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Timmy the kitten's bed stays dry.

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Copyright © 2015 by Alan Johnstone and Ierma Burger.

 

All rights reserved.

 

No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means including information storage and retrieval systems, without permission in writing from the author. The only exception is by a reviewer, who may quote short excerpts in a review.

 

Alan Johnstone

Visit my website at: www.sstonecorp.co.za

 

Table of Contents

Copyright

Preface

About the audio file

Theory: Why do children wet the bed?

Timmy the kitten’s bed stays dry!

Preface

 

*Ierma Burger *

I met Alan about two years before this book was conceptualized. Alan helped me through my own life issues.

I always had a passion for children and through our work together it became clear that I wanted to help children that also had issues to work through. To help me to fulfill my inner drive to help children, Alan suggested that I write children stories with him as mentor. When children learn positive perceptions and obtain the skills to handle issues, at a young age, they have it much easier handling issues later in life. 

*Alan Johnstone *

Much has been said about emotional quotient (EQ) and most parents have come to realise how important it is to recognise the need to assist their child’s emotional development. It is simply not enough to trust our natural parenting instincts.

How do you develop the EQ of a young child or toddler? Children learn through stories and easily associate with the characters in stories. This natural tendency provides a parent a wonderful opportunity to guide his or her child’s behaviour and feelings and teach them understandings with which to improve their EQ.

In these books different problem behaviours are used to depict techniques and skills that children can use to help themselves change their behaviour and feelings. The stories in these books have been developed to help a child help him or herself.   Along with the stories are technical notes that assist parents and educators with a deeper understanding of the technical aspects behind this type of story telling. This has been done so that the parents may tell stories of their own making to help their children with their own unique set of problems.

I suggest that a parent reads the stories to the child a few times before allowing the child to make use of the Cd. The Cd can be seen as a tool that will help the child, consciously, and subconsciously absorb the lessons within the stories. You may find that you child comes to deeply love the stories!

These books and audios are not only meant for children who have developed the problem behaviours depicted but are also meant to give all children new skills and understandings. 

This work augments a skills workshop which gives parents and educators the skills they need to help their children.

 

Professionally recorded story for you child:

For your child to benefit from this work it is important that your child can listen to it repeatedly. You may want to read it often, over and over, but this may become laborious. Therefore I have made a recording of the story for your child.

This helps your child to subconsciously learn through repetition. It is an easy way for a child to learn, especially when it’s fun. Also it saves you from having to read this bedtime story every night yourself. I suggest you read it perhaps once to your child and then play the audio in the future, when your child goes to bed.

If you are aiming to learn to tell therapeutic stories of this nature, the audio file will assist you in recognising where emphasis, pausing and changes in tonality are used to highlight suggestion to the child’s subconscious mind.

The audio file is available here:

http://alanjohnstone.bandcamp.com/track/timmy-the-kittens-bed-stays-dry

Do you want this recorded story for your child (worth $5.00) for free?

 

Click on the link below to find out how.

I want it for free please.

 

Theory: Why do children wet the bed?

 

There are many causes attributed to bed wetting. These include genetics, bladder maturity, hormonal balances, deep sleep, small bladders and constipation. The fact remains that it is the brain that controls the bladder. In my opinion, conditioning is another reason for bed wetting.

A child becomes used to the safety and comfort of a nappy.  As adults we can understand the phases of development but a child does not know that they are going through a phase. For a child the “now” is all there is. When a child becomes comfortable in the knowledge that there is safety in urinating in a nappy it becomes normal.

The brain has no need to consider waking the child to go to the toilet. The story on this Cd is developed around the problem of bed wetting and is meant to teach the childlike subconscious mind to recognise a developmental phase.

This lesson to the childlike subconscious mind is not only valuable in solving bed wetting but can be used by the mind to solve other similar developmental issues. This work therefore compounds on the understanding offered to the childlike subconscious in the first story of this series.

A note to parents and educators: The first story in this range provides an insight into using descriptive language and how such language can be used to guide behavioural change. This story provides a technique that a child can learn and practice that will allow him or her to effect behavioural change throughout the rest of his or her life. 

– Alan Johnstone

 

Timmy the kitten’s bed stays dry!

 

All the little animals are playing under the big old tree. Corry the monkey is busy showing his friends how to build a tree house. They work and laugh together. (Story begins by offering a safe and friendly environment.) “I wish we could build all day long!” said Timmy the kitten. “If we could build all day long we could finish our tree house much, much quicker!” Corry thought a bit and smiled from ear to ear.

“I know,” said Corry “if everyone sleeps over at my house we could be up very early and build all day! I will ask my mommy and tell you what she says tomorrow.” (Developing the storyline for the outcome of behavioural change.)

The little animals are so excited. Maybe they’re going to sleep over at Corry’s house. The monkey’s house is so much fun! In the monkey’s house you don’t walk around, you swing around! There are ropes hanging from the roof in the house! (Engaging the imagination.) Blue ropes for boys and pink ropes for girls. [_(Involving male and female participation in the story.) _]

When you go to the kitchen you swing to the kitchen and when you need to make a wee wee you swing to the toilet. Even in the night! It is so much fun! When the monkeys sleep and need to go to the toilet they wake up and use the ropes to swing to the toilet. (Continuing the idea of ease in “fun”[_ while bringing about the first mention to the subconscious of waking up and going to the toilet.)_]  They hold it (Direct suggestion to control urination.) and swing to the toilet! [_(Continuing to promote the idea of fun.) _]

After they’ve had a wee wee (Past tense, therefore something already accomplished.) they swing back to bed. The next morning Corry ran to his friends. “Hi guys! My mommy and Daddy said everyone can sleep over at our house!” The little animals jumped for joy. “Yippee! We’re going to sleep over at the monkey’s house! We’re going to swing and swing and swing!’ (The idea of “swinging”[_ now associated with urinating in the toilet.) _]

Corry looks at his friends and can see how happy they are.

[_(Compound a previous direct suggestion from the last story to the parental subconscious of how important emotional honesty is to the childlike subconscious. In the first story: Corry looks at his mommy and can really see that she means it. And: Suzy looks at her mommy and can really see that she means it.) _]

But where is Timmy the kitten? Corry doesn’t see him. Timmy the kitten is Corry’s best friend. Corry begins to look for Timmy and finds him sitting all alone on a branch of the big old tree. His eyes are full of tears.  “What’s wrong Timmy?” asked Corry. [_(Associating the child’s  imagination with the presented emotion and problem.)  _]

“Then Timmy began to cry. And he cried and he cried and he cried. [_(Deepening of listeners emotional involvement.)  _]

“Oh Corry! I also want to come and sleep over at your house!”

Will your mommy say you can’t?” asked Corry. [_(Providing an excuse for current situation) _]

“She will let me sleep over but I have another problem!” Said Timmy the kitten. “The problem is; at night I wee in my bed!” (Recognising the discomfort as well as the benefit of a change of behaviour) “Timmy you can easily learn how to wake up at night and go to the toilet if you want to! I can show you how.“ [_(Minimising the behavioural state) _]

“Oh Corry! Will you really show me? I really want to know how. [_(Conscious willingness for change) _]

“If you show me I will learn quickly and easily!” (Presupposing the change can be quick and easy) said Timmy excitedly. (Reflecting an eagerness for change. This is important) _]Timmy knows monkeys are very clever. [_(Recognising the importance of authoritative suggestion) “First,” said Corry, “you need to change some things. (Describing behavioural change) “You mustn’t drink anything before you go to bed and you must have a wee wee before you go to bed.” [_(This allows the child to feel he or she is in control of constituting change: Please note that the feeling of having control is important)  _]

When you were a little baby your mommy put a nappy on you when you went to bed and gave you a bottle. Then you drank your bottle and fell asleep. At night when you needed to wee wee you did it in your nappy. Now you don’t wear a nappy anymore and you don’t drink anything before you go to bed anymore because you are big enough.“ [_(Rational explanation of behaviour and an explanation of a developmental phase.) _]

“I can do that easily!” said Timmy the kitten. (Acceptance of implied suggestion) “I can drink in the day if I want but at night I don’t drink before I go to sleep! And I wee wee before I get into bed!” (Conformity, therefore acceptance of suggestion)  “Good!” said Corry. [_(Encouragement) _]

“The next thing you need to do is wake up if you do need to wee wee at night. This is easy to do! (Downscaling problem state.) Let me show you how to practise. Close your eyes. And let only your eyes go to sleep. When they are sleeping you can try open them but you will see they will stay closed.” [_(Bypassing of critical faculty.) _]

Timmy stretches out on the branch and closes his eyes. (Conformance.) He lets his eyes rest and tells them to go to sleep. (Process)  Timmy tries to open them but they are sleeping. (Acceptance of critical faculty bypass) “Corry my eyes are sleeping now.” Said Timmy. “Good Timmy!” (Encouragement) said Corry. When you practise your eyes stay sleeping. They will open all by themselves when you have finished practising.” [_(First alternative to exiting process.) _]

Then Corry said, “At night when you need to wee wee you will wake up and you will go wee wee in the toilet. (Direct 2nd person suggestion.) Practise now Timmy say it to yourself. See how you are sleeping there in your bed and how you wake up and you go wee wee in the toilet and then go back to bed and go back to sleep. [_(Describing the act of self suggestion and using the visual representational system of the imagination to enhance self suggestion.) _]

Every time you practise like this, it becomes stronger and stronger.” [_(Implied suggestion (a causes b): because he repeats positive suggestion to himself he gets the benefits described.) _]Timmy begins to practise. He sees how he is sleeping there in his bed. He sees how he wakes up, puts his little light on and goes to wee wee in the toilet. When he is finished he goes back to bed, climbs into his warm bed and sleeps nicely again. [_(Again describing the process.) _]

Then Timmy said to himself, “At night when I need to wee wee I wake up and I go wee wee in the toilet. At night when I need to wee wee I wake up and I go wee wee in the toilet. At night when I need to wee wee I wake up and I go wee wee in the toilet.” (Compounding of 1st  person suggestion.) “That’s it!” said Corry, (Encouragement from an authoritative figure.) “And when you are finished practicing you say; One, two, three, eyes open! And they will open. Are you ready to open your eyes?” [_(Second alternative to exiting process.) _]

“No not yet!” said Timmy, “I want to practice some more!” (Allowing for the compounding of suggestion.) Timmy sees himself sleeping in his bed. He needs to wee wee. He wakes up, he puts his little light on and he goes and wee wees in the toilet. Then he goes back to bed and sleeps.

Timmy says to himself, “At night when I need to wee wee I wake up and I go wee wee in the toilet. At night when I need to wee wee I wake up and I go wee wee in the toilet. At night when I need to wee wee I wake up and I go wee wee in the toilet.” (Compounding of 1st  person suggestion.) Timmy is finished practising so he says, “One, two, three eyes open!” and his little eyes woke up and opened. [_(Using 2nd alternative to exiting process.) _]

“Wow Corry! That is so clever! I didn’t know my eyes can sleep like that! (Recognition of altered state.) I am going to practise a lot!” “Just remember, ” said Corry, “to let your eyes sleep when you practise.” (The “sleeping eyes”[_ anchored to the altered state.) _]“I will!” said Timmy, “It feels really nice when they are sleeping!” [_(Implying that practicing in an altered state is safe and pleasant.) _]

Three days later Corry sees Timmy. “Hello Timmy the kitten. How are you?” “I am so happy Corry! When I wake up in the mornings now my bed is warm and dry! I wake up at night, put my little light on and go wee wee in the toilet! (Result of practicing.) I am so happy because now I can sleep at your house!” (Benefit of practicing.)

“Yippee!” said Corry. “You can be so proud of yourself Timmy. You did very well!” (Rewarding recognition from an authoritative figure.)

Then Timmy Kitten said, “Corry you helped me so much, is there anything I can do to help you?” “Timmy you are my best friend,” said Corry, “and friends help each other. Perhaps you can help someone else one day to wake up at night and go to the toilet.” (Suggesting the concept of helping someone because you were helped.) “That’s a good plan!” said Timmy the kitten. “I will show them how to have a dry bed just like you showed me!” (Suggesting gratitude and paying a good deed forward.)

The next part of the story helps a girl relate to the story and compounds on the suggestions offered in the first part of the story.

Bonny the bunny’s mommy is visiting Timmy the kitten’s mommy. They are chatting and drinking tea while Timmy the kitten is playing nearby with a ball of wool. Little kittens love playing with balls of wool. Timmy’s ball of wool is bright yellow. He hits the ball of wool and when it rolls away he chases it and catches it again.

It’s the game he likes best. “I really don’t know what to do,” said Bonny the bunny’s mommy, “we have tried everything but Bonny still wee wees in her bed!”

“Timmy used to do that,” says Timmy’s mommy but his bed is dry now. Maybe they just grow up and wee wee in the toilet.” Timmy begins to smile. His mommy doesn’t know what Corry taught him. “I can help Bonny the bunny!” Timmy thinks to himself. The next day he sees Bonny. “Bonny I used to wee wee in my bed, but I learned how to fix that. Do you want to know how?”

“Timmy do you really know how? Please show me!” First,” said Timmy, “you need to change some things. [_(Describing behavioural change.) _]

You mustn’t drink anything before you go to bed and you wee wee before you go to bed. [_(This allows the child to feel he or she is in control of constituting change: Please note that the feeling of having control is most important.) _]

When you were a baby your mommy put a nappy on you when you went to bed and gave you a bottle. Then you drank your bottle and fell asleep. At night when you needed to wee wee you did it in your nappy. Now you don’t wear a nappy and you don’t drink anything before you go to bed anymore because you are big enough.” [_(Rational explanation of behaviour and an explanation of a developmental phase.)  _]

“I am big enough not to drink anything before I go to bed.” said Bonny the bunny. “I used to drink a bottle to go to sleep but I don’t want it anymore. I want a dry bed! And I will remember, every night, to wee wee before I get into bed!”[_ (Conformity, therefore acceptance of suggestion.)_] “Good!” said Timmy. [_(Encouragement.)  _]

“The next thing you need to do is wake up if you need to wee wee at night. This is easy to do! (Downscaling problem state.) Let me show you how to practise. [_(Starting to reframe behaviour under the context of process.) _]

Close your eyes. And let only your eyes go to sleep. When they are sleeping you can try open them but they will stay closed.” (Bypassing of critical faculty.) 

Little Bonny closes her eyes and tells them to go to sleep. “Sleep now eyes!” Bonny tries to open them and they stay sleeping. “Timmy my eyes are sleeping now,” said Bonny “Good Bonny!” said Timmy. (Encouragement.) When you practise your eyes stay sleeping. They will open all by themselves when you have finished practising or when you say one, two, three, eyes open!” [_(First and second alternative to exiting process.)  _]

Then Timmy said, “At night when you need to wee wee you will wake up and you will go wee wee in the toilet. [_(Direct 2nd person suggestion.) _]

Practise now Bonny say it to yourself. See how you are sleeping in your bed and how you wake up and how you go wee wee in the toilet and then you go back to your dry bed and back to sleep some more. [_(Describing the act of self suggestion and using the visual representational system of the imagination to enhance self suggestion.) _]

Every time you practise saying this and seeing this, you become stronger and stronger.” [_(Implied suggestion (a causes b): because he repeats positive suggestion to himself he has the benefits described.)  _]

Bonny begins to practise. She sees how she is sleeping in her bed. She sees how she wakes up, puts her little light on and goes to wee wee in the toilet. When she is finished she goes back to her dry bed and sleeps again. [_(Again describing the process.)  _]

Then Bonny said to herself, “At night when I need to wee wee I wake up and I go wee wee in the toilet. At night when I need to wee wee I wake up and I go wee wee in the toilet. At night when I need to go wee wee I wake up and I go wee wee in the toilet.” (Compounding of 1st  person suggestion.) “That’s it!” said Timmy, “That’s how you practice! (Encouragement from an authoritative figure.) And when you are finished practicing you say; one, two, three, eyes open! And they will open or they will open by themselves. [_(First and second alternative to exiting process.) _]

Are you ready to open your eyes?”

“Yes Timmy!” said Bonny, “I am finished practising now and look my eyes opened all by themselves because I was finished practising! I am going to go and practise at home now. I will practise lots and soon my bed will stay dry!” [_(Accepting suggestions.) _]

It’s night time now and it’s bed time for Bonny. She has been practising a lot today. (Affirming the importance of repetition.) She didn’t drink anything before she went to bed and she didn’t take a bottle to bed. She also made a wee wee in the toilet before she got into bed. [_(Accepting suggestions.)  _]

Bonny loves going to bed because she has a very special and fun way to go to sleep. “Timmy helped me to have a dry bed and I am so happy!” thought Bonny to herself. “I know perhaps I can teach someone my special way of going to sleep! Then I will also help someone like Timmy helped me!” [_(Suggesting gratitude and paying a good deed forward.) _]

Bonny is so happy because she knows that soon she will have a dry bed every morning. [_(Developing positive expectation.) _]

She closes her eyes and begins to sleep. Later that night Bonny is sleeping and she’s dreaming of hop, hop, hopping around when all of a sudden,  guess what happens? She wakes up! “Ooh! I need a wee wee!” said Bonny. She put her little light on and went to wee wee in the toilet.

When she was finished she went back to bed. [_(Showing a successful outcome.) _]

She closed her eyes and began to think about her favourite place and went all the way to sleep.

The next morning Bonny woke up and guess what? Her bed was dry! She ran to her Mommy and said “Mommy, mommy my bed is dry, my bed is dry!” [_(Showing a successful outcome.)  _]

“That is wonderful Bonny! I am so very, very proud of you!” Said Bonny’s mommy. Bonny’s mommy is happy and Bonny feels good. [_(Rewarding recognition from an authoritative figure.) _]

 

The End.

This story is the third of a set of books that offer skills to parents with young children. Audio files of these stories are available for download so that your child can listen to the story enough to internalise the concepts offered. Please check my blog for more details or if you wish to contact me.

Do you want this recorded story for your child (worth $5.00) for free?

 

Click on the link below to find out how.

I want it for free please.

[*These ebooks are also available: *]

Positive Parental Communication. (A book that offers advanced communication skills with regard to getting children to obey and comply in a positive manner. The four stories in this series of books are examples where the skills in this book have been used.)

[* *]

Corry the monkey is done sucking his thumb. (Helping children overcome thumb sucking.)

Timmy the kittens bed stays dry. (Helping children overcome bed wetting.)

Bonny teaches Corry how to fall asleep. (Teaches children a technique to enjoy falling asleep.)

Benny the lion learns it’s not his fault. (Helps children cope when parents are in conflict.)

 

 


Timmy the kitten's bed stays dry.

Timmy is very sad. He also wants to sleep over at Corry's house but he still wets his bed! This story helps children to solve the problem of bed wetting by assisting the child to subconsciously accept behavioural change as he or she listens to a story. Children learn through stories and easily associate with the characters in stories. This natural tendency provides a parent a wonderful opportunity to guide his or her child’s behaviour and feelings and teach them understandings with which to improve their EQ. In the ebook, notes are provided which teach parents, educators and play therapists the valuable skills of story telling. The notes are interspersed in the story and explain why certain words and ideas are offered in the story.

  • Author: Alan Johnstone
  • Published: 2016-05-28 22:05:11
  • Words: 3984
Timmy the kitten's bed stays dry. Timmy the kitten's bed stays dry.