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What To Eat To Feel & Look Amazing In Your Wedding Dress!

 

What To Eat To Feel & Look Amazing In Your Wedding Dress!

by Darren Harris

Copyright 2016 Darren Harris

Shakespir Edition

Shakespir Edition, License Notes

Thank you for downloading this ebook. This book remains the copyrighted property of the author, and may not be redistributed to others for commercial or non-commercial purposes. If you enjoyed this book, please encourage your friends to download their own copy from their favourite authorised dealer. Thank you for your support.

Note to readers

Readers are advised to consult with their physicians or other medical practitioners before implementing the suggestions that follow. This ebook is downloaded with the understanding that the author is not engaged in rendering medical, health, psychological or any other personal professional services or therapy in the ebook. This ebook is not intended to take the place of sound professional medical advice or treat specific maladies. The author assumes no liability for possible adverse consequences, loss or risk, personal, or otherwise, which is incurred as a consequence, directly or indirectly, of the use and application of any of the contents of this ebook.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1: What to eat?

Protein

Brassica vegetables

The good starchy complex carbohydrates

Oils and fats

Fruits and vegetables

Beverages

Chapter 2: What foods to avoid

Refined foods

Refined carbohydrates

Dairy and Gluten

Dairy

Gluten

Chapter 3: When to eat

Chapter 4: Snacks

Chapter 5: Reduce that inflammation!

Chapter 6: Manage your stress and support your liver

Dangers of stored toxins

Chapter 7: Gut feeling

Causes of Dysbiosis and SIBO

Chapter 8: Exercise

Chapter 9: Meal Suggestions

Breakfast

Lunch and Dinner

Chapter 10: Have fun with it!

About the author

Connect with me

Notes

Introduction

As a nutritional therapist, over the years I have observed that of my clients who came to me seeking advice on what to eat to reduce their weight in order to achieve and maintain a figure they were happy with, all were also searching for solutions on how to feel good at the same time. Feeling good about their body, feeling good in the clothes they wore, feeling good from a general health point of view, and in particular brides-to-be, who were wanting to feel and look good in their wedding dress on their wedding day, arguably one the most memorable and important days of their lives. So with that in mind I wanted to create this book, What To Eat To Feel & Look Amazing In Your Wedding Dress! The 12 week wedding weight loss plan that will help brides-to-be who are seeking weight loss solutions.

So what will it take on your part? Two things:

1) When first reading this book follow all the information within it. The purpose of this book is not to follow only part of it or jump in at different sections of your choosing, taking a bit of information here and a bit of information there and then trying to implement this information into your lifestyle. You will receive no desirable results following this approach.

2) This is a 12 week wedding weight loss plan, however, should you wish to follow it for less, you can, but I would suggest you do so for a bare minimum of 30 days. Thereafter you can continue to implement the information to help maintain your figure and a healthy lifestyle.

That’s it!

So, before I proceed with this dialogue and outline these fundamental factors, I think it’s important that I first set the stage and outline the mechanisms in your body that can potentially have a negative impact on you from a weight gain point of view, if they are not kept in balance.

Blood sugar (glucose)

Care must be taken when it comes to the balancing of your blood sugar levels as failure to do so can result in excess weight gain. All is dependent upon the type of carbohydrates you choose to eat, the amount, and the presence of other nutritional components such as fibre and protein, the likes of which will increase feelings of fullness (satiety) once eaten, thus reducing hunger and excess food intake, which in turn will help to balance your blood sugar levels.

Complex carbohydrates (slowly digested starches, resistant starches, fibres) such as sweet potatoes, yams, or vegetables, should be your carbohydrates of choice, as these types of carbohydrates take longer to be digested and broken down into simple sugars (glucose, which is your body’s preferred source of energy), and absorbed into your body. They also increase satiety and reduce hunger, all of which will result in keeping your blood sugar levels balanced throughout the day, through the slow release of sugar into your blood, which will also lead to the balancing and sustaining of your energy levels throughout the day, and result in no excess weight being incurred.

However, when your choice of carbohydrates are refined carbohydrates such as white bread, white rice, white pasta, rapidly digested starches such as potatoes, and simple sugars such as table sugar, due to the refining processes these carbohydrates have undergone…not only are they totally lacking in essential fibres and vitamins, when eaten, these refined carbohydrates have a negative impact on your blood sugar levels and therefore your weight, as they contain no fibre. Which means they are digested into simple sugars quickly within your body and then absorbed rapidly into your blood. This large influx of sugar in your blood can result in organ damage. In an effort to rebalance your blood sugar levels your body stores the excess sugar as fat in your fat cells, thus resulting in excess weight gain. Additionally, after consuming these refined carbohydrates you experience sharp spikes in your energy levels, which is always inevitably followed by an epic crash in energy. Then, what most find themselves doing in an effort to boost their energy levels again, search for the nearest sugar hit, in any shape or size (be it chocolate, cake, biscuits, cookies, whatever), once eaten, those energy levels rise but along with their weight, followed by the crash and loss of energy, however, not the loss of weight! And on and on they go on their vicious sugar, weight gain continuous cycle. Incidentally, the hormone, insulin, which is released from your pancreas, is required for the storage of sugar (glucose) in your body, and is therefore responsible for the lowering of raised blood sugar levels. When you constantly eat refined carbohydrates you are constantly causing large influxes of sugar to enter your bloodstream, and this puts a huge strain on your pancreas as its having to work harder to produce more insulin in an effort to lower your blood sugar levels. If this continues eventually your pancreas will be unable to keep up with the demand to constantly produce insulin and then will start to produce very little if no insulin at all. At this stage the cells in your body could also become resistant to the effects of insulin, which will lead to hyperglycemia (excess glucose in the blood), insulin resistance and potentially Type 2 diabetes.

Stress hormones

The stress response is a biochemical mechanism that our body creates in an effort to confront or escape stressful situations. When you are the victim of chronic stress, that is, stress which is experienced on a daily basis with no let up, your body responds by releasing a cascade of hormones which includes adrenaline and cortisol. All these hormones induce a variety of behavioural, biochemical, and physiological changes, which is collectively termed as the stress response or, fight or flight. 

Weight gain can occur from the repeated activation and release of the stress hormones in your body, this release of hormones causes levels of cortisol to rise, which in turn leads to the activation of an enzyme called adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase, which causes the breakdown and accumulation of abdominal fat and leads to weight gain. The reason why a constantly activated fight or flight response will induce your body to accumulate and hold on to fat comes down to survival and protection. As the body believes it will need a source of energy to manage further, perceived, stressful situations to come, and it’s for this reason in our modern era of long working hours and tight deadline pressures that occur on a daily basis, the little sleep and little rest and relaxation people get, malnutrition, etc, that so many people accumulate excess weight they are unable to shift. It’s because they are constantly activating their ancient biological stress mechanism, the fight or flight response, the likes of which was designed only to be used for short, acute, periods of time, which would allow for your stress hormones to return back to normal baseline levels.

Immune system

Your body breaks down the food you consume into small molecules of amino acids, fatty acids, and simple sugars, to be carried and utilised by the cells in your body. However, when the permeability of your gut wall (your intestinal barrier) has been comprised (which is the case when you eat gluten based foods such as wheat for example) instead of only small molecules of food being permitted to pass through your gut wall, larger undigested food particles and pathogenic bacteria have the opportunity to pass through as well and enter your bloodstream, which alerts your immune system and causes an immune response. This immune response occurs because your immune system has been trained to only recognise small molecules of amino acids, fatty acids, and simple sugars that cross your gut wall, anything other than these tiny molecules is deemed as foreign and therefore a foe.

Typically, with any immune response, inflammation occurs. The reason why this happens is because inflammation is the process by which your body protects and heals itself when inflicted with damage (severe or minor) or under a pathogenic bacterial or viral attack. During such incidences the blood vessels in your body will widen and become more permeable, allowing for extra blood to the area which brings with it oxygen, nutrients, immune cells and defense proteins such as antibodies and clotting factors into the tissue, and also aids the removal of toxins and dead cells. The combination of this whole process creates redness, swelling and heat, and is thus called inflammation.

Now if you continually activate your immune system by allowing your gut to remain in a permeable state, it will mean the continual production of inflammation, and should this continue over a long period of time, low-grade chronic inflammation will result. And in addition to being implicated as the underlying cause of many chronic diseases, low-grade chronic inflammation is also a major stress on the body, and as previously discussed when you are in a constant state of stress your body could accumulate and store fat.

Gut bacteria

An imbalance between the beneficial and pathogenic bacteria in your gut i.e. having more pathogenic than beneficial bacteria, can result from the food and lifestyle choices you make. This can actually lead to your body burning less fat and you accumulating more weight. The good news is that should you make healthier food choices and lead a balanced lifestyle, this is very much under your control. However, what was not under your control was your mode of delivery into the world and also how you were fed as a baby, and these factors can also effect how your body uses and burns fat. Let me explain. So it all started from your childbirth when you came into the world, and if you were born via the virginal canal it’s during this process your microbial gut colonisation would have began when virginal and fecal bacteria entered your mouth and your nose as you made transition through it into the world. However, if you were born by via caesarean section you would have been colonised with microbes associated with the hospital environment. Now the difference between the two is that the caesarean mode of delivery would have lead to you having a lower diversity and proportion of microbes in your gut, in comparison to those born via the virginal canal. In addition, the bacteria in your mothers breast milk would have been a major source of bacterial colonisation for your gut as a baby, so if you were not breast fed at all or not for too long, again, this would have further compounded the problem of having lower diversity and proportion of microbes in your gut, which basically means less beneficial bacteria colonising your gut. And it has been reported that lower levels of beneficial bacteria from an early age, especially bifidobacteria, can be attributed to excess weight later on in life. But don’t despair, if you were born via caesarean section and/or had received little to no breast milk at all as a baby, again, you can still influence a healthy weight outcome regardless of these factors by making healthy food choices that nourish your body and that of the beneficial bacteria in your gut, in addition to making sensible lifestyle choices, and how you go about that is what I will be sharing with you throughout this book!

Chapter 1: What to eat?

Protein

In today’s fast moving world of fast foods, busy schedules, and long working hours, we’ve simply forgotten some of the basics when it comes to looking after our bodies and providing it with the right fuel. The right fuel being nutrient dense foods that provide the body with a quality supply of macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats) in addition to micronutrients that are supplied by the consumption of fruits and vegetables and required for the metabolic functions of our body. Even taking the time just to sit down and enjoy the food we eat, rather than eating on the go, seems to also be an ever-growing challenge. So the way I see, it’s’ all about getting back into good habits, and if you really want to feel and look at your best, if you really want to lose weight and feel and look amazing in your wedding dress, you’re going to have to establish (or maybe re-establish) healthy eating habits that will ultimately lead to healthy eating routines.

So, where to start? What to eat? Well lets start with the macronutrients, the first being protein, which is the building block of every cell in your body. You'll find that consuming protein, in comparison to fats, leads to a greater feeling of fullness after a meal, and this increase in satiety that you will experience will be beneficial for weight loss because you will feel fuller quicker, resulting in you consuming less food (1). Therefore, include quality, lean protein (organic being best) with every meal. Your ratio of protein intake along with the other macronutrients of carbohydrates and fats should be 25% protein (128-139g/d), 65% carbohydrates, 10% fats (2).

Your sources of protein should also include oily fish (wild fish should be your fish of choice), which should be eaten a minimum of 3 times a week, as they are good sources of omega-3 fatty acids which act as an anti-inflammatory and thus help reduce inflammation in the body (3). The reduction of inflammation is a very important step for weight loss, as you will learn later on in the chapter on inflammation.

In addition, protein has greater dietary induced thermogenesis than that of carbohydrates and fats. Basically meaning the consumption of protein induces a greater increase in body temperature and also the body’s metabolism, the likes of which helps with weight loss (4).

Sources of protein:

• Sardines

• Anchovies

• Mackerel

• Salmon

• Herring

• Trout

• Chicken (organic pasture raised)

Vegetables and brassica vegetables

It’s important to include vegetables, and most definitely brassica vegetables, into your diet, as brassica vegetables will help your liver do it’s job of detoxification more effectively, and like most vegetables, they are also a good source of complex carbohydrates that will provide your body with good sources of fibre (5) which will help eliminate toxins from the body (6), all of which are important factors for losing weight.

You should note, your vegetables should be somewhat crunchy and not completely soft when eaten, this is to ensure as much of the nutrients are retained in the vegetables as possible, and not lost through over cooking. Steaming your vegetables will help you achieve this result.

Brassica vegetables include:

• Broccoli

• Chinese Broccoli

• Cauliflower

• Cabbage

• Brussels sprouts

• Turnip

• Radish

All other vegetables include:

• Zucchini

• Asparagus

• Carrots

• Artichokes

• Celery

• Parsnips

• Spinach

• Kale

• Lettuce

• Mushrooms

• Cucumbers

• Leeks

• Onions

The good starchy complex carbohydrates

Eat starchy complex carbohydrates with your meals to support your energy levels while losing weight (7) and to prevent those mid morning and mid afternoon dips in energy. Eating these complex carbohydrates are a must to help control your dips in energy throughout the day, as these dips may well be single-handedly sabotaging your efforts to get down to a body weight that you are happy with, due to you consuming large amounts of refined sugar (in all it’s guises) in an effort to boost your energy levels when these dips in energy occur. As mentioned earlier in this book, complex carbohydrates behave differently in our body, as they release a constant, gradual and steady stream of energy throughout the day, thus no extreme fluctuations in your energy levels throughout the day and no additional weight being stored in your body.

Sources of starchy complex carbohydrates should be:

• Sweet potatoes

• Yams

• Butternut Squash

• Pumpkin

Oils and fats

Extra virgin olive oil is widely known for its health benefits, the likes of which include reducing oxidation in the body. Oxidation is a process that can cause damage to the cells of your body, it occurs both naturally in the body and also through the consumption of refined foods, environmental factors such as pollution, sunlight, etc. Extra virgin olive oil is also beneficial for increasing HDL (high-density lipoproteins) in your body as opposed to LDL (low-density lipoproteins). Lipoproteins are complex particles composed of multiple proteins that transport fat molecules around your body. Ideally, you want your body to have a higher ratio of HDL as opposed to LDL, as HDL absorbs cholesterol in the blood and delivers it to the liver where it converts stored fat to a useable form, thus reducing cholesterol levels in the blood (8), while LDL is responsible for delivering cholesterol to the cells of your body, which is needed, however, this can potentially lead to weight gain and cardiovascular health issues should you have a higher ratio of LDL to HDL, as you will have too much cholesterol being delivered and stored in your body.

Extra virgin olive oil is best used to pour over salads rather than to cook with as it becomes unstable when heated, especially when it starts to burn and produce smoke, which can then lead to the production of unhealthy oil (oxidation), which in turn can give rise to cell damage and inflammation when consumed. If you must cook with olive oil do not let the oil smoke, if this happens discard it. Also, be sure to purchase extra virgin olive oil that is in dark bottles, as these types of bottles protect the oil from direct sunlight, which also damages the oil.

Organic virgin coconut oil is a better choice when it comes to cooking. It oil remains stable when heated at high temperatures. One of the key benefits of this oil (in addition to the other numerous health benefits that it has) is due to the high concentration of medium chain fatty acids that it possesses, as these types of fatty acids are not stored as fat in the body (9). Organic virgin coconut oil will actually help increase your metabolism and help your body use fat for energy.

Sources of beneficial fats include:

• Virgin Organic Coconut Oil

• Olive oil

• Avocados

Fruits and vegetables

Eat fruits and vegetables containing vitamins A, C, E, and K, and the mineral magnesium, as these micronutrients will help prevent cell damage from toxic substance build up and oxidation (which our bodies are exposed to on a daily basis from environmental and lifestyle factors) through the antioxidant actions they perform (10). This is an important process for damage control that will help reduce inflammation in the body, which in turn is an important factor for weight loss.

Sources of fruits and vegetables containing these vitamins and minerals include:

• Sweet potatoes

• Spinach

• Mangos

• Apricots

• Apples

• Strawberries

• Raspberries

• Blueberries

• Blackcurrants

• Redcurrants

• Kiwis

• Grapes

Beverages

Drink two litres of water a day to assist with the elimination of toxins from your body. This should also include green tea, as green tea has thermogenic action that helps burn fat (11). However, if stress is a major factor for you drink only in moderate amounts, and I mean moderate! As we don’t won’t to be stimulating an already over stimulated nervous system. We need you relaxed on your wedding day! You should also include teas that support the immune and digestive system such as rose hip, chamomile, etc.

Sources of beverages include:

• Green tea

• Rose hip tea

• Ginger tea

• Cinnamon tea

• Peppermint tea

• Chamomile tea

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Chapter 2: What foods to avoid

Refined foods

These foods should be eliminated from your diet, especially during your period of weight loss, as the processing of foods involves high temperatures, flavourings, the adding of high amounts of sugar, etc. All of which generates inflammation in the body when eaten (1) and blood sugar imbalance, which leads to weight gain.

Refined carbohydrates

Through the actions of the hormone insulin, when eaten, these types of carbohydrates tend to not only have a negative impact on your energy levels throughout the day (due to the peak followed by the sharp fall in your blood sugar levels), they can also negatively impact insulin when consumed in excess amounts and lead to insulin resistance. When insulin resistance occurs the body is unable to breakdown fat causing an increase in the synthesis and storage of fat (2).

Also, research shows that when you increase your refined carbohydrate intake, this leads to an increase in weight gain (3).

Refined foods and carbohydrates to avoid include:

• White bread

• White rice

• White pasta

• White flour

• Processed cereals

• Cakes and baked goods

• Sugar

• Fast foods

• Ready made meals

Dairy and Gluten

I would suggest that for a period of 30 days or more, you eliminate dairy and gluten from your diet, for the reasons I state on the next pages. Long before I became a nutritional therapist, after much research, I decided to give up dairy and gluten permanently, and to say it was a challenge is an understatement! So I know how challenging this will also be for you. You should know that there are morphine substances found both in dairy (casomorphins) and gluten (gluteomorphins), which act in a very similar way to morphine. You feel fantastic when the dairy or gluten is in your system, but when giving it up you go through withdrawal. Feeling irritable, tired and also have cravings for dairy or gluten (4). However, stick with it. These cravings will subside in 5-7 days.

Dairy

Okay, let me start off by stating the following, dairy is the breast milk of a cow. Therefore it contains high levels of hormones and proteins for the purpose of growing a baby calf, and not a human. From a general health point of view, research shows that casein, the main protein in cow’s milk, can help give rise to cancer (5).

From a weight loss point of view there is evidence that suggests some component of cow’s milk may increase inflammation (6) and when the body is in a state of inflammation it doesn’t burn fat. Therefore, to further help you with your goal of weight loss, I would eliminate dairy from your diet for a minimum of 30 days, or more, if you have a big weight loss goal to achieve, and also would like to benefit from long term health benefits.

Alternatives to dairy are:

• Unsweetened almond milk

• Coconut milk

Gluten

Gluten is a group of proteins that are difficult for your body to digest, which causes havoc with your digestive system leading to increased inflammation and intestinal permeability (7). Okay, so what does all of that really mean? Well, inside your small intestines, where the majority of your nutrients are absorbed, you have what's called an epithelial cell wall, an intestinal barrier that is held together by what are called tight junctions. So just imagine your intestinal barrier is a protective brick wall and these tight junctions are very narrow gaps in your wall that permits only the tinniest nutrient particles to pass through, where they are then transported into your bloodstream to be carried and utilized by the different cells in your body. Now when we eat gluten-containing foods a substance called zonulin is produced that cause the gaps in your wall to loosen and open, thus causing what's called intestinal permeability. Continual consumption of gluten products means the gaps remain open allowing undigested food particles and pathogenic yeast and bacteria (which normally wouldn't be able to enter) to pass through your intestinal barrier i.e. your protective wall. Now, positioned behind your intestinal barrier is your body's personal army, your immune system. 80% of your immune system is actually located behind your intestinal barrier, ready and waiting to help protect and serve you by eliminating any foreign intruders. So when undigested food particles and pathogenic organisms come into contact with your immune system, it recognises these as foreign substances, and goes to work to help eradicate them using inflammation. Unfortunately there is collateral damage to your own issue that occurs as a result of prolonged exposure to inflammation (8), and if allowed to continue, yes, you guessed it, weight gain occurs!

As with dairy, important for you and your goal of weight loss, is the avoidance of such inflammation, which is why I suggest you also eliminate gluten from your diet for a minimum of 30 days, or more if you have a big weight loss goal to achieve, and also would like to benefit from long term health benefits.

Gluten containing grains are:

• Wheat

• Wheat flours: Bulgur, Durum flour, Farina, Graham flour, Semolina, Spelt

• Rye

• Triticale (a cross between wheat and rye)

• Barley (malt, malt flavouring, and malt vinegar are usually made from barley

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Chapter 3: When to eat

At breakfast, lunch, and dinner you should be eating a well-balanced, nutrient dense meal. There should be no skipping of meals. Eating at every meal will provide your body with the regular nutrients that it needs to help manage biological stressors, as stressors can lead to access fat through the imbalance of hormones such as cortisol (1). These nutrients will also help support optimal energy levels throughout your day.

Your breakfast and lunch should be the largest meal you have in the day, and your dinner should be a smaller portion. You should also eat your dinner by 7pm latest, as digestion begins to slow down during the evening.

To help with proper digestion and assimilation of food, during your meal times, focus on the action of eating, avoiding distractions such as watching television while eating. And very importantly, chew your food thoroughly! This is one of the single, most important steps to facilitate the digestion of your food, do not overlook it!

Chapter 4: Snacks

Almost all the fruits listed below help reduce inflammation. You’ll see why this is important shortly. During the mid-morning and mid-afternoon you can treat yourself to the following snacks:

• Celery and/or carrots with crushed avocado

• Sweet potato fries

• Apricots

• Apples

• Pears

• Strawberries

• Raspberries

• Blueberries

• Blackcurrants

• Redcurrants

• Kiwis

• Grapes

• Mangos

• Watermelon

Chapter 5: Reduce that inflammation!

So here’s the reason why throughout this book I’ve been telling you that inflammation will sabotage your weight loss efforts. So, in addition to being a major stress on your body, when your body is in a state of continual inflammation levels of the hormone adiponectin are reduced (1) which results in your body burning less fat. Reason being is that one of the main roles of adiponectin in the body is the increase of fat burning (2). This is why I have suggested you eat the previously mentioned anti-inflammatory and antioxidant foods, and also avoid eating refined foods, dairy and gluten, as this will help regulate your immune system and thus reduce your inflammation.

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Chapter 6: Manage your stress and support your liver

Your liver is one of the most important organs for the control and reduction of weight, due to its role in the regulation and breakdown of fat, and deactivation of hormones such as cortisol (stress hormone) (1). Important, as previously mentioned, excessive amounts of cortisol in the body leads to the storage of fat and therefore an increase in weight. This is a particularly important point for you women, as this excessive weight gain typically shows up as belly fat and fat on the buttocks in women. This excessive rise in cortisol can be activated when we experience continual states of stress, which is why it is important to manage your stress, especially during the preparations leading up to your wedding.

Biological stressors:

• Inadequate amount of sleep (less than 8 hours)

• Long and stressful working hours

• Excessive caffeine intake

• Excessive alcohol intake

• Smoking

• Consumption of junk food

• Excessive toxic build up as a result of the above

Stress management activities:

• Tai Chi with deep breathing exercises

• Yoga

• Sleep (between 7 & 8 hours a night)

• Reading

• Massages

• Sauna

• Meditation

• Reiki

• Swimming

• Walking

Dangers of stored toxins

Your liver is your body’s major detoxifier, which is a huge job if you consider not only the potential toxic and inflammatory hazards that can enter your body through the foods and drinks that you consume e.g. food additives, pesticides, heavy metals, GMO foods, and also the endless products you put on your skin (the likes of which, by the way, can also contain gluten and dairy too!) e.g. shower gels, shampoos, body and face moisturisers, deodorants, make-up, etc. And that’s not all, there are environmental and work related pollutants we are exposed to on a daily basis! So as you can see, it’s a big job to undertake.

Toxins that our bodies are exposed to are stored in our fat cells. During weight loss fats are broken down and toxins are released, which is exactly what will happen with you once you begin to follow this plan. It’s important that these toxins don’t have the opportunity to re-enter your blood circulation and cause inflammation and stress in your body, as this will be counterproductive to your goal of weight loss. Therefore, it’s very essential that you are taking care of your liver to ensure that it is in good working order, as it is the liver’s job to break down and convert toxins into non-toxic substances, which are then excreted from the body (2). To help you achieve optimal liver function consume nutrients on a daily basis that will stimulate and support your liver.

Liver supporting foods include:

• Artichokes

• Spinach and all other dark green leafy vegetables

• Asparagus

• Garlic

• Onions

• Leeks

• Ginger

• Cabbage

• Broccoli

Liver supporting drinks include:

• Green Tea

• Green smoothie liver detox drink at breakfast (see meal suggestions for recipe) will help detoxify the liver and improve its function.

Liver supporting spices:

• Turmeric

Liver supporting supplements that I recommend to my clients are:

NAC Enhanced Antioxidant Formula

From Allergy Research Group

1 tablet a day with food

Taken for 30 days

• Buffered Vitamin C.

From Allergy Research Group

2 capsules per day between meals

Taken for 30 days

N.B.

An important point to note is that if you have what’s called intestinal microbial imbalance in your gut (see next chapter), the conversion of toxins to non-toxic substances by the liver will be in vain, as this type of imbalance will reverse this conversion, releasing these toxins back into blood circulation. Therefore, the re-balancing of your intestinal bacteria should be one of your top priorities to ensure toxins are safely eliminated from your body during your period of weight loss.

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Chapter 7: Gut feeling

Digestive complaints could be a sign of microbial imbalance in your gut, called dysbiosis, resulting in yeast overgrowth and/or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). This imbalance occurs due to the depletion of beneficial gut (intestinal) bacteria, which leads to an overgrowth of pathogenic yeast and bacteria in the gut.

Causes of Dysbiosis and SIBO

Diets that include refined sugars can bring about these opportunistic bacteria (1) and also the use of antibiotics negatively impacts ones beneficial gut bacteria through strong suppression of beneficial bacteria colonies (2). We require our beneficial bacteria to undertake many roles in the gut, therefore dysbiosis can reduce your body’s ability to metabolise your food, control and modulate fat burning, digestion and inflammation, all of which can lead to extra weight gain (3). It can also contribute to further toxic build up in the blood, therefore placing an extra strain on the liver’s ability to detoxify. Therefore, the rebalancing of your gut bacteria is of crucial importance for your health and your goal of weight loss, and as previously mentioned, should actually be one of your first priorities to ensure success of your weight loss goal.

Gut supporting supplements to restore balance that I recommend are:

• Oregano oil (an anti-microbial to inhibit pathogenic yeast and bacteria)

• Digestive enzymes and Betaine Hydrochloride (ingredients for proper digestion and absorption that can be depleted by diet, stress, medications, etc)

• L-Glutamine (to repair the lining of the gut wall)

• Probiotics (to populate your gut with friendly, beneficial bacteria)

• Previous listed liver support supplements

If you suspect you have yeast overgrowth and/or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and need guidance as to how to heal and rebalance your gut bacteria, enlist the help of a qualified nutritionist or health professional, who should provide you with a tailor-made nutritional therapist and lifestyle plan for the purpose of rebalancing your gut bacteria. I would also suggest that during your gut healing you have no more than one cup of fruit, and no more than two cups of starchy vegetables, as you want to make sure that you are not providing the pathogens in your gut with in over abundance of starchy foods that they crave and feed on. Also, eliminate all vinegars, using only apple cider vinegar, and eliminate mushrooms during this period.

Chapter 8: Exercise

To look and feel good at the alter, you simply must include aerobic training as part of your weekly exercise routine, at home or in the gym, it doesn’t matter where, as studies show that this form of exercise reduces both body weight and fat mass (1). This form of exercise includes the use of treadmills, elliptical trainers, and cycle ergometers (stationary bicycles). The additional benefit of aerobic training is that it will also help you reduce fat around your mid-line (2). Should you also wish to increase your lean body mass, resistance training will help you achieve this (3). Note, in the gym on the treadmills and cross-training machines, you will see there is a ‘cardio zone’ exercise option, and below that there is the ‘fat burning zone’ exercise option. You’ll be happy to hear that the ‘fat burning zone’ is a less intense form of exercise!

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Chapter 9: Meal Suggestions

The meals you eat will literally make or break you, and to achieve your wedding weight loss goal you’ll need to eat meals that are highly nutritious, taste good, and encourage weight loss. So to help you prepare and get started I’ve put together and provided you with a seven-day meal plan suggestion for your breakfast, lunch, and dinner, followed by the recipes to create them. In order to help organise your weeks ahead I would start your plan and prepare some of your meals on the weekend (in particular the broth) and then any leftovers that you have you can then refrigerate or freeze to enjoy during the first couple of days of your starting week for breakfast, lunch or dinner, depending on what you prepare. Recipes such as cauliflower coconut rice you can prepare big batches of to enjoy throughout the week with other dishes.

Now for the first few days or so upon starting this program you may experience some symptoms as outlined below. Reason being is that your fats cells (where your body stores toxins) will begin to break down and release toxins into your blood to be carried out of your body, as the health and function of your liver and other eliminatory organs improves. The likes of which will all be down to the fact that you’ll no longer be eating toxic and inflammatory foods, thus relieving the toxic burden on your body, providing it with more energy to draw them out. And it’s during this process when the toxins are being ferried out of your body, that you become exposed to them and therefore may experience some symptoms.

Also, if you have unbeneficial/pathogenic bacteria or yeast overgrowth, sometimes there can be what’s referred to as die off symptoms, because you will no longer be providing them with the high in sugar foods that they enjoy and live off, and as a result they will begin to starve and die. Unfortunately as they do so they release toxins into the body.

Also, if you are used to living off unhealthy foods and drinks that provide little in terms of nutrients but are highly energy stimulating, you may experience a decline in energy due to your body’s dependency upon them.

Symptoms you may experience:

• body rash

• irritability

• bad breath

• body odour

• fatigue

• cravings

• headaches

But don’t worry, all these symptoms are short lived and within the week you’ll soon be feeling the splendid weight loss, energy invigorating, health benefits of this program.

So, to get you started, here’s a summary of your food shopping list that you will need:

Protein:

Sources of fish should be wild.

• Sardines

• Anchovies

• Mackerel

• Salmon

• Herring

• Trout

• Chicken (organic pasture raised)

Vegetables

• Broccoli

• Cauliflower

• Cabbage

• Brussels sprouts

• Zucchini

• Asparagus

• Carrots

• Artichokes

• Celery

• Parsnips

• Spinach

• Kale

• Lettuce

• Cucumbers

• Leeks

• Onions

• Sweet potatoes

• Yams

• Butternut Squash

• Pumpkin

Oils and fats

• Virgin Organic Coconut Oil

• Extra Virgin Olive oil

• Avocados

Fruits

• Mangos

• Apricots

• Apples

• Strawberries

• Raspberries

• Blueberries

• Blackcurrants

• Redcurrants

• Kiwis

• Grapes

Beverages

• Green tea

• Rose hip tea

• Ginger tea

• Cinnamon tea

• Peppermint tea

• Chamomile tea

• Unsweetened almond milk

• Coconut milk drink

Herbs and Spices

• Ginger

• Turmeric powder

• Cumin powder

• Nutmeg

• Cinnamon

Seven-Day Meal Plan

Day 1.

Breakfast

Breaky Chicken with 1/4 avocado and handful of rocket

Peppermint tea

Lunch

Butternut Squash Soup

Zucchini Strips Chicken Salad

Dinner

Roasted Pesto Chicken

1 cup of steamed broccoli

Broth Gut Healing Soup

Day 2.

Breakfast

Breaky Chicken with ¼ avocado and handful of rocket

Rooibos tea

Lunch

Roasted Pesto Chicken

Avocado Salad

Dinner

Butternut Squash Soup

Day 3.

Breakfast

Mini Chicken Burgers with ¼ avocado and 1 cup of lettuce

Broth Gut Healing Soup to enjoy as a warm beverage

Lunch

Marinated Salmon Delight

Avocado Salad

Dinner

Chicken Thai Coconut Curry

Cauliflower Coconut Rice

Day 4.

Breakfast

Mini Chicken Burgers with ¼ avocado and 1 cup of spinach

Lunch

Zucchini Chicken Strips Salad

Dinner

Breaky Chicken

Cauliflower Coconut Rice

Day 5.

Breakfast

Smoking Salmon Breakfast

Peppermint tea

Lunch

Salmon and Avocado Salad

Dinner

King Pesto Zucchini Paste Shrimp

Roasted Carrot with Red Onions

Day 6.

Breakfast

Smoking Salmon Breakfast

Lunch

Marinated Salmon Delight

Avocado Salad

Dinner

Chicken Thai Coconut Curry

Golden Roast Sweet Potatoes

Day 7.

Breakfast

Breaky Chicken

Avocado Salad

Ginger tea

Lunch

Yum Baked Sweet Potato

Zucchini Chicken Strips Salad

Dinner

Roasted Pesto Chicken

Roasted Carrots with Red Onions

Recipes

Vegetables

Cauliflower Coconut Rice

Serves 4

1 head cauliflower, chopped

1 onion, diced

1 teaspoon cumin

6 tablespoons coconut milk

¼ teaspoon himalayan salt

2 tablespoons of organic coconut oil

Rinse the cauliflower heads and break them apart into florets. Using a food processor with an S-shaped blade, in batches, place the florets inside and process until the cauliflower begins to resemble rice. In a pan, on a medium heat setting, sauté the onion in the coconut oil for 4 minutes. Add the processed cauliflower to the pan, the cumin, salt, and coconut milk. Stir the cauliflower to combine the ingredients and sauté until soft. Serve with dish of your choice. Eat or store in the fridge or freezer.

Golden Roast Sweet Potatoes

Serves 4

1 kg sweet potatoes

6 tablespoons of organic virgin coconut oil

Preheat oven to 200 °C. Fill a large bowl with cold water, peel the sweet potatoes and put straight into the water.

Cut each potato in half, so they are all about the same size, then put them into a large pan and cover with cold water. Bring to the boil and as soon as the water is boiling, set the timer for 5 minutes.

After 5 minutes, drain the potatoes into a colander in the sink. Shake the potatoes around in the colander to roughen up the edges.

Pour the organic virgin coconut oil into a large roasting tin and put into the hot oven for 3 minutes. Tip the potatoes into the hot oil and use a spoon to spread them evenly around the tin, sprinkle with himalayan salt.

Roast for 30 minutes, turn them over and cook for a further 15 to 20 minutes or until they are crisp and golden. Serve with roast chicken.

Yum Baked Sweet Potatoes

Preheat oven to 200 °C. Take 1 large sweet potato, prick the skin several times with a fork, place in oven for 1 hour, then serve with salad and salmon.

Baked Sweet Potato Fries

*Serves 2

2 medium sweet potatoes, peeled

3 Tablespoons coconut oil

Pinch of himalayan salt

Preheat oven to 230 °C.

Halve the sweet potatoes lengthwise and cut each half in two. Place them on a sheet pan and toss with coconut oil. Spread the potatoes in one layer. Bake for 15 minutes and then turn with a spatula. Bake for another 5 to 10 minutes, until lightly browned. Sprinkle with salt and serve hot.

Roasted Carrots with Red Onions

Serves 4

5 peeled carrots

3 teaspoons organic coconut oil

1 red onion cut into slices (optional)

½ teaspoon himalayan salt

¼ teaspoon turmeric

Preheat oven to 175 °C

Chop the carrots length ways into sticks, around 1/4 inch wide and cut them into 3 segments. In a bowl, add the carrots, onions, salt, and turmeric in the coconut oil and mix. Remove from bowl and place them on a baking sheet, roasting them for 20 minutes.

Soups

Broth Gut Healing Soup

Makes 8 cups

This is good for healing the gut lining. Use as a stock for soup or drink as a warm beverage.

8 cups of water

2 teaspoons of himalayan salt

½ teaspoon pepper

1 chicken carcass or 1/2 kg of chicken bones

2 carrots

2 celery stalks

1 onion

2 teaspoons of dried parsley or 2 tablespoons of fresh parsley

2 teaspoons rosemary

2 teaspoons thyme

2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar or 1 lemon

Place all ingredients into a pot and bring to a boil

Let simmer on low fire for several hours (4-24)

Remove bones and pour through a strainer. After storing in fridge skim off fat.

Butternut Squash Soup

Serves 4

I absolutely love this soup! In wintertime no home should be without it!

1 whole garlic glove

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 butternut squash, peeled, remove seeds and cut into chunks

1 large sweet potato

1 large diced onion

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

½ teaspoon ground nutmeg

4 cups of broth

1 tin coconut milk

½ teaspoon himalayan salt

½ teaspoon black pepper

In a large pot, sauté the garlic in the olive oil for 3 minutes. Add the squash, sweet potato, onion, cinnamon, and nutmeg and sauté for 5 minutes. Add the broth and bring the soup to a boil, turn the heat down and leave to simmer partially covered for 2 minutes, until the sweet potato and squash are tender.

Remove the pot from the heat and blend until smooth.

Return the soup to cooker, on a low heat setting, and stir in the coconut milk. Continue to stir and heat the soup on a low heat setting. Season with himalayan salt and black pepper.

Salads

Zucchini Strips Salad

Serves 3

2 Zucchini, peeled (using a potato peeler) and cut into strips

2 carrots peeled and cut into strips

2 chopped avocados

¼ cup chopped spring onions

¼ cup chopped cucumber

Juice of 1/2 a lime

¼ teaspoon rind of a lime

¼ teaspoon rind of ginger

2 tablespoons extra-virgin oil

¼ teaspoon black pepper

¼ teaspoon himalayan salt

Place the zucchini strips, carrot strips, avocado, cucumber and spring onions in a bowl. In another small bowl whisk together the lime juice, lime rind, olive oil, salt, pepper, and ginger, then pour over the vegetables. Toss the salad and serve.

Zucchini Strips Chicken Salad

Serves 3

Prepare the zucchini strips salad recipe as previously outlined, then at the end add leftover Breaky Chicken.

Avocado Salad

Serves 2

2 cups lettuce, chopped

1 avocado, chopped into chunks

¼ cup spring onions, chopped

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

¼ teaspoon himalayan salt

Place lettuce, avocado, spring onions a bowl. In another small bowl whisk together the together the olive oil, apple cider vinegar, and salt. Pour over the lettuce, avocado, and spring onions. Toss the salad and serve.

Salmon and Avocado Salad

Serves 2

2 wild- caught salmon fillets, cooked and cut into chunks

½ chopped lettuce

2 avocados, chopped into chunks

3 tablespoons fresh lime

2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

½ teaspoon cumin

¼ teaspoon himalayan salt

Place in a bowl the salmon, lettuce, avocados, lime juice, parsley, olive oil, cumin, and salt. Toss salad and serve.

Condiments

Smooth Pesto Sauce

2 cups fresh basil

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 garlic clove

Pinch of himalayan salt

¼ cup water

Place all ingredients in a high-speed blender. Blend until mixture is smooth. Store in the refrigerator for up to a week or in the freezer.

Guacamole

Serves 3

Heavenly and nutritionally good!

Flesh of 2 avocados

¼ cup spring onions

1 half cucumber, peeled into strips

2 carrots, peeled into strips

1 garlic glove

2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped

Juice from one half of a fresh lemon

Himalayan salt to taste

Mango Salsa

Serves 2

½ mango, chopped

1 avocado, chopped

½ red onion, diced

Juice of 1 fresh lemon

3 tablespoons chopped parsley

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

3 teaspoons lime zest

Pinch of himalayan salt

Pinch of ground black pepper

Place all ingredients in a large bowl, stir and serve with a salmon dish.

Poultry

Breaky Chicken

Serves 4

350g small chicken fillets

1 teaspoon cumin

1 teaspoon dried parsley

1 teaspoon of dried oregano

1⁄4 teaspoon of himalayan salt

2 tablespoons of coconut oil

Cut chicken fillets into chunks. Heat coconut oil in a frying pan and add chicken. Cook for 8 minutes until brown and cooked through. Serve with spinach or zucchini salad (see salads).

Mini chicken burgers

Serves 3 (makes 6 burgers)

Prepare the night before or over the weekend.

1 packet of organic pasture-raised minced chicken

1 crushed garlic clove

¼ teaspoon of himalayan salt

¼ spring onion finely chopped

1 teaspoon of dried oregano

1 teaspoon of dried basil

1 teaspoon of mild curry powder or cumin powder

2 tablespoons of organic virgin coconut oil

¼ cup of water

Place all ingredients into a mixing bowl. Using your hands mash ingredients together. Form chicken into 6 burgers.

Heat coconut oil in a large pan. Add mini chicken burgers to pan cooking for about 5 minutes until both sides are brown. Add water and cook covered for another 3 to 5 minutes until cooked through.

Serve with avocado and rocket, or any green leafy vegetable of your choosing.

Eat or store in the fridge or freezer.

Roasted Pesto Chicken

Serves 4 -6

You’ll enjoy this one, it tastes so good!

1 whole organic pasture-raised chicken (1-1.8kg), giblets removed

2 minced garlic

1 tablespoon extra-virgin oil

1 teaspoon cumin

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 teaspoon dried basil

1 teaspoon dried thyme

2 tablespoons smooth pesto sauce

½ cup broth

¼ teaspoon himalayan salt

Preheat the oven to 200 °C.

Cut slices into the skin of the chicken. Rub the following into the skin: garlic, cumin, oregano, basil, thyme, salt, and pesto sauce. Also place some of these ingredients into the cavity of the chicken. Pour over the chicken ¼ cup of the broth, saving the rest for later. Drizzle the chicken with olive oil and place in a baking dish. Roast for 90 minutes, or until the chicken is brown and cooked through. Half way through cooking, check the chicken to see if it is too dry, if it is, pour the remaining broth over the chicken.

Save the carcass bones to make Broth Gut Healing Soup.

Chicken Thai Coconut Curry

Serves 4

2 organic, pasture-raised chicken breast, cooked and cut into 1/2 inch pieces

2 tablespoons organic coconut oil

2 chopped garlic gloves

½ tablespoon turmeric

½ tablespoon cumin

2 sweet potatoes, peeled and chopped into cubes

½ cup spring onions

2 celery stalks, chopped

1 cup water

1 tin coconut milk (400ml)

1 teaspoon himalayan salt

Heat your coconut oil in a large pan on a medium heat setting. Sauté the garlic until aromatic. Add your spring onions and continue sauté, stirring in the cumin, turmeric, sweet potato, celery, spring onions, water, and salt. Simmer the ingredients until the sweet potatoes are soft, then add your cooked chicken and coconut milk, and continue to simmer for 10 minutes. Serve with Cauliflower Coconut Rice. Yummy!

Seafood

Smoking Salmon Breakfast

Serves 1

Avocado Salad

2-3 slices of organic smoked salmon.

Prepare your Avocado Salad and serve with salmon.

Marinated Salmon Delight

Serves 2

2 wild-caught salmon fillets

½ minced garlic clove

Juice from half fresh lime

½ teaspoon grated ginger

½ teaspoon dried oregano

2 tablespoons fresh chopped parsley or 1 teaspoon dried parsley

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

¼ teaspoon himalayan salt

Preheat oven to 150 °C.

Rub the garlic, oregano, and parsley into the skin of the salmons. In a small bowl whisk together the limejuice, olive oil, ginger, and salt. Drizzle over the salmons and place in the oven to bake for 20 minutes. Serve with a salad of your choosing.

King Pesto Zucchini Pasta with Shrimp

Serves 4

450 kg shrimp

4 large zucchini, peeled into long stripes

2 tablespoons of organic virgin coconut oil

2 garlic cloves, minced

Pinch of himalayan salt

4 tablespoons of Smooth Pesto Sauce

3 tablespoons of coconut milk

½ cup chopped fresh basil

2 springs onions, cut

1 carrot peeled into strips

Heat the coconut oil in a large pan. Add spring onions, garlic, a pinch of himalayan salt, and sauté the garlic until it begins to brown. Then add the shrimp and cook them for about 3 minutes, stirring frequently. When the shrimp begins to turn pink, add the zucchini and carrot to the pan, along with pesto sauce and the coconut milk. Stir to evenly coat everything with the sauce, and then heat the mixture for about another 30 seconds to 1 minute and serve.

Beverages

Green Smoothie Liver Detox

Serves 1

Place a handful of rocket or any dark green leafy vegetable in a blender, add 1 apple or half a mango that you’ve cut into small pieces, add approximately a quarter inch of fresh ginger, 400ml litres of water, blend, pour, and drink.

Note: If you have dysbiosis do not drink until you have restored balance to your gut.

Peppermint tea

Serves 1

Rooibos Tea

Serves 1

Rose Hip Tea

Serves 1

Ginger Tea

Serves 1

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Chapter 10: Have fun with it!

The motivation to eat and train in order to lose weight, so you can feel and look amazing in your wedding dress, is always easier and more fun with friends so get them involved if they are also on a mission to lose weight. By doing this you can help motivate each other, set each other weekly targets, and help each other achieve them.

Then for those of you who always need someone to help push you to achieve your goals, I would suggest you team up with a personal trainer, and/or a nutritional therapist, who will be able to put together a tailor-made exercise and nutrition plan for you.

So now it’s up to you to put in the work. This book is my wedding gift to you, and I wish you every success in your quest to feel and look amazing in your wedding dress!

###

Thank you for reading my book. If you enjoyed it please take a moment to leave me a review at your favourite retailer.

Thanking you!

Darren Harris

About the author:

Darren Harris is a fully qualified nutritional therapist, having studied Biomedicine and Naturopathic Nutrition at the College of Naturopathic Medicine in London. His specialised area of interest lies in weight loss and digestive health conditions. Keeping up to date with the latest scientific research, he continues to broaden his knowledge in order to help influence better health outcomes for his clients, through the use of nutritional and lifestyle approaches. Thus helping them to achieve increased health and quality of life.

Connect with me:

Visit my website at: http://www.weddingweightvows.com

Friend me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/weddingweightloss123/

Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/wedweightvows

Connect with me on LinkedIn: http://ch.linkedin.com/in/weddingweightvows

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Notes

Chapter 1: What to eat?

1. Paddon-Jones D, Westman E, Mattes RD, Wolfe RR, Astrup A, Westerterp-Plantenga M (2008) Protein, weight management, and satiety. The American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition. 87 (5) pp. 1558S.

2. Paddon-Jones D, Westman E, Mattes RD, Wolfe RR, Astrup A, Westerterp-Plantenga M (2008) Protein, weight management, and satiety. The American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition. 87 (5) pp. 1559S.

3. Marron JC, Bost JW, Marron A (2010) Natural anti-inflammatory agents for pain relief. Surgical Neurology International. 1, 80. doi:10.4103/2152-7806.73804. pp. 8

4. Paddon-Jones D, Westman E, Mattes RD, Wolfe RR, Astrup A, Westerterp-Plantenga M. (2008) Protein, weight management, and satiety. The American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition. 87 (5) pp. 1559S.

5. Nutri Ltd (2013a) Nutritional support for detoxification. Available at: http://www.nutri-online1.co.uk/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=D1XHFHM26%2fk%3d&tabid=101&mid=1260 (Accessed: 30 June 2015)

6. British Nutrition Foundation (2012) Dietary fibre. Available at: http://www.nutrition.org.uk/nutritionscience/nutrients/dietary-fibre (Accessed: 30 June 2015).

7. Scott KP, Gratz SW, Sheridan PO, Flint HJ, Duncan SH (2013) The influence of diet on the gut microbiota. Pharmacological Research. 69 (1) pp. 53.

8. Fitó M, de la Torre R, Farré-Albaladejo M, Khymenetz O, Marrugat J, Covas MI (2007) Bioavailability and antioxidant effects of olive oil phenolic compounds in humans: a review. Ann Ist Super Sanità. 43 (4) pp. 378.

9. Liau KM, Lee YY, Chen CK, Rasool AHG (2011) An open-label pilot study to assess the efficacy and safety of virgin coconut oil in reducing visceral adiposity. ISRN Pharmacology. (2011) pp. 4.

10. Namiesnik J, Vearaslip K, Nemirovski A, Leontowicz H, Leontowicz M, Pasko P, Martinez-Ayala AL, Gonsalez-Aguilar GA, Suhaj M, Gorinstein S (2014) In vitro studies on the relationship between the antioxidant activities of some berry extracts and their binding properties to serum albumin. Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology. 172 (6) pp. 2850.

11. Hodgson AB, Randell RK, Jeukendrup AE (2013) The effect of green tea extract on fat oxidation at rest and during exercise: evidence of efficacy and proposed mechanism. Advances In Nutrition. 4 (2) pp. 130.

Chapter 2: What foods to avoid

1. Rapin JR, Wiernsperger N (2010) Possible links between intestinal permeability and food processing: a potential therapeutic niche for glutamin. Clinics. 65 (6) pp. 636.

2. Wilcox G (2005) Insulin and insulin resistance. The Clinical Biochemist Review. 26 (2) pp. 27.

3. Mozaffarian D, Hao T, Rimm EB, Willet WC, Hu FB (2011) Changes in Diet and Lifestyle and Long-Term Weight Gain in Women and Men. The New England Journal Of Medicine. 364 (25) pp. 4.

4. Myers A, (2015) The autoimmune solution: prevent and reverse the full spectrum of inflammatory symptoms and diseases, 1st edition. New York: HarperCollins Publishers. p. 80.

5. Youngmann LD, Campbell TC (1992) Inhibition of aflatoxin B1-induced gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase positive (ggt+) hepatic preneoplastic foci and tumours by low protein diets: evidence that altered ggt+ foci indicate neoplastic potential. Carcinogenesis: 13 (9) pp. 1607-13.

6. Butler J, (2014) The history, geography and biology of milk. In Gellatley J (ed.) White lies. Bristol: Viva!. pp. 9.

7. Punder KD, Pruimboom L (2013) The dietary intake of wheat and other cereal grains and their role in inflammation. Nutrients. 5 (3) pp. 773.

8. Punder K D, Pruimboom L (2013) The dietary intake of wheat and other cereal grains and their role in inflammation. Nutrients. 5 (3) pp. 774 – 775.

Chapter 3: When to eat

1. Torres SJ, Nowson CA (2007) Relationship between stress, eating behaviour, and obesity. Nutrition. 23 (11-12) pp. 892.

Chapter 5: Reduce that inflammation!

1. Greenberg AS, Obin MS (2006) Obesity and the role of adipose tissue in inflammation and metabolism. The American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition. 83 (2) pp. 463S.

2. Greenberg AS, Obin MS (2006) Obesity and the role of adipose tissue in inflammation and metabolism. The American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition. 83 (2) pp. 462S.

Chapter 6: Manage your stress and support your liver

1. Ahmed A, Rabitt E, Brady T, Brown C, Guest P, Bujalska IJ, Doig C, Newsome PN, Hubscher S, Elias E, Adams DH, Tomlinson JW, Stewart PM (2012) A switch in hepatic cortisol metabolism across the spectrum of non alcoholic fatty liver disease. PLoS One. 7 (2) pp. 2.

2. Liska DJ, (2002) The role of detoxification in the prevention of chronic degenerative diseases. Advanced Nutrition Publication. 650 8/02 Rev. 6/05 pp. 2-3.

Chapter 7: Gut feeling

1. The Second Opinion Series, Vol 2, Digestion Sessions (2014) Mike Mutzel MSc [Digital Access]. USA: Sean Croxton, Underground Wellness.

2. Hawrelak JA, Myers SP (2004) The causes of intestinal dysbiosis. Alternative Medicine Review. 9 (2) pp. 186.

3. Brown K, DeCoffe D, Molcan E, Gibson DL (2012) Diet-induced dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota and the effects on immunity and disease. Nutrients. 4 (8) pp. 1098.

Chapter 8: Exercise

1. Willis HL, Slentz, CA, Bateman LA, Shields AT, Piner LW, Bales CW, Houmard JA, Kraus WE (2012) Effects of aerobic and/or resistance training on body mass and fat mass in overweight or obese adults. Journal Of Applied Physiology. 113 (12) pp. 1835.

2. Willis HL, Slentz, CA, Bateman LA, Shields AT, Piner LW, Bales CW, Houmard JA, Kraus WE (2012) Effects of aerobic and/or resistance training on body mass and fat mass in overweight or obese adults. Journal Of Applied Physiology. 113 (12) pp. 1836.

3. Willis HL, Slentz, CA, Bateman LA, Shields AT, Piner LW, Bales CW, Houmard JA, Kraus WE (2012) Effects of aerobic and/or resistance training on body mass and fat mass in overweight or obese adults. Journal Of Applied Physiology. 113 (12) pp. 1835.


What To Eat To Feel & Look Amazing In Your Wedding Dress!

Is the wedding dress weight loss plan that shares the best step by step, 12 week plan, of healthy weight loss solutions to help plus size brides-to-be who have made a wedding weight loss goal, fit flawlessly into their wedding dress so they can love how they look, fit, and feel while wearing it on their wedding day. The program within this book has been designed to be easy to implement into your lifestyle, uses simple terminology so as to make it easy to follow and understand, and will help guide you, the bride-to-be, to achieve your desired wedding weight loss goal and feel amazing while you're going through the whole process.

  • Author: Darren Harris
  • Published: 2016-04-27 13:50:12
  • Words: 10033
What To Eat To Feel & Look Amazing In Your Wedding Dress! What To Eat To Feel & Look Amazing In Your Wedding Dress!