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Write an Essay in 20 Minutes: English College Essay Generator

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Write an Essay in 20 Minutes: English College Essay Generator

Essay and Thesis Writing Series

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Grant Andrews

Academic Coaching

www.writeyourthesis.com

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Copyright © 2017 by Grant Andrews

 

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission requests, write to the publisher at the address below.

 

 

Academic Coaching

Editing, Coaching and Counseling Services

For Thesis Writing

www.writeyourthesis.com

[_[email protected] _]

 

Contents

Chapter 1: Introduction

Chapter 2: What’s in an Academic Essay?

Chapter 3: The 10 Questions to Generate Your Essay

Chapter 4: Editing Your Essay

Chapter 5: Example of a Generated Essay

Things to Remember

Academic Coaching

Academic Coaching is run by Dr. Grant Andrews and Malan van der Walt.

The Academic Coaching team offers free content to help anyone writing a thesis, essay or article. We provide free short books on every topic relating to thesis writing, as well as step-by-step guides on how to plan, research and write your academic piece. If you would like to request that we compile a tutorial or eBook that you need, or if you have any questions, please email us at [email protected].

Our services also include editing, coaching and counseling. We coach our clients through all stages of essay and thesis writing, and host online workshops and writing marathons. You can find our pricing guide on our website, www.writeyourthesis.com.

We hope this short guide can help you to make a success of your academic work!

Chapter 1: Introduction

If you have to write an essay for English Studies on a novel, poem or film, and if you are struggling with where to start, the Academic Coaching team has developed a free English Essay Generator. You can download the generator and follow the guidelines in this short guidebook to make sure that your essay meets all of the requirements and academic conventions.

The automatically generated essay will fit all of the regular requirements of an undergraduate essay in English literature or textual analysis. It will provide a good introduction, three well-structured body paragraphs and a concise and effective conclusion. The generated essay will be around 1000-words, depending on the length of the answers you provide to the questions in the generator. However, if you require additional words and paragraphs, you can simply repeat the format for body paragraphs and add more of your own.

Download the essay generator template at the Academic Coaching website before you start working through this guide. [+ Click here to download it now+].

It’s important to get the structure right early on in your writing process, so that you won’t have to go back and redo work later on. This guide will explain to you what should be included in a good essay, and once you use the generator, you will already have a good outline for what your essay should look like. You can also find many more short guides on academic writing by visiting the resources page of the Academic Coaching website: www.writeyourthesis.com/p/resources.html. There are books on writing a thesis statement, a good introduction, and how to structure body paragraphs.

Before we begin with this guide, take note that you can test your academic and thesis readiness levels, and get detailed advice and strategies on your unique challenges, in a free, personalized report written by the Academic Coaches. Take the quiz at the following link to get your report: http://www.writeyourthesis.com/p/quiz.html.

For now, before we look at the generator itself, let’s look at what should be included in a good academic essay.

Chapter 2: What’s in an Academic Essay?

An academic essay has multiple components, and all of them need to work together to ensure that your essay is well-structured and effective. The Academic Coaching team has developed a checklist of all of the components of an academic essay. Before you generate your essay, it’s useful to familiarize yourself with the various components and requirements of an academic essay.

Take a few minutes to read through the checklist and the description of each component before moving on to the questions for the generator.

Introduction

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p<>{color:#000;}. Context: Give the reader some basic background information which they can use to understand your discussion/ argument. This should be one to three sentences. Your context could include: book’s title, author’s name and plot points (for literature analysis), introduce important dates, events and people that relate to your essay, or a discussion of the major themes and concepts in your field that your essay will touch on. For example, an essay on photosynthesis will have to explain what it is, basically, in the context section, and then later you can go into more detail.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Thesis Statement: Your thesis statement is the main point of your essay, or the main argument you will make. You should not simply repeat the essay topic or question, but answer it. For example, if your essay topic is to evaluate the merits of eating eggs for breakfast, your thesis statement needs to say whether eggs for breakfast would be good or bad according to your research, not simply say that you will evaluate it later.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Overview: Give the main steps that you will take to support your thesis statement throughout your essay. You could list the three most important aspects you will look at, or the three or four main elements that will form topics of your different paragraphs.

Body Paragraphs

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p<>{color:#000;}. Topic Sentence: Your topic sentence is the first sentence (or two sentences) of every body paragraph that introduces the main topic that you will discuss in that paragraph. Your topic sentence needs to be clear and show a direct link to your thesis statement, explaining how the paragraph will build on your argument or discussion in some way.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Evidence/ Support: The second section of your paragraphs needs to include evidence or support in the form of citations, research, data or experiments. Every paragraph which introduces a new topic should have some support. Each piece of support that you get from external sources needs to be referenced properly (APA, Harvard, MLA, Chicago or other referencing style).

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p<>{color:#000;}. Explanation: You need to spend the bulk of your paragraph explaining the evidence or support in your own words, clearly showing how it links to the topic of the paragraph as well as to your overall thesis statement. You need to analyze, criticize, or explain the evidence you’ve provided so that any reader in your field could understand it. Your explanation section is where you use your own critical thinking skills to demonstrate the significance and veracity of your evidence, and where you show how the new ideas you’ve introduced take your argument or discussion forward.

Conclusion

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p<>{color:#000;}. Summary of Ideas: Briefly summarize the main ideas you’ve introduced in the body of your essay.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Show Support for Thesis Statement: Explain again how the evidence or support has linked to your thesis statement in one or two sentences. Reinforce the main idea of your argument.

In addition to the components of the essay, there are also style guidelines and academic conventions that you need to follow. These are listed below for you to familiarize yourself with:

Logic and Coherence

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p<>{color:#000;}. One Idea per Paragraph: Is there only one main idea in each paragraph? To test this, try to summarize each paragraph in one sentence. If you use a conjunction like the word “and” in your summary, you might have two ideas that require two paragraphs.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Paragraphs build towards conclusion: Do each of your paragraphs add to your argument? Do they flow from one to the next in a logical way? This means that each paragraph is placed in a position that moves from one step to the next, and doesn’t take steps backwards. The understanding or knowledge from one paragraph should be a building block towards the ideas you introduce in the next paragraph.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Good use of Signposting: Signposting is the use of words that allow the reader to follow the logical progression of your argument. If one point leads into the next, you could use a signpost word like “therefore” or “thus”. If one point contradicts another or shows an opposing viewpoint, you could use a signpost like “however”. If you are giving a second point, you could signpost it with “secondly”.

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p<>{color:#000;}. No irrelevant ideas or paragraphs: Are all of the ideas and paragraphs that you include in your essay necessary to build towards your conclusion? Are any parts repeated? Are there paragraphs which could be left out? Are there ideas that don’t help you to build your discussion or argument?

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p<>{color:#000;}. Support for ideas/ contentions/ interpretations/ claims: Every idea or claim which you introduce needs to be supported by evidence. You shouldn’t use statements like “As we all know…”. Rather, give a citation or refer to research that makes the point you are trying to make. It might not be a self-evident fact like you imagine it is.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Evidence/ Support is Scientific and academic in nature: You should only use evidence that follows the rigor of science and academic knowledge. Personal convictions, religious ideals (outside of religious studies essays), or other forms of support which are not academically peer-reviewed, produced by experts in the field or empirically tested should not be used in academic essays.

Clarity

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p<>{color:#000;}. Academic Register: You need to write formally and academically throughout your essay. Your language has to be professional, like you are writing for a journal, newspaper or to an important person who deserves great respect. Avoid conversational language or informal conventions like contractions (“isn’t” in the place of “is not”). Check your spelling, grammar and punctuation.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Argument/ discussion clarity: Is the “golden thread” of your argument or discussion clear throughout the essay? This means: is there a clear and focused main point that all of your other points link to?

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p<>{color:#000;}. Clarity of ideas: Do your ideas all make sense? Do you overexplain or underexplain some ideas? Will the reader easily be able to follow what you’re saying and not be confused or lost while reading your essay?

Academic Conventions

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p<>{color:#000;}. Title: Do you provide a short (less than 20-word) title that clearly explains your main point and that would make sense to any reader?

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p<>{color:#000;}. Referencing: Do you use proper referencing for each piece of external information that you didn’t come up with on your own? Do you have a good reference list/ bibliography which follows all of the conventions of your department/ school?

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p<>{color:#000;}. Formatting: Do you format your essays neatly, professionally and legibly? The requirements are usually 12-point Times New Roman font with 1.5-line or double line spacing, and 1-inch margins, so that your professor or tutor will have enough space for comments if applicable.

These are all of the major requirements of an academic essay. In addition to the above, you also have to make sure that you fulfill all of the requirements of your essay topic and address all of the different elements that are being asked of you.

Now that you understand what an essay should look like, let’s move on to generating your essay.

Review Your Learning:

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p<{color:#000;}. An essay should have a good introduction with context, thesis statement and overview

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p<{color:#000;}. An essay should have well-structured paragraphs with a topic sentence, some evidence or support, and explanation of that evidence

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p<{color:#000;}. There are strict academic conventions for essays. Your essays need to be logical and coherent, and your language needs to be clear and formal

Chapter 3: The 10 Questions to Generate Your Essay

The essay generator can be a very useful tool when you are not yet sure of what an essay should look like or when you struggle with how to structure your ideas. The generator asks 10 simple questions of you, and if you complete those questions, it will be able to generate a completed essay with three body paragraphs, an introduction and a conclusion.

These are the 10 questions and the explanations of each question. You can fill in your responses to these questions in the generator as you work through this guide. Remember, you can download the generator template by [+ clicking this link to the Academic Coaching website+]. The first 6 questions are very easy and straightforward, and the final 4 will require you to apply your knowledge of the text and to give your answer to the question.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Title of Your Essay

The title should ideally be fewer than 20 words, and explain the main point of your essay. For example, “A Feminist Analysis of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice”. Try not to include a title that is too vague or confusing for the reader. If you are providing an analysis, you will need to provide the name of the text that you are analyzing in the title.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Title of the Text, Poem, Novel or Film that you are discussing:

Simply give the title of the text, for example Pulp Fiction or “Sonnet IX”.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Name of the Author

This is the name of the author who wrote the text you are analyzing, or the director of the film.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Summary of the novel, poem or text:

Your summary should be 15 – 30 words, and give only the main idea. Fill it in as if it starts with the following words: The text deals with… (your response). For example, “The text deals with a man named John Carpenter trying to find his way back to Mars.” You only type the words highlighted in yellow for the generator to work properly.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Type of approach you are taking

If you are writing an argumentative essay where you need to support a contention with evidence, type “argue that”. If you are writing a comparative essay between two or more texts, type “compare”. If you are writing a discussion or analysis on a particular theme, character or idea, type “discuss” or “analyze” as appropriate.

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p<>{color:#000;}. What type of text is your essay about?

Is it a novel, book, film, play, drama, comedy, tragedy or something else? Give only a one-word answer in lowercase letters, e.g. novel.

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p<>{color:#000;}. The main point you are looking at (thesis statement)

You should list your answer to the question in as few words or possible (recommended 15-30 words, or fewer). Your answer should be very clear and concise, and not simply repeat the question. For example, if the question is “Which TV show is the best?” your answer should be “Game of Thrones is the best TV show, and no other show compares”. If the question is “Analyze the character of Lady Macbeth” your answer that you fill in could be “Lady Macbeth is power-hungry and manipulative, and wants to control Macbeth”. Give an answer here, or your main idea that you want to respond to the question with. For more on writing thesis statements as direct answers to the question, there is a guide on the Academic Coaching website.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Three pieces of evidence to support the main idea:

Your evidence to support your main idea should be all of the major points from the text that have led you to your answer to the question, or led you to your thesis statement. For example, if you have to explain why you think that Lady Macbeth is power hungry and manipulative, you could give the following evidence: 1) she conspires to kill the king, 2) she sees the prophecy in a positive way, 3) she shows more intelligence than Macbeth. You will need at least 3 pieces of evidence for a good essay. If you have more evidence than this, that’s great: you’ll just have to amend the essay after it’s generated, copy the basic outline, and insert your extra evidence where appropriate. For now, just put in your main three points.

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p<>{color:#000;}. A Quote to Support Each Piece of Evidence

You need to include a quote or citation that gives extra support or evidence for each of the ideas which you presented for question 8. Each quote should fit with the corresponding evidence from above. If you have two or three quotes to support any particular piece of evidence, put them all into the corresponding text box and separate them with commas. Include the reference in brackets after each quote.

For example, for Evidence 1, the fact that “she conspires to kill the king”, you could insert the quotes as follows: “Come, you spirits /That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,/And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full/Of direst cruelty” (I, v), “Come, thick night,/ And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell,/ That my keen knife see not the wound it makes” (I, v). These quotes both support the first point of evidence you have given. Remember to include the in-text references here according to your appropriate referencing style. If you need help on referencing, be sure to visit the Academic Coaching site.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Your understanding of each of the quotes

In these text boxes, put your full understanding of the quotes for each piece of evidence. Try to explain the quote a bit in the way that you understand it. What do the quotes mean to you? How do they support the main point that your essay is trying to make, and how do they help to clarify the evidence that the quote is linked to? Explain each quote in at least two sentences, but preferably three or four detailed sentences each. Use proper punctuation and full sentences.

Once you complete all of these components, you’re ready to generate your essay in the template that you’ve downloaded. All you need to do is press CTR+A, and then press F9 (“Function 9”, the button in the row at the top of your keyboard). Your essay will automatically be generated on the final pages of the document. You can copy and paste it as plain text, and then edit and format it according to your needs.

You should make sure to edit it properly before submitting it if you are using it for formal grading, and make sure that you acknowledge the Academic Coaching website in your reference list to avoid the possibility of plagiarism. If you didn’t know exactly how to complete any of these sections, don’t worry; there is an example essay using the generator in the final chapter of this guide.

We will cover some tips on editing in the next chapter.

Chapter 4: Editing Your Essay

Once your essay has been automatically generated, you’ll see that there are many punctuation problems and some phrases are repeated. The generator simply puts your ideas in the correct order, but you’ll still have to read through the generated essay carefully in order to make sure that it meets the high standards discussed in chapter 2 of this guide.

Remember, if you need a good editor, you can go to the Academic Coaching website and get a quote for your essay. Our editing will usually come to around $22 for a 3000-word college essay, and we can usually deliver the edited document within a day. You can also request a structure and clarity check so that we can help you to ensure that your essay is the best it can be.

To edit your own work, make sure that you use a consistent font. Select all of the text and copy it into another document as plain text. Then, select the paragraphs and make sure that all of them are in Times New Roman 12-point font, or Arial 10-point font, as long as it is legible. You also need to increase the size of the line spacing between paragraphs. When you have selected all of the text, right-click on it and select “Paragraph”. Then, choose 1.5 lines under the line spacing heading.

Next, read each sentence carefully, and wherever text is repeated, you should find different ways of stating the information so that the essay doesn’t become tedious or frustrating for the reader. You should also remove the double spacing or the double punctuation wherever these are present, and make sure that capitalization is correct; capital letters at the start of sentences and none in the middle of sentences.

Finally, you will have to add a reference list. If you have used multiple sources for your citations, you will have to reference each of these in your reference list. You will also have to reference your primary text (the book or poem that you analyzed).

Let’s end off by looking at an example essay generated with the automatic essay generator. You’ll be able to see how you can use it for your own essays.

Review Your Learning:

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p<{color:#000;}. When editing your essay, make sure that the font is consistent and legible, and that your margins and line spacing are wide enough for comments and to allow for easy reading

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p<{color:#000;}. Change any repeated phrases by using different words with the same meaning so that your writing has variety and is more interesting

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p<{color:#000;}. Produce a reference list where all of the texts you discuss or refer to are listed with full details

[]Chapter 5: Example of a Generated Essay

Now that you know how to use the generator, what an essay should look like, and how to edit your generated essay, let’s end off by looking at an example of a generated essay. Below are the answers to the 10 questions for a made-up essay about a topic on a film. Look at how the questions are answered for examples of how you should answer your own questions in the generator. Then, see the full generated essay at the end of the chapter.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Title of Your Essay

The Visual Splendor of Damien Warnick’s Film The Betrayal

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p<>{color:#000;}. Title of the Text, Poem, Novel or Film that you are discussing:

The Betrayal

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p<>{color:#000;}. Name of the Author

Damien Warnick

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p<>{color:#000;}. Summary of the novel, poem or text:

a heartbreaking tale of making sense of the difficulties of the world and finding one’s own voice

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p<>{color:#000;}. Type of approach you are taking

argue that

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p<>{color:#000;}. What type of text is your essay about?

film

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p<>{color:#000;}. The main point you are looking at (thesis statement)

Warnick’s film is masterful at using imagery to convey emotion

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p<>{color:#000;}. Three pieces of evidence to support the main idea:

Evidence 1

the visual effects in the first act show Melody’s sadness

Evidence 2

the use of green screen is not overdone, and adds to the aesthetic of the scenes

Evidence 3

none of the characters are one-dimensional, and each one has a unique visual style

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p<>{color:#000;}. A Quote to Support Each Piece of Evidence

Quote for Evidence 1

“You made me wait for you, Melody. It was incredibly difficult” (Warnick, 2014)

Quote for Evidence 2

“There isn’t anything we couldn’t do with practical effects, but the green screen made the film much more fantastic” (Davies, 2015)

Quote for Evidence 3

“Designing these characters was a passion project for me. I wanted to show how many layers they had inside by giving them interesting dimensions on the outside” (Carmichael, 2016)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Your understanding of each of the quotes

Understanding 1

The fact that the character Johan says this to Melody in the film is a clear indication that he is in love with her, but she only responds by looking sad. Her eyes droop down and the make-up even changes color, showing a great level of heartache at the thought that she has lost Johan forever.

Understanding 2

The producer, Marko Davies, says these words in an interview with Moviemob, and he shows how important green screen is to the making of the film. The green screen gives a flair of something out of this world, and makes all of the backgrounds look animated with watercolor edges. It feels jarring and otherworldly.

Understanding 3

The production designer Liev Carmichael explains that the characters were designed in a way to make them seem more interesting and more multidimensional. He did not simply choose to design the characters in a way that was arbitrary, but took great care with each character. This shows in how colorful and strange each character looks.

Final Generated Essay:

The Visual Splendor of Damien Warnick’s Film The Betrayal

This essay will look at the film entitled The Betrayal by Damien Warnick, which deals with a heartbreaking tale of making sense of the difficulties of the world and finding one’s own voice. The essay will argue that Warnick’s film is masterful at using imagery to convey emotion. In support of this argument, the essay will refer to the textual evidence that the visual effects in the first act show Melody’s sadness, the use of green screen is not overdone, and adds to the aesthetic of the scenes and none of the characters are one-dimensional, and each one has a unique visual style.

The first piece of evidence to support the contention that Warnick’s film is masterful at using imagery to convey emotion is the fact that the visual effects in the first act show Melody’s sadness. This can be seen in quote(s) from the text, namely: “You made me wait for you, Melody. It was incredibly difficult” (Warnick, 2014). The quote(s) support the aforementioned point in the following ways: The fact that the character Johan says this to Melody in the film is a clear indication that he is in love with her, but she only responds by looking sad. Her eyes droop down and the make-up even changes color, showing a great level of heartache at the thought that she has lost Johan forever. Ultimately, it is clear that the visual effects in the first act show Melody’s sadness, which links to the main contention that Warnick’s film is masterful at using imagery to convey emotion.

A second element of how Warnick’s film is masterful at using imagery to convey emotion is the fact that the use of green screen is not overdone, and adds to the aesthetic of the scenes. This point is supported in the text as follows: “There isn’t anything we couldn’t do with practical effects, but the green screen made the film much more fantastic” (Davies, 2015). To understand the importance of this textual evidence, it is important to note the following: The director, Marko Davies, says these words in an interview with Moviemob, and he shows how important green screen is to the making of the film. The green screen gives a flair of something out of this world, and makes all of the backgrounds look animated with watercolor edges. It feels jarring and otherworldly. It becomes clear when analyzing this point that it supports the main contention of this essay, namely that Warnick’s film is masterful at using imagery to convey emotion.

In addition, the contention that Warnick’s film is masterful at using imagery to convey emotion is also supported by the fact that none of the characters are one-dimensional, and each one has a unique visual style. This third point is evident in the text in the following quote(s): “Designing these characters was a passion project for me. I wanted to show how many layers they had inside by giving them interesting dimensions on the outside” (Carmichael, 2016). The significance of this quote should be clearly understood. The production designer Liev Carmichael explains that the characters were designed in a way to make them seem more interesting and more multidimensional. He did not simply choose to design the characters in a way that was arbitrary, but took great care with each character. This shows in how colorful and strange each character looks. This point thus further demonstrates that Warnick’s film is masterful at using imagery to convey emotion.

In conclusion, the various points explored in this essay all serve to reinforce the main contention of this essay. Through close textual analysis, it is evident that Warnick’s film is masterful at using imagery to convey emotion.

Things to Remember

This generator can be a very useful first step in writing your essay. Use it to get the structure right, and to insert your own ideas and research in a way that fits academic conventions. Then, edit the essay appropriately and make it your own.

Writing an essay can be challenging, but there are many resources that can help you along the way. The Academic Coaching team offers editing and guidance for your essays, and we’re able to help you at any point from the initial idea stage to the final edit. We’ll help you come up with a plan and to refine your ideas, and we’ll give you expert feedback on your rough work so that you can write your essays with confidence. Go to www.writeyourthesis.com to find out more.

This book is part of a series for researchers and students writing essays and theses. We offer many more books and resources at our website, www.writeyourthesis.com/p/resources.html.

Take the Academic Readiness Quiz for a FREE Report

Are you feeling unsure of your academic strengths and challenges? We offer a free, personalized report on your readiness for writing an academic essay or thesis, as well as tips and guidelines to improve your skills. Simply take the 10-minute quiz at the following link, and your free report will be emailed to you: http://www.writeyourthesis.com/p/quiz.html.

All the best with your studies!

Grant and Malan

(P.S.: If you’d like to receive links to all of our academic writing tools as soon as they’re released, sign up for our mailing list today. Go to: www.writeyourthesis.com and sign up in the sidebar. As soon as you sign up, we’ll send you a welcome gift of four free academic writing books.)


Write an Essay in 20 Minutes: English College Essay Generator

This short guide comes with a free generator to produce a fully-written essay that fits all of the conventions of academic writing. You simply have to answer 10 questions based on your knowledge of the subject and the generator will produce the essay for you. In addition, the guide offers a complete checklist of what an English essay should look like so that you can check your work against it, and it explains exactly how to use the essay generator. You'll also get tips on how to edit your essay, and links to many more resources on essay writing. This guide will be useful for making sure that you start your journey of academic writing off on the right foot. You'll be able to read through the guide in about 30 minutes, and you'll be able to generate essays in fewer than 20 minutes once you understand the requirements. The guide is written by Dr. Grant Andrews, who has been teaching academic writing for years, and who knows the common pitfalls that students experience in academic writing. This book is part of the Essay and Thesis Writing Series.

  • ISBN: 9781370115082
  • Author: Grant Andrews
  • Published: 2017-08-04 19:35:11
  • Words: 4927
Write an Essay in 20 Minutes: English College Essay Generator Write an Essay in 20 Minutes: English College Essay Generator