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Technology Solution for Global Hunger

Technology Solution for Global Hunger

 

 

Richard Lighthouse

 

Technology Solution for Global Hunger

Published by Richard Lighthouse at Shakespir

Creative Commons License 4.0; 2017 by Richard Lighthouse.

 

ISBN: 9781370925100

 

 

www.Shakespir.com/books/view/706585

 

Limit of Liability/Disclaimer of Warranty: The author has used his best efforts in preparing this document, but makes no representations or warranties.

 

 

7 October 2014 – originally published as “Synthetic Food Production: Solving Global Hunger”

Revision 1B – 25 February 2017

Houston, Texas, U.S.A.

 

This document has been corrected many times and the errors reappear after posting to Shakespir. Very strange.

 

 

 

F
igure P1. Shakespir error message.

 

 

F
igure P2. Epub validated.

 

 

 

Technology Solution for Global Hunger

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chapter 1.

Introduction

 

Chapter 2.

Conclusions

 

Chapter 3.

References

 

 

 

Abstract

 

 

This short technical paper presents a technology with the potential to solve global hunger. A Synthetic Food Production facility is described which can provide daily food supplies for thousands of people at extremely low cost. Using the representative example, and 5 to 10 people operating the facility, it is possible to provide up to 10,000 ears (about 200 bushels) of sweet corn per day. Basically, the process converts electricity into instant food. The math for time travel or time-forwarding has been previously explained by this author and this math has been confirmed by two university professors. It is possible to use time-forwarding to rapidly grow all kinds of vegetables and fruits. Basically, a corn seed and a mature stalk of corn are the same thing, but exist at different times in our terms. Time-forwarding technology allows the seed to be instantly converted into a mature stalk of corn. Technically, we could call it Newtonian Superposition, which is a summation of forces. But, if you prefer ‘time travel’ for vegetables, that works just as well. This discussion is about the economics of food production. The typical American spends $151 per week on food. This compares with a large-scale synthetic food production facility that will make it possible to provide nearly unlimited vegetables and fruits at less than 1 cent per person per day. This is extraordinary. The facility is minimally self-sustaining, and could be utilized for a wide variety of vegetables and fruits – it also produces new seeds for the next crop generation. The process can also be adapted for use on Mars, or any planet with sunlight and a source of water. An example is provided using ordinary sweet corn, but this same process can be used to produce a variety of fruits and vegetables. Each reader must comprehend that our universe literally blinks, off and on, approximately 1 trillion times every second (1.039 THz). By using this blinking frequency, it is possible to travel through time, sending objects or seeds forward in time, in less than one second.

 

 

 

Chapter 1.

Introduction

 

 

The math for time travel has been previously explained. [1] Using this idea of parallel/probable universes, it is possible to use time translation to rapidly grow all kinds of vegetables and fruits. Technically, we could call it Newtonian Superposition, which is a summation of forces. But, if you prefer ‘time travel’ for vegetables, that works just as well.

 

This discussion is about the economics of food production. The typical American spends $100 to $300 per month on food and groceries. This compares with a large-scale synthetic food production facility that will make it possible to provide nearly unlimited vegetables and fruits at less than 1 cent per person per day. This is extraordinary.

 

In Figure 1, we see a basic flow chart, which is quite simple. Electricity, seeds, and water as input – fresh corn as output.

 

 

 

Figure 1. Synthetic Production Facility

 

 

Preliminary Design – Basic Configuration

 

Germination racks are used for much of the area inside the building. This allows for a continuous flow of product into the Time Translation Machine (TTM). Germination times will vary depending on the type of seed and variety, but typically on the order of an hour or two . Once the germination process is initiated, the seed can be placed into the TTM. The TTM is basically an aluminum structure that contains the energy for time travel. This has been described in my previous technical papers. Our universe literally blinks, off and on, at 1.039 trillion cycles per second. This blinking frequency can be used to travel thru time.

 

 

Figure 2. Typical Germination Trays for the seeds. A number of studies suggest that certain frequencies of light, such as blue light, will stimulate the seeds to germinate. The blue color is similar to that of “sky blue”.

 

 

[++]

Figure 3. Preliminary Design – Basic Configuration for the Facility

 

 

The Facility is approximately 10 by 30 meters for indoor germination. External or outside germination is also possible to provide greater capacity. Solar panels are sized to accommodate the electrical consumption and the energy required to operate the TTM. Blue or red spectrum laser light may be best for initiating germination.

 

 

Figure 4. Time Translation Machine – base is approximately 3 meters by 5 meters. Capacity of 100 stalks of mature corn. Construction is thin-sheet aluminum. Similar to a conventional backyard aluminum shed.

 

 

Seedlings or germinated seeds are placed inside the TTM, and an electric charge is provided to the aluminum structure. This electric charge has 2 components. One is for the energy to perform the time translation, and the other is to vibrate the structure at the Lighthouse Frequency, which is the natural resonant frequency of our universe. [2]

 

When properly timed and controlled, the TTM takes the seedlings to a mature stalk in less than one second.

 

For the case of sweet corn, we will use an example case of “Trinity,” which is a popular varietal with a 70-day maturity period. See Appendix.

 

 

Electrical operating costs on a daily basis are estimated at $35 USD. Note that over a 30 year period, the Capital Costs to build the facility are considered small relative to the long-term operating costs.

 

This means that about $35 USD per day can feed several thousand people.

 

To accelerate the germination phase, it may be possible to use the following process:

 

 

Germination Process

 

 

1. Soak the seeds in a shallow tray of water. The water tray is placed under gro-lights, LED lights, or laser light during the soaking. A small DC electric charge of 0.1 mA – 1.0 mA is applied to the tray (6 – 12 VDC). Seeds are soaked for about one hour.

 

2. Drain the tray, and let stand for another 5 to 30 minutes at the optimal germination temperature. (For corn, it is around 77 F)

 

3. Place in the TTM.

 

 

This process can be optimized through experiment, depending on the type of seeds.

 

Large-scale facilities can be designed to feed one million people or more. As the process is scaled up, the effective cost becomes much less than 1 cent per person per day.

 

 

Further Research

 

 

In theory, based on Seth’s Basic Law of Infinite Change and Transmutation, it should be possible to alter the structure of any mass. For example, a one kilogram rock can be altered into a one kilogram apple.

 

There are three properties of physical matter: [5]

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Spontaneous

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Instantaneous

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Pattern Assumption

 

The Mass (volts) and Range (amp*sec) of an object exist in the electrical universe, but the shape, size, color, texture, etc., – do not exist as permanent attributes. These are arbitrarily perceived by the viewers in a physical universe.

 

So the basic idea is to alter an object by pattern assumption. Future research may be able to determine a practical method to apply pattern assumption to any mass.

 

 

Chapter 2.

Conclusions

 

 

This paper has presented a concept for the mass production of food at extremely low cost. It has emphasized the economics and cost associated with food production, and proposed a radical new method at a substantial savings in time and money.

 

This was not intended to be a lesson in nutrition, nor does it instruct people to eat only corn – which was simply an example case. A real facility would likely produce a large variety of vegetables and fruits – all at very low cost.

 

 

Readers are encouraged to read the associated technical papers at Shakespir.com

 

 

 

This is a living document. The author reserves the right to make corrections and changes.

 

Chapter 3.

References

 

1. Richard Lighthouse, Time Travel: An Approximate Mathematical Solution, Shakespir.com; 2013.

2. Richard Lighthouse, Preliminary Model for Grand Unified Theory (GUT), Shakespir.com; 2013. https://www.Shakespir.com/books/view/374520

3. Richard Lighthouse, The Discovery of Parallel Universes, Shakespir.com; 2013.

https://www.Shakespir.com/books/view/376593

4. Seth (Jane Roberts) Early Sessions, Book 2, Session 60, 1964. “Physical material has in actuality two main properties. It is spontaneous and instantaneous…The third actual property of matter is what I will call pattern assumption. It assumes and flows within patterns.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Richard Lighthouse, Massless Travel; 2013. Shakespir.com, lulu.com, amazon.com

#
p<>{color:#000;}. http://www.gallup.com/poll/156416/Americans-Spend-151-Week-Food-High-Income-180.aspx Average American spends $151 dollars per week on food.

 

 

Acknowledgments

 

Acknowledgments: The author gratefully acknowledges Seth, Jane Roberts, and Rob Butts for their significant contributions.

 

About: The author holds a Master of Science (M.Sc.) degree in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University, and has previously worked for NASA.

 

Contact:

RLight767—at-yahoo point com

RLighthouse1 –at- fastmail point fm

 

Funding:

This research was generously supported with a grant from the Foundation Opposed to Academic Puffery (FOAP).

 

 

 

APPENDIX

 

 

Sample calculations for Trinity Corn with 70 day maturity, time-averaged mass of one stalk assumed to be 2kg.

 

 

From Reference [1}:

 

dE = 2c*dc*m

 

dc assumed equal to 3.149*70/365 = 0.6039

 

 

= = = = = = = = = =

 

Energy required to time translate 100 corn stalks of Trinity variety:

 

 

 

V*A*sec/2 = 2c * m * dc

 

V*A*sec = 2 * 2c * m * dc [units are m/s * kg * m/s]

 

= 4 * c * 2.0 * 0.6039

 

= 1,448,358,289 volt*amps*sec

 

= 1,448,358 kVA sec [units are kvolts * amps * sec]

 

= 402 kW.hr (per corn stalk)

 

= 40,200 kW.hr (for 100 corn stalks)

 

 

(Note that the mass of the TTM adds to the calculation, but is neglected here for simplicity. The larger the TTM is designed – the less this mass will contribute.)

 

 

= = = = = = = = = =

 

If we use Massless Travel for time translation, it is possible to reduce the energy required by a factor greater than one million. See Reference [5]

 

This can be performed with the use of a precision gamma-ray clock. A gamma-ray clock operates at about 10^21 cycles per second.

 

 

Which yields an electric energy of:

 

40200 kW.hr/1,000,000 = .0402 kW.hr for 100 corn stalks

 

 

If electric costs are typically 10 cents per kW.hr

this would equal about 0.4 cents for 1000 ears of corn,

or less than one cent. The mass of the TTM will add about 10 – 20 % to the calculation, but from a practical viewpoint, this will not significantly change the cost. In the future, we will use plasma-energy fields to surround the objects in a TTM. This will eliminate the mass contribution for the TTM.

 

 

Figure 5. ISBN


Technology Solution for Global Hunger

This short technical paper presents a technology with the potential to solve global hunger. A Synthetic Food Production facility is described which can provide daily food supplies for thousands of people at extremely low cost. Using the representative example, and 5 to 10 people operating the facility, it is possible to provide up to 10,000 ears (about 200 bushels) of sweet corn per day. Basically, the process converts electricity into instant food. The math for time travel or time-forwarding has been previously explained by this author and this math has been confirmed by two university professors. It is possible to use time-forwarding to rapidly grow all kinds of vegetables and fruits. Basically, a corn seed and a mature stalk of corn are the same thing, but exist at different times in our terms. Time-forwarding technology allows the seed to be instantly converted into a mature stalk of corn. Technically, we could call it Newtonian Superposition, which is a summation of forces. But, if you prefer 'time travel' for vegetables, that works just as well. This discussion is about the economics of food production. The typical American spends $151 per week on food. This compares with a large-scale synthetic food production facility that will make it possible to provide nearly unlimited vegetables and fruits at less than 1 cent per person per day. This is extraordinary. The facility is minimally self-sustaining, and could be utilized for a wide variety of vegetables and fruits – it also produces new seeds for the next crop generation. The process can also be adapted for use on Mars, or any planet with sunlight and a source of water. An example is provided using ordinary sweet corn, but this same process can be used to produce a variety of fruits and vegetables. Each reader must comprehend that our universe literally blinks, off and on, approximately 1 trillion times every second (1.039 THz). By using this blinking frequency, it is possible to travel through time, sending objects or seeds forward in time, in less than one second.

  • ISBN: 9781370925100
  • Author: Richard Lighthouse
  • Published: 2017-02-25 17:35:22
  • Words: 1828
Technology Solution for Global Hunger Technology Solution for Global Hunger