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Sci-Fi Women Interview: The 2016 Collection

Sci-Fi Women Interviews

 

The 2016 Collection

 

(Shakespir Edition)

 

 

 

Natacha Guyot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright

 

 

 

Text Copyright ©2017 Natacha Guyot.

All Rights Reserved.

 

Cover Design by Jennifer A. Miller.

 

Table of Contents

 

Dedication

Acknowledgements

Sci-Fi Women Still Matter

Robin Rivera and Heather Jackson

Jennifer A. Miller

Sally Ember, Ed.D.

Diana J. Gordon

Amanda Ward

Philippa Ballantine

D. Wallace Peach

Marie Bilodeau

Tracy Gardner

Alison Berrios

Tonya R. Moore

Kate M. Colby

About the Author

In memory of Carrie Fisher,

Witty princess,

Courageous general,

Resilient soul,

Versatile writer,

Thank you for your voice.

May we carry your legacy, always.

 

Acknowledgements

 

As always, I would like to express my gratitude to two people who make my writing projects possible: my editor Jaime Krause and my cover designer Jennifer A. Miller. I am so glad that both of you have been with me since I embarked on my indie publishing journey. I wouldn’t be the same author without you two!

This compilation of interviews wouldn’t have been possible without all my outstanding guests: Robin Rivera and Heather Jackson, Jennifer A. Miller, Sally Ember, Diana J. Gordon, Amanda Ward, Philippa Ballantine, D. Wallace Peach, Marie Bilodeau, Tracy Gardner, Alison Berrios, Tonya R. Moore and Kate M. Colby. Thank you for your interest in being featured in this monthly series and for takin the time to answer my questions.

Of course, I cannot forget everyone else who has supported this project since it started as a monthly blog feature in March 2015. Without you, I would not have been able to develop this project. I am touched to see this series running strong after more than two years and see more women accept my invitation to participate. Thank you!

 

Sci-Fi Women Still Matter

 

When I started Sci-Fi Women Interviews as a monthly feature on my blog in March 2015, I was hoping to see the series flourish as a platform for women involved in Science Fiction, whether authors, bloggers, cosplayers, graphic artists, scholars, or fangirls.

 

Being able to put together the compilation for the second year of Sci-Fi Women Interviews is a blessing and an honor. I had hoped that the feature would work well, but it has gone beyond my expectations. I am thrilled to continue this series and am delighted to know I already have guests for more than half of 2017 confirmed as of today, December 16, 2016. I went to see Rogue One: A Star Wars Story this morning, and it reminded me again of my deep love for this genre and how I am glad to participate to it as a woman. I owe a lot of my personal and especially professional trajectory to Star Wars, so it is no surprise that seeing this new movie compelled me to work on this eBook.

 

Science Fiction has shaped the woman I am now, both as a fiction author and scholar. I still stand by what I said in the introduction for the 2015 collection of interviews: women don’t own Science Fiction nor should desire to “conquer” it. Women are simply equally important in the genre as any other creator and fan. This is why they need to be to be celebrated for their love and contributions to this significant literary and media genre.

 

Robin Rivera and Heather Jackson

Robin trained as a professional historian on the West Coast. Her studies led her to working as a museum curator, an educator, a shipwreck hunter, a curriculum developer, and media consultant. After a lifetime of professionally writing nonfiction, Robin loves the freedom of writing fiction on her own time. However, old habits die hard so she always grounds her young adult fiction in solid historical research. Her finished projects include a novel set in an alternative vision of mid-Victorian Egypt, and a heist novel set in Italy. She is currently working on a YA Gothic retelling of the 14th century novel, The Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio

 

Heather escaped her small town for the big city of Toronto, where she attended Ryerson University’s Radio & Television Arts program and the Canadian Film Centre’s Prime Time Television Writing program, which led to a career penning cartoons and tween dramas that continue to be broadcast all over the world. But recently she transferred her screenwriting skills to a new medium: video games. She wrote an episode of Bloom Digital’s dating adventure game Longstory, and is currently writing what she calls “a super cool” educational game for an undisclosed client. Heather is also working on two YA novels: Psycho Smart and Demons Don’t Do Love. She swears that neither is autobiographical. “Mostly”.

 

You can find Heather and Robin at their blog WriteOnSisters.com, which was why I invited them to be guests for the same feature.

 

***

 

NG: How were you first introduced to Science Fiction?

RIVERA and JACKSON: Both Heather and I were late arrivals to the genre. I’m a huge Sci-Fi TV addict, but neither of us read these books as kids. I was a pretty hard core mystery reader in my youth, and we both favored the classics. For me, the big turning point was meeting my husband; he is a huge Sci-Fi reader. I remember he would rave about books I had never heard: the Ring World series, Dune, the Stainless Steel Rat, or Starship Troopers and he would want me to read these books too. He gave me my first copies of many of the big authors. He still reads more Sci-Fi than I do, and he was the one who trained our kids from an early age. When a new book comes into the house, there can be some massive debates over who gets to read it first. At one point last year three of us were all reading the same book (Feed by M.T. Anderson) at the same time. It was crazy! We had a list of page numbers written down because we kept losing each other’s bookmarks. Now both Heather and I read a ton of young adult Sci-Fi and we often have long discussions over books we like. Or we don’t like. Our taste is somewhat different. Heather likes her books much edgier than I do.

 

NG: What are your top 3 favorites for Science Fiction books, TV shows and movies?

RIVERA and JACKSON: Only three? That is cruel and unusual punishment! We’ll go with just the top picks for each so we don’t crowd the whole page.

 

My book pick is Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Perhaps that is an unorthodox choice, but it’s one of my favorite books of all time. It’s funny and fresh; I just love it! There are others, ; I’m a River World fan and I can’t pass up on anything in the steampunk genre. Heather is a dystopian fan, so The Hunger Games gets her vote. It’s pretty darn high on my list too. Also the Lunar Chronicles gets a nod from both of us.

 

TV shows is much harder. As I said before, I’m a huge TV fan; I live for the SyFy channel. Firefly, Warehouse 13, Eureka, X-Files, Star Trek, Dr. Who, Red Dwarf, Stargate… Brain implodes into mushy glop from overload. Okay, nope, can’t pick. I have been known to binge watch all of these shows and about two dozen others, over and over again. For Heather it’s Firefly. Let’s face it, it’s a great show on every level and one any writer can learn a lot by watching. Oh, and Orphan Black! Heather is an emphatic member of the clone club.

 

Movie pick for both of us is Blade Runner! Honestly, there is no contest, that movie just has it all. We both loved the fact that it stands alone! Sometimes sequels just end up messing things up. Blade Runner stays pristine in a bubble, at least for now. Yes, we’re glaring at you Scott and Ford. Don’t mess with our perfect Deckard!

 

NG: What place does Science Fiction have in your writing?

RIVERA and JACKSON: I think I’m more influenced by my background in history than I am by Science Fiction. However, Sci- Fi taught both of us a lot about writing outside the box. The way we combine facts with fiction trying to make the impossible seem plausible, is taken right from Sci-Fi style writing craft. All the best Sci-Fi makes you think events could happen the way the authors describe it. Also Sci-Fi weaves social commentary and current societal concerns into other worlds and times, and we both love to weave deeper context into our writings. We both know as writers that we are products of our own experiences; what we care about on a deeply personal level is what we make our characters care about, regardless of their race, age, or imaginary environments.

 

NG: Can you tell us a bit more about your writing projects?

RIVERA and JACKSON: Heather and I always have several projects going at once, all it various stages. In my case I have two Sci-Fi projects currently in the works, one of which is a serial that’s sort of Area 51 inspired, but it’s still in first draft mode. I also have a space opera that’s only in the plotting stage. However, I did write an 80,000-word steampunk novel. That project is packed with all sort of futuristic gadgets. Plus, it has Victorian social, gender, capitalist, and colonial commentary of every sort. I really channeled my inner Jules Verne on that project. Heather is currently working on two young adult novels: one horror and one paranormal. She also has several media projects in the works, including a video game and a new TV script.

 

NG: Which Science Fiction characters have had the greatest influence on you?

RIVERA and JACKSON: This question is so hard that Heather is bowing out! But for me growing up I think I was bit like Spock. I wanted the world to be a logical place; I just didn’t understand so many things others took for granted. At a very young age I started calling out adults for acting illogically, like punishing the whole classroom when one kid made a mistake. It took me a long time to let go of that inner lens that made me see everything as black and white. I still have a strong need for personal order. Now that I’m a mom, I relate a lot to Beverly Crusher of Star Trek: Next Generation. I’m raising my own sons, two Ensign Crushers in training, who are both smart, driven, independent boys. I know they need me to be a strong female role model and they also need me to be someone who drops everything at a moment’s notice to make them cookies for the school bake sale. It’s a challenge being a mom, even on a good day. I’d like to think in my next phase of life I’ll be a bit like Doctor Who. Taking on new challenges, having adventures, and being willing to risk everything to stand up for what’s right. But I’m not there yet. Maybe someday.

 

NG: Do you think that Science Fiction can influence writers outside of the genre?

RIVERA and JACKSON: We both know it does. It’s ingrained in our imaginations and into popular culture. People who would never consider themselves Sci-Fi fans make Dark Side jokes. We even talk about light speed travel, suspended animation, and death rays as if we have personal knowledge of these things. That’s the power of the genre.

 

NG: Do you believe that Science Fiction is a genre welcoming to complex female characters?

RIVERA and JACKSON: We would both like to think it’s getting better, but it’s still a mess! Look at how many films, TV shows and books don’t pass the Bechdel test, and it’s hardly a challenging standard: the movie, show, book must have at least two women in it, the women talk to each other, and those women must talk about something besides a man.

 

Also, we both feel there is a tendency to over-sexualize all female characters, and they are too often relegated to the sidekick, love interest, or other secondary story roles. There is also an unfortunate age issue we still need to address. People want young, good-looking female Sci-Fi characters; the masses welcome a Zoe from Firefly, or a Gamora from Guardians of the Galaxy, someone who stops traffic with how beautiful she is while she kicks ass. But then the producers and directors won’t let those female characters get over forty, or put on any weight and develop some wrinkles if they are older. I think the backlash over Carrie Fisher reprising her role as Leia has shown us all how far we still need to go. It’s not a comforting thought! We all get older, yet we live in a world where 40, 50 and 60-year-old male characters are expected to hook up with a person in their late teens or early twenties. Men dating women younger than their own biological children has become Hollywood’s standard relationship. But if a 50-year-old woman does the same thing, she is perceived as emotionally damaged and the relationship is ridiculed.

 

We both feel like the one place making some fantastic headway is in young adult fiction. The characters are still young, and often pretty, but at least they are usually the stars of their own stories. And they are sometimes mentored, parented or partnered with some fabulously strong, smart, practical female characters. We think Hunger Games is a great example of this. It gives us a lot of hope to see teen Sci-Fi stepping it up and bringing us some complicated and memorable female characters.

 

NG: What is Science Fiction’s responsibility in diverse and inclusive representation?

RIVERA and JACKSON: We both agree the main responsibility of a writer is first and foremost to write great stories with great characters. The problem is too many writers seem to think what makes a great story is the life experiences of a pretty limited group of people. We are both tired of writers who take the easy route and just stick in a secondary character pulled from the same old (and often negative) stereotypes. That’s not helpful to anyone. We want to see all writers step up their games and write better diversity, diversity that bridges gaps and creates unforgettable characters.

 

NG: Do you think that Fangirls are an expression of Feminism?

RIVERA and JACKSON: Neither one of us is a huge Fangirl, but I’m a bit more of one than Heather is, however we both identify as feminists. Short answer: we think it can be. There is a sense of solidarity when any group of women share a common interest, but we don’t think the two are necessarily related. We know some fandoms are more welcoming to feminist members than others, but if a Fangirl truly loves something, we hope she sticks with it regardless of the haters. Fangirls getting involved with any community can help pave the way for less enthusiastic women to also take part. Plus, if enough Fangirls decide to boycott or support a cause, they can create a powerful voice. Giving women a voice that must be recognized is potentially beneficial to all women.

 

NG: Do you think Science Fiction is a genre that speaks as much to younger audiences as adult ones?

RIVERA and JACKSON: Heather is not a mom, so she is leaving this one to me. I have no concerns for movies and TV, but as a mom I do wonder about books. So many of my son’s friends have no interest in reading and if they do read it is for an assignment and not for pleasure. Sci-Fi has a reputation for being less approachable for fledgling readers. The books are longer and the words are harder. It’s a more challenging read, and kids have so many other activities that give them more immediate gratification than reading. If the decline in reading skills continues much longer, the next generation might have very little interest in reading Sci-Fi. Or any books.

 

NG: Thank you so much for being part of this project, ladies! I am sure my readers will be glad to connect with both of you.

 

Jennifer A. Miller

Jennifer A. Miller is a graphic designer by trade and writer by calling. Her design experience is based in advertising, identity and print design, with novice and expanding capabilities in web development and photography. You can find more about her work on her website.

 

***

 

NG: How were you first introduced to Science Fiction?

MILLER: I grew up in a Western-watching family. My mother liked Science Fiction and Fantasy, but I never remember her introducing me to it (she might say otherwise…I have a terrible memory). I have a collection of defining moments when I was a kid, but they’re kind of jumbled and I don’t remember what came first. I was living in Oregon, which would mean I was younger than eight. I remember going through the satellite channels and finding the tail end of a movie that just captivated me. I don’t think I knew how to see what the movie was called at that time because I remember agonizing over figuring it out so that I could rent it. Trying to describe it to my parents was frustrating (for all involved). It turned out it was . I quickly learned it was part of a trilogy. Fast forward a couple years when we were in Wyoming I remember going to Albertson’s video store as a family on our usual Wednesday run when they had 99 cent rentals and trying desperately to find them all. They never seemed to have all of them at once, so it took a couple rentals to watch the entire trilogy, but I was immediately hooked.

 

NG: What are your top 3 favorites for Science Fiction books, TV shows and movies?

MILLER: I only get 3?! These aren’t in any particular order, just the ones that first come to mind. Books: I, Jedi by Michael A. Stackpole, The Starlight Crystal by Christopher Pike (it took me forever to find the name of this…I’ve been searching for years!), and Shapechangers by Jennifer Roberson (this is technically Fantasy and I love the whole series). TV Shows: Firefly, , and Battlestar Galactica. Movies: Return of the Jedi , Back to the Future, and The Fifth Element.

 

NG: Which Science Fiction characters have had the greatest influence on you?

MILLER: Samantha Carter (Stargate SG-1), Leloo Dallas (The Fifth Element) , and Princess Leia (Star Wars).

 

NG: How has your roleplaying experience affected your creative endeavors?

MILLER: When I am actively roleplaying (and reading), my wordsmithing/sentence creativity is the first thing affected, although I tend not to notice unless I’m absent for a while and read what I’ve written in the past. I’m always pleasantly shocked at how good I can be compared to when I go to write again after some time away. It’s funny how you lose skills when habits aren’t exercised regularly.

 

I am a print graphic designer and I will be the first to say that my creativity has been completely lacking for the past several years. I’ve also just fallen out of love with the profession. When I look back at projects and times in my life that I felt my most creative, they were times that I was constantly writing/roleplaying and surrounding myself with people who had similar passion. My brain was always thinking about characters and scenes, and was influenced by literally everything in my physical environment. It definitely makes me think about carving time out to do it again. Perhaps I’d get my actual writing projects more than partially finished!

 

NG: Can you tell us a bit more about your writing projects?

MILLER: I have quite a few that I’ve started—I tend to get really hyped about them around NaNoWriMo season—but sadly none have developed much further than what was done that month. I have a trilogy that I started in middle and high school based off a dream I had. It involved all of my favorite people (and crushes); I loosely based the characters off of them. I finished the first and most of the second. Unfortunately, the documents were saved on some floppy disk (this dates me…) that became corrupt. I don’t mind too much because I still have most of it printed out, and honestly it needs to be rewritten. I’ve been trying to figure out how best to do that. It originally started as a group of kids having a sleepover and getting sucked into a Fantasy/Sci-Fi world in which the lead character actually hailed. The first book was a big long adventure figuring out her past and getting introduced to the villains. The next two involved defeating the villains with the help of her best friends and then figuring out her future (whether she’d stay there or on Earth). It was fun to write as a kid, but a little hokey for my tastes now.

 

I started another series a couple years ago that involves a lonely kid who lives in a not-too-distant future where natural disasters are happening on an epic level all over the globe. He soon discovers that there are invisible fissures/rifts in his town and he might be the only one that can see them. After testing what happens to a baseball when thrown over one, he adventures through and gets sucked into another plane of existence… There’s much more to it, but I don’t want to give anything away! I realize that most first novels tend to be horrible, but I’m hoping it turns out decent because I really love the concept, story, and characters I’ve developed!

 

NG: What is your favorite type of character to write in a Science Fiction setting?

MILLER: The accidental hero. And this goes for all genres, really. I just love characters that aren’t setting out to be a hero, lead ordinary lives, and somehow get pulled into a situation that tests their mental strength and moral compass. I love the complicated types, the lessons they learn, and the inevitable roller coaster ride of their journey.

 

NG: Do you believe that Science Fiction is a genre welcoming to complex female characters?

MILLER: Definitely! My favorite movies, shows, and books are great examples of such complex female characters. I think anyone would be hard-pressed to find any Sci-Fi media that doesn’t have at least one.

 

NG: What is Science Fiction’s responsibility in diverse and inclusive representation?

MILLER: I think it’s every genre’s responsibility to be diverse. Our world is not just one type of person or another—whether a certain skin color, culture, or gender at its core, it’s a collection of human beings all trying to live. We’ve been experiencing gender division and overall bigotry for centuries, which is why I love that most Sci-Fi is futuristic and usually depicts the human race having accepted all skin colors and genders as equal. I can’t wait to see that in real time!

 

NG: Do you think that Fangirls are an expression of Feminism?

MILLER: I rewrote this answer twice. I’m not big on putting labels on people. The terms “fangirl and feminism” get such a bad rap because the definitions mean something different to everyone. A fangirl makes me think of a teenager obsessing over a pop idol. I would probably only use fangirl and fanboy in that reference. But that doesn’t mean I’m not considered a fangirl by someone else for loving Star Wars and Firefly. I use the term fan because dividing it out into gender does just that: divides. That said, I think fans (girls or boys) are an expression of self (at least that’s the idea). As for Feminism, I wouldn’t call myself a feminist, but that doesn’t mean I don’t share the same passion for women’s equality. I am most certainly an advocate. So, I guess my answer is not really. You can certainly be both, but I don’t think one is necessarily an expression of the other. I think any title is an expression of yourself, your individuality, and your passions.

 

NG: How do you think fangirls can change media industries?

MILLER: As long as they have passion for what they love and do, they can most definitely impact the media industries. If you take a closer look at the people behind books, television shows, and movies, you’ll find both men and women who have positively influenced the media because of their passion for it. Passion is the basis behind any fan and with it we can create incredible things that shape and influence all sorts of industries and like minds.

 

NG: Thank you so much for accepting to be part of this interview series! I am certain my readers will enjoy reading your answers.

 

Sally Ember, Ed.D.

Sally Ember, Ed.D., has been passionate about writing since she was nine years old. She’s won prizes for her poetry, stories, songs and plays. Her Sci-Fi/romance/speculative fiction/paranormal/multi-verse/utopian books for YA audiences (or older), The Spanners Series, are getting great reviews. Sally blogs regularly on wide-ranging topics and includes reviews, interviews, guest blog posts, and excerpts from her books. She also meditates, writes, swims, reads, and hosts her live video talk show, Changes, which records conversations between authors. In her “other” professional life, Sally has worked as an educator and upper-level, nonprofit manager in colleges, universities, and private nonprofits in many parts of the United States before returning to live in St. Louis, MO, in August, 2014. Sally has a BA in Elementary Education, and a Master’s (M.Ed.) and doctorate (Ed.D.) in education. You can find more about her at the following links: WordPress Blog and main Website, Tumblr, Twitter, Patreon Crowdfunding Campaign, Pinterest, Youtube Channel, Goodreads and LinkedIn.

 

***

 

NG: How were you first introduced to Science Fiction?

EMBER: My Pinterest has a Board, “Writers I Love,” that displays the writers who influenced me and whom I admire. For my earliest favorites from there, I have to credit Mrs. Pickerell Goes to Mars with some of my plot ideas for This Changes Everything. I read it when I was eight. I would never have known I loved Sci-Fi or writing in general if not for Madeline L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time. I read it when I was 9, then I wrote my first story, Princess Why, which was published in the Central School newspaper. I still have that issue. I have to thank Betty MacDonald for the Mrs. Piggle Wiggle Fantasy series, which I first read when I was 7. Loved every one! I must have read every story in and every “color” of Andrew Lang’s Fairy anthologies. Those were truly entertaining for an elementary girl. Kate Wilhelm’s The Downstairs Room stories still inspire me, and she introduced me to many other great spec-fi and Sci-Fi authors. I also love her mysteries.

 

NG: What are your top 3 favorites for Science Fiction books, TV shows and movies?

EMBER: Also from this Board and another, you can find [+ my later faves and influences+], with movies and TV shows in “TV Shows and Movies I Actually Like,” and from recurring blog posts in which I review current and recurring TV shows, I discuss most of them. I have mostly been disappointed with newer shows, though. What can compare to the original Invasion of the Body Snatchers and e films or The Invaders and Star Trek (The Original Series and ) TV shows from the 1960s and 70s? I wouldn’t want to have a world without Joss Whedon in it. Thanks to him, we have Buffy, Firefly, Dollhouse, the Marvel shows and so many more!

 

Robert Heinlein’s Stranger in a Strange Land informed me that I am bisexual while I was still in high school. Heinlein’s work inspires me to this day as a novel of great vision and writing. Joanna Russ inspires me with Utopian rather than dystopian Sci-Fi. I especially admire The Female Man. Sherri Tepper is a marvelous, inspiring, unique-vision writer. The Gate to Women’s Country stands alone of its kind. The first feminist utopian Sci-Fi I ever read was Herland, by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, which continues to inspire me to this day. Marge Piercy’s books and poetry first showed me the intersections of politics, personal and fictional worlds and changed my perspective forever.A Door into Ocean by Joan Slonczewski is another feminist Science Fiction novel I am inspired and thrilled by. The stories from Zenna Henderson’s The People series still influence and resonate with me, over 50 years after reading them! My first influence was from an extremely powerful and amazing author, Ursula K. Le Guin who is still writing, in her 80s.

 

NG: What place does Science Fiction have in your writing?

EMBER: It is my main and only fiction genre at this time. Science Fiction/romance/utopian. I have entire blog posts about why I write Sci-Fi utopian fiction: go read some!

 

NG: Can you tell us a bit more about your writing projects?

EMBER: I was awakened one night by hearing a voice (my own) narrating Clara’s first encounter with the alien holograms. I got up to write it all down and also the outline of the entire first book and the synopsis for each of the subsequent nine volumes for the series that same night. It took about two hours!

 

NG: What brought you to write a multiverse in The Spanner Series[*?*]

EMBER: I prefer to write from multiple points of view so I have many narrators and types of chapters in each volume of The Spanner Series, probably because I see things in multiple ways and I get bored easily. “The Spanners” are the generations of people (and animals) whose ages make them the Earth inhabitants who are alive through both the turn of the 21st century and the public announcement of the Many Worlds Collective’s existence, previous visits, and intentions to help Earth survive, thus bridging, or “spanning” both ways of living/thinking/being. They are the “before” and “after” characters who narrate my stories, attempting to understand and live with the knowledge that all time is simultaneous (timultaneity, in my books), which we are all beginning to grasp ourselves in actual reality. Some people can view or know things (timult) about more than one timeline, alternate presents, pasts and futures, such as my main characters and those who get trained in the Excellent Skills Program (ESP), and some are “natural” timulters, as Clara and many in her biological family are. Necessarily, I can’t present infinite numbers of alternate versions of each scene, so I choose some to present multiply whose variations have immediate meaning for the characters. I know this can be confusing and reading books written all in the present tense is unusual (and awkward for English and other languages to manage), but I hope the challenges and intrigue make the difficulties worthwhile for readers.

 

NG: How do you enjoy mixing several genres in your books, like romance and Science Fiction?

EMBER: I write, tone-wise, humorously serious or seriously humorous with a lot of science and spirituality; romance and family relationships are included because life. Compassion, caring, empathy, acceptance, inclusiveness, and more cooperation with less selfishness/greed and eliminating violence are the only routes to Earth’s survival. Also, we are not alone in the multiverse.

 

NG: Do you think that Science Fiction can influence writers outside of the genre?

EMBER: I and many other authors certainly hope so, since we invite readers to reconsider and enlarge their points of view for many immediate and imminent social, political, interpersonal, interspecies, and environmental issues regularly. Speculative fiction is famous for making us revisit our lives and choices from the micro to the macro levels (and, hopefully, do better…). Regarding science, there are websites devoted wholly or in part to delineating the inventions and discoveries which were first mentioned or “invented” in Sci-Fi books, movies, and TV shows before showing up in the real world. Many scientists and inventors have mentioned being inspired by having learned about these potentials in Sci-Fi first!

 

NG: Do you believe Science Fiction is a genre open to all types of age ranges?

EMBER: I write for adults, and New and Young Adults together because that is the way I read sci-fi growing up (there were no YA or NA sections). I do not believe in the age-segregation that publishers and libraries have created in recent decades and I know many adults read YA and many teens read “adult” fiction. Age categories are mostly a convention for shelving and marketing that have little or nothing to do with what actual readers want to and do read.

 

NG: Do you believe that Science Fiction is a genre welcoming to complex female characters?

EMBER: When the authors are feminists, yes. When not, no. Graphic novels and “comics” are infamous for creating 2-D female characters scantily dressed and horribly depicted, but not all are like that. Certainly, many genres in fiction are just as guilty of underestimating and denigrating female characters. Joss Whedon is famous for replying, when asked why he creates such strong female characters, that he won’t have to do that when people stop asking him that, or words to that effect.

 

NG: What is Science Fiction’s responsibility in diverse and inclusive representation?

EMBER: As a life-long feminist, activist and social justice advocate who understands and lives better having learned about intersectionality (the impact of the overlapping oppression of sexism, racism, homophobia, classism, and others), I hope my writing reflects my insights and shows my utopian views of how life can be better when we all understand and reject such oppression, singly or in combinations. I do believe more “majority” authors should be more aware of creating characters that do not all look like and live the ways we do, but since I based my main characters on myself and my family, I am just as guilty as many of starting there. However, I deliberately created a Latina main character, included many younger characters, made sure the main and other characters are not assumed to be hetero or cis-gender (Clara is bi, others are gay and lesbian, and some are undetermined regarding gender), and I up ended some age, class, religion and other foundations for biases in my stories’ plots and premises. So, I try and I hope others do, too.

 

NG: Thank you very much for your answers, Sally! I am sure my readers will be happy to connect with you.

 

Diana J. Gordon

Diana J. Gordon is a nerd, bookworm, feminist, and social media junkie. She is a freelance writer and researcher, and the administrator of the blog Part-Time Monster. You can follow her on Twitter @parttimemonster or find her on Facebook. She lives in New Orleans with her son, her husband, and one very energetic terrier.

 

***

 

NG: How were you first introduced to Science Fiction?

GORDON: Star Wars was a really big deal in my house when I was a child. I had two older brothers, and both of them had been to theaters and seen the movies. We re-watched them a lot when I was young, because they were something that the entire family could watch and enjoy–my mother, who really doesn’t like movies but loves Harrison Ford; my father, who loves nothing more than a happy ending (well, except maybe a John Wayne film); my brothers, who were teenagers; and me. We watched the movies on VHS so many times that we ruined our copies and had to buy new ones.

 

NG: What are you top 3 favorites for Science Fiction books, TV shows and movies?

GORDON: This is so difficult! I always find it hard to make a list–I don’t like to play favorites! But I’ll try! Books would be: Ready Player One, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, and…. Frankenstein; for films, I would probably go with Equilibrium, The Empire Strikes Back, and Ex Machina; and for TV shows, I’ve settled on with Black Mirror, Sense8, and Futurama. If you ask me tomorrow, I might make a different list. But there’s today’s!

 

NG: What place does Science Fiction have in your creative endeavors?

GORDON: Most of my writing is focused on girls and women, and I enjoy talking about different ways of representing women, what those things might mean. That’s really a cross-genre thing, and so I end up looking at a lot of different writing and TV and film. But even within all of that, Science Fiction is a unique genre—it’s relatively new, historically speaking, and it’s incredibly expansive.

 

NG: What do you think of the place of monsters (especially female) in Science Fiction?

GORDON: Some of the most interesting depictions of women, to me, are the gods and monsters–those women who are not quite human. And Science Fiction is a pretty good place for that, because quite often, what you get is not only powerful women but powerful women of various races and species. There’s a lot of cultural work that’s done in writing about the non-human female.

 

NG: What can female monsters bring to a narrative?

GORDON: I think that story-wise, you can do pretty much anything with monsters, because a monster can be anything. A monster can be linked to archetypes we already know–Yeti, Bigfoot, Nessie, vampires, witches, etc.–or it can be something totally new. And that frees you up so much as a writer. You can craft a monster narrative that does anything. Making the monster female allows for all sorts of cognitive dissonance between expectations of docile, feminine virtues and fears of the monstrous feminine.

 

NG: How do you view the connections between Science Fiction and other genres like horror or folk tales?

GORDON: I think that some of the very best fiction, whatever genre it may be, makes use of conventions and ideas from other genres. I think that the intersections of Science Fiction and horror make for some very compelling stories, and we see that with works that have endured, like Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, not just newer works like M.R. Carey’s The Girl with All the Gifts. And folk tales have provided a pretty rich heritage that we keep coming back to and re-working, even in Science Fiction. I’m thinking now of Charlie Jane Anders’s All the Birds in the Sky, a science Fantasy that I’ve just finished reading. It uses a lot of folk tale conventions that work very well paired with the more scientific parts of the novel.

 

NG: How much do you believe mythology inspire Science Fiction?

GORDON: I think it’s difficult to say just how much influence mythology has in the world of Science Fiction, because this probably depends on the author who is writing the Science Fiction. But I think there are definitely works of Science Fiction that are inspired by mythology. While myths generally helped explain things that already were, Science Fiction often looks forward, and so the two would seem to be doing different cultural work. But of course, even that isn’t true of some of our biggest Sci-Fi stories, Star Wars in particular.

 

NG: Do you think that Science Fiction can influence writers outside of the genre?

GORDON: Absolutely. I think that as writers we are constantly drawing on things that we’ve read and seen, not just things that we’ve felt and known or even things that we imagine.

 

NG: Do you believe that Science Fiction is a genre welcoming to complex female characters?

GORDON: I think it can be. There have been some major missteps along the way, but genre fiction has generally been more welcoming to complex female characters (and authors) than literary fiction.

 

NG: What is Science Fiction’s responsibility in diverse and inclusive representation?

GORDON: In some ways, I hesitate to place a restriction or responsibility on any genre, honestly. But at the same time, representation matters a lot, and readers should have access to works that challenge them and represent an array of perspectives and peoples. I do think that Science Fiction is especially well equipped to create and disseminate works that are inclusive and diverse.

 

NG: Thank you very much, Diana! I’m sure my readers will enjoy your answers and check your blog out.

.

 

Amanda Ward

Amanda Ward is the administrator of MakingStarWars.net and co-host of Rebel Grrrl, a new podcast from MakingStarWars.net. She occasionally contributes content as well as handles public relations and media inquiries for the site. Amanda is married to Jason and has two children: Luke Danger and Penny Rebel. You can also connect with her on Twitter.

 

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NG: How were you first introduced to Science Fiction?

WARD: My older brother was born in 1975 and so was a Star Wars kid. I grew up in a home that always had Star Wars movies and merchandise to play with. My brother took most of his stuff when he moved out when I was five, but I did get to keep copies of the films and watch them a lot. If I was to nitpick, I’d say that Star Wars isn’t truly Science Fiction. I’d say my true introduction to Science Fiction was at the age of 15 when I found Dune Messiah by Frank Herbert in a local bookstore.

 

NG: What are you top 3 favorites for Science Fiction books, TV shows and movies?

WARD: The Jesus Incident by Frank Herbert and Bill Ransom, Children of Dune by Frank Herbert (and also the SyFy channel miniseries), and .

 

NG: Which Science Fiction characters have had the greatest influence on you?

WARD: It seems cliché to say, but absolutely Princess Leia has been a great influence on me in recent years. The biggest thing I’ve learned from her is to not take any crap from anyone and hold true to your convictions entirely. Leia is a boss, and I hope someday to be half the woman she (and Carrie) is. I also really love Sarah Connor, particularly from The Sarah Connor Chronicles. I wish I could be that strong. Jessica Atreides is a favorite of mine too, I guess. She’s such a humanizing character. An extremely intelligent and perfectly trained being who still makes such tragic mistakes because she’s human. I just really adore Frank Herbert’s women characters.

 

NG: What makes the Star Wars prequels as worthy as the rest of the franchise to you?

WARD: I think the first thing people need to realize about me when talking Prequels is that I am first and foremost a George Lucas movie fan. I love everything he’s ever made and his aesthetic and storytelling style really connect with me. For this reason, I cannot dislike the prequels. That’s not to say I have reasons to dislike them and I stubbornly choose not to. They just work for me. They don’t work for everyone and that’s fine.

 

To answer your question, what makes the Star Wars prequels as worthy as the rest of the franchise is that they’re not that different. Jar Jar is only as annoying as C-3PO. The dialogue in Attack of the Clones is not worse than the dialogue in Return of the Jedi. The CGI is really not any more obtrusive than obvious models and a Millennium Falcon that barely moves in some Original Trilogy shots. These are apparent to me when I watch the films and I can take them for what they are and enjoy the films when I watch them. I’ve given up on trying to convince others because I’ve found perspective is about as hard to find as a needle in a hay stack for Star Wars fans. I have such a huge appreciation for not just the movies that were made but the technological innovation that came with them and George Lucas’ “I’ll make my movies how I want” attitude when it came to the prequels. That’s why I find them worthy.

 

NG: What brought you to blogging and podcasting about Star Wars?

WARD: My husband is an ethnographer with a deep appreciation for Star Wars history. He’s been teaching me things I didn’t know about the making of Star Wars for over 10 years. After we lost our first child I found support on Tumblr and Jason found a huge group of Star Wars fans who shared his passion for the making of process. He started curating behind the scenes Star Wars images and created the blog that eventually became MakingStarWars.net.

 

NG: Do you have any upcoming projects you are working on?

WARD: Personally. I’m just working on perfecting my podcast Rebel Grrrl. Hoping to maybe add a third host later this year. I’m also going to start covering Star Wars rumors other places around the web besides Making Star Wars. Jason and Randy of Now, This Is Podcasting! have a really exciting project coming in June!

 

NG: What do you think of the recent development of the Star Wars franchise in terms of female characters?

WARD: I think Star Wars has made grown in leaps and bounds for female characters in the past few years. I cannot wait to see what else Kathleen Kennedy can do for women in film both in front of the camera and behind it!

 

NG: What influence does being a fangirl have in your life?

WARD: Being a fangirl has really taught me a lot about not giving credit to negative people or their opinions. On a positive note, I’ve met a lot of amazing parents who’ve taught me great, positive ways to incorporate my passions in to how I raise my kids.

 

NG: Do you think that fangirls are an expression of feminism?

WARD: I think anywhere where women are carving out their place where they’re not necessarily wanted or seen as traditionally belonging is an expression of feminism. So yes, I definitely see fangirls as a good example of that. It’s incredibly frustrating being a fangirl and having to justify your existence in fandom, but I see incredible examples of fangirls young and old doing this every day and it gives me such strength. For every negative comment about a female lead in Star Wars, there are 100 talented and intelligent girls screaming their fandom from the roof tops and showing it off in life and on social media, so the feminists are out there, even if they don’t know that’s what they are yet!

 

NG: How do you think fangirls can change media industries?

WARD: If there’s one thing that’s common among all fandoms it’s that we all like to buy stuff. A lot of stuff. And money talks. I think a great way for fangirls to influence media industries is to show just how much of a chunk of the audience we are by buying tickets, watching the TV shows and wearing the merchandise. We also need women writing, blogging, YouTubing and podcasting about media as much as possible particularly about women’s issues in media.

 

NG: Thank you very much for being here with us today, Amanda! I am sure my readers will be happy to check your projects out and connect with you!

 

Philippa Ballantine

New Zealand born writer and podcaster Philippa (Pip) Ballantine is the author of the Books of the Order and the Shifted World series. She is also the co-author with her husband Tee Morris of the Ministry of Peculiar Occurrences novels as well as Social Media for Writers. Her awards include an Airship, a Parsec, the Steampunk Chronicle Reader’s Choice, the RT Reviewer’s Choice Award for steampunk, and a Sir Julius Vogel. She currently resides in Manassas, Virginia with her husband, daughter, and a furry clowder of cats. You can find more about her on her website and the Ministry of Peculiar Occurrences one.

 

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NG: How were you first introduced to Science Fiction?

BALLANTINE: My Dad was the first one to show me the beauty of imagined worlds. He read bedtime stories to me when I was about eight years old, first the Hobbit and then the Lord of the Rings. He is a huge fan of science and Fantasy in all its forms, and I was let loose on his collection of books at an early age. It was undoubtedly one of the greatest gifts I ever been given.

 

NG: How did you start writing in this genre?

BALLANTINE: I have always been a very fast reader, just like my father, and so when I got to the end of his collection I had no choice but to write my own stories. I started when I was about thirteen, and recently when I connected with old school friends, they recalled me carting around this green hardback journal. I was constantly scribbling in the thing, and the habit has stayed with me for decades.

 

NG: Which Science Fiction authors have been most inspiring to you?

BALLANTINE: One writer that I was instantly drawn to is C.J. Cherryh. I love many things about her writing, but her ability to create mesmerizing characters with strengths and vulnerabilities is something that just hooked me in. I also admire the length and variety of her career. She writes with such diversity, and does so many different things even in the space of one book. I can only hope to emulate that sort of writing career as I move forward in my own.

 

NG: What do you think of Science Fiction’s versatility and its ties to other genres such as Speculative Fiction and Fantasy?

BALLANTINE: When I first started reading I feel like the delineation between Science Fiction and Fantasy was more clearly defined. As time has gone along, those lines have blurred. Someone like Anne McCaffrey brought dragons and space travel together, and when I read her books, the fact that it was ‘allowed’ was quite eye opening. I write steampunk with my husband, Tee Morris, and that is technically a subgenre of Science Fiction; however it is also incredibly diverse. You can have steampunk set on distant planets, steampunk chugging through the Wild West, but also steampunk that deals with the occult and magic. The speculative fiction genre and Science Fiction are all about flights of the imagination, and the imagination knows no boundaries of genre, which is a box we writers and readers put the creation into afterwards. I see all those varieties of imaginative writing as a continuum, and that’s why I enjoy working in as many different spots on that continuum as possible.

 

NG: What are some recurring themes and patterns in your Science Fiction stories?

BALLANTINE: Looking back, I think I can find a continuous thread of examination of otherness in my stories. Most of my protagonists are definitely ‘other’ in the communities to they find themselves in. Some of them because they are powerful, and society is wary of them, and sometimes because they themselves are afraid of society. How they deal with that otherness, how they come to accept who they are and even use it, fascinates me. Also, I like to look at power, and how people handle it when they get it. The changes it can wreck on people, both good and bad, are fascinating. Even when we are having fun writing steampunk, it doesn’t hurt to delve a little deeper now and then.

 

NG: What difference is there between any written formats and audio ones such as podcasting, for you as a storyteller?

BALLANTINE: I don’t write audio dramas, where there is only dialogue, and action is implied with sound effects and background music. I simply read my stories aloud and record them, ; however doing so has given me a great grasp about how to write dialogue. Often now, even when I am not podcasting, I read what I do aloud. One day I would like to try writing audio dramas though.

 

NG: What is Science Fiction’s responsibility in diverse and inclusive representation?

BALLANTINE: I don’t think that Science Fiction should be limited by the bubble we may find ourselves writing in. Science Fiction of all genres should not be confined like that. We owe it to our readers and ourselves to reflect the wider world. When we talk about diversity, we are completely ignoring the fact that even on our little planet Earth white men do not make up the majority. Perhaps they make up the majority of what we think Science Fiction readers are, but that isn’t the reality. Our responsibility as far as writers is to show the differences, and explore what they mean. We need to reflect the beauty and complexity of our world in others. Books that are not diverse do a disservice to the reader and the craft. Limiting writing, hobbling it ignorant perceptions of the world, is not what Science Fiction has ever been about.

 

NG: Do you think Science Fiction is a genre welcoming to women creators and female characters?

BALLANTINE: Thinking back to my early reading experience with Norton, McCaffrey, and Cherryh, it never occurred to me as a writer that it wasn’t a place for women. I think there are still sub-genres of Science Fiction—particularly the ‘hard’ Science Fiction—where women are considered less likely to write. However, since there are plenty of women who work in science, I don’t see why that perception continues.

 

NG: What advice would you have for an aspiring Science Fiction writer?

BALLANTINE: Read. Read a lot. Go back and discover writers from earlier times, not necessarily to copy them, but to understand the foundations of the genre. They may not have done things we enjoy now, but that understanding will make you a better writer working in the present. It is also gives you great ideas for subverting what has come before. Find out what has already been done and do it differently. That is where the excitement of Science Fiction lies.

 

NG: Do you have future Science Fiction projects?

BALLANTINE: At the moment, I am working on a galaxy-spanning series, with corporations vying for control of planets. Twisted families, intergalactic corporate takeovers, and a messed-up religion. The godfather in the outer reaches would be the best way of describing it.

 

NG: Thank you very much, Philippa! I am sure my readers will be happy to check your books out, if they aren’t already familiar with your writing.

 

 

 

D. Wallace Peach

D. Wallace Peach didn’t start writing until later in life once the kids had moved out and a temporary relocation for her husband’s job left her unemployed. Her husband suggested that she wrote a book and she took him up on the offer. She loves writing, and has the privilege to pursue her passion full time. She is still exploring the Fantasy genre, trying out new points of view, playing with tenses, creating optimistic works with light-hearted endings, and delving into the grim and gritty what-ifs of a post-apocalyptic world. You can find more about her work on her website and blog, Twitter, [+ Facebook+], and Goodreads.

 

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NG: How were you first introduced to Science Fiction?

PEACH: First of all, thank you, Natacha, for inviting me to participate in the . It’s an honor!

 

My family loved camping. We had a rustic 10’ x 16’ cabin in Vermont without electricity but loaded with hundreds of books, most of them purchased used by my father and many from the local church attic where we bought them for a nickel each. He was and still is a voracious reader and loves Science Fiction. When we weren’t fishing, hiking, and playing board games, we were reading Sci-Fi.

 

NG: How did you start writing in this genre?

PEACH: I thought if I wrote speculative fiction I could get away without having to do any research. Ha! So many genres require knowledge and research, and I’m basically a lazy person. I figured with Science Fiction or Fantasy, I could just make up what I didn’t know. Sounds good – despite being ridiculous. I learned very quickly that research is essential and unavoidable, and I really don’t mind learning things I’m interested in (though I still make a lot of stuff up).

 

NG: Which Science Fiction authors have been most inspiring to you?

PEACH: I’m going to go back a ways here to a couple books that opened my mind to Science Fiction like The Hobbit did for Fantasy. The impact was so powerful that I never forgot the reads or what it felt like to turn the pages. They were the Sci-Fi first books I couldn’t put down. One was Earth Abides by George R. Stewart. Written in 1949 (yes, 1949!), it’s a post-apocalyptic story that I read 45 years ago, and still remember as if I read it yesterday. It had a profound impact on me – one of my favorite books of all time. It felt completely real, and I still think back to it when I contemplate life beyond the coming apocalypse. The other is Frank Herbert’s Dune, a classic and not heavily technical. To me it lies on the edge of Fantasy which is exactly where I like to write.

 

NG: What do you think of Science Fiction’s versatility and its ties to Fantasy?

PEACH: Science Fiction has huge versatility as does Fantasy. Both are speculative genres presenting characters, settings, concepts, and devices that don’t exist in our present reality. Though there are subgenres of Science Fiction and Fantasy that are solidly entrenched in their respective genres, there is plenty of space where the line between them blurs. Dune is a perfect example of a book where elements of both genres blend perfectly. I actually like this blurred middle ground the best when coming up with stories and consider myself a soft Sci-Fi and Fantasy author. I’m not interested in writing about wizards, elves and dwarves, nor am I interested in writing hard Sci-Fi (I simply lack the knowledge). I do like using scientific concepts as a jumping off point. My science isn’t technological, but it does explore or stretch the “what if’s” of current understanding and capabilities. For example, what if science developed the capability to graft animal parts to human bodies (not much of a stretch there)? What if a split personality was in fact two separate people sharing a single body? What if a man could go back in time and reset the course of his life? The exploration of these questions could fall into either genre.

 

NG: Would you say that Science Fiction emerged from stories such as folk tales and Fantasy?

PEACH: Fantasy, from what I understand, is thousands of years old where Science Fiction started with the Age of Enlightenment and the scientific revolution. It makes sense that as human knowledge expands, there will be speculative thinkers and dreamers who ask questions and imagine possibilities. With every new advancement, there will be writers stretching beyond the known limits. A favorite quote of mine is from John Dewey (1929): “Every great advance in science has issued from a new audacity of the imagination.” Imagination is the fuel for discovery!

 

NG: What are some recurring themes and patterns in your Science Fiction stories?

PEACH: Good question. I’m still playing with my stories and I like stretching myself with each book. I think there are two recurring themes/patterns. One is that humans don’t seem to be able to stop when enough is enough. We tend to push past the benefits of science into the arena of self-destruction, often for immediate gratification without thought for the future. This theme shows up in my darker work. The other area I like to explore is the forces at work in the natural world (of which we are a part) that we don’t acknowledge because we don’t have the scientific means for measuring them. Just because something can’t be “proved” doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. We agree collectively on what constitutes “reality” but that’s almost silly. At one point, we all agreed that the sun rotated around the Earth. I think we are perceptually limited and rather primitive in our beliefs about what is and isn’t. That leaves lots of room for fun!

 

NG: Do you think Science Fiction is a genre welcoming to women creators and female characters?

PEACH: No and yes. I understand that Science Fiction books written by men tend to be more popular and they win more awards, but this industry is changing rapidly. I refuse to be limited by gender stereotypes. I’ll do my part by writing the best books I can and making sure my reading includes authors from both genders. I haven’t been disappointed yet.

 

NG: Have any Science Fiction female characters been particularly inspiring to you?

PEACH: Not in particular, but they’re out there! Look at the great success of Collin’s The Hunger Games, Roth’s Divergent, and some older ones: Sagan’s Contact, Atwood’s , and McCaffrey’s Pern series. All but Contact are written by women too.

 

NG: What advice would you have for an aspiring Science Fiction writer?

PEACH: Read, read, read and fill your brain up with Science Fiction (and other books) that you love. I’m a huge fan of writer critique groups and was a member of a Sci-Fi/Fantasy group for years. I would never have published without the valuable feedback I received from my peers. Then write what you enjoy.

 

NG: Do you have future Science Fiction projects?

PEACH: My current work-in-progress is a serial called The Rose Shield. It’s one of those blurry-line books. By distilling a sentient and naturally occurring element in the alien world and inserting it in their skin, people can manipulate the emotions of others. I’m about 1/3 of the way into the project and hope to have it done in early 2017. That seems a long way off, but for a book, it’s right around the corner!

 

Thanks again, Natacha, for the opportunity to chat on your blog. This was great fun!

 

NG: Thank you for accepting to be with us today! I am certain my readers will be glad to check your books out and connect with you.

 

Marie Bilodeau

Marie Bilodeau is an Ottawa-based Science Fiction and Fantasy author, with a number of novels and short stories to her name, and some awards to go with them. The native Montrealer is a professional performing storyteller. Armed with a Bachelor’s Degree in Religion and Culture with a minor in Archaeology from Wilfrid Laurier University, Marie mostly tells adaptations of fairy tales and myths, as well as original stories of her own creation. You can connect with her on her blog, Facebook, and Twitter.

 

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NG: How were you first introduced to Science Fiction?

BILODEAU: I discovered Science Fiction watching Star Trek from my hiding spot under the dining room table (we weren’t allowed to watch it – it was too, um, I’m not sure too what). I’d say that I really discovered Science Fiction in grade 9. I’m French Canadian and didn’t really speak English at the beginning of high school, but English classes were a requisite to graduate from high school. We had to do three book reports, and my teacher told me to ignore the list of classics and pick three books that I wanted to read. My brother handed me a Fantasy trilogy, and I devoured it as quickly as a French Canadian kid can devour their first English books, never stopping to check any word in the dictionary. I didn’t know what a dagger was, but man did I ever want one.

 

NG: How did you start writing in this genre?

BILODEAU: I never even considered another genre. This is what I read and loved, and just dove in to these stories. I started writing seriously after university, when I realized that, if I was going to be a writer, I should actually put words down on the page.

 

NG: Which Science Fiction authors have been most inspiring to you?

BILODEAU: I’m a huge fan of pulp writers like Robert E. Howard for multiple reasons. I love how prolific they are, and how their characters captured the imaginations of so many readers. I want to be one of those writers with such a long backlist that it takes a long time to get them all, like Terry Brooks, Marion Zimmer Bradley, and Ed Greenwood.

 

NG: What do you think of Science Fiction’s versatility and its ties to other genres such as Fantasy and folk tales?

BILODEAU: Science Fiction follows many of the same story beats as Fantasy and folk tales, it just does it in a science-based setting, to varying degrees. You have hard Science Fiction, where the magic is science, the creatures and demons are usually ignorant (or ignorance-driven characters), and the reward is solving an enigma or having it solved through some scientific principle or theory. You have some “softer Science Fiction,” like space opera, which doesn’t rely on science as much but relies on scientific “real world” ideas without making the thrust of the story about them. No matter which end of the Science Fiction spectrum, the bones are similar to Fantasy and folk tales, the beats practically the same, but the focus is on the cool science and/or concepts of the setting.

 

NG: Do you think Science Fiction is a genre welcoming to women creators and female characters?

BILODEAU: It’s definitely heading that way, but there’s much more work to be done for the genre to be welcoming of female creators and characters. Women are stepping up to the plate, holding their own and claiming space. The more women do that, the more it’ll change.

 

NG: What are some recurring themes and patterns in your writing?

BILODEAU: I hadn’t noticed until it was pointed out to me, but home comes up a lot. Finding a home, whether physical or emotional, is a recurring theme. Whether it’s due to me growing up in a culture that fears losing itself, or moving many, many times as a child, that’s for psychologists to figure out. But it’s definitely a recurring theme.

 

NG: What place does Science Fiction have in your storytelling?

BILODEAU: I tell a few Science Fiction stories, from space journeys to scientific discoveries, and also stories of discovery that mimic some of the emotional journeys of Science Fiction. In romance, many beats rely on finding your true love. In Science Fiction, many beats are about discovering your surrounding OR your true self (or both), and those are beats I use a lot in my storytelling.

 

NG: Has your podcasting experience influenced your views on Science Fiction?

BILODEAU: The recently defunct Planet X Podcast reviewed many Science Fiction storylines. My cohorts, Jay Odjick and Ken Bonnie, gave some fascinating reviews on Science Fiction shows and comics, and always brought it back to how the spirit and the mind intertwined. Whereas I’d traditionally viewed Science Fiction as mostly a discovery of one’s surroundings, I started to view it as mostly a journey of self-discovery and reflection.

 

NG: How important are conventions in the Science Fiction community?

BILODEAU: Science Fiction is often about ideas, and conventions are an awesome place to share and develop ideas. I find them very important in most fan communities, and Science Fiction is no different. Finding people of a like mind can be an exhilarating and fulfilling (and sometimes annoying) experience. If you’ve been to conventions, you probably know what I mean. If not, go check one out and find out!

 

NG: What advice would you have for an aspiring Science Fiction writer?

BILODEAU: Stick to the rules of your world. The more you try to explain, the more you highlight the cracks in your own logic. Trust that your readers can follow. Make sure that any strong story concept is supported by great characters and an awesome intrigue.

 

NG: Thank you very much for being with us today, Marie! My readers will be happy to learn more about your work and many stories.

 

Tracy Gardner

Tracy Gardner is a Los Angeles native with a degree in Art History and Women’s studies from University of California, Irvine. She worked for art collectives and institutions, primarily focusing on public works, performance art, and archives. She has a passion for history, art and technology. She is an aspiring artist and one half of the hosts of the podcast Rebel Grrrl on the Making Star Wars (MSW) network. Additionally, she is a whiskey and craft spirit specialist, as well as a fine dining server of ten years in Orange County. 

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NG: How were you first introduced to Science Fiction?

GARDNER: I was introduced through films and books. As a child, I was an avid reader. H.G. Wells and Edgar Rice Burroughs had a huge effect on me. I’m pretty sure I read The Time Machine at least ten times when I was 11. Films like The Day the Earth Stood Still captured my imagination and started a lifelong obsession with Science Fiction and Fantasy.

 

NG: What are you top 3 favorites for Science Fiction books, TV shows and movies?

GARDNER: 3 is so hard to narrow down! My top three books are Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood, Saga by Bryan K. Vaughan, and the Time Machine by Margaret Atwood. For TV shows, Battlestar Galactica, Star Trek, and The Twilight Zone. For movies, I’d have to say The Empire Strikes Back, The Day the Earth Stood Still, and .

 

NG: Which Science Fiction characters have had the greatest influence on you?

GARDNER: I would have to say Starbuck from Battlestar Galactica, and Princess Leia and Padme from Star Wars.

 

NG: What place does Science Fiction have in your life?

GARDNER: It’s not only a personal interest, obsession, and hobby, but it has greatly influenced my academic pursuits. I’m very interested in the agency and role of women in Science Fiction. I love reading and writing about the history and cultural significance of Science Fiction. I believe the stories we tell are indicative of our complicated relationships with technology, progress and industry.

 

NG: How did you start podcasting?

GARDNER: I had a commute from Orange County to Hollywood and I started listening to quite a few podcasts. I loved the format and ease of conveying culturally relevant information in a casual, genuine manner. It felt like something I could do. I actually started podcasting with Randy from MSW back in 2011. The focus was video games. From there I started Force Cult, which is still around. I’m excited to be back home at MSW doing Rebel Grrrl with my co-host Amanda.

 

NG: Can you tell us more about your Science Fiction-related projects?

GARDNER: I’m currently finishing my Master’s degree in American studies with and large emphasis on art and technology. Science Fiction has fallen perfectly into this emphasis and I hope to keep analyzing marginalized identities within Science Fiction. I also paint scenes from my favorite Science Fiction. My art is mixed media and can be found at irebelart.bigcartel.com.

 

NG: Do you think that Science Fiction’s responsibility in diverse and inclusive representation?

GARDNER: Science Fiction has historically been a mirror for society’s fears and anxieties, as well as its optimisms. Like most media, it has a complicated history of further marginalizing certain identities. I argue consistently that Science Fiction has a responsibility to its fans to be more diverse. It’s an opportunity to represent and grant agency through story telling that is otherwise absent.

 

NG: Do you think that Fangirls are an expression of Feminism?

GARDNER: Absolutely. I’m so impressed by what the trans/queer/female/minority fans around me are accomplishing. We’re challenging the status quo and carving out a space in a traditionally male dominated fandom.

 

NG: How do you think fangirls can change media industries?

GARDNER: I think we already have. You can’t ignore the influence we’ve had. We’re consumers, content creators and an ever-growing vocal presence in media. We’re getting strong female leads. There will be set backs, but we are seeing changes.

 

NG: What hopes do you have for the future of the Star Wars franchise?

GARDNER: I hope for an integrity and commitment to meaningful stories. Star Wars shaped my childhood because at its core, it’s a powerful story. The allusions to mythologies and the resonance of the saga come from a deep and passionate place. I hope this legacy is respected and protected by future writers and directors.

 

NG: Thank you very much, Tracy! I am certain my readers will be glad to find more about your projects and check your art out.

 

 

Alison Berrios

Alison Berrios is married, and mom to Padawan Caleb. She is the owner of Cosplay For Jedi. The handmade hats she crafts and sells are inspired by aliens of Star Wars, including Twi’lek, Togruta, and Ewoks. She also moderates Star Wars panels at local conventions. You can find more about her work on her Website, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and Etsy.

 

***

 

NG: How were you first introduced to Science Fiction?

BERRIOS: The Battle for Endor was the first time (that I can remember) ever watching anything Sci-Fi related. I loved it. It was the only movie I wanted to watch. E.T. came next and I adored it but gosh did it make me cry. It still does.

 

NG: What is Science Fiction’s responsibility in diverse and inclusive representation?

BERRIOS: Science Fiction it is for everyone who wants to be a part of it. No one should be left out as a fan or as characters in film. It is a welcoming community and I think there is a big responsibility to not make people feel excluded or like they don’t belong. If you see someone saying derogatory things about a character because of their race or ethnicity, you can’t stand by silently. This should be a community for everyone and the more the film industry starts to represent that, the better it will be.

 

NG: What are you top 3 favorites for Science Fiction books, TV shows and movies?

BERRIOS: Ok well for movies Star Wars is number one, always and forever. My second favorite movie is Stardust which is more of a Fantasy genre, but outside of Star Wars, I really am a Fantasy fangirl. The Fifth Element comes to mind as well; the movie was just so entertaining to me! TV shows: Star Wars the Clone Wars took my breath away. My family and I rewatch episodes weekly. Star Wars Rebels comes in second: go Hera! I love that it is bringing together so many characters from the Star Wars universe. True Blood takes my number 3 spot. I was totally obsessed with the books and the show! The books question, I honestly have to say that this is more Fantasy genre, but I gobbled the Harry Potter books up. I even have a tattoo! Please don’t make me pick my top 3 I just can’t do it! I have a feeling once I get a chance to read the Ahsoka book, that will definitely be up there in my favorites!

 

NG: Which Science Fiction characters have had the greatest influence on you?

BERRIOS: Hera Syndulla for her compassion and strength. She is truly a role model for how compassion doesn’t equal weakness. She is selfless and strong. Leia is another strong woman who proves that gender stereotypes mean nothing.

 

NG: How did you start cosplaying?

BERRIOS: For Star Wars Episodes II & III, I dressed up like Padme for the Midnight premieres. I just wanted to feel completely immersed in the movie and what better way for me then to cosplay and have fun! I stopped cosplaying for a while, and then when I decided I wanted to start Cosplay For Jedi, I made a Barriss Offee cosplay. Now I love playing around with different lekku (Twi’lek head tails) and experimenting with different looks.

 

NG: What prompted you to start Cosplay for Jedi[*?*]

BERRIOS: I went to a local comic convention and saw all these amazing artists, happily living their dreams by showcasing their creativity. I always loved creating unique things, but was too apprehensive and scared. I was also having major self-esteem and depression issues at the time, and thought this would help bring me out of my shell. I was a stay at home mom for a while, and a lot of moms won’t admit this because of the stigma, but it is not for every mom. You still need something for yourself. It worked! I still work a regular job, but I feel so fortunate that my entire family has been so supportive so I can pursue my dreams! And my Padawan has fun going to the local convention every year, and lets me know he is proud of me.

 

NG: What are some of your best/worst cosplaying experiences?

BERRIOS: I don’t really have a worst honestly; everyone has been pretty friendly! Also, I have a really good stank face if someone seems like they are about to get out of line. Best was this year, when I got to meet Nalini Khrishan (Barriss in Episode II: Attack of the Clones) and I dressed as Barriss. I got to moderate her panel along with Jesse Jensen (Saesee Tiin) so it was like, two Barrises. It was awesome!

 

NG: What advice would you have for someone wanting to start cosplaying?

BERRIOS: Be true to yourself and don’t feel bad if you can’t afford in time or money something that would win first place in a contest. It’s cosplay, no matter why you do it, for pleasure or work, it should always be fun. My Barriss cosplay was done on a budget, and sometimes it’s easy to feel like your cosplay isn’t good enough. Confidence is the most important cosplay accessory you can wear. You do what makes you happy. Do it for yourself only, and don’t let anyone make you feel bad about your hard work. Sometimes cosplays you put together from Goodwill shopping binges are amazing!

 

NG: Do you think that fangirls are an expression of feminism?

BERRIOS: Yes, because we are equally as excited about it as men. No one’s trying to steal anything from the boys or any of that other nonsense the haters want to spew. We’ve been here all along, and we love that we are feeling represented in big ways now in films.

 

NG: How do you think fangirls can change media industries?

BERRIOS: Keep pushing. When you see women not being taken seriously simply because of their gender, call it out. We don’t want special treatment or representation, we want EQUAL representation. If you read a book or watch a movie that was put out there by a woman and you loved it, let people know!

 

NG: Thank you so much, Alison! I am certain my readers will be glad to check out your creations.

 

 

Tonya R. Moore

Tonya R. Moore is a Public Safety Professional by day; by night, she’s a student pursuing a Bachelor’s of Science in Communication. In the stolen moments in between, she’s a Science Fiction, horror, and urban Fantasy writer. Tonya hails from Bradenton, Florida. A fan of anime, manga, and all things speculative fiction, she grew up on the island of Jamaica. She has been living in the United States of America since 1998. Her latest publication was Ephemera, a short story, in The Nettle Tree anthology. You can connect with her on her website, her lifestyle blog, and Twitter.

 

***

 

NG: How were you first introduced to Science Fiction?

MOORE: My mother is a fan of Science Fiction, so I suppose that’s where it all may have started. Through her, I had access to works of fiction and television shows that probably otherwise would have escaped my notice. I read voraciously as a child. Any genre that I could get my hands on was fair game. My favorite, though, were always the Science Fiction stories. I especially loved stories about interstellar travel and stories that took place on distant worlds, anything to do with humanity out there among the stars, surviving and thriving. When it came to television, I naturally gravitated towards Science Fiction. I remember loving a cartoon called Silver Hawk and watching episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation at the age of nine or ten. I can never forget that sense of awe I used to get listening to Patrick Stewart say the words “Space, the final frontier…” and “to boldly go where no one has gone before!”

 

NG: How did you start writing in this genre?

MOORE: I have this whole awesome backstory of how a few careless words from a childhood friend got me entranced with the idea of writing my own stories when I was twelve years old or so. At first, I was never quite sure about what I wanted to write. I started out writing slice of life and mystery stories, and poetry. I even gave up on writing during my turbulent teen years. As I grew out of my teens, I rediscovered the desire to write. At some point during that time, I read Ray Bradbury’s The Foghorn and became entranced by the beauty of that piece of writing. I realized, that’s the kind or story I wanted to write, the kind of story that filled readers with wonder and made them question everything they thought they knew. To this day, I think that my writing is fueled by this desire.

 

NG: Which Science Fiction authors have been most inspiring to you?

MOORE: I doubt that I have the wherewithal to be an excellent author such as Ray Bradbury but it’s something to which I aspire. Other writers that I found to be quite inspiring early on include Anne McCaffrey, Larry Niven, and Isaac Asimov. Lately, I’ve also become quite fond of the works of Neil Gaiman and Nnedi Okorafor.

 

NG: What are your favorite Science Fiction books, movies and TV series?

MOORE: I have to say my favorites change depending on the day but the following are currently high up on my list: The Foghorn and A Sound of Thunder by Ray Bradbury; short stories but they really are quite memorable. I’m currently reading Nnedi Okorafor’s The Lagoon and it is fast becoming one of my favorites. Two of my all-time favorite Science Fiction movies are The Fifth Element and Enki Bilal’s Immortal Ad Vitem. As for television shows, Farscape, Doctor Who, and The Expanse currently top the list.

 

NG: What do you think of Science Fiction’s versatility and its ties to other genres such as Horror and urban Fantasy?

MOORE: Science Fiction plays very well with other genres. When I watched Event Horizon for the very first time, I was struck by how Science Fiction could be made so much more interesting by introducing the element of horror. Thinking back to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein or even the Epic of Gilgamesh, I can see that Science Fiction’s versatility has been apparent since before it was even recognized as a genre. If I remember correctly, in the Epic of Gilgamesh, the gods who created Enkidu bring him to this place from which he is able to look down upon the Earth. The idea of a character from ancient mythology looking down upon the earth from what we can easily imagine as a spaceship gives me goosebumps. Even so, it was when I read Ann McCaffrey’s Acorna series that I first started to think of Science Fiction as a truly versatile genre. The story of a unicorn girl is a concept straight out of Fantasy but what Ann McCaffrey did with both Acorna and the Dragon Riders of Pern series was plop these fantastical characters and beasts into a Science Fiction setting, thereby creating some of the most wonderful stories I have ever read.

 

NG: What are some recurring themes and patterns in your Science Fiction stories?

MOORE: One recurrent theme in my stories that I only recently noticed is transformation. I don’t just mean character growth over the course of a story. I mean transformation that is drastic and life altering. Rebirth, regeneration, and shapeshifting are some of the elements that come into play. Death is another theme that crops up in my stories quite often. A quote by Shunryu Suzuki comes to mind: we die and we do not die.

 

Somehow, I think it often applies to my work. I write about death but something always comes afterward. It’s as if I refuse to let death be the end of the story.

 

NG: How did you start the Spec-Fic Trifecta Podcast?

MOORE: I’ve always had the intention of starting a podcast but never quite got around to starting one. Some time ago, I was a guest on the Kugali Podcast and it was quite a positive experience. Once again, I found my interest in starting a podcast piqued, so I began to do some research and started planning the Spec-Fic Trifecta. Spec-Fic Trifecta is something I came up with, on the spot, for a podcast targeting fans and creators of the Science Fiction, Fantasy, and horror genres. The podcast will officially begin airing in January and each episode will be less than 15 minutes long.

 

NG: What is Science Fiction’s responsibility in diverse and inclusive representation?

MOORE: Science Fiction’s versatility and amenability provides us with a robust platform for diverse and inclusive representation. As creators, it is our prerogative to not only push the boundaries of our imaginations but also to see to it that the Science Fiction universe is populated by characters and elements from all walks of life. It is the responsibility of publishers to find the gems among these works and give them the recognition they deserve. It is the responsibility of creators to be persistent when it comes to producing and submitting the work that we believe in and we must not cower in the face of rejection and criticism. Readers have a certain responsibility too, to select and respond to works that move and inspire them. I say that with the hope that the works that readers advocate feature diverse and inclusive representation. We each have our part to play and frankly, I’m a bit tired of reading articles by people point the accusing finger at someone else instead of stepping up and doing what they can to improve the situation.

 

NG: Do you think Science Fiction is a genre welcoming to women creators and female characters?

MOORE: Science Fiction is a universe. As inhabitants of this universe, women creators and female characters each have the inalienable right to be here. No culture, no naysayer, no critic can take that away. Now, fandoms and publishers may pigeon-hole and reject but Science Fiction, as a genre, accommodates all.

 

NG: What advice would you have for an aspiring Science Fiction writer?

MOORE: Write what you want to write, not what happens to be selling right now. Write fast or write slowly and edit well. Only then, worry about whether what you’ve written will sell. Now, if the current fad is what speaks to you, so be it. Write away. All you must do is nurture your love of writing and it will nurture you.

 

NG: Thank you for being here today, Tonya! I am sure my readers will be happy to check your website and publications out.

 

Kate M. Colby

Kate M. Colby is an author of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and nonfiction. Her first series, Desertera, consists of steampunk Fantasy novels with themes of socio-economic disparity, self-empowerment, romance, and revenge. She lives in the United States with her husband and furry children. You can learn more about Kate and her books on her website: KateMColby.com. You can also connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, and Instagram.

 

***

 

NG: How were you first introduced to Science Fiction?

COLBY: My dad introduced me to Science Fiction by sharing with me his favorite video games and television shows. As a child, I used to watch him play Resident Evil and “help” him shoot zombies with an unplugged controller. We would also watch shows like Star Trek, Stargate, Sliders and Quantum Leap together. My interest in Science Fiction started as a way to be close to my dad, but it quickly evolved into a lifelong passion.

 

NG: How did you start writing in this genre?

COLBY: Honestly, I never considered writing in a genre other than Science Fiction or Fantasy. Whenever I have a writing idea, it almost always includes aspects of “soft” Science Fiction, such as an apocalypse, a dystopian government, or something else “unrealistic.” While I do enjoy literary fiction, thrillers, and even the occasional romance novel, I get enough straight reality from my real life and other forms of entertainment. I want my writing to push the boundaries of life as we know it and give my readers (and me) an escape from the everyday.

 

NG: Which Science Fiction authors have been most inspiring to you?

COLBY: As an independent author, I’m most inspired by Hugh Howey. Not only is his Wool series a fantastic dystopian trilogy (I wish I had written it!), he also helped lessen the stigma surrounding independently published books and paved the way for them to be taken seriously. Growing up, Lois Lowry and The Giver had a strong impact on me. From the concept itself to the social themes within the book, it challenged my views on the world and showed me how Science Fiction could be a vessel for social criticism and change.

 

NG: What are your favorite Science Fiction books, movies and TV series?

COLBY: Where do I even begin?! Beyond the books already listed, I really enjoy classic Sci-Fi novels like Frankenstein and graphic novels like Watchmen and The Umbrella Academy. I probably consume most of my Science Fiction through movies and television, which goes back to how I was introduced to the genre. My favorite movies include the Mad Max films (The Road Warrior is the best!), Interstellar, and pretty much anything that features superheroes. As for TV series, I’ve really enjoyed Westworld and The Walking Dead (who hasn’t?), but a few “classic” favorites are Sliders, Stargate SG-1, and The Jetsons.

 

NG: Do any of the video games you play provide inspiration for your writing?

COLBY: I don’t think the act of playing video games inspires my writing, as that’s my time to unwind and “turn off” my critical side. I love Ratchet & Clank, Diablo, and Resident Evil, but none of them have much in common with my published or planned novels. Honestly, I think I get more inspiration from watching others play video games, as the separation from the game allows me to really take in the visuals, as well as detach myself from and critique the storyline. In fact, watching my husband play Bioshock Infinite helped me realize that my first novel, The Cogsmith’s Daughter, should be set in a steampunk-inspired world.

 

NG: What do you think of Science Fiction’s versatility and its ties to other genres such Steampunk Fantasy?

COLBY: Science Fiction’s versatility is the reason I love this genre. Whether you’re into the “harder” side of the spectrum and its serious technologies, or you’re like me and lean toward the “softer” side of apocalypses, dystopian societies, and steampunk, Science Fiction has a story for you. Because Science Fiction keeps its roots in reality, it’s a natural bridge to Fantasy, and that’s how I’ve used it in my novels. My Desertera series takes place in a post-apocalyptic society that feels like a Fantasy world, but it also includes steampunk technologies and stylings. I love being able to take different aspects of Science Fiction and piece them together into something imaginative and unique.

 

NG: What are some recurring themes and patterns in your Science Fiction stories?

COLBY: In my Science Fiction novels, I explore themes from real life that occupy much of my thought. The most obvious recurring themes are female empowerment and sexuality, the question of revenge vs. justice, and discrepancies between social classes. All of these themes have deeply impacted my life and the lives of my loved ones, and my fiction allows me to determine my own values and (hopefully) help my readers consider their own stances on these topics.

 

NG: Do you think Science Fiction is a genre welcoming to women creators and female characters?

COLBY: Obviously, Science Fiction remains dominated by men. However, I think it continuously becomes more open to female creators as women push forward in the field. Speaking anecdotally, I’ve never felt uncomfortable in the genre because of my sex/gender, and I hope my experience is not an anomaly (and that it remains this way as my career evolves). From a character standpoint, I think Science Fiction has actually been one of the strongest genres for female protagonists. While the ratio of male-to-female protagonists may not be equal, when women take the leading role in Sci-Fi stories, they’re often strong (or learn to be), confident, capable, and complex. While there are exceptions to every rule, in my experience, the strongest Science Fiction female protagonist almost always proves to be a better crafted, more respected character than female protagonists in other genres.

 

NG: How does your background in sociology affect your writing?

COLBY: My background in sociology influences much of my writing. By studying sociology, I learned how larger societies and smaller social groups function, the building blocks of every society, and basic theories surrounding race, gender, religion, and other important topics. Having a base of academic and theoretical knowledge on these issues, as well as understanding many different perspectives on them, helps me to craft more well-rounded worlds and characters. And, as you can see above, it also affects what themes I convey through my narratives.

 

NG: What advice would you have for an aspiring Science Fiction writer?

COLBY: Let your imagination run wild, but also do your research. The whole point of Science Fiction is to push the limits of reality and challenge your way of thinking. No matter how out-of-the-box your idea is (mine’s certainly a little nuts!), you will find readers who “get” it. That being said, Science Fiction (and Fantasy) readers are also some of the most critical. They want to be entertained, but they’re also smart and expect a certain level of realism in their stories. So give them an imaginative world or awe-inspiring new technology – just make sure you also have an explanation in your back pocket!

 

NG: Thank you for being with us today, Kate! I am sure my readers will be happy to check out your website and your books.

 

About the Author

Natacha Guyot is a French researcher, author, and public speaker. After studying at Paris III Sorbonne Nouvelle and King’s College London, she relocated to Texas in the summer of 2016. There, she has embarked on a new academic journey: doctoral studies in Arts and Humanities at the University of Texas at Dallas.

 

Her main fields of interest are Science Fiction, Gender Studies, Children Media and Fan Studies. Besides her nonfiction work, she also writes Science Fiction and Fantasy stories. She is a feminist, nerd, cat lady, book dragon and Earl Grey drinker.

 

You can connect with Natacha Guyot on her platform | Twitter | Facebook | Goodreads | LinkedIn.

 

 

 

 


Sci-Fi Women Interview: The 2016 Collection

This eBook includes all 2016 monthly features from Natacha Guyot's blog series "Sci-Fi Women Interviews", which celebrates women who create, write, enjoy Science Fiction. The 2016 guests were the following women: Robin Rivera and Heather Jackson Jennifer A. Miller Sally Ember, Ed.D. Diana J. Gordon Amanda Ward Philippa Ballantine D. Wallace Peach Marie Bilodeau Tracy Gardner Alison Berrios Tonya R. Moore Kate M. Colby

  • ISBN: 9781370754021
  • Author: Natacha Guyot
  • Published: 2017-03-13 22:05:14
  • Words: 15863
Sci-Fi Women Interview: The 2016 Collection Sci-Fi Women Interview: The 2016 Collection