) into Open Ground. It is 4” from the edge of the wood. It rolls a 4 allowing it to move 10” (6+4). It costs 8” to move to the edge of the wood, leaving it with 2” to move into the Open Ground.

If a 2 had been rolled, the unit would only have enough movement to get to the edge of the wood. It would have to wait until its next activation before moving into the Open Ground. On a roll of 1 it would have only moved 3 1/2” and would have remained within the wood.

Back to Contents

Line of Sight

Line of Sight (LOS) determines whether one unit can see another. It consists of drawing an imaginary line across the table from one unit to another. LOS is blocked if it passes through a solid object such as a tall wall or hedge, a building, hill or smoke screen.

There are many different ways to check LOS. Some players prefer to stretch a length of string between the viewing unit and its target. Some prefer to use laser pointers, and some prefer to eyeball it by getting down to table level and sighting along the ground. All of these ways are fine. Just watch out for your opponent’s eyes when using a laser pointer!

For a unit to be in LOS at least half of the unit base must be visible to the unit drawing the LOS. It doesn’t matter if the rest of the unit is hidden behind a building, wall, etc, it can still be seen.

Terrain comes in so many different heights and sizes that it’s impossible to provide LOS rules for all occasions. The following guidelines work well, and can be easily changed if both players agree.

Woods: Woods always block LOS. Any unit within 1” of the edge of a wood can see out of the wood, and be seen by any other unit outside of the wood. Two units within a wood can see each other up to 1” away.

Hills: Hills always block LOS. Only a higher hill can provide LOS over a lower one.

Hedges: Hedges block LOS. But LOS may be drawn across hedges from a hill. Units adjacent to a hedge can see through it and be seen by other units.

Friendly Units: Friendly units always block LOS unless the firing unit is on a higher elevation and the friendly unit is closer to the firing unit than its target.

Back to Contents

Unit Morale

This section describes how unit morale works.

Reaction Dice

Reaction Dice are used to determine how units react in combat. Reaction Checks are made every time a unit takes one or more hits.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Unsuppressed units have a 4+ TN.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Suppressed units have a 5+ TN.

Disruption Points

Disruption represents the psychological impact of combat on a unit. As casualties build up and combat fatigue sets in troops become less willing to fight. Each hit not cancelled by a Reaction Check results in the unit taking a Disruption Point.

Removing Disruption Points

Disruption Points can be removed by rallying units with Command Dice (covered later when Command Orders are discussed).

Suppressed StuG III with two Disruption Points.

Dispersion

A unit is Dispersed  as soon as it has three Disruption Points. The unit is removed from the table and D3 Army Morale Points are lost.

Suppression

Enemy fire can suppress a unit. When suppressed a unit’s officers may have been hit, or part of the platoon may have panicked. A suppressed unit keeps its head down and is reluctant to engage the enemy.

Causes of Suppression

Suppression may occur each time a unit takes fire. Any time you roll one or more 6s when firing at an enemy unit, you may suppress it. Unless your opponent rolls as many 6s with his Reaction Dice as you rolled, his unit is suppressed. It doesn’t matter if his units don’t take any hits. Unless he matches or exceeds your number of 6s, his unit is suppressed.

Effects of Suppression

Suppressed units cannot fire. This occurs as soon as the unit is suppressed. A unit that has just been activated, which is then suppressed by opportunity fire, cannot fire.

A suppressed unit cannot be activated as part of a Command Group. A suppressed unit can be activated on its own, but no other unit can be included in this activation. The unit remains suppressed after being activated.

A suppressed unit cannot be rallied.

A suppressed unit loses its Fixed Move as its troops are reluctant to advance quickly. It only uses its Variable Move.

Removing Suppression Prior to Activation

Before a unit is activated a Remove Unit Suppression order removes suppression from one unit.

Removing Suppression After Activation

After a unit has been activated, suppression can only be removed with a Wild Dice or Staff Order.

For example, three Panzer IVs are activated and they move towards a group of M4 75mm. The M4s use opportunity fire and suppress one of the Panzer IVs. The player uses a Wild Dice to remove the suppression: the Panzer IV can now fire.

Forced Back

A unit may be Forced Back. A unit is Forced Back when it becomes suppressed and takes at least one Disruption Point from the fire. Forced Back units move directly back 6” plus an additional 1D” for each unmatched 6. A unit with one unmatched 6 is Forced Back 6+1D”. If it has two unmatched 6s, it is Forced Back 6+2D”. Units are Forced Back facing the enemy.

Units may move into or behind cover as part of their Forced Back move. They halt on moving behind or into the cover.

If a unit is Forced Back into a friendly unit, it moves through the friendly unit. If a Forced Back move would move a unit so that it ends the move on top of a friendly unit, it is moved through the unit and placed behind it.

If a unit is Forced Back into an enemy unit, the Forced Back unit is Dispersed.

If a unit is Forced Back so that it would move off the table, it halts at the table edge.

Back to Contents

Command Orders

Command Orders are used to activate or rally units. Double or larger Dice Chains can be used to increase the number of Staff Orders or issue multiple move orders.

Command Groups

Each Command Dice lets you activate one Command Group. Command Groups are based on historic company formations but are not restricted to them. Combat HQ uses a flexible command system that lets you decide which units follow your orders.

You activate Command Groups one at a time, completing all actions with one Command Group before activating another. When you activate another Command Group, you cannot go back to a previous one, so be sure you have performed all actions with a Command Group before activating another.

Creating a Command Group

Nominate any unit on the table as a leader. This unit can activate itself and up to three other units within 6” (measure from the centre of the unit to the closest point on the models you want to activate).

Command Group activated with a Single Dice Chain.

Command Group activated with a Triple Dice Chain.

Command Groups are flexible and can be changed each turn.

Activation Restrictions

No unit may be activated more than once per turn. Therefore, it’s not possible to include a unit in more than one Command Group as that would activate it twice.

A suppressed unit may not be included in a Command Group. It must be activated on its own or first have its suppression removed (this does not count as activation) and then be included in a Command Group.

Forming a Command Group

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Choose one unit to be the leader

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Place Command Dice next to it

*
p<>{color:#000;}. The Command Unit activates itself and up to three other units *

*
p<>{color:#000;}. No unit can be activated more than once per Command Pulse

  • Suppressed units may not be included in a Command Group

Command Orders Defined

A Command Group can be given a variety of orders.

Move and Fire

This order is the basic activation used to move and fire with units. Activated units may move and fire, or they fire and then move. They can also be activated to fire, but not move. They may make a normal move without a penalty to firing, but suffer penalties when making multiple moves.

Commit Reserves

This order commits a Command Group held in reserve to enter the table with a triple move. Units already on the table cannot be included in a reserve move.

Reserves are committed by selecting a reserve Command Group and placing the units on the Friendly Table Edge. The Command Group can now make a triple move for only one Command Dice. It is subject to opportunity fire as normal.

A Commit Reserves order cannot be used in a turn in which you roll a Command Failure.

Disengage Group

Units may disengage directly backwards. They move their full distance back and end their move facing the enemy. Disengaging units may halt on entering or moving behind cover. Otherwise, they move back as far as their total rolled move. Disengaging units pay any Fixed Move penalty for crossing obstacles and move at 1/2 speed in Broken Ground.

If a disengaging unit is fired at with opportunity fire it gains +2 Reaction Dice.

Disengaging units may make multiple moves with a Dice Chain, but must move directly backwards. They cannot manoeuvre when disengaging. A disengaging unit cannot fire, but may use opportunty fire in an Enemy Command Pulse.

Rally Group

A Rally Group order allows a Command Group to attempt to rally. Successful rally attempts remove Disruption Points from units (see Morale).

When rallying, form a Command Group as you would for movement. All non-suppressed units within 6” of the nominated leader, as well as the leader, are eligible to be rallied.

Suppressed units cannot be rallied. The suppression has to be removed first with a Remove Unit Suppression order. A Command Group that receives a rally order cannot be activated this turn, but it may use opportunity fire.

How to Rally

Each unit in a Command Group is rallied individually. You can attempt to rally units in any order you want. Nominate a unit and roll your Rally Dice. Your opponent rolls one dice for each Disruption Point your unit has. Your opponent has a 4+ TN. One Disruption Point is removed for each of your successes.

Your TN for Rallying is determined by the distance of the unit from the closest enemy unit. Measure the range to the closest enemy unit and look up the Target Number on the Rally Table.

Rally Table

Your opponent has a 4+ TN.

 

Distance: How far your unit is from the nearest enemy unit.

Rally TN: The TN required for a success.

Cover: Units who are in or behind cover are easier to rally and gain +1D.

No LOS to Enemy: If your unit cannot see the enemy, you gain +1D.

Remove Unit Suppression

This order is given to a single unit and removes a suppression marker from it. The unit may now be included in a Command Group.

For example, a US M4 platoon is suppressed. Tom uses a Command Dice to remove the suppression marker. He then uses another Command Dice to activate it along with two other units.

Removing Suppression After Activation: A unit that has been suppressed after it has been activated can have its suppression removed with a Wild Dice or Staff Order. It can then fire.

Wild Dice

A Wild Dice is a roll of 6 when rolling Command Dice. It represents a lucky break: an opportunity for the Combat HQ to influence the battle directly. A Wild Dice can be combined with other dice to create a larger Dice Chain, be added to any combat roll, used as a Variable Move dice, or used to improve a Rally Order attempt.

Except when creating a Dice Chain, only one Wild Dice may be used per action, but you can, for example, activate a unit using a Wild Dice, and then add another Wild Dice to its AT Dice.

A Wild Dice can also be used as a normal Command Dice; you don’t have to use it as a special dice.

Create a Larger Dice Chain

A Wild Dice may be added to any other dice to make a Double, Triple or larger Dice Chain.

For example, you roll two 1s, one 4, one 5, and two 6s. The two 1s are discarded. The two Wild Dice allow you to create a Dice Chain of two 6s. Or you can combine the Wild Dice with the 4 and the 5 to create two Double Dice Chains. You can use both Wild Dice to create a Triple Dice Chain by adding them to the 4 or the 5.

Add to a Combat Roll

A Wild Dice may be used to add one dice to one unit’s AT dice.

Add to a Reaction Roll

A Wild Dice may be used to add one dice to one unit’s Reaction Dice.

Add to a Rally Roll

A Wild Dice may be used to add one dice when rallying a Command Group.

Replace a Variable Move Dice

You may use a Wild Dice to replace a Variable Move dice allowing a Command Group to move its maximum distance. Instead of your fast vehicle moving 6+1Dx2”, it would automatically move 18”. As with other actions, you may only do this once, so if a double or triple move is made, only one Wild Dice can be used.

Instant Staff Orders

Staff Orders are described later. Usually when you add a Staff Order it’s not available until your next turn. If you use two or more Wild Dice, you can issue a Staff Order that is instantly available. You get one instant Staff Order for two Wild Dice; two instant Staff Orders for three Wild Dice 6, and so on. Think of instant Staff Orders as an urgent request for your staff to act immediately.

Wild Dice Table

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Create a Larger Dice Chain

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Add to a Combat Roll

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Add to a Reaction Roll

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Add to a Rally Roll

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Replace a Variable Move Dice

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Double, triple or more 6s can be used to issue instant Staff Orders

Back to Contents

Staff Orders

Each Combat HQ is supported by a team of Staff Officers dedicated to the running of the army. As the Combat HQ you’re concerned with ordering and motivating your troops while your Staff Officers coordinate the support needed to win.

Staff Officer abilities are tracked using Staff Orders and can be used to call artillery missions (available in Battles 2 & 3), and for ordering and rallying units.

Initial Staff Orders

The initial number of Staff Orders are listed in the Mission Briefings for each battle group.

Restocking Staff Orders

As the game progresses, you’ll run low of Staff Orders. The briefing you gave before the battle is represented by the initial Staff Orders, but as they call artillery, Commit Reserves and help you issue orders, their knowledge of your requirements is reduced. Unless you take the time to update your staff officers on the current situation, they’ll become distanced from your needs.

A Double Dice Chain allows you to add one Staff Order. A Triple Dice Chain allows you to add two Staff Orders, a Quadruple Dice Chain allows you to add three Staff Orders, and so on.

You cannot use Staff Orders in the same turn that you restock them – it takes time for the orders to be assimilated (but see Instant Staff Orders).

Stocking Staff Orders with Wild Dice

As well as allowing Instant Staff Orders, Wild Dice allow Staff Orders to be restocked on a one-to-one basis. Each Wild Dice may be converted into directly into a Staff Order. Wild Dice used this way cannot be used to issue Instant Staff Orders – they may only be used on your next turn.

Maximum Number of Staff Orders

You may have as many Staff Orders as you have Command Dice.

Instant Staff Orders

Any Dice Chain consisting of Wild Dice lets you issue instant Staff Orders. Instead of storing them for later, you can use the Staff Orders immediately.

Using Staff Orders

Staff Orders may be used in the Logistics Phase to adjust artillery missions, and at any point after the Logistics Phase for other orders.

Command Staff Orders

Command Staff Orders are identical to Command Orders. You can use Staff Orders instead of or in addition to Command Dice.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Move & Fire

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Commit Reserves

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Disengage Group

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Rally Group

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Remove Unit Suppression

Staff Orders Only

The following orders are available as Staff Orders.

Create a Larger Dice Chain

Staff Orders may be used to create Double or Triple Dice Chains. You can combine them with Command Dice to create one or more chains, or you can use multiple Staff Orders. You must, however, create the Dice Chain before rolling to see how effective it is.

Wild Dice

A Staff Order is effectively a Wild Dice. It can add +1D to any Reaction Check, Direct Fire roll or Rally attempt. This bonus can be used at the same time as a Command Wild Dice, giving you a +2D bonus.

Off-Table Assets

The rules for artillery are presented later. The rules here describe how Staff Officers direct off-table assets. You don’t need these rules to play Battle 1.

Call Artillery Mission

This order calls an Artillery Mission for an artillery battery.

Call Smoke Mission

This order calls a Smoke Mission for an artillery battery.

Adjust Artillery

Using a Staff Order, the Impact Marker of a battery may be adjusted up to 4” in any direction before it fires for effect in the Logistics Phase. The unit acting as the battery’s Forward Observer must be able to see the new location. After adjusting the Impact Marker, roll the Deviation Dice.

Maintain Artillery & Smoke Missions

Artillery and smoke missions are cancelled when a Command Failure occurs, but may be maintained with a Staff Order. This is useful when your artillery has been called, but hasn’t fired for effect yet.

Cancel Fire Mission

A fire mission may be cancelled for free: it doesn’t need a Staff Order. A new fire mission may be plotted next turn.

Opportunity Staff Orders

The following Staff Orders may be used during an Opponent’s Command Pulse:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Remove Suppression

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Increase Combat Dice

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Increase Reaction Dice

Orders Summary

Command and Staff Orders

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Move and Fire

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Commit Reserves

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Disengage Group

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Remove Unit Suppression

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Rally Group

Staff Orders Only

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Call Artillery Mission

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Call Smoke Mission

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Maintain Artillery

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Maintain Smoke

6s = Wild Dice

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Create/Add to Dice Chain

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Instant Staff Order

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Add to Combat, Reaction or Rally Dice

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Replace Variable Move Dice

 

Back to Contents

Direct Fire

Direct fire is ranged fire with Anti-Tank weapons. The firing unit rolls its AT Dice, the opponent then rolls his Reaction Dice, and the results are compared.

Firing

When activated a unit may fire without moving, or it can move and fire, or fire and move. It may not fire while moving. A unit may also use opportunity fire during an enemy Command Pulse whenever an enemy unit moves or fires within its LOS. All firing is done on a unit by unit basis. Resolve the shooting of one unit before going on to resolve the shooting of another.

Fire Markers

Units that have fired are marked with a Fire Marker. A unit cannot fire again until next turn. Fire Markers are removed at the end of the turn.

Arc of Fire

A unit’s arc of fire determines in which directions it can fire. Most units in Armour Battles have turrets and can fire in any direction with a 360° arc of fire. The StuG III doesn’t have a turret and is restricted to a 180° arc of fire. It can fire to its front only. When activated a unit may pivot on its centre to face any direction. This, however, counts as moving for the purpose of triggering opportunity fire.

How to Fire

To fire a unit needs LOS to its target. The range to the target is then measured. If this is out of the weapon’s range, the unit fires, but misses.

Target Priority

A target is declared before the dice are rolled. Nominate which one of your units is firing at which enemy unit. Your unit must fire at the closest enemy unit. After firing one unit, nominate another unit and carry out its attacks. You are not required to make multiple attacks against the same target, but you can do so if you want to. Once a unit has been fired at you can then fire at the next closest unit, and so on.

As the Combat HQ, you order your units to engage the enemy and assume that they will perform to the best of their abilities. This means that your units target enemies immediately to their front and don’t take the time to decide whether a more distant target is a greater threat. A Command Group can be ordered to concentrate on one target or to spread its fire, but it cannot be ordered to ignore the closest units in favour of ones further away.

Armour Battles doesn’t require you to deploy your units into formal formations, however, the target allocation rules make it advantageous to do so.

For Example, Tom’s M4s are set up in a two up, one down formation. He has two 75mm M4s in the front and a 76mm M4 in the rear. Max fires at Tom’s M4s with three Panzer IVs. Max wants to target the 76mm M4 as this is the biggest threat, but he has to target the two M4s at the front of the formation first. He can then target the 76mm M4 with his third tank. If Max had four tanks, he could target the 76mm M4 twice.

Fire Modifiers

The Target Number required to hit a target at effective range is 4+. A unit’s Anti-Tank Dice and TN are modified according to the situation.

Suppression: A suppressed unit cannot fire.

Target Number Modifiers

The following modify the unit’s TN.

Range: A unit’s ability to hit decreases at long range and improves at short range.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Short Range –1 TN

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Effective Range +0 TN

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Long Range +1 TN

Flank and Rear Attacks: Units are more vulnerable to fire against their flanks and rear. When firing at the flank or rear of a unit the firing unit's TN is reduced by -1.

Movement and Flank/Rear Attacks: A flank/rear attack can be made when a firing unit begins its activation completely behind the front base edge of the target unit. A unit that makes a single move from the front to the flank/rear of its target must still fire against the front of the unit. However, a unit making a double or triple move may move behind the front facing of the enemy unit and fire into the flank/rear.

Multiple Move

A unit making multiple moves has its number of AT dice reduced:

Double Move -1D

Triple Move -2D

*
h2<>{color:#000;}. Reaction Checks

After applying any Fire Modifiers, and deducting any dice for movement, roll the unit’s AT Dice. If you score any successes, your opponent makes a Reaction Check with a 4+ TN. This increases to TN 5+ if the target unit is suppressed. If you fail to score any successes, your opponent doesn’t need to make a Reaction Check.

Cover Dice

Cover obscures the target and provides protection. Only light cover is described in Armour Battles and is represented by woods and hedges.

Light Cover increases a unit’s Reaction Dice by +1D.

Light Cover +1D

For example, a unit of Panzer IVs in a wood (light cover) gains a +1D to their Reaction Dice. When fired at they roll 6D, instead of their usual 5D.

Units hit by indirect fire don’t gain any bonus from light cover (indirect fire is explained later).

Target Uphill

A target that is uphill from the firing unit gains +1 Reaction Dice.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Target Uphill +1D

Direct Fire Combat Results

After both players have rolled, compare the results. Each hit not cancelled by a Reaction Check results in the target unit taking a Disruption Point.

h3<>{color:#000;}.

Firing unit rolls more successes than target

Target takes 1 Disruption Point for each uncancelled success

Check for suppression if the attacker rolled one or more 6s

h3<>{color:#000;}.

Firing unit rolls same or fewer successes than target

Target takes no Disruption Points

Check for suppression if the attacker rolled one or more 6s

Suppression Check

As mentioned previously in the Unit Morale section, each time a unit is fired on and the attacker rolls one or more 6s, the target unit becomes suppressed if it fails to roll the same or more 6s than the attacker. If the unit takes any Disruption Points, it is Forced Back its Fixed Move plus 1D” for each unmatched 6.

Back to Contents

Opportunity Fire

Opportunity fire is a powerful means of controlling the battlefield as it allows units to fire in an Enemy Command Pulse.

Note: You cannot use opportunity fire during your own Command Pulse – you have to activate a unit before it can fire.

Units That Can Use Opportunity Fire

A unit is eligible to use opportunity fire if it doesn’t have a Fire Marker or is suppressed. The unit must also be present on the table. Therefore off-table artillery cannot use opportunity fire. The unit must also have LOS to the target. A Fire Marker is placed next to the unit when it uses opportunity fire.

Targets That Trigger Opportunity Fire

An enemy unit that fires or moves in LOS triggers opportunity fire.

Opportunity Fire Against a Firing Target

When your opponent says that one of his units is firing but not moving, you may use opportunity fire against it. You must declare this before your opponent rolls his AT Dice. You cannot wait to see what the effects of his fire are – your fire occurs simultaneously with his. For convenience, let your opponent roll his dice first, but don’t apply the results until after you’ve fired back.

You may then use opportunity fire against the firing enemy unit with any of your other eligible units. You choose a unit and conduct its fire before deciding whether any more of your units are going to fire. You can keep selecting units and firing until you decide to stop or you run out of firing units.

Opportunity Fire Against a Moving Target

When your opponent moves a unit that is within or enters LOS of one of your units you can request that he halts the unit’s movement while you fire at it.

A unit that is suppressed by your fire halts where it is – it cannot advance any further. Measure any Forced Back results from where it was halted.

A unit that is not suppressed completes its move after all opportunity fire has been resolved. In the event of the unit entering the LOS of another of your units, this unit may also use opportunity fire.

For example, Max is moving three Panther tanks towards three American M4 tanks. Tom decides to use opportunity fire against the German tanks when they enter effective range at 14”. One Panther is suppressed and stops moving immediately. The second is suppressed and takes a Disruption Point. It halts and is Forced Back 6+1D”. The third Panther isn’t hit and completes its move 6” away from the Americans. As two of the German tanks are suppressed, only one can fire.

Back to Contents

Indirect Fire

Indirect fire ignores intervening terrain and troops. Indirect fire artillery batteries are situated off the table behind the Friendly Table Edge.

Forward Observers

Armour Battles doesn’t require figures for Forward Observers. It’s assumed that Forward Observers are operating alongside the army’s platoons. As long as one of your platoons has a LOS to an enemy unit, it can act as a Forward Observer and be used to target indirect fire.

Note: A suppressed unit cannot function as a Forward Observer.

Logistics Phase

The indirect fire rules add a new phase to a turn. The Logistics Phase occurs as the first action of a player’s first Command Pulse. You can’t call any new artillery or smoke missions until after the Logistics Phase, but you can adjust the fire mission (see Adjusting Fire Missions). During the Logistics Phase any batteries with a placed Impact Marker fire for effect. Impact Markers are removed after a battery fires.

The Enemy Logistic Phase occurs at the start of his first Command Pulse.

Off-Table Fire Missions

Fire missions are called with Staff Orders – Command Orders cannot be used. A fire mission is a single round of artillery fire. The battery fires for effect once and its Impact Marker is removed. A fire mission costs one Staff Order.

Calling Off-Table Fire Missions

To call a fire mission, you use a Staff Order and indicate which unit is acting as the battery’s Forward Observer. Place an Impact Marker on the table.

Artillery Response Check

To determine if the artillery starts firing with immediate effect, make an Artillery Response Check. Roll the Artillery Response Dice with a 4+ TN. Your opponent rolls 3D, also with a 4+ TN. If you roll more successes than him, your battery fires for effect immediately. If you fail to fire with immediate effect, the battery fires for effect during your next Logistics Phase providing you don’t roll a Command Failure.

Deviating Fire Missions

When your battery fires for effect, it may deviate from its Impact Marker. Roll a Deviation Dice. If you get a “Hit” result, it lands where you placed the Impact Marker.

A hit is rolled – the targetted StuG III is hit along with the other two StuGs.

If an arrow is rolled the fire deviates in the direction of the arrow. Roll 1D and move the Impact Marker the distance rolled in inches.

The Impact Marker is moved 5” in the direction of the arrow. Only one StuG III is hit.

Firing for Effect

Batteries have a burst radius of 4”. Measure 4” from the centre of the Impact Marker to the closest point on any nearby units. This is similar to measuring ranges in direct fire, except that the fire originates from the centre of the Impact Marker.

Off-table artillery has a 4+ TN when firing for effect. This TN is not adjusted by range - off-table artillery always fires at effective range.

When firing for effect, roll to hit each unit individually and apply the results. Any unit Forced Back by the artillery fire moves towards its Friendly Table Edge.

Adjusting a Fire Mission

At the start of your Logistics Phase, you can use a Staff Order to move an Impact Marker 4” in any direction – a unit acting as Forward Observer must be able to see the new impact location. You move the Impact Marker before the battery fires. After moving it you still need to roll for deviation.

Light Cover and Artillery

Units under fire from off-table artillery do not gain Reaction Dice for light cover.

Suppression From Artillery

When a unit is hit by artillery fire and 6s are rolled by your opponent, you must roll more 6s or become suppressed. The chance of being suppressed by artillery fire is therefore higher than when hit by direct fire where you only have to equal the number of 6s.

Units are Forced Back from artillery fire as normal if they take any Disruption from the attack. If no Disruption is taken, they are suppressed where they are.

Command Failure and Fire Missions

A Command Failure cancels all artillery and smoke missions. Missions may be kept active with Staff Orders.

Hit and Scatter Dice

If you don’t have a Deviation Dice, you can use two dice of different colours. Nominate one as the Hit Dice and the other as the Scatter Dice. Roll both dice. If the Hit Dice rolls a 5 or a 6, the fire mission hits without deviating.

The black dice is the Hit Dice. A 5 is rolled – a hit!

On a roll of 1–4 the fire mission deviates the distance rolled in inches on the Scatter Dice. Check the angle of the Scatter Dice relative to the Hit Dice and move the Impact Marker towards, onto, or past the Scatter Dice depending on its location and the amount rolled.

A 3 is rolled on the Hit Dice – the fire deviates 4” in the direction of the Scatter Dice.

Back to Contents

Smoke Missions

Smoke Missions are similar to artillery missions. A Staff Order is used to request a smoke mission. Place a Smoke Marker and roll to see if the smoke arrives this Command Pulse. If it doesn’t, it arrives in your next Logistics Phase.

Smoke missions always land on the Smoke Marker – they never deviate.

Off-table artillery creates a 1” wide by 12” long smoke screen centred on the Smoke Marker. The smoke screen can be orientated in any direction.

A smoke mission blocks line of sight and lasts until the start of your next Logistics Phase.

Back to Contents

Minor Obstacles

Hedges are minor obstacles. Crossing a hedge costs a vehicle its Fixed Move – a vehicle only moves the distance rolled on its Variable Dice.

When moving to cross an obstacle, if a Command Group doesn’t roll enough to reach the obstacle it may use its Fixed Move to move up to, but not over the obstacle.

For example, a Panzer IV platoon is 5” away from a hedge and has been ordered to cross it. It moves at its Variable Move only (1D”). It rolls a 6, allowing it to move 5” up to the hedge. As it as only used 5 of its 6 inches, it is placed on the other side of the hedge.

If it had rolled a 5, it would only have moved up to the hedge. If it had rolled a 4 or less, it wouldn’t have reached the hedge. In this case, it could have used its Fixed Move of 6” to move up to the hedge, ready to cross it on its next activation.

Using a Dice Chain

Using a multiple Dice Chain makes it easier to cross obstacles. For Minor Obstacles, the Fixed Move is deducted only from the first movement; the second Fixed Move is unaffected. The easiest way to calculate this is to deduct the Fixed Move before moving.

For example, a Panzer IV platoon is 5” from the hedge and has been ordered to cross it. This time it’s using a Double Dice Chain which normally allows it to move 12”+2D”. It deducts one of its Fixed Moves to cross the hedge, leaving it with a move of 6”+2D”. It rolls an 8 for a total move of 14”. It moves up to the hedge (5”), crosses it, then moves 9” beyond it.

Back to Contents

Hidden Units

Presented here is a simple system for using hidden units in Armour Battles.

Hidden units are marked on the player’s map before the game begins. They cannot move or fire without being spotted and placed on the table. Hidden units are also placed on the table when an enemy unit ends its move within 15” of them.

Ambush Fire

Hidden units may use ambush fire when they are activated or as opportunity fire. When using ambush fire a unit gains +1D bonus to its AT Dice. The vehicle is placed on the table when it uses ambush fire.

Hidden units that are activated to use ambush fire can be fired at with opportunity fire. This opportunity fire always occurs after the hidden units have fired – it’s never simultaneous.

Back to Contents

Special Rules

Special rules for units include:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Sloped Armour

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Low Profile

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Reconnaissance

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Break-Off

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Shoot and Scoot

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Open-Topped

Sloped Armour

Sloped armour increases a unit’s Reaction by 1D against frontal attacks. When fired at in the flanks/rear, or when hit by artillery, its Reaction is reduced. This is shown as two numbers.

Reaction: 7D/6D

Use the first number for frontal attacks and the second for all other attacks.

Low Profile

Units with a low profile gain +1D Reaction Dice against direct fire. A low profile provides no benefit against artillery fire.

Reaction: 6D (5D)

Use the first number against direct fire and the number in brackets against artillery fire.

Reconnaissance

One reconnaissance unit may be added to a Command Group without affecting the Command Group limit of four. This allows a Command Group to contain five units. Only one reconnaissance unit gains this benefit, so if two reconnaissance units are included, the second unit counts against the Command Group limit.

Break-Off

Units with the Break-off ability may immediately move backwards a normal move when fired at by direct fire or artillery. A vehicle gains +2D to its Reaction Dice when breaking off. Measure the range to the target vehicle’s original position, not its final one.

No fire is allowed by the breaking off unit, but it may use opportunity fire in a subsequent enemy Command Pulse.

A unit that Breaks-off cannot be activated again this turn. However, it may Break-off multiple times even if it has been already been activated, or has already Broken-off.

Shoot and Scoot

Vehicles with this ability can fire and immediately move backwards a normal move. A vehicle that shoots and scoots can be either activated to fire or it may use opportunity fire. When activated it may Shoot and Scoot, but it cannot move before doing so.

When using opportunity fire, a vehicle that has been previously activated may Shoot and Scoot, providing it doesn’t have a Fire Marker.

Enemy units may fire at a vehicle as it scoots. The target vehicle gains a +2D bonus to its Reaction when Shooting and Scooting. See the rules for Break-off earlier for how to calculate enemy fire.

Shoot and Scoot units can always Break-off when under fire – they do not have to fire.

Open-Topped

Vehicles with open turrets are more vulnerable to enemy artillery. When fired at by artillery an open-topped vehicle’s Reaction Dice is reduced by –1D.

Reaction: 5D (O)

Back to Contents

US Units

These units are used in Armour Battles. More are available in the Armour Battles Expansion.

M4 75mm

Mass produced and mechanically reliable, the M4 is under-gunned compared to the German armour. Often the best tactic is to close with the Germans to offset their superior anti-tank fire.

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 75L38 Gun

Range: 7/14/28

AT: 7D

 

M4 76mm

Available in limited numbers, the M4 76mm places the Americans on an equal footing with the Panzer IV, but is no match for the Panther. Try to protect your M4 76mm by positioning it behind your M4 75mm tanks.

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 76L52 Gun

Range: 8/16/32

AT: 8D

M5 Light Tank

The M5 is fast, but its 37mm gun is severely under-powered against the German armour. Use the M5s to locate hidden enemy units and then use their Break-off ability to pull back when fired at. Once the enemy’s location is known use the M5s’ speed to try and outflank the Germans and close to short range.

Type: Light AFV

Move: Fast 6+1Dx2

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 37L53 Gun

Range: 6/12/24

AT: 5D

Notes: Break-off.

M10 Tank Destroyer

The late production M10 tank destroyer and has the ability to Shoot and Scoot. This allows it to move backwards after firing. Its 76mm gun is a match for the Panzer IV, but it lacks armour penetration against the Panther and Tiger I. Use the M10 to manoeuvrer into the flank and rear of the German armour. Because it has an open-top, the M10 is vulnerable to enemy artillery.

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 5D (O)

Weapon: 76L52 Gun

Range: 8/16/32

AT: 8D

Notes: Shoot and Scoot. Break-off. Open-topped.

M7 Howitzer Motor Carriage

The M7 HMC provides off-table artillery with its 105mm howitzer. Use it to suppress and knock out the lighter Pumas, Panzer IVs and StuG IIIs. Or use both batteries against the Panthers. Alternatively, use smoke screens to block fire from the German vehicles.

Type: Off-table Artillery

Move:

Reaction:

Weapon: 105mm howitzer

Range: Off-Table”

AT: 4D

Notes: Artillery Suppression. Units must roll more 6s than your artillery to avoid being suppressed.

 

Back to Contents

German Units

These units are used in Armour Battles. More are available in the Armour Battles Expansion.

Tiger I

The Tiger I is a formidable heavy tank. Armed with an 88L56 gun, the Tiger can pick off enemy armour from long range and its heavy armour provides excellent protection against anti-tank weapons and artillery. Prone to breaking down when it makes double or triple moves, the Tiger is best moved slowly.

Type: Heavy AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 7D

Weapon: 88L56 Gun

Range: 10/20/40

AT: 10D

Notes: Poor reliability.

 

The Tiger I is mechanically unreliable. If it rolls more 1s than 6s on a double or triple move, it breaks down and cannot move this turn. It may still fire. Next turn it can be repaired using a Command Dice or a Staff Order. It cannot move on the turn it’s repaired, but it may move again the following turn.

Panther Ausf G

Powerful and rightly feared by the Americans, the Panther is well armed and armoured. While resistant to damage, the Panther is not invulnerable when fighting superior numbers of enemy tanks. Try to avoid letting the US tanks manoeuvrer into your flank and rear zones.

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 7D/6D

Weapon: 75L70 Gun

Range: 9/18/36

AT: 9D

Notes: Sloped Armour.

Panzer IV H

The workhorse of the German army, the Panzer IV is a good all round tank. Its 75L48 gun has good anti-tank ability that is superior to the M4 75mm, and is a match for the M4 76mm.

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 75L48 Gun

Range: 8/16/32

AT: 8D

Sturmgeschütz III

Designed with a low profile, the StuG III benefits from an increased Reaction Dice over the Panzer IV against direct fire. However, its lack of a turret restricts it to a 180° fire arc. As the StuG often has to move so that it can fire at units it is likely to trigger opportunity fire. Because of this the StuG is best used to support the Panzers rather than fighting in the front line.

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 6D (5D)

Weapon: 75L48 Gun

Range: 8/16/32

AT: 8D

Notes: Restricted to 180° fire arc. Low Profile.

SdKfz 234/2 Armoured Car (Puma)

Fast and armed with a 50L60 gun, the Puma lacks the armour protection of the Panzers. The Puma is good for moving around the enemy’s flanks, and it can use its Break-off ability to get itself out of trouble when attacked.

Type: Light AFV

Move: Fast 6+1Dx2

Reaction: 4D

Weapon: 50L60 Gun

Range: 7/14/28

AT: 6D

Notes: Recon. Break-off.

105L28 Howitzer

The 105mm howitzer provides off-table artillery support. Use it to suppress and knock out the lighter US tanks or use a smoke screen to block fire from the American vehicles.

Type: Off-table Artillery

Move:

Reaction:

Weapon: 105L28 howitzer

Range: Off-Table

AT: 4D

Notes: Artillery Suppression. Units must roll more 6s than your artillery to avoid being suppressed.

 

Back to Contents

 

Mission Briefings Explained

This section explains the information contained in the mission briefings.

Units: The number of units in the battle group including off-table artillery (present in Battles 2 & 3).

Command Dice: The number of Command Dice rolled each turn.

Staff Orders: How many initial Staff Orders a battle group has. A battle group can store as many Staff Orders as it has Command Dice.

Rally Dice: The number of dice rolled when rallying units.

Army Morale Points: How many Army Morale Points a battle group starts with.

Initial Forces: Which units are placed on the table at the start of the game.

Reserves: Units that enter the table as Reserves from the second turn onward.

Deployment: Where initial forces are deployed on the map.

First Command Pulse: How to determine which side gets the first Command Pulse.

Victory or Defeat: How the winner and loser are determined.

Back to Contents

Battle 1 – Meeting Engagement

Type: Meeting Engagement

Time: 0700 hours, 20th September 1944

Location: Near Lezey, Lorraine

The morning mist clears revealing an attacking German battle group. American tank companies are hurriedly pushed forward to drive the Germans off.

This introductory battle takes just over an hour to play.

Battle 1 Map

The map is for a 6’x4’ table and shows the layout of the terrain for the battle. Don’t worry about reproducing it exactly – near enough is good enough. The important thing is that the woods and hills break up line of sight. If you are playing with a larger or smaller table add or remove some terrain.

Woods: The woods are Broken Ground (half speed) and provide light cover (+1D).

Hills: The hills are Broken Ground (half speed).

Deployment Zones: The German Deployment Zone is at the top of the map and the American one at the bottom. Vehicles are placed along the table edges in their respective Deployment Zones.

Victory or Defeat: The game is won by the player who reduces the other to zero Army Morale Points.

US Briefing – Battle 1

Time: 0700 hours, 20th September 1944

Location: Near Lezey, Lorraine

You have rapidly crossed France and are now in Lorraine near Lezey. The morning mist has cleared revealing an attacking German Battle Group. You are ordered to engage and drive off the enemy.

US Battle Group Statistics

Units: 9

Command Dice: 4

Staff Orders: 2

Rally Dice: 4

Army Morale: 9

Battle Group Units

You have three companies of M4s available.

Tank Company

M4 75mm

M4 75mm

M4 76mm

Tank Company

M4 75mm

M4 75mm

M4 76mm

Tank Company

M4 75mm

M4 75mm

M4 76mm

US Set-Up

Initial Forces: All your units are present on the table.

Reserves: None.

Deployment: You deploy your companies after the German Player has deployed his. Your companies may be deployed anywhere in your Deployment Zone.

First Game Turn: Both players roll their Command Dice. The first Command Pulse goes to the player who rolls the most 6s, etc.

Army Morale: You start with nine Army Morale Points. You lose 1D3 Army Morale Points each time one of your units is Dispersed.

Victory or Defeat: You win if you reduce the Germans to zero Army Morale Points. You lose if the Germans reduce you to zero Army Morale Points.

US Unit Statistics

M4 75mm

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 75L38 Gun

Range: 7/14/28

AT: 7D

M4 76mm

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 76L52 Gun

Range: 8/16/32

AT: 8D

German Briefing – Battle 1

Time: 0700 hours, 20th September 1944

Location: Near Lezey, Lorraine

The Americans have pushed into Lorraine and are threatening Germany’s borders. You are to advance and engage the enemy in the vicinity of Lezey.

German Battle Group Statistics

Units: 7

Command Dice: 3

Staff Orders: 2

Rally Dice: 4

Army Morale: 7

German Battle Group Units

You are in command of a composite armour battalion.

Panzer Company

Panther Ausf G

Panther Ausf G

Panzer Company

PzKwf IV H

PzKwf IV H

PzKwf IV H

Assault Gun Company

Sturmgeschütz III (StuG III)

Sturmgeschütz III (StuG III)

German Set-Up

Initial Forces: All your units are present on the table.

Reserves: None.

Deployment: You deploy before the American Player. You can place your companies anywhere in your Deployment Zone.

First Game Turn: Both players roll their Command Dice. The first Command Pulse goes to the player who rolls the most 6s, etc.

Army Morale: You start with seven Army Morale Points. You lose 1D3 Army Morale Points each time one of your units is Dispersed.

Victory or Defeat: You win if you the reduce the Americans to zero Army Morale Points. You lose if the Americans reduce you to zero Army Morale Points.

German Unit Statistics

Panther Ausf G

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 7D/6D

Weapon: 75L70 Gun

Range: 9/18/36

AT: 9D

Notes: Sloped armour.

Panzer IV H

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 75L48 Gun

Range: 8/16/32

AT: 8D

Sturmgeschütz III

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 6D (5D)

Weapon: 75L48 Gun

Range: 8/16/32

AT: 8D

Notes: Restricted to 180° fire arc.

 

Back to Contents

Battle 2 – Attack/Defend

Type: Attack/Defend

Time: 1300 hours, 20th September 1944

Location: Near Lezey, Lorraine

Reinforced by a company of M5 light tanks, the Americans are ordered to attack the German forward positions. This battle introduces rules for off-table artillery, smoke, hidden units and obstacles.

Battle 2 Map

The map is for a 6’x4’ table and shows the layout of the terrain for the battle.

Deployment Zones: The German Deployment Zone is at the top of the map and the American one at the bottom.

Victory or Defeat: The game is won by the player who reduces the other to zero Army Morale Points.

US Briefing – Battle 2

Time: 1300 hours, 20th September 1944

Location: Near Lezey, Lorraine

US Battle Group Statistics

Units: 14

Command Dice: 5

Staff Orders: 4

Rally Dice: 4

Artillery Response Dice: 4

Army Morale: 12

US Battle Group Units

You have been reinforced with a company of M5 light tanks and two batteries of M7 Howitzer Motor Carriages. Your M7 HMCs provide off-table artillery support. Use Staff Orders to call and adjust artillery missions.

Armour Company

M4 75mm

M4 75mm

M4 76mm

Armour Company

M4 75mm

M4 75mm

M4 76mm

Armour Company

M4 75mm

M4 75mm

M4 76mm

Armour Company

M5 Light Tank

M5 Light Tank

M5 Light Tank

Off-Table Artillery

M7 Howitzer Motor Carriage

M7 Howitzer Motor Carriage

US Set-Up

Initial Forces: The M5 light tanks are deployed after the Germans have placed their hidden units. The M5s deploy any where along the Friendly Table Edge in the US Deployment Zone.

Reserves: The remaining armour companies may be committed as Reserves from the second turn. Each company is a separate Command Group. They may enter anywhere along the Friendly Table Edge within the US Deployment Zone.

No Reserves may be committed during a turn in which you roll a Command Failure.

First Command Pulse: The US player automatically has the first Command Pulse even if he rolls a Command Failure.

Victory or Defeat: You win if you the reduce the Germans to zero Army Morale Points. You lose if the Germans reduce you to zero Army Morale Points.

US Unit statistics – Battle 2

M5 Light Tank

Type: Light AFV

Move: Fast 6+1Dx2

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 37L53 Gun

Range: 6/12/24

AT: 5D

Notes: Break-off.

M7 Howitzer Motor Carriage

Type: Off-table Artillery

Move:

Reaction:

Weapon: 105mm howitzer

Range: Off-Table

AT: 4D

Notes: Artillery Suppression.

M4 75mm

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 75L38 Gun

Range: 7/14/28

AT: 7D

M4 76mm

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 76L52 Gun

Range: 8/16/32

AT: 8D

German Briefing – Mission 2

Time: 1300 hours, 20th September 1944

Location: Near Lezey, Lorraine

The Americans are attacking our forward positions. Your StuG IIIs start the game hidden and may use ambush fire against the Americans.

German Battle Group Statistics

Units: 11

Command Dice: 4

Staff Orders: 3

Rally Dice: 4

Artillery Response Dice: 4

Army Morale: 10

German Battle Group Units

Your battle group has been reinforced by a StuG III platoon, and two SdKfz 234/2 (Puma) platoons. You have one battery of 105mm howitzers to provide off-table artillery support. Use Staff Orders to call and adjust artillery missions.

Panzer Company

Panther Ausf G

Panther Ausf G

Panzer Company

PzKwf IV H

PzKwf IV H

PzKwf IV H

Assault Gun Company

StuG III

StuG III

StuG III

Recon Company

SdKfz 234/2 Puma

SdKfz 234/2 Puma

Off-Table Artillery

105L28 Howitzer

German Set-Up

Initial Forces: The StuG IIIs are deployed as hidden units. They can be placed behind the hedges surrounding the fields or at the edges of the woods. The StuG IIIs are placed as a company. Mark their location on the map.

The Pumas may be deployed on your Friendly Table Edge any where in your Deployment Zone or they can be added to your Panzer companies.

Reserves: The two Panzer companies may be committed as Reserves from the second turn. Each Panzer company is committed as a separate Command Group. They may enter anywhere along the Friendly Table Edge within the German Deployment Zone.

No Reserves may be committed during a turn in which you roll a Command Failure.

First Command Pulse: The US player automatically has the first Command Pulse even if he rolls a Command Failure.

Victory or Defeat: You win if you the reduce the Americans to zero Army Morale Points. You lose if the Americans reduce you to zero Army Morale Points.

German Unit Statistics – Battle 2

SdKfz 234/2 Armoured Car (Puma)

Type: Ligth AFV

Move: Fast 6+1Dx2

Reaction: 4D

Weapon: 50L60 Gun

Range: 7/14/28

AT: 6D

Notes: Recon. Break-off.

105L28 Howitzer

Type: Off-table Artillery

Move:

Reaction:

Weapon: 105L28 howitzer

Range: Off-Table

AT: 4D

Notes: Artillery Suppression.

Panther Ausf G

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 7D/6D

Weapon: 75L70 Gun

Range: 9/18/36

AT: 9D

Notes: Sloped armour.

Panzer IV H

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 75L48 Gun

Range: 8/16/32

AT: 8D

Sturmgeschütz III

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 6D (5D)

Weapon: 75L48 Gun

Range: 8/16/32

AT: 8D

Notes: Restricted to 180° fire arc.

 

Back to Contents

Battle 3 – Counter-Attack

Type: Counter-Attack

Time: 0800 hours, 21st September 1944

Location: Near Lezey, Lorraine

As the US armour attempts to break through the German lines, the Germans commit one of their few Tiger platoons to push the Americans back.

Battle 3 Map

The map is for a 6’x4’ table and shows the layout of the terrain for the battle.

Deployment Zones: The German Deployment Zone is at the top of the map and the American one at the bottom.

Victory or Defeat: The game is won by the player who reduces the other to zero Army Morale Points.

US Briefing – Mission 3

Time: 0800 hours, 21st September 1944

Location: Near Lezey, Lorraine

You have been reinforced with a company of M10 Tank Destroyers. You are to attack the Germans and eradicate their armour.

US Battle Group Statistics

Units: 17

Command Dice: 6

Staff Orders: 4

Rally Dice: 4

Artillery Response Dice: 4

Army Morale: 15

US Battle Group Units

Armour Company

M4 75mm

M4 75mm

M4 76mm

Armour Company

M4 75mm

M4 75mm

M4 76mm

Armour Company

M4 75mm

M4 75mm

M4 76mm

Armour Company

M5 Light Tank

M5 Light Tank

M5 Light Tank

Tank Destroyer Company

M10 Tank Destroyer

M10 Tank Destroyer

M10 Tank Destroyer

Off-Table Artillery

M7 Howitzer Motor Carriage

M7 Howitzer Motor Carriage

US Set-Up

Initial Forces: The M5s are deployed after the Germans have placed their hidden units. The M5s deploy anywhere along the Friendly Table Edge in the US Deployment Zone. All other units enter as Reserves.

Reserves: The remaining armour companies and tank destroyer company may be committed as Reserves from the second turn. Each company is a separate Command Group. They may enter anywhere along the Friendly Table Edge within the US Deployment Zone.

No Reserves may be committed during a turn in which you roll a Command Failure.

First Command Pulse: The US player automatically has the first Command Pulse even if he rolls a Command Failure.

Victory or Defeat: You win if you the reduce the Germans to zero Army Morale Points. You lose if the Germans reduce you to zero Army Morale Points.

US Unit Statistics – Battle 3

M10 Tank Destroyer

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 5D (O)

Weapon: 76L52 Gun

Range: 8/16/32

AT: 8D

Notes: Shoot and Scoot. Break-off. Open-topped.

M5 Light Tank

Type: Light AFV

Move: Fast 6+1Dx2

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 37L53 Gun

Range: 6/12/24

AT: 5D

Notes: Break-off.

M7 Howitzer Motor Carriage

Type: Off-table Artillery

Move:

Reaction:

Weapon: 105mm howitzer

Range: Off-Table

AT: 4D

Notes: Artillery Suppression.

M4 75mm

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 75L38 Gun

Range: 7/14/28

AT: 7D

M4 76mm

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 76L52 Gun

Range: 8/16/32

AT: 8D

German Briefing – Mission 3

Time: 0800 hours, 21st September 1944

Location: Near Lezey, Lorraine

The Americans are close to breaking through our lines. A Tiger I platoon is on its way to your position. Destroy the enemy armour. Show the Americans that Germany can still fight.

German Battle Group Statistics

Units: 14

Command Dice: 5

Staff Orders: 4

Rally Dice: 4

Artillery Response Dice: 4

Army Morale: 12

German Battle Group Units

Panzer Company

Panther Ausf G

Panther Ausf G

Panther Ausf G

Panzer Company

PzKwf IV H

PzKwf IV H

PzKwf IV H

Recon Company

SdKfz 234/2 Puma

SdKfz 234/2 Puma

SdKfz 234/2 Puma

Assault Gun Company

StuG III

StuG III

StuG III

Heavy Tank Platoon

Tiger I

Off-Table Artillery

105L28 Howitzer

German Set-Up

Initial Forces: The StuG IIIs are deployed as hidden units any where in the German Deployment Zone.

One to three Pumas (your choice) are deployed as a company on your Friendly Table Edge any where in your Deployment Zone. Any Pumas that are not deployed may be added to your Panzer companies (one Puma per company).

Reserves: The Panzer companies may be committed as Reserves from the second turn. They may enter anywhere along the Friendly Table Edge within the German Deployment Zone.

The Tiger I may be committed as a reserve from the third turn. It enters anywhere along the Friendly Table Edge within the German Deployment Zone.

No Reserves may be committed during a turn in which you roll a Command Failure.

First Command Pulse: The US player automatically has the first Command Pulse even if he rolls a Command Failure.

Victory or Defeat: You win if you the reduce the Americans to zero Army Morale Points. You lose if the Americans reduce you to zero Army Morale Points.

German Unit Statistics – Battle 3

Tiger I

Type: Heavy AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 7D

Weapon: 88L56 Gun

Range: 10/20/40

AT: 10D

Notes: Poor reliability.

SdKfz 234/2 Armoured Car (Puma)

Type: Light AFV

Move: Fast

Reaction: 4D

Weapon: 50L60 Gun

Range: 7/14/28

AT: 6D

Notes: Recon. Break-off.

105L28 Howitzer

Type: Off-table Artillery

Move:

Reaction:

Weapon: 105L28 howitzer

Range: Off-Table

AT: 4D

Notes: Artillery Suppression.

Panther Ausf G

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 7D/6D

Weapon: 75L70 Gun

Range: 9/18/36

AT: 9D

Notes: Sloped armour.

Panzer IV H

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 5D

Weapon: 75L48 Gun

Range: 8/16/32

AT: 8D

Sturmgeschütz III

Type: Medium AFV

Move: Average

Reaction: 6D (5D)

Weapon: 75L48 Gun

Range: 8/16/32

AT: 8D

Notes: Restricted to 180° fire arc.

 

Back to Contents

What Next?

You can replay the battles with all of the forces for Battle 3, but decide where and when units are deployed. You can start with all vehicles on the table, or have them enter as Reserves from the first turn onwards. Both sides may deploy one or two hidden Command Groups.

You can also form your own Command Groups at the start of the game. For example, the US player might want to group his three M4 76mm tanks into the same Command Group, and to add one M5 to each of his M4 companies. Similarly, the German player might want to add one or two Pumas to his panzer or Stug III Command Groups.

You might also like to increase the amount of artillery so the US starts with three M7 HMCs and the Germans with two 105mm howitzers. Add one Army Morale Point and one Staff Order to each side, if you take this option.

Also play around with the terrain to create different battlefields. The main thing when placing terrain is to provide cover and to block Lines of Sight so that vehicles are forced to manoeuvrer.

Back to Contents

Armour Battles Expansion

Would you like more Armour Battles?

Get a FREE rules expansion Armour Battles by visiting the Wargames Design website.

http://wargamesdesign.com/abx-download/

The Armour Battles Expansion includes:

New Rules

Hidden Movement

Additional Rules for Artillery

Vehicle Reliability

Unit Special Rules

New Battle Groups

May 1940 – Battle of France

Commonwealth Armour

French Armour

German Armour

December 1940 – Operation Compass

Commonwealth Armour

German Armour

Italian Armour

February 1941 – Operation Sonnenblume

Commonwealth Armour

German Armour

May-June 1941 – Brevity to Battleaxe

Commonwealth Armour

German Armour

Italian Armour

November 1941 – Operation Crusader

Commonwealth Armour

German Armour

Italian Armour

Late War 1944

Commonwealth Armour

German Armour

Soviet Armour

US Armour

New Missions

Meeting Engagement

Attack/Defend

Flank Attack

Hold the Line

Counter-Attack

http://wargamesdesign.com/abx-download/

Rules Summary

[]Game Turn

Both players roll their Command Dice

Check for Command Failure

Discard any 1s

The player who rolled the most 6s goes first

First Friendly Command Pulse

Friendly Logistics Phase

First Enemy Command Pulse

Enemy Logistics Phase

Second Friendly Command Pulse

Second Enemy Command Pulse

Command Pulses alternate until all Command Dice are used

End of Turn – Remove Fire Markers

Command Failure

More 1s than 6s

Opponent gets to use the 1s as Wild Dice

Player with the Command Failure has the second Command Pulse

Artillery and smoke missions are cancelled

Commit Rerserve orders cannot be issued

If both players roll a Command Failure, the turn ends

Command Group

Nominate one unit as the leader

Another three units within 6” can be included in the Command Group

Suppressed units cannot be included

One reconnaisance unit can be included in the group without adding to its size

Command and Staff Orders

Move and Fire

Commit Reserves

Disengage Group

Rally Group

Remove Unit Suppression

Staff Orders Only

Call Artillery Mission

Call Smoke Mission

Adjust Artillery Mission

Maintain Artillery Mission

Maintain Smoke Mission

Staff Orders can be used as Wild Dice

Restock Staff Orders

Double roll = 1 Staff Order

Triple roll= 2 Staff Orders

Quadruple roll = 3 Staff Orders

Wild Dice – Rolls of 6s and Staff Orders

Create a Larger Dice Chain

Add to a Combat Roll

Add to a Reaction Roll

Add to a Rally Roll

Replace a Variable Move Dice

Double, triple or more 6s can be used to issue instant staff orders

Direct Fire TN = 4+

Roll your unit’s AT Dice. Your opponent rolls his unit’s Reaction Dice

Suppressed Units Cannot Fire

Close Range -1 TN

Effective Range 0 TN

Long Range +1 TN

Flank/Rear Attack -1TN

Ambush Fire +1D

Double Move -1D

Triple Move -2D

Indirect Fire

Roll Artillery Dice versus 3D. Both players have a 4+ TN. The battery fires for effect immediately if you roll more successes than your opponent. Otherwise, your battery fires in your next Logistics Phase.

Roll for deviation. A deviating battery deviates 1D”

Batteries always fire with a 4+ TN

Reaction Checks

Target unit is not suppressed 4+TN

Target unit is suppressed 5+ TN

Target unit is in or behind light cover +1D

Target is uphill of firer +1D

Open-topped versus indirect fire -1D

Target unit is disengaging +2D

Target unit breaks off +2D

Target unit shoots and scoots +2D

Fire Results

Disruption Points: Target takes one Disruption Point for each success by the firing unit.

Dispersal: Remove a unit when it has three Disruption Points, then deduct D3 Army Morale Points.

Suppression: Caused when the firing unit rolls more 6s than the target. A unit hit by indirect fire must roll more 6s than the firing unit or become suppressed.

Forced Back: A unit is forced back if it is suppressed and takes one or two disruption points.

A unit is Forced Back 6" +1D" per unmatched 6.

Rallying

You roll Rally Dice. Your opponent rolls one dice for each Disruption Point on your unit with a 4+ TN. Your TN depends on the distance to the closest enemy unit. Remove one Disruption Point per success. Suppressed units cannot be rallied.

 

Cover: Units who are in or behind cover are easier to rally and gain +1D.

No LOS to Enemy: If your unit cannot see the enemy, you gain +1D.

Back to Contents

Play Aids

FREE Quick Reference Sheet, Unit and Battle Group cards for Armour Battles are available from:

http://wargamesdesign.com/downloads/downloads-2/

Quick Reference Sheet

Unit Cards

You can either use them as reference sheets or cut out the cards and place them into card protectors.

Battle Group Cards

Handy reference cards for the battle groups featured in the three battles, plus a blank card for making your own battle groups.

Back to Contents

Credits

Game Design: Jim Bambra

Editing: Catherine Bambra

Playtesting: Alan Stringer, Hugh Attwood, Ian Westworth, Chris Bambra.

The Wargames Design Recon Team

Peter D. Antill, Steve Applegate, John Aston, Don Bailey, Vidal Bairos, Steve Barber, Sean Bartholome, Si Brooks, Rodrick Campbell, Dan Clancy, Richard Coffland (1LT, ARNG Ret), Scott Collingwood, Dom Cook, Joe Corsaro, Rick Cox, John Eagles, Clay Ellis, Alex Filewood, Glenn Foden, Emery Gallant, Rob Goodfellow, Paul de Haan, Roy J. Harter, Jim Hayes, Keith Hershey Jr, Martin A. Johncock, Shane Johnson, Brett Kvisle, Derek Paul Ler, Stephen Luscombe, Gary McKenzie, Jim McLarty, Martin Mitchell, Justin Penwith, Richard Radgoski, Andrew Rees, Dean N Rogers, Vitaly Simakov aka SunCat, Ian Skinner, Neil Smith, Martin Stein, Alex Stoddart, Dave Strebe, Robert Taylor, Keith Tracton, Ted Triandafilou III, James Turner, Keith Tracton, Paul Wright.

Thanks for your support, guys. It’s greatly appreciated!

Special Thanks

Special thanks to Alan Stringer, veteran of countless games of Combat HQ ranging from the deserts of Egypt to the Normandy bocage and the steppes of Russia.

Did You Like Armour Battles?

Thank you for reading Armour Battles. If you like the rules, won’t you please take a moment to leave me a review at your favourite retailer?

Thanks!

Jim

Back to Contents

About the Author

Jim Bambra is an award winning designer who has worked extensively on roleplaying games, table-top games and video games. Some of his previous credits include Warhammer Fantasy Battles, Warhammer 40K and Star Wars Miniatures, Dungeons & Dragons, StarFrontiers, Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay, Star Wars Roleplaying Game, TORG, and GURPS. Video games include Special Forces, Fields of Glory, The Legacy, Warzone 2100, the Great Escape, Conflict: Desert Storm, Conflict: Desert Storm II, Conflict: Vietnam and Conflict: Global Storm.

Back to Contents


Armour Battles: World War Two Wargame Rules

Armour Battles is an introductory set of World War Two wargame rules. Based on the larger Combat HQ rules, Armour Battles is a fully playable game. Armour Battles features three armoured battles set in Lorraine, France in 1944 as Patton’s 3rd Army advances towards the Rhine. The first battle is a small meeting engagement between US and German tanks. The next battle has the Americans attacking the Germans. This is followed by the Americans attempting to break through the German positions as the Germans counter-attack with a Tiger I platoon. Armour Battles includes all the rules needed to play these battles

  • ISBN: 9781310075506
  • Author: Jim Bambra
  • Published: 2016-03-31 18:35:18
  • Words: 14986
Armour Battles: World War Two Wargame Rules Armour Battles: World War Two Wargame Rules