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The Stress-Free Baby Names Book: How to Choose the Perfect Baby Name with Confid

The Stress-Free Baby Names Book

 

How to Choose the Perfect Baby Name with Confidence, Clarity and Calm

 

By Aston Sanderson

The Stress-Free Baby Names Book by Aston Sanderson. Published by Walnut Publishing Company, Hanover Park, IL 60133

 

www.walnutpublishing.wordpress.com

 

© 2017 Walnut Publishing.

 

All Rights Reserved. No portion of this book may be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except as permitted by U.S. copyright law. For permissions contact:

 

[email protected]

 

 

Table of Contents

 

Introduction to the Stress-Free Baby Names Book

Chapter 1: Why You Can’t Find the Perfect Name — But You Will Anyway

Chapter 2: On Meaning and Origin

Chapter 3: Naming Strategies: Going Unique

Chapter 4: Naming Strategies: Going Trendy or Semi-Unique

Chapter 5: Naming Strategies: Going Totally Unique

Chapter 6: Choosing Advice: Sounding It Out & Full Name Considerations

Chapter 7: Choosing Advice: Associations & Nicknames

Chapter 8: Choosing Advice: It’s About Them, Not You

Chapter 9: How to Deal with Family and Outside Pressure

Chapter 10: Communication with Your Partner

Chapter 11: To Tell — Or Not to Tell?

Chapter 12: There You Have It

Chapter 13: Resources: Websites for Research

Chapter 14: Resources: Baby Naming Worksheets

Chapter 15: Resources: The Big List of Baby Names

Chapter 16: Conclusion: About the Author and Further Reading

 

Introduction

 

 

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet,” – William Shakespeare

 

 

Congrats!

 

I’m so happy and honored that you’ve chosen The Stress-Free Baby Names Book to help you find and choose the perfect name for your baby!

 

Becoming a parent is an important and amazing journey, whether you’re becoming a parent for the first time, or once again.

 

I’m so elated to be a small part of it.

 

How to Use This Book

 

This book has two parts:

 

Twelve written chapters with advice about how to select a baby name and what to consider during the process.

 

And three chapters with resources:

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Websites that can help you learn more about names you’ve narrowed down and popularity over time

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Worksheets to help you narrow down your choices and move forward with the process with your partner

*
p<>{color:#000;}. And a giant list of more than 3,000 girls’, boys’ and unisex names to inspire you, get you started, and maybe find the perfect name!

 

The most important part of this book, however, is that you get the most of out of it. Think one of our chapters of advice is total codswallop? Don’t like some of the names in our list? That’s up to you, and feel free to ignore them!

 

But maybe you’ll also find you really identify with one of the strategies I’ve broken down in one of our Naming Strategies chapters, or you just want to know how to deal with pressure from your family.

 

This book can be digested as a whole, or taken in bits and pieces. It’s whatever is most helpful to you to be happy with your baby name decision.

 

Ultimately, the choice is yours, for your family and child.

 

It’s not your mom’s decision. Or your aunt’s. Or the nosy neighbor’s. Or your opinionated friend. Or even mine!

 

It’s 100% yours, and I hope I can help you find the perfect name for your baby!

 

Chapter 1

 

Why You Can’t Find the Perfect Name — But You Will Anyway

 

 

OK, I know that in the last sentence you just read of the introduction of this book, I told you that this book would help you find the capital-P “Perfect” baby name!

 

But guess what? It doesn’t exist.

 

It’s not out there, ready to be found by you, if only you can read thousands of name, sifting through them like hay looking for the needle.

 

It’s not a long-lost relative who will inspire you with the perfect classic-and-historical but also sounds-just-right-for-this-decade-and-cultural-moment-and-zeitgesit name.

 

It’s not going to be worth hundreds of hours of planning and thinking and considering. Trust me.

 

How do I know you won’t find the perfect name?

 

Because you will create it.

 

No, I don’t mean you’re going to make it up out of thin air. (But if you want to make up a new name that has never existed before, hey, you do you!)

 

You’re going to make a perfect name because you’re going to give it to your child, a human you’ve created (or adopted or any other way you’ve become a parent), a child you will raise and care for and love unconditionally and that is why it will be a perfect name.

 

Do you know how many parents freak out about naming their kid before it comes, and then once the child arrives, totally love the name? I hear from many people that they wish they had known how perfect a name would sound once they held that tiny person in their arms, even if it didn’t feel perfect when they were choosing it.

 

Part of preparing for a child (especially your first) is over-preparing. Over-preparing can be caused by nervousness, a healthy dose or practicality, and the pressures of the outside world.

 

We all want to be perfect parents, and having a kid is a huge, heck of a scary thing! You are responsible for another human being. One you’ve given life to.

 

Of course, preparing to be a parent is important. We should all be prepared, to a reasonable degree. But then there’s also the tendency to give into our nervousness, the ancient, simple, reptile part of our brain that tells us we can fail or be bad parents or not do everything 100% perfect. One of the ways to stamp down this stress and fear is to obsess about details that aren’t the most important. Like a name.

 

Listen here: You’ll choose a wonderful name. You won’t mess up your kid forever by choosing one that isn’t capital-P Perfect. Their success doesn’t depend on a gender-neutral name or a trendy name or a classic name. Their success depends on everything else: your love, you being present, you knowing when a small detail, a name, is not worth stressing over.

 

Choose a name you love. Or like well enough. Choose a name that fits and feels right.

 

But if nothing feels all-important “Perfect,” seriously, it’s OK. You might not find the perfect name.

 

You can’t find the perfect name, in essence. Because a name isn’t perfect.

 

You know what will be perfect?

 

That name on your kid.

 

Now go forth, and let me help you spend a reasonable amount of time picking out a name, and not stressing out about it.

 

It’s time for the Stress-Free Baby Names guide to get to work for you!

 

Sit back, relax, and let me do the hard stuff.

 

Chapter 2

 

On Meaning and Origin

 

 

I’ll dive in during the next chapter to different naming strategies, like whether to go unique, trendy, classic, super unique or semi-unique with your baby’s name.

 

But first, I’d like to make a point about meaning and origin.

 

For some parents, choosing a name based on the linguistic origin of the name and meaning are important. But for most of us, I’d argue that it really doesn’t matter that much.

 

Sure, maybe you want your daughter’s name to mean “beauty,” or your son’s name to mean “strength.” Or the other way around. But outside of one school project in 2nd grade, how often will the linguistic meaning or origin of your child’s name come up?

 

It doesn’t really make a difference. What will matter most over the course of a lifetime is the name itself.

 

Now, a note here: This is not to say that you can’t choose a name that has an important meaning or origin to you, like a family origin or association meaning (to a friend, beloved book character, etc.).

I’m just saying that basing your child’s name on an origin or meaning that has no connection to you, like the types of meaning and origins you see in, yes, baby name books, is a bit silly. That meaning often will not come up in conversation, ever, unless you force it.

 

Why choose a name for this reason when you could instead think about all the other reasons and factors that will have an actual impact on your child’s life? For instance, how the name will position your child in their generation, how it will sound with their middle and last name, how it will go with your and your partner’s name and any siblings, or what sort of pop culture or well-known associations the name has in people’s minds?

 

Those reasons are a bit more important for most people’s purposes, and that’s what we’ll cover in this book.

 

We included in this book a list of more than 3,000 baby names to get you started in your search. And we haven’t included meanings or origins, and this is why: We think you should focus on other aspects that matter more.

 

Listen, if linguistic meanings and origins are your thing, definitely go for it! We still have some great advice in this book we think you’d like to read. And our list can be a starting place for you to find new names or remember old ones you’d forgotten about but still love.

 

Now, let’s dive in to the good stuff and find your little bundle the perfect name — and save you the worry and stress of this process— to make it as easy and smooth as possible! Just read our chapters, use our worksheets, and in no time you will have the perfect name for your little one!

 

Chapter 3

 

Naming Strategies:

Going Unique

 

 

First things first: You really can’t go wrong with a classic name.

 

For example, classic names for boys are: William, John, James, Joseph. Or for girls: Elizabeth, Catherine, Emma, Lillian.

 

They are classic, common, timeless.

 

Benefits of a Classic Name

 

People will always know how to pronounce them (in large English-speaking countries at least, but maybe your little one will grow up to be a world traveler, of course!)

 

The benefits to this naming strategy are that your kid’s name won’t be jarring or surprising to people. Kids with unique names have to deal with constant mispronunciation, misspelling, misunderstanding, and comments on their “interesting” name their entire lives.

 

If your kid has a classic name, they won’t have to face any of those problems.

These names also sound classic, so usually pair quite well with any last name.

 

Another good strategy is to use a classic name as a middle name. This gives your kid an insurance policy. If they end up really not liking their first name for whatever reason, (let’s say they end up sharing it with an embarrassing young starlet, like if you named your kid Paris about 15 years ago…) they have a classic, sure-fire normal name to use instead. It’s quite common for people to go by their middle name, and it is still a legal name so can prevent any problems that just choosing random names out out of the blue might cause.

 

Downsides to a Classic Name

 

So what are the downsides to going with a classic or timeless name?

 

Well, it will be shared with a lot of other classmates and people.

 

Common names can mean trouble for email addresses, mail mix-ups, identity mix-ups, or sharing a name with someone online who happens to have a criminal record.

 

But usually, these names can be so common as to be totally fine for those sorts of things. There will be so many people with the same name, the name almost can’t become anything bad or negatively associated with it.

 

What’s the flipside of “normal,” or “common,” though? The flipside is “boring.” This may not be an issue for some people. One man’s boring is another man’s classic, and that’s great.

 

It’s up to you! Let’s move on to the next naming strategy now that I’ve covered classic names.

 

Chapter 4

 

Naming Strategies:

Going Trendy or Semi-Unique

 

 

On Trendy Names

 

Alright, parents, let’s get to the bottom of it: A lot of the names you probably think are unique right now are actually the most popular names of the moment.

 

They appear to be unique because they are so different and differently-sounding than the classic names we discussed in the last chapter. You’ve heard them a few times, but not very often. Something about it just sounds perfect but you’re not sure why.

 

Well, it’s probably because the name is at the top of the current trending list.

 

In 2015 (the most recent year US government data was available), the top boy’s names were:

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Noah

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Liam

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Mason

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Jacob

#
p<>{color:#000;}. William

The top girl’s names in 2015 were:

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Emma

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Olivia

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Sophia

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Ava

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Isabella

 

It is easy to miss what names are trending at the moment. It’s hard to know everyone is naming their kids that because your baby is on the way, not just getting signed up for preschool and meeting the other seven “Noahs” in the class. Especially if you’re not surrounded by friends having children, you may be out of the loop of what other parents are going with.

 

But, these trendy names are one way to go. Like the classic names, they will not be mispronounced, misspelled, misunderstood, or uncommon, at least for your kid’s generation. Just like the most popular names in 1920 for girls were Mary, Dorothy, Helen, Margaret, and Ruth, those names now sound like elderly women names, because they were popular for that generation.

 

So you can feel safe that your kid can enjoy all the benefits of having a classic name, while also having a name that ties them specifically to their generation. For instance, when your kid is young, they will have a kid-sounding name. When they are 40-something, they will have a middle-aged-sounding name. And when they are a senior citizen, they will have an old-sounding name. So your kid will get to age with their generation.

 

Trendy names could be a great naming strategy! Just that word of caution I mentioned at the beginning of this section: The names you think are semi-unique may actually be really popular at the moment! But that doesn’t mean they aren’t great names. Just check the recent years’ baby names lists to see how your top names compare.

 

But what if you do want a semi-unique name? Read more in the section below:

 

On Semi-Unique Names

 

But what about a name that is semi-unique? Not waaaaay out there, but not trendy, and not classic? These might be the names you’d find at the bottom of the top 100 most popular names lists. These names may provoke a little misunderstanding, but they will be unique to your child, especially more so than trendy names, or the names at the top of the recent years’ most popular lists.

 

It is a little safer than going for a really unique name, but a little more unique than just going for straight trendy or classic names.

 

But remember — you never know what will happen in the future. A name that is unique now is not guaranteed to safely stay unique over time (especially once your little pumpkin has it and is an all-around amazing human and a ton of other parents and community members want to copy you until the name is famous. OK, that may happen, but maybe it will not).

 

Regardless, you can’t predict the future. Maybe the name that is unique now will be at the top of popular baby name lists in 10 years, or 20. There’s just no way to know.

 

But do you research, and check out the resources I’ve provided for you to do some research into whether that unique name you’ve chosen is really unique.

 

Chapter 5

 

Naming Strategies:

Going Totally Unique

 

 

Alright, so you want to go totally out there? Like famous celebrity baby names “Apple” (daughter of Coldplay front-man Chris Martin and actress Gwyneth Paltrow) and “Moon Unit?” (daughter of Frank Zappa)?

 

If celebrities can do it, why not you? Indeed. If you are ready to go super unique, go for it! Live your truth, do what makes you happy in your heart.

 

But first — a few considerations.

 

Are You Actually Ready for an Out-There Name?

 

First: a note on spelling. If you are going to go for a unique name, just having a unique spelling of a regular name (Jesika, Cyndee, Mykel) will actually not be unique — as your child’s name will actually just be pronounced like Jessica, Cindy or Michael. And it will cause a lifetime of headaches for your son or daughter, especially when it comes to government forms, calling any customer support help line, or just getting through life with a common name pronounced commonly but spelled in quite an uncommon way.

Then it also has the effect in the opposite direction: Whenever people try to pronounce the name, they’ll assume it surely can’t be pronounced like the common name, otherwise, why is it spelled that way?

Sure, I understand, having a unique name is not about pleasing the masses. But remember that a name, ultimately, is about communication. It’s what everyone will use to call your son or daughter from the time they are born to the time they are 90+ years old. It will be the word with the most neural connections in their brain, and the way they will most frequently interact with the world, whether they intend to or not. So making that name something that hinders communication, confuses it, or breaks it down unnecessarily, will cause some headaches and annoyance for your kid. We all know these people with unusual names, and if we know them well enough, we know how annoyed they can be. (If we don’t know them well enough, we still may not even be sure how to pronounce their name or spell it!)

 

Are you ready to defend it to family members, strangers, and others?

Depending on how unique the name is, plan for some pushback from people. Usually people are pretty good about respecting the name a parent has chosen, but be prepared for people to try to question you about it, even in a polite way.

 

On Research & Things to Consider

 

Do your research.

 

Make sure to Google the name and/or word you’ve chosen, just to see what associations are already out there with it. You never know what weird company has been using the name in relative obscurity for years but will cause it to unwittingly come up in any Google search anyone performs on your kid.

 

So just make sure to do a check before signing the name away on the birth certificate.

 

There is always the possibility that the name will not be liked by your child as they get older. So one tactic to take is to give them a unique first name (or middle name) and then do a common first name or middle name, so they can choose to swap to the other if it really doesn’t fit them well.

 

Some names, also, that are very unique may sound strange at first to people, but if your kid grows into the name and has a personality to match, people will think your kid is especially awesome and probably be jealous that they couldn’t pull off a name with so much spunk like your kid with the huge personality. What if they turn out to be a wallflower and are embarrassed by the name though? These are the things to consider.

 

Another thing to think about is the hiring process, as boring as that sounds. Will a super unique name hurt your kid’s chances of getting callbacks for job interviews, or will it make them stand out more? Imagine you are hiring for a company, and imagine a resume with the name you are thinking of giving your kid that is unique. Does it still sound professional?

 

Benefits of a Unique Name

 

But what will be the benefits? Your kid will stand out with a unique name. And the 15 Jacobs in his kindergarten class might be jealous that he gets to be just Frad instead of Jacob W or blond Jacob or however they decide to demarcate all the un-unique, boring kid names in class.

It will probably be easier for your kid to get their username on websites, acquire a Gmail address, and do personal branding if they want to open up their own business later in life (or be an author, like your favorite author Aston Sanderson right here…).

 

Also be aware that more parents are going outside the norm these days, so you will be in good company by going a little out there. In the old days, practically everyone named their kid classic names. Now, people get more creative and feel more comfortable going outside the norm. So, yes, even when trying to be unique these days, you still may be following trends by being unique. It’s a bit tiresome to try to wrap your brain around, huh?

 

So, ultimately, my best advice is to just go unusual if you want! Just be aware of common pitfalls for parents trying to go unique, and do your best to do your research.

 

Now that you know all about the different naming strategies — whether you want to go classic, unique, semi-unique or trendy — I can move on to just how you’ll go about choosing that name.

 

Time to learn more about naming your special little one! In the next few chapters, I’ll talk about pronunciation, nicknames, and other considerations.

 

Chapter 6

 

Choosing Advice:

Sounding It Out & Full Name Considerations

 

 

Onto some advice on how to choose that precious little one’s name. So far I’ve talked about different strategies you can take in naming your child. You can go common or classic, trendy at the moment or a little unique, or totally out-there unique and special. Whichever way you go is up to you, but no matter which method you take, these next three chapters on choosing advice will apply and help walk you through the steps to making sure you avoid the common pitfalls and choose the most perfect name possible for your special little kid.

 

Let’s get to it:

 

Sound It Out

 

A very important part of your kid’s name is the way it sounds. The name won’t just be written, but said millions of times over the course of your child’s full life.

 

So make sure to say it aloud. Let it roll off your tongue. Say it sweetly and softly. Yell it happily like you’re cheering your kid on across the soccer field. Yell it angrily like Jr. has just run away from you in the supermarket. (We all pretend we’re never going to yell, not once, before we become parents, but please tell me of one person you know who has actually followed their belief in this).

 

Sounds & How They Are Perceived

 

Believe it or not, there are a lot of subtle sound associations with different letters, sounds, vowels, consonants and letter groupings that we hear on a daily basis. This is especially pertinent in advertising, where you want the name of a car to sound strong and slick (like Porsche) while others sound…well, a bit weak and strange. (like the Wingle: Yes, an actual name from a Chinese car manufacturer for a car model.)

 

The same applies to names for people. The name Xena is going to sound stronger than Daisy, at least with pop culture associations, but how does the name actually sound in terms of the letters?

 

Names that sound breathier, or have fewer hard consonants, may sound a bit less forceful. Like Hannah (soft) vs. Jackie (hard), or Charles (soft) vs. Eric (hard).

 

Consider the Full Name

 

When sounding out your kid’s name, it will be especially important to combine it with any middle name you choose to give him or her as well as your last name.

 

Beware of tongue-twister first-middle-last name combinations!

 

Also be especially aware of rhyming and the repetition of certain sounds. My own name veers into that territory: Aston Sanderson has two “As” sounds in it. Two is enough; if my middle name had this sound as well, it would be a bit much.

 

For example:

 

Aston Michael Sanderson (ok) (and my actual real name)

vs.

Aston Samson Sanderson (too much sound repetition)

 

So make sure all the names flow together and sound good. You want them to roll off the tongue and be a beautiful combination of sounds and names.

 

What About Siblings?

 

Another thing to think about along with your child’s full name is how it works within the family unit. Do you already have other kids, or plan on having more? How do all the first names of your children sound together? How does the new child’s name sound with your first name, or your partner’s? For example, you may sign your family Christmas cards as “The Hendersons,” but you may also sign it with all of your first names, so make sure the collection of those names sounds good.

 

I also have one word of caution if you want to name your children something similar to their siblings: Naming your daughters Leah and Leslie will mean a lifetime of them being confused for each other and called each other’s names by elderly relatives and family friends.

 

Initials

 

Also look at initials: Don’t name your kid Aaron Sean Smith, for example, or Dorothy Ursa Mitchell. You don’t want to open your kid to a lifetime of teasing with embarrassing initials, and I’ll look more at avoiding nicknames and the cruelty of children in the next chapter.

 

Chapter 7

 

Choosing Advice:

Associations & Nicknames

 

 

“Nicknames stick to people, and the most ridiculous are the most adhesive,” — Thomas Chandler Haliburton

 

“I love nicknames. It makes me feel loved. It makes me feel less alone in this world,” — Ellen Page

 

 

Kids can be cruel.

 

That is the crux of this next chapter, which is about nicknames and other associations for the name you are going to choose for your child.

 

Associations from the Outside World

 

If you name your kid Lola, for example, or Cecilia, they might forever be cursed with people singing to them the moment they meet them.

 

Or if you name your kid Beyoncé, well, that’s certainly an association that will follow them around their entire life.

 

It may seem cute now, but that is a name the kid will have to live with forever.

 

What other associations will your child’s name stir? If your last name is Potter, and you want to use Henry because it is a family name dating back generations, it will still be more associated with Harry Potter than with your dad, grandpa and great-uncle all named Henry Potter. Think about the associations the outside world might force upon your innocent little kid.

 

Nicknames

 

As I have mentioned, kids can be cruel. So your kid might end up with an unfortunate nickname from classmates that you didn’t intend.

 

Think:

 

What does the name rhyme with?

What does it sound like with your last name?

If you shorten the name, what does it rhyme with?

If you shorten your last name, what does it rhyme with?

Remember again about initials — what do they spell?

 

And if you love a full name, like Elizabeth, but can’t stand Liz, Eliza, Beth or any other shortening, remember that you can’t control what your kid will end up preferring as they grow up. Maybe your daughter really feels like a Beth in her heart of hearts, even if you really see her as an Elizabeth.

 

And friends especially will shorten names, even if it is against your daughter’s wishes as well, maybe her friends just really want to call her “E” all the time. So you won’t be able to choose what your kid is called, and must be ready and prepared for all variations of the birth name you choose and accept them all into your life.

 

You may think that you get license to always call your son or daughter whatever you want throughout their life anyway, but remember, they may decide one day that they really prefer to be called something else, so always remember that you need to be flexible no matter what.

 

Associations from the “Inside” World

 

During the choosing process, a lot of old name associations start to rise up for many of us that we didn’t remember we even had.

 

Maybe you really love the name Amber but it is the name of a character you really hate on a TV show, or it’s your partner’s ex, or it’s the annoying cube-mate of your friend at work, or it’s the dog walker, or it’s the inefficient bag person at the grocery store, or any number of small acquaintances you run into throughout the course of your lived life.

 

But what if you really like the name and your partner has a small bad association? Or you really like the name, but just remembered, oh yeah, that was the name of the bully in my school growing up?

 

I’ve got great news for you if this is the case: All those small associations will fall away once you give this name to your child.

Think about it: You haven’t met your child yet, and they are still just a blank slate, a person you can’t yet imagine or hold or see living in the world. All you have to go on is blurry ultrasounds and what you imagine will happen in the future and how you currently feel.

But soon that little ultrasound picture will be a living, breathing, fully-formed human, and he or she will become your everything. And all other associations will fall away. It will no longer be the dog walker or the person who hit your car three months ago. It will just be your daughter or son, and all the other associations won’t matter, because you will have a real person to stand in for those associations, and they will be your favorite person in the world.

 

That awesome new member of your family will grow into that name more and more every day.

 

Those are just a few of the considerations you should have choosing a baby name, and in the next chapter, I’ll talk a little more about seeing that little human in utero as a real person.

 

Chapter 8

 

Choosing Advice:

It’s About Them, Not You

 

 

Like I discussed in the last chapter, sometimes the whirlwind of being pregnant can overshadow the little life that’s about to start. Of course, being pregnant is all about preparing for the little life that is about to be born. But there is a lot of crazy hoopla that surrounds pregnancy: A ton of unsolicited advice from acquaintances and strangers, endless showers, parties and gifts, worry and preparation for the first few weeks, for the birthing process, telling family and making them a part of the process and of course: Figuring out a name!

 

It’s a lot to take in.

 

(But don’t stress. This guide is here to help you choose a baby name-stress-free, so that’s at least one thing to cross of the huge to-do list.)

 

Here’s something else to think about as you name your child:

 

Your Baby Will Be a Full-Fledged Adult Some Day

 

So a lot of the planning of preparing for a baby surrounds pregnancy, the moments leading up to birth, the birthing process, and the immediacy after birth. You probably don’t spend a ton of time sitting around imagining your little peanut-to-be working at a corporate office and wearing a tie at 45.

 

But that may be their life someday! Whether your baby grows up to be a lawyer, an astronaut, a circus performer, a writer, a truck driver or a manager, they will grow up, that’s for sure.

 

So you need to make sure the name you choose is not just appropriate for an infant, baby and toddler in cute little outfits, but for a teenager, for a 20-something fresh out of college and ready to hit the job market, for a middle-aged person, for a father or a mother themselves and finally, for an aging senior citizen.

 

Thinking of an appropriate name for a senior citizen may be, I admit, thinking a bit too far ahead. So let’s stop at that stage right after teenager: A 20-something out of college and hitting the job market.

 

Is the name professional enough for your kid if they decide to be a corporate lawyer, or does it sound only appropriate for an avant-garde artist?

 

You never know what the future holds for the life of your little one, so make sure to let the world be as big as their dreams, and allow them to have any opportunities they want.

 

Don’t accidentally hinder them with their name. Make sure it is one that can allow them to be anything and achieve anything they want. Of course, a name won’t actually stop someone who is very determined from achieving their dreams. But that’s not what this book is about, OK? It’s about names, so do your best to give the future life of your child at least a few thoughts before choosing an uber-cute-for-a-baby name.

They’ll thank you for it, trust me.

 

A helpful thought exercise to help you imagine your baby-to-be as a grown-up person is to think of what you would want to be named were you to start your life over. What name would give you the most advantages, sound super cool, and set you up for success, as much as a name is able to? What name would you adopt, right now?

 

You Don’t Need to Express Yourself

 

While you are pregnant, there is a lot of pressure. People always, always want to talk about the baby, about being pregnant, what is your birth plan, have you thought of any names yet?

 

It can be a lot of pressure to put on a new mom or dad.

 

People will want to be impressed by you and everything that you have come up with for your newborn. You may feel stressed out trying to impress people with how creative you are with the name.

 

People will immediately judge your baby’s name, and you must get over that.

 

It doesn’t need to say anything about you, your personality, your creativity, or your life. It doesn’t need to say anything about your child, either.

 

It is just a name.

 

And you are choosing the name that is best for your little one; so don’t feel held up worrying about how it will reflect on you, no matter how much other people want to talk all about it.

 

Chapter 9

[[++
How to Deal with Family and Outside Pressure]]

 

 

There is a lot of outside pressure, oftentimes, when are having a baby and choosing a name. You can feel outside pressure from your family, your friends, your partner or tradition.

 

That can be a lot to deal with! But remember the No. 1 Golden Rule: This is about your baby, not your friends, your church, your parents, or what anyone else says. Like we went over in the last chapter, the name you choose should be the one that you think feels right.

 

Family Names

 

If you are open to naming your child in the family tradition, or want to harken back to a relative, immediate or distant, with your name, you can do so, and choosing this naming route is often a nice way to honor family (or friends, as, as we all know, friends can become as close as if not closer than family).

 

You can choose the actual name of a distant relative for your child, just adopting the name straight, as it is, or you can do a creative twist on a family name.

 

For example, is there a tradition of men in your family being named William? Name your son Liam, which means “son of William.” Then you have a new twist on the name, without having to use the name itself.

 

Another example: Your partner’s grandmother is Ann and your grandma is Mary? How about Anna Marie?

 

There are many different creative ways to honor a loved one without being tied to using that person’s exact name. You can put a twist on the name and find one that works best for you and that feels new and fresh even if it is an older name.

 

Family Pressure

 

However, if you have pressure from your family to choose a family name, and you really don’t want to, remember an important point about naming your child.

 

Remember in the first chapter about choosing the perfect name (Why You Can’t Find the “Perfect” Name — But You Will Anyway)? We talked about how even if a name doesn’t feel perfect before the birth, it will begin to suit your child and you will love it more and more each day.

 

It should be the same for your family. Even if their initial reaction to the name is not overwhelmingly positive, they will slowly over time realize that the name is for the child that they love, and it will grow on them, too.

 

So what works for you will also work for your family.

 

Pressure from Friends & Other Outside Influences

 

Are your friends pressuring you to choose a regular name? Are you feeling like your culture, community or small group of parents in the neighborhood will judge you?

I’m here to say: Forget them.

 

Name your child what you want. Family pressure is one thing, but strangers? Who cares what they think?

Friends may be a bit different. But still — what kind of friends are they if they are pressuring you about your child’s name?

 

As for other outside pressure in the neighborhood, of course, you must also think about how your child will grow up in his or her community. Will the name be reason for teasing? That’s never good. But also, learning to be strong in the face of being different is what “The Ugly Duckling” fairytale is all about, right?

All in all, don’t worry too much about outside pressure. Do what makes you and your partner and your future child happy! That is what truly matters.

 

Decide What’s Important

 

Ultimately, it’s up to you how much you want to bend to outside pressure. Maybe you want to go rogue and do whatever you want, even if it displeases your family.

 

But if pleasing your family or fitting into societal norms makes you happy, then by all means, do that!

The choice is yours, and my book is here to tell you that whatever choice you want to make is the right one.

 

Chapter 10

 

Communication with Your Partner

 

 

Deciding on a name for your baby should be a couple’s decision.

 

Even if your partner says, “I don’t care, choose whatever name you want,” it is good to clue them into your naming process. Like over-obsessing about naming your child as a way to combat the stress of becoming a new parent, trying to totally stay out of the process can be another way to attempt to deal with that stress.

 

You both made the kid, did you not? (Or went through the adoption process together, or any other non-traditional means of becoming parents). So you can both decide on the name, or at least have a say.

 

Here are some basic rules for communication with your partner that you may find helpful in all areas of life, and not just during the time you are deciding on a name during pregnancy:

 

Be Open and Honest

 

As in most forms of communication, more is better. Be open with your partner about the names you like, and why you like them.

 

If your partner immediately dismisses a name, find out why. But you also must be willing to share the “why” with your partner as well if you immediately don’t like a name, even if you feel embarrassed about the reason (a short fling in college? The name of the guy whose car you wrecked in high school in that accident?)

 

Also identify what is important to you in naming your child. Share your values with your partner. Is it important to honor family? Is it important to choose a trendy name? Is it important the name starts with the same letter as your mom’s name? Communicate what you are thinking and what is important to you.

 

Be a Good Listener & Nonjudgmental

 

On the flip side of being open and honest, you also must be willing to hear what your partner is saying.

 

What is important to your partner in a name may not be important to you; or it may sound trivial. But you also should be nonjudgmental. What is important to you is very subjective, just like what is important to your partner. You may have different ways of approaching how important names are, what they should stand for, and how to ultimately choose one.

 

That’s OK! Because if you have open communication, you may disagree on a few things when it comes to the naming process, but that is when we get to:

 

Compromise

 

If you love love love a name, but your partner detests it, it’s probably not going to work out. It’s better to find a name you both love 80% than one of you feel 100% great about and your partner feels 0% great about.

 

You may feel disappointed when you tell your partner the name you love and they don’t like it all. Sure, they may come around in time, but there’s also a huge possibility they will not be able to get over their initial reaction.

 

So be prepared to let some “perfect” names go, and don’t fall into the trap of believing they seem more “perfect” because you can’t have them.

 

I have added some worksheets at the end of this book for your partner and you to work together on choosing a name, if you’d like the added help of a guided way to talk about the names that are important to you and figure out your values.

 

 

 

 

Chapter 11

[[++
To Tell — Or Not to Tell?]]

 

 

When you’ve decided on a name, you’ll probably feel super excited, as you should! That’s going to be the name of your child! You may be tempted to shout it from the rooftops and email every one you’ve ever met and post it on Facebook and tell strangers in the street.

 

Most people, however, recommend keeping the name for your child — even if it’s just a hard “maybe” at this point — to yourself.

 

Everyone and their mom will have a huge opinion on the baby name you have chosen, and they may not all be favorable. People will draw from all areas of their life to explain to you why they don’t like it. No name is going to get a 100% positive response.

 

If you keep the name to yourself until you have your son or daughter, people may complain behind your back about the name, but they should have the decency not to do it to your face, so who cares what they think then! They will pretend to love it, and that will save you all the grief of getting their honest opinions while pregnant.

 

While you (or your partner) is pregnant, people will see the name as not yet “set” in stone. So they may assume you are asking for a critique or a reason to change your mind. Once the child has been officially named, they don’t see that name as flexible anymore, and so will not give you as much of a critique.

 

There is one bonus to sharing the name, and that is feedback. Maybe your friends or family or even a stranger will think of something you didn’t realize about the name. Something it rhymes with, some famous embarrassing celebrity it reminds them of, or something else you didn’t think of.

 

But there’s a way to get feedback without suffering the judgment of family and friends: Do it anonymously on an online forum. If you need to sign up to one, find a free one and share your chosen baby name anonymously. Strangers will tell you their honest opinion, and maybe you will gather some good information. Maybe they assume it is a girl’s name when it is a boy’s or the other way around, or maybe they don’t know how to pronounce it. But ultimately, they are strangers on the internet, so you have the freedom to ignore them in a way you wouldn’t be able to ignore your friends and family. Thank goodness!

 

Strangers online will also have less of an emotional reaction, as they do not know you, and cannot imagine the future little person in their life, so they will not be as emotionally and intensely reacting, also saving you some headaches were you to reveal it to people you knew in person.

 

You have control how much you will bow to outside pressure.

Chapter 12

 

There You Have It

 

There you have it! We have gone through the different naming strategies you can take (timeless and classic, trendy or semi-unique, and very unique), given you some choosing advice (be open with your partner, sound it out, think of middle and last name and siblings, think of your child being an adult, consider nicknames and the cruelty of kids, think of cultural associations and famous people) and hopefully helped you get on your way to choosing the perfect baby name for your new son or daughter!

 

The most important takeaway from this book should be that you shouldn’t stress or spend a ton of time on picking a name, you should only spend however much time it takes to consider each of the points I’ve raised in this book, and you’ve had a good, hashed-out discussion with your partner, and the name feels mostly right.

 

Because even if it doesn’t feel perfect, there could be any number of factors why it doesn’t feel perfect, and they could be that you are feeling nervous about properly raising a little person to be a wonderful, thoughtful, smart, talented, kind, interesting and loving human in this messy, complicated and harsh world of ours.

 

Once your son or daughter is born, all will be right. You will not be able to imagine him or her ever having any other name. It will be the Perfect baby name. Yes, with a capital P.

 

Many new parents say this: That they wish they had known how little the name would matter, and also how much it would matter once it was attached to their child.

 

I also recommend that you don’t put off this decision. There’s a lot of paperwork you have to do before leaving the hospital, so don’t delay getting home and getting started with your new life with your little one. It’s best to choose before going into labor. There’s enough to think about during the birthing process.

 

Some people think that they will know which name feels right upon seeing their child’s face for the first time, but oftentimes, this just leads to feeling even more pressure about the name, especially when you don’t have a name to announce to friends and family eagerly awaiting the birth.

 

Let’s get real: Most babies just look like babies. You won’t be able to distinguish whether your baby looks like a “John,” “Jacob” or “James.” So decide on that name before entering the hospital.

 

In the next few chapters, I have some resources to help you choose the best baby name. Chapter 14 covers websites for further research, Chapter 15 includes baby naming worksheets if you feel stuck or just need some help, and Chapter 16 has our list of more than 3,000 baby names for girls, boys and unisex names. These resources are not the end-all-be-all, but hopefully they will help you in your journey.

 

Thanks for reading!

 

And if you enjoyed this book, please leave me a review, as it helps me reach more parents-to-be and keep writing helpful books!

Chapter 13

 

Resources:

Websites for Research

 

 

In a few of these chapters, I mentioned doing some research before going with a name for your child. These two resources will help you to gain a little more context around the popularity over time of the name you want to choose, or can show you which names have been popular in the US.

 

Social Security Government Website

 

On the Social Security Administrations’ government website, you can find data on the most popular baby names in a few different ways.

 

You can find out the most popular baby names by decade (all the way back from the 1880s until 2010), popular names by state, statistics on popularity change over time, the top 5 names, year by year, over the last 100 years, and the top names, overall, over the last 100 years.

 

Start browsing this website by following the link here: http://bit.ly/ssababynames

 

Baby Name Wizard

 

This website has so much fascinating data, you could get lost for hours. If you just want to skim the surface, however, (remember, make the process stress-free! Sometimes more information is too much information and paralyzing instead of helpful), you can use this tool to search the top names you are considering for your baby to see how their popularity has changed over the last 135 years.

 

Just plug the name into where it says “Name Voyager” (not where it says “Search for a Name” in orange at the top) to see a chart showing the rise and fall of that name over years.

 

Putting in the name “Elisa,” for example, shows that it remained a relatively uncommon name until it exploded in 1960s to 1980s. It then saw an unprecedented, huge spike in popularity around 2011, but swiftly dropped off.

 

You can also double click on the chart to go to a page containing name facts (like linguistic origin). One of the most helpful features on this page is where you can find “Related Names.” For “Elisa,” a few related names are “Elise, Eliza, Alisa, Lisa.” This is a phenomenal way to find names similar to ones you like, and maybe discover a new one you hadn’t thought of.

 

You can browse the Baby Name Voyager by following the link here: http://bit.ly/babyvoyager

 

In the next chapter, use our baby naming worksheets to get you started on finding and narrowing down the perfect name for your kid!

Chapter 14

 

Resources:

Baby Naming Worksheets

 

 

How to Use These Worksheets:

 

Like the rest of this book, take or leave whatever you like from the following worksheets. All are meant to be helpful, but if some don’t seem to speak to you particularly, feel free to skip them if you so choose.

 

For those of you reading on Kindle or an eBook format, you can email the small publisher I write for, Walnut Publishing, at [email protected] to ask for a downloadable PDF of the worksheets which you can then print out or edit right on your computer.

 

For those of you reading in print, feel free to write directly into the book, or copy these pages to fill them out. (Or you can email [email protected] for the printable PDF as well.)

Baby Naming Worksheet #1:

 

Let’s Brainstorm

 

In this worksheet, feel free to write all over it, scribble, doodle, whatever you feel! We have some suggestions to get the brain juices flowing, but ignore our questions and make up your own if you like!

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Name 10 names. Right now! Any 10 names.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Name your favorite movie characters.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Name your favorite book characters.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Choose 5 obscure names from your family tree. Go!

#
p<>{color:#000;}. What is your favorite flower?

#
p<>{color:#000;}. What is your favorite season?

#
p<>{color:#000;}. What day of the week is it?

#
p<>{color:#000;}. What is your favorite weather?

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Write down 2 names that you like. Now combine them into 1.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Write down the name of someone you admire.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Open up your Google Maps. Close your eyes and move your mouse around. Open your eyes. What’s the nearest town name or landmark?

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Write down 10 names you don’t like. Now think: What if this were your best friend’s name?

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Write down your favorite letter. Write down 10 words that start with this letter.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Write down your three favorite pet names.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Write a name that sounds strong.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Write a name that sounds beautiful.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Write a name that sounds like a good friend.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Write a name that sounds like a leader.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Write a name that sounds like a person who can make you laugh.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Make up a name you’ve never heard of before.

 

Baby Naming Worksheet #2:

 

Finding Your Values

 

In this worksheet, you’ll reflect on what’s important to you in a name. There are no right answers; be honest with yourself, and true to yourself, to make sure you are choosing a name for your future child for the right reasons.

 

There are two sections here, so you and your partner can both fill it out:

 

Partner 1

When naming my child, I most care about pleasing (choose as many as apply):

 

 Myself  My partner  My child about to be born  My other children  My dad  My mom  My mother-in-law  My father-in-law  My grandparents  My husband’s grandparents  My siblings  My partner’s siblings  Other relatives of mine  Other relatives’ of my partners  My friends  My partner’s friends  The community I live in with my partner  Friends on social media  Strangers I will meet with my child  Other:

 

Now you can only choose ONE of the above. Which do you choose?

 

How will this affect your naming choice? (i.e., I will choose a name that honors my maternal grandmother. I will choose a name that sounds professional for my child’s future.)

 

When naming my child, I value (choose as many as apply):

 

 Tradition  Fitting in  Being unique  Honoring family  Culture  Alliteration  Meaning & Origin  Other:

 

Now you can only choose ONE of the above. Which do you choose?

 

How will this affect your naming choice? (i.e., I will find a names that feels special and unique, or I will research the meaning of my top name choices)

 

 

Partner 2

When naming my child, I most care about pleasing (choose as many as apply):

 

 Myself  My partner  My child about to be born  My other children  My dad  My mom  My mother-in-law  My father-in-law  My grandparents  My husband’s grandparents  My siblings  My partner’s siblings  Other relatives of mine  Other relatives’ of my partners  My friends  My partner’s friends  The community I live in with my partner  Friends on social media  Strangers I will meet with my child  Other:

 

Now you can only choose ONE of the above. Which do you choose?

 

How will this affect your naming choice? (i.e., I will choose a name that honors my maternal grandmother. I will choose a name that sounds professional for my child’s future.)

 

When naming my child, I value (choose as many as apply):

 

 Tradition  Fitting in  Being unique  Honoring family  Culture  Alliteration  Meaning & Origin  Other:

 

Now you can only choose ONE of the above. Which do you choose?

 

How will this affect your naming choice? (i.e., I will find a names that feels special and unique, or I will research the meaning of my top name choices)

 

Baby Naming Worksheet #3:

 

My Top 10 List

 

Use this worksheet when you have narrowed down your names to a few top contenders. With the help of this worksheet, you will evaluate each name based on some important factors I have written about in my book.

Feel free to split five and five names with your partner, or copy/print extra sheets so you can both fill out as many as you like.

 

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Name:

I have considered/checked:  First name with last name  First name with middle name  First name with middle & last  Initials  Nicknames  Rhyming nicknames  Pop culture associations  Popularity over time/history of name  This name fits a young adult/middle-aged person as well as a baby/child

 

I like this name because:

I am hesitant about this name because:

This name reminds me of:

How does my partner feel about this name?  Loves it  Likes it but not totally convinced  Doesn’t like it that much  Does not like it at all

Additional Notes:

 

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Name:

I have considered/checked:  First name with last name  First name with middle name  First name with middle & last  Initials  Nicknames  Rhyming nicknames  Pop culture associations  Popularity over time/history of name  This name fits a young adult/middle-aged person as well as a baby/child

 

I like this name because:

I am hesitant about this name because:

This name reminds me of:

How does my partner feel about this name?  Loves it  Likes it but not totally convinced  Doesn’t like it that much  Does not like it at all

Additional Notes:

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Name:

I have considered/checked:  First name with last name  First name with middle name  First name with middle & last  Initials  Nicknames  Rhyming nicknames  Pop culture associations  Popularity over time/history of name  This name fits a young adult/middle-aged person as well as a baby/child

 

I like this name because:

I am hesitant about this name because:

This name reminds me of:

How does my partner feel about this name?  Loves it  Likes it but not totally convinced  Doesn’t like it that much  Does not like it at all

Additional Notes:

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Name:

I have considered/checked:  First name with last name  First name with middle name  First name with middle & last  Initials  Nicknames  Rhyming nicknames  Pop culture associations  Popularity over time/history of name  This name fits a young adult/middle-aged person as well as a baby/child

 

I like this name because:

I am hesitant about this name because:

This name reminds me of:

How does my partner feel about this name?  Loves it  Likes it but not totally convinced  Doesn’t like it that much  Does not like it at all

Additional Notes:

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Name:

I have considered/checked:  First name with last name  First name with middle name  First name with middle & last  Initials  Nicknames  Rhyming nicknames  Pop culture associations  Popularity over time/history of name  This name fits a young adult/middle-aged person as well as a baby/child

 

I like this name because:

I am hesitant about this name because:

This name reminds me of:

How does my partner feel about this name?  Loves it  Likes it but not totally convinced  Doesn’t like it that much  Does not like it at all

Additional Notes:

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Name:

I have considered/checked:  First name with last name  First name with middle name  First name with middle & last  Initials  Nicknames  Rhyming nicknames  Pop culture associations  Popularity over time/history of name  This name fits a young adult/middle-aged person as well as a baby/child

 

I like this name because:

I am hesitant about this name because:

This name reminds me of:

How does my partner feel about this name?  Loves it  Likes it but not totally convinced  Doesn’t like it that much  Does not like it at all

Additional Notes:

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Name:

I have considered/checked:  First name with last name  First name with middle name  First name with middle & last  Initials  Nicknames  Rhyming nicknames  Pop culture associations  Popularity over time/history of name  This name fits a young adult/middle-aged person as well as a baby/child

 

I like this name because:

I am hesitant about this name because:

This name reminds me of:

How does my partner feel about this name?  Loves it  Likes it but not totally convinced  Doesn’t like it that much  Does not like it at all

Additional Notes:

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Name:

I have considered/checked:  First name with last name  First name with middle name  First name with middle & last  Initials  Nicknames  Rhyming nicknames  Pop culture associations  Popularity over time/history of name  This name fits a young adult/middle-aged person as well as a baby/child

 

I like this name because:

I am hesitant about this name because:

This name reminds me of:

How does my partner feel about this name?  Loves it  Likes it but not totally convinced  Doesn’t like it that much  Does not like it at all

Additional Notes:

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Name:

I have considered/checked:  First name with last name  First name with middle name  First name with middle & last  Initials  Nicknames  Rhyming nicknames  Pop culture associations  Popularity over time/history of name  This name fits a young adult/middle-aged person as well as a baby/child

 

I like this name because:

I am hesitant about this name because:

This name reminds me of:

How does my partner feel about this name?  Loves it  Likes it but not totally convinced  Doesn’t like it that much  Does not like it at all

Additional Notes:

 

10. Name:

I have considered/checked:  First name with last name  First name with middle name  First name with middle & last  Initials  Nicknames  Rhyming nicknames  Pop culture associations  Popularity over time/history of name  This name fits a young adult/middle-aged person as well as a baby/child

 

I like this name because:

I am hesitant about this name because:

This name reminds me of:

How does my partner feel about this name?  Loves it  Likes it but not totally convinced  Doesn’t like it that much  Does not like it at all

Additional Notes:

 

 

Chapter 15

 

Resources:

The Big List of Baby Names

 

 

Below you’ll find 3,000 baby names, divided into sections for girls’ names, boys’ names and unisex names, or those that can be used for either sex.

 

If you want to jump to a specific letter, use this index:

 

Girls’ Names

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

Boys’ Names

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

Unisex Names

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

Baby Names for Girls

Baby Names for Boys

Unisex Baby Names

Chapter 16

 

Conclusion:

About the Author and Further Reading

 

 

Thanks for reading “The Stress-Free Baby Names Book.” I hope I was able to help you choose the perfect baby name with confidence, clarity and calm, as promised! I hope I at least helped you on your way and gave you some good strategies to think about as you embark on this important, life-changing journey we call becoming a parent.

 

If you liked the writing style of this book, you may enjoy my other book, called “Small Talk: How to Talk to People, Improve Your Charisma, Social Skills, Conversation Starters & Lessen Social Anxiety.”

 

And if you enjoyed “The Stress-Free Baby Names Book,” please don’t hesitate to let me know what you think by writing a review on the platform of your choice! I always like to hear what readers think, and reviews help me improve my books and keep writing.

 

If you want to reach me, please email my publisher at [email protected] and address the email to me.

 

Happy name choosing! And thanks again for reading.

 

Thanks,

Aston

 


The Stress-Free Baby Names Book: How to Choose the Perfect Baby Name with Confid

Do you want to find the *perfect baby name*, and make the choosing process easy, stress-free and fun? Most new parents do. But sometimes, we put all the nerves that come with expecting (like, the pressure of raising a little human in the world, the pressure of a birth plan, etc.) into decisions we have control over before the little one arrives. Take a step back, and a deep breath, and realize that there’s no need to get stressed or overwhelmed when thinking about how to name your baby. If you’re thinking enough about this decision to be searching for books on the topic, you already know you’ll be a great parent. Choosing a name can be the simple part, with our help! The process of choosing baby names can be enjoyable, stress-free, simple, and fun when you know the strategies outlined in this baby names book. If you buy “The Stress-Free Baby Names Book,” today, you’ll get: Ways to brainstorm and narrow down your baby name choices with three helpful worksheets The answers to what you value in a name and methods to work backwards from what is most important Resources for researching the origin of your top baby name choices Resources for finding the most popular baby names by year or state A list of 3,000+ baby names to inspire you and perhaps find the perfect name you’ve been looking for, separated into baby names for girls, baby names for boys, and gender-neutral baby names lists Strategies for open communication with your partner about the names you both love but the other isn’t so keen on An exhaustive list of different factors you need to consider before solidifying a baby name on a birth certificate If you buy this baby names ebook, you’ll also learn: How to deal with opinionated or traditionalist family members How to keep your sanity around nosy friends, family and strangers How to have fun choosing the name of your little one And much, much more! “The Stress-Free Baby Names Book” takes everything you need to consider before naming your baby and makes it simple, easy-to-read and fun to explore with the help of author Aston Sanderson. You won’t regret buying this book when you realize all the things you had never considered about finding the perfect baby name. Read helpful chapters that point you in the direction of the perfect baby name: Introduction to the Stress-Free Baby Names Book Chapter 1: Why You Can’t Find the Perfect Name — But You Will Anyway Chapter 2: On Meaning and Origin Chapter 3: Naming Strategies: Going Unique Chapter 4: Naming Strategies: Going Trendy or Semi-Unique Chapter 5: Naming Strategies: Going Totally Unique Chapter 6: Choosing Advice: Sounding It Out & Full Name Considerations Chapter 7: Choosing Advice: Associations & Nicknames Chapter 8: Choosing Advice: It’s About Them, Not You Chapter 9: How to Deal with Family and Outside Pressure Chapter 10: Communication with Your Partner Chapter 11: To Tell — Or Not to Tell? Chapter 12: There You Have It Chapter 13: Resources: Websites for Research Chapter 14: Resources: Baby Naming Worksheets Chapter 15: Resources: The Big List of Baby Names Chapter 16: Conclusion: About the Author and Further Reading Buy the book today, and choose the perfect baby name with confidence, clarity and calm! Note: You don’t need a Kindle to read this small talk conversation book — read it in your browser with the Kindle Cloud Reader right now by clicking the buy button!

  • Author: Walnut Publishing
  • Published: 2017-02-16 13:50:14
  • Words: 14439
The Stress-Free Baby Names Book: How to Choose the Perfect Baby Name with Confid The Stress-Free Baby Names Book: How to Choose the Perfect Baby Name with Confid