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Save $500 Every Month Using Open Source Tools

Save $500 every month Using open source tools

Open Source Tools

By

TOM MAHLER

Copyright © 2016

Table of Contents

Save $500 every month Using open source Tools1§

Open Source Tools……………………………………..1

Save Money with Open Source Tools………………2

Office suite: LibreOffice…………………………………2

CRM: SugarCRM………………………………………..3

Accounting: TurboCASH ………………………………5

Project Management: Restyaboard……………………6

Email: Thunderbird…………………………………….. 8

Calendar: Lightning……………………………………. 9

File archiver: 7-Zip……………………………………… 9

Desktop publishing: Scribus………………………… 10

Invoicing: Simple Invoices…………………………… 11

Diagram creation: Dia………………………………… 12

Some other open source tools…………………….12

Wings 3D……………………………………………….12

Blender………………………………………………….13

GIMP and GIMPshop………………………………….14

Inkscape……………………………………………….. 14

Ubuntu…………………………………………………..15

Is free or open source right for you?………………. 16

Open Source vs Commercial app…………………17

About the Author……………………………………..18

SAVE $500 EVERY MONTH USING OPEN SOURCE TOOLS§

Open Source Tools

“For me, open source is a moral thing” – Matt Mullenweg

Credits:Flickr/ Victor

Open source tools are often free to download and use. The open source model has become so popular that projects both small and large are being developed this way, resulting in viable alternatives to costly commercial software for both home and business. One of the most obvious ways to save money is to use open source, low cost, or free software.

Why spend hundreds or thousands of dollars on software? These days, everyone is looking to save money. Using some creative thinking and learning a few new tools you can use open source projects to lower your costs.

Open source alternatives to expensive licensed products can save you a bundle. Here of our favorite open source apps that helps to save $500 for every month.

SAVE MONEY WITH OPEN SOURCE TOOLS

1. Office suite: Libreoffice

LibreOffice is compatible with Microsoft Office file formats.

It’s a word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software, Microsoft Office is the heart and soul of productivity for most businesses.

It works with the standard Microsoft Office file formats, so you’ll still be able to open and view Office files from others, or share your LibreOffice documents with partners or customers who use the Microsoft suite. It also integrates with Content Management Systems and online document storage for easy collaboration.

Credits:Flickr/tapaponga

Microsoft Office cost $220 per user per year, but LibreOffice saves $220 per user per year and it gives you the same general functionality for free.

2. CRM: SugarCRM

SugarCRM is offered in several editions so you can expand its capabilities as your business grows. Keeping track of prospects and leads and having tools available to manage your customer relationships is critical for growing your business.

It is a full-featured open source platform that provides similar features. SugarCRM Community Edition is free, and as your business and needs grow, you can move up to the Professional, Corporate, Enterprise, or Ultimate editions for a fee. No matter which version you use, you have access to the source code so you can modify the CRM tool to meet your needs.

CRM options start around cost $300 per user, but SugerCRM saves $300 per user and it gives you the same features and capabilities for free.

Credits:Flickr/ DRI – Discovery/Reinvention/Integration/

3. Accounting: TurboCASH

It’s no surprise many businesses rely on Quickbooks to keep their books. The Intuit software helps manage quotes and proposals, invoicing, accounts payable, accounts receivable and more, all from an intuitive interface.

TurboCASH helps you keep track of the money going into and out of your business.

Credits:Flickr/Keith Rowley

You can manage debtors, creditors, invoicing, bank reconciliation, and more. TurboCASH has comprehensive reporting features, and it can be configured for different currencies and industries to meet the needs of small businesses around the globe.

QuickBooks options start around $150 per license, but TurboCASH saves $150 per license and it gives you the same capabilities for free.

4. Project Management: Restyaboard

Trello Enterprise options start around $20.83 per user/month, but Restyaboard is the free open source, flexible, and visual way to organize anything with anyone.

Drop the lengthy email threads, out-of-date spreadsheets, no-longer-so-sticky notes, and clunky software for managing your projects. Restyaboard lets you see everything about your project in a single glance. Restyaboard is a list of lists filled with cards, used by a team or by you.

Restyaboard features are Easy to Login with username or email, Profile setting, Organizations – Add members and Remove members, Closed boards listing and starred boards listing, Add board with predefined templates, Background image from flickr, Create, Copy and move list, API explorer, Notification for card overdue, Card notification & highlight, Button to delete all archived items, Card history filtering, Import LDAP users.

Restyaboard stays perfect and it’s fast and intuitive apps for the web, Android phones and tablets, iPhone and iPad and Kindle Fire. Restyaboard is simple on the surface, but cards have everything you need to get stuff done. Post comments for instant feedback. Upload files from your computer, Google Drive, Dropbox, Box, and OneDrive. Add checklists, labels, due dates, and more. Notifications make sure you always know when important stuff happens.

You’ll see everything about your project just by glancing at the board, and it all updates in real-time. There’s nothing to set up and everyone gets it instantly.

5. Email: Thunderbird

Email is the primary method of communication for most businesses. There are a number of paid and free email clients available, but Microsoft Outlook is one of the most widely used. Outlook is part of the Microsoft Office Home & Business package, as well as the more expensive Microsoft Office Professional suite, or it can be purchased separately for $95.

Credits:Flickr/Roland Tanglao

You can save that $95 per user, though, by switching to Thunderbird for your email.

Developed by Mozilla—the makers of the Firefox Web browser—Thunderbird provides comprehensive features including tabbed email, integrated chat, smart folders, and phishing protection. And, like Firefox, it’s customizable via add-ons. Thunderbird Filelink lets you email large files by uploading them to an online storage provider and sharing the link to the recipient.

6. Calendar: Lightning

Mozilla’s Lightning integrates with Thunderbird for email-related calendaring tasks.

Another function that most businesses rely on Microsoft Outlook for the calendar. With all your appointments, conference calls, sales meetings, and deadlines, you need a robust calendar tool to manage your days.

Mozilla also has a free tool to fit this need. Lightning integrates with Thunderbird to manage your scheduling, send and receive meeting invitations, and manage events and tasks. You can expand its capabilities with add-ons.

7. File archiver: 7-Zip

7-Zip offers file archiving with 256-bit AES encryption.

WinZip is the de facto standard for file compression software, with a powerful set of tools and options for compressing and decompressing files in a variety of formats. As an alternative, consider 7-Zip. It works with a broad range of compression formats, just like WinZip. It also offers 256-bit AES encryption, integrated with Windows, and localization in 79 different languages.

WinZip won’t break your budget, but it does cost $30 per license, but 7-Zip saves $30 per license and its offer 256-bit AES encryption.

8. Desktop publishing: Scribus

Many small and medium businesses also create their own marketing and advertising, designing brochures, fliers, and other content using a product like Microsoft Publisher. Like Outlook, Publisher is included with some of the pricier versions of Microsoft Office.

Credits:Flickr/Raphael Quinet

Scribus has all the tools you need to create professional-quality marketing materials.

The open source software includes the tools you need to create professional-looking marketing materials, including press-ready output using color separations, CMYK and spot colors, and ICC color management.

Desktop Publishing cost $95 per user, but Scribus saves $95 per user and you can get the same page layout capabilities.

9. Invoicing: Simple Invoices

No matter what business you’re in, one of the most important functions—if not the most important—are getting paid. A lot of small businesses turn to services like Freshbooks to create professional, custom invoices to send to customers. The basic Freshbooks service is about $240 per year, though.

For an affordable alternative, take a look at Simple Invoices. This invoicing tool lets you track clients, manage recurring billing, adjust tax rates, and more. And Like Freshbooks, you can access it from any Web browser.

Invoicing cost $240 per year, but Simple Invoices saves $240 per year and lets you handle your billing from any Web browser.

10. Diagram creation: Dia

Dia lets you visualize complex information through flowcharts and diagrams.

If you need to create flow charts or other visual diagrams, Microsoft Visio is a great tool to use. It will also cost you $250 per license, but Dia saves you $250 at same capabilities for free.

Instead, try Dia. Inspired by Visio, Dia includes a variety of tools and special objects to help create entity relationship diagrams, flowcharts, network diagrams, and more. It can also save diagrams in a variety of file formats, such as XML, EPS, WMF, SVG, PNG, and XFIG.

Some other open source tools

1. Wings 3D

It’s a free 3D modeling tool, creates low and mid-range polygon models. While it does not support animation, it can be used with Blender, which does support animation. It can also be used in conjunction with Inkscape. With Wings3D, you can apply lighting, materials, vertex colors, and textures to your 3D models. While the user documentation for Wings 3D is a bit thin, there are tutorials available.

2. Blender

It’s a free 3D modeling software that allows you to create animations. Blender is a cost-effective alternative to 3D Studio Max. Blender is open source, and can be freely distributed and used according to the GNU GPL guidelines. Blender allows you to create 3D models, apply meshes, lighting effects and shading, and perform many tasks related to creating games and modeling visualizations. Blender also allows you to integrate python scripts to manipulate objects. Blender has tutorials and documentation available on its site and also has an active, multilingual user community.

Credits:Flickr/David Orban

3. GIMP and GIMPshop

GIMPshop offers the same features as GIMP, but uses an interface that is very similar to Adobe Photoshop.

GIMPshop is free, open source, raster graphic creation and editing alternatives to Adobe Photoshop. GIMP, which stands for the GNU Image Manipulation Program, can be used on Linux, Windows, and Mac. It supports TIFF, JPG, GIF, PNG, and PSD (Adobe Photoshop’s native format) files. With GIMP you can perform standard functions, such as retouch photos, create raster graphics, compress images, and apply masks and paths, and more. Additionally, GIMP allows you to customize the view and behaviors for your interface and can also be used with a variety of hardware devices, including some tablet PCs.

4. Inkscape

Inkscape is a free, open source, vector graphic tool. Licensed under the GNU GPL, Inkscape can run on the Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms. Inkscape, which is roughly comparable to Adobe Illustrator, allows you to create scalable vector graphics to create static 2D animations. While it is not quite as robust as Illustrator, it does allow you to create and manipulate 2D objects, create paths, as well as incorporate and manipulate XML.

Credits:Flickr/John Baer

Inkscape also provides multilingual interfaces for 40 languages. Inkscape does not support animation, but does have a robust interface that supports a wide variety of tasks related to vector graphic creation. Inkscape also has a user community that maintains several mailing lists.

5. Ubuntu

The open source community has always encouraged frequent updates (release early, release often), which means that security and other updates are made available immediately with Ubuntu. The frequent schedule also means updates are well tested, and any problems are fixed quickly.

Credits:Atiqur Rahman

Ubuntu provides free updates for 18 months after a new release of the operating system. New releases, such as Jaunty Jackalope (Ubuntu V9.04), are launched every six months. Canonical can also provide commercial support for up to three years for desktop products and five years for server releases.

Ubuntu’s approach has attacked two issues that have troubled Linux distributions for some time: functionality and usability. For any product to compete with the commercial offerings from Microsoft and Apple, it must have a comparable feature set and, in many cases, a similar interface. This has been made to appeal to people migrating to the open source environment from their commercial cousins, and it is something that Ubuntu does very well.

Is free or open source right for you?

Keep in mind that free isn’t always better. In some cases, you may choose a paid application over a free or open-source tool for a number of reasons, including:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Paid software may be more reliable than open source.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Open-source applications are more likely to cease development without advanced notice, leaving you in a lurch.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Paid tools typically have some level of customer support available. Open source support, if it exists, is generally managed through an online community or wiki, so it can be more difficult to get quick and correct answers.

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The most important step is researching the open-source alternative and making sure it will effectively meet your needs without causing any unnecessary challenges in your business.

Open Source vs Commercial app

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About the Author

Author Name is Tom Mahler

My name is Tom Mahler; I’m a 34 year old character Writer and independent Software developer.

I have around seven years of experience in the software industry, having worked in an outsource developing, as a freelancer with a developer like web development tools and later on as an own business development worker.

I’m also heavily involved in creating independently new developing tools and am currently heading the development of my team.

Throughout the past couple of years I’ve also been learning and teaching my development team and the understanding of free outsource tools and how to use it, giving workshops at various universities and teaching facilities. Using my own experience with referred many open source tools I shared articles for you; I hope it is very useful for you.

Find my blog here : https://webdevelopaid.wordpress.com/

CAN I ASK A FAVOUR?

If you enjoyed this book, found it useful or otherwise, then I’d really appreciate it if you would post a short review on Amazon. I do read all the reviews personally so that I can continually write what people are wanting.

Thanks for your support!

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Save $500 Every Month Using Open Source Tools

Open source tools are often free to download and use. The open source model has become so popular that projects both small and large are being developed this way, resulting in viable alternatives to costly commercial software for both home and business. One of the most obvious ways to save money is to use open source, low cost, or free software.

  • ISBN: 9781370349807
  • Author: TomMahler
  • Published: 2016-09-29 16:05:10
  • Words: 2424
Save $500 Every Month Using Open Source Tools Save $500 Every Month Using Open Source Tools