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Resumes Theat Will Land You the Interview: An Easy to Follow Guide

 

Contents

Contents 2

[Chapter 1
Before You Begin 4]

ASK YOURSELF: WHAT DO I WANT TO DO? 5

NEXT, DO YOUR HOMEWORK. 6

[Chapter 2
The Basic Components 8]

WHAT TO INCLUDE 8

WHAT NOT TO INCLUDE 14

[* Chapter 3*
Let’s Get Some Word Action 17]

ACTION WORDS 19

[Chapter 4
Formatting Your Resume 21]

CHRONOLOGICAL RESUME EXAMPLE 23

FUNCTIONAL RESUME EXAMPLE 24

HYBRID RESUME EXAMPLE 27

CREATIVE RESUME EXAMPLE 28

[Chapter 5
Submitting Your Resume 29]

YOUR COVER LETTER 31

COVER LETTER BODY TEMPLATE SAMPLE 32

[* Chapter 6*
You’ve Applied for The Job…. Now, What? 33]

THE INTERVIEW 34

Chapter 1
Before You Begin

Most people don’t think about updating their resumes until they are downsized and are in desperate need for another job. Unfortunately, uncertainty is a certainty in the job market, and it is to your advantage to keep your resume updated and maintained as a smart career management strategy.

Whether you’re simply updating your resume or actively looking for a job, writing a resume is a daunting and stressful task – but it doesn’t have to be. All it takes is for you to be organized. We’re here to help.

Your resume is the foundation of your brand and is your primary marketing tool. A well-written resume can be adapted to become your social media profile. It can open doors to opportunities you didn’t imagine possible – just as a poorly written resume can close the doors to opportunities that you may deserve.

Take charge of your career right now by implementing these three simple strategies:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Make sure your resume is structured to be searchable in resume databases by including a target job title and skills keywords.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. For example, if your target job title is Dental Hygienist, you will need to prepare a list of keywords that illustrate your skills set.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Some examples may include:

***
p<>{color:#000;}. In depth knowledge of procedures and equipment used in dental work

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Possess state dental license

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Well-versed in using different dental practice software

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Demonstrated ability of administering oral prophylaxis

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Recruiters, HR Staff, and Hiring Managers will spend (at most) 6 seconds on your resume. Make sure it is visually accessible and contains all relevant keywords on the first page.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Brand consistency is vital. Make sure your social media profiles reflect the same messaging as your resume.

Before you sit down and write your resume, there are a few preparatory steps you need to do to make the writing process easier and to ensure that you have a streamlined and well-organized document. After all, your resume is arguably one of the most important documents you own. It can make the difference between landing your dream job and settling for a job that barely pays the bills.

[] ASK YOURSELF: WHAT DO I WANT TO DO?

It’s important to be truly honest with yourself when answering these questions, as the answers can and will affect the way you organize and write your resume.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Am I satisfied with my current career path?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Am I looking for opportunities to advance within the same career or industry?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Am I looking for opportunities to expand my knowledge and skill base within the same industry, or am I looking to leave my current path and change industries?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. What have I done (specifically, the process) to increase sales revenue or decrease costs for my current employer? What tools did I use to do this?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. What were the benefits you brought to the table when you were first hired in your current job? What do you have to offer in this new position?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. How have you saved your employer time or increased productivity?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. What are you most proud to have accomplished in your current role?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. What have been some of the biggest challenges you faced in your job(s)? What did you do? What was your role in the challenge? How was the issue resolved?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. How are you viewed by your boss? Your peers? Your customers? Your direct reports?

[] NEXT, DO YOUR HOMEWORK.

Research job titles and descriptions relating to what you want to do, which companies you want to target, and match your skills and experience to the descriptions. Ask yourself:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. What is the company looking for and how can I present myself in the best light to this company?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. What skills and experience do I have that relate to this job?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. How can I phrase my experience and skills to best match the job description?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. If I were the hiring manager, what keywords would I look for in a resume?

Remember that your resume is the key that opens the door of opportunity. It’s the document that gets you’re the invitation to interview. It’s your first impression. It has to hit the spot right away, and do it in 4-6 seconds.

Chapter 2
The Basic Components

Now that you’ve gathered the necessary information, let’s get to setting the foundation of your resume. There are five vital components that every resume needs:

[] WHAT TO INCLUDE

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Your Contact Information

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Contact information should be located at the top of the resume. Beneath your full name, include as much detail as you’re willing to share. Keep in mind that you expose yourself to identity theft if you include your full mailing address and social security number.

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Information to include: Name, city, state, zip code, hyperlinked email address, mobile number, active links to your LinkedIn profile and other related social media accounts as well as active links to your portfolio

**
p<>{color:#000;}. It is important to enhance the visibility of your contact information, as hiring managers and recruiters are very busy (remember 4-6 seconds).

*
p<>{color:#000;}. A Summary Statement

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Your summary statement is arguably the most important component of your resume. It should contain a short, compelling professional synopsis of your career accomplishments and future goals.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Some questions you may want to ask yourself before writing this section include:

***
p<>{color:#000;}. How will I impact the target company?

***
p<>{color:#000;}. What sets me apart from all other applicants?

***
p<>{color:#000;}. What keywords should I include to ensure the intended audience continues reading the rest of my resume?

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Tailor your Summary Statement to each job application. It may sound tedious, but it’s worth the effort. Here’s how to do it:

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Read the job description, keeping in mind keywords and key phrases. What are they looking for?

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Once you identify the keywords and key phrases, ask yourself the following questions:

****
p<>{color:#000;}. “How do I my skills and experience fit into the job description?”

****
p<>{color:#000;}. What are my top selling points (choose 3)

****
p<>{color:#000;}. What are the critical issues and how am I positioned to solve them?

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Some examples from the [+ Harvard Business Review+]:

****
p<>{color:#000;}. “Pharmaceutical marketing executive with 20 years of experience creating commercial infrastructures, growing brands, and optimizing product value throughout launch, re-launch, and sunset life cycles across all customer segments—payers, physicians, and patients. Lead global marketing and commercial operations teams with P&Ls up to $2B.”

****
p<>{color:#000;}. “EHS director with 20 years of experience driving regulatory compliance and employees’ health and safety across industries—manufacturing, retail, and healthcare. Develop award-winning, injury-reducing ergonomic equipment. Launch LMS training programs and engaging websites to inform thousands of employees.”

****
p<>{color:#000;}. “Online ad sales director with 12 years of experience leading sales teams in start-up, rapidly growing, and established companies. Maximize profitability of ads across all platforms, including games, mobile, social, and web. Consistently exceed revenue targets—even when battling Facebook and other relentless competitors in crowded markets.”

***
p<>{color:#000;}. If you are applying for a position in an industry different from your current one, the example below shows an alternative structure of an applicant highlighting three areas of expertise that the target company considered important by using bullets and bolding.

****
p<>{color:#000;}. “Project manager with 18 years of experience leading cross-functional teams to deliver children’s technology products and family museum experiences to international audiences.

****
p<>{color:#000;}. Strategy leader for brands with complex and diverse product lines.

****
p<>{color:#000;}. Communicator skilled at exciting audiences at conferences, online, and in products and exhibits.”

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Education

**
p<>{color:#000;}. If you have completed higher education, list it in reverse chronological order. Make sure that your highest level of education is always listed first. If you have a Bachelor’s degree, there is no need to list a high school.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Do not make this section too general. Your education section should highlight your achievements in a way that directly catches the attention of your potential employer.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Dates are important. List the month and year of graduation (or anticipated graduation date) unless you graduated over 15 years ago.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. If you have certificates in certain industries that are relevant to the job, list those after your highest level of education.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Unless you are a recent college graduate, there is no need to list your GPA. Your achievements are more important than your GPA.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. If you are a recent college graduate, include your GPA, academic honors, scholarships, Dean’s List, and other awards.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. If you did not complete your degree, include the number of credits you obtained. Also list your area of study and relevant coursework completed. For example:

***
p<>{color:#000;}. University of California, Irvine – Irvine, California

Completed 90 credits toward a BA in Psychology, 2002 to 2006

*
**
p<>{color:#000;}. Where is the best placement for the Education section?

***
p<>{color:#000;}. According to [+ Monster.com+], if you have five or more years of experience related to the desired position, place the Education section AFTER the Experience section. Likewise, if you have fewer than five years of experience, place Education BEFORE Experience.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Work Experience

**
p<>{color:#000;}. The Work Experience section of your resume can make or break you. This section requires details to be presented in a concise manner, using action words that pop out and impresses the intended audience – the recruiter and ultimately, the hiring manager.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Use action words and avoid hyperbole. Highlight the relevant information that relates to the position you are applying for, and keep it short.

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Instead of: “I worked on a daily basis helping clients solve problems and making sure they received a level of customer service that made them tremendously happy.”

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Use: “Consulted with clients to evaluate needs and determine best options for service.”

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Use: “Consistently improved customer satisfaction through adept resolution of conflicts, issues, and concerns.”

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Alternative labels for the section include:

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Work History

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Experience

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Employment Experience

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Employment History

**
p<>{color:#000;}. This section should include experience for which you were paid. In other words, unless it is directly relevant to the job you are seeking to obtain, do not include volunteer jobs, charitable works, unpaid internships, or any other unpaid jobs.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Relevant experience includes full-time work, part-time jobs, self-employment, freelance work, paid internships, temporary projects, contract, and consulting jobs.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Qualifications and Skills

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Also labeled as “Additional Skills” or “Relevant Skills” section, this segment is where you can list all of your qualifications that are not explicitly mentioned in the Work History section.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. This section needs to contain key industry buzzwords that illustrate skills relevant to the job for which you are applying. If a skill is not directly related to the position but may be relevant to the industry, include it.

***
p<>{color:#000;}. For example, if you are applying for a management position at a music shop/retailer, it is acceptable to mention that you play the flute. Although the ability to play an instrument is not directly related to managing the shop, it does show a common interest with the target market and knowledge of the industry.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Use specific, quantifiable information instead of nonspecific, flowery adjectives. Skills are tangible, practical, and hands-on. They are not personality traits such as “strong work ethic,” “focused and motivated,” and “effective communication skills”. It is acceptable to list soft skills if they are relevant to the position. Some examples are:

***
p<>{color:#000;}. NOT SKILLS: “Excellent speaker of foreign languages”,

***
p<>{color:#000;}. SKILLS: “Fluent in German, French, and English, proficient in Italian, conversant in Japanese”

***
p<>{color:#000;}. NOT SKILLS: “Effective project manager, proficient at LinkedIn”

***
p<>{color:#000;}. SKILLS: “Working knowledge of Basecamp (specific project management software), proficient at LinkedIn advertising (provide niche topic within the platform)”

***
p<>{color:#000;}. NOT SKILLS: “Highly focused and motivated”

***
p<>{color:#000;}. SKILLS: “Experience with virtual teams and working independently in a home office”

**
p<>{color:#000;}. There is no need to include that you know Microsoft Office. Everyone knows the MS Office Suite of products, including elementary school children, so putting this information in your resume will NOT set you apart from the pack in a positive manner.

[] WHAT NOT TO INCLUDE

While most job seekers focus on what to include in their resume, it is also critical to know what NOT to include. The following information are common resume mistakes that will most likely derail your job search.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Objective Section

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Since you are applying for the job, it is assumed that the objective is to get the job. There is no need to tell everyone that you want the job.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Irrelevant Experience

**
p<>{color:#000;}. You may have been the “best lifeguard ever in the history of the country club pool” one summer in high school, but unless you are applying for a lifeguard position, leave this out. There’s no need to list every single job you’ve ever held.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Likewise, do not include achievements that aren’t really achievements. It’s awesome that you ate the most hotdogs at the state fair, that you belonged to a sorority or fraternity, or that you were the top cheerleader on the squad. Limit your achievements to professional, quantifiable accomplishments, such as “Developed lean organizational system that resulted in $5,000 monthly savings for company.”

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Personal Details

**
p<>{color:#000;}. While it’s important to include personal information such as your name, city, state, phone number and email, any additional personal information is unnecessary (and sometimes illegal for employers to ask for). Some examples of information that’s best left out are:

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Marital status

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Age

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Head shot (unless you’re applying for an acting or modeling job)

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Sexual orientation

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Hobbies

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Religious preference

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Social Security number

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Complete mailing address (city and state are sufficient)

***
p<>{color:#000;}. References (if the employer wants references, they will ask you)

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Personal pronouns (everyone knows the resume is about you)

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Unprofessional email accounts

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Your current business contact information (you don’t want a potential employer calling you at your current job, do you?)

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Social media URLs that are not related to the targeted position

***
p<>{color:#000;}. Salary information

Chapter 3
Let’s Get Some Word Action

Having the right words – keywords and key phrases – in your resume is integral to your resume being seen. A hiring manager and recruiter uses certain keywords and key phrases to search for possible candidates. If your resume doesn’t have the right words, then it doesn’t pop up as a search result. It’s that simple.

Here are a list of common keywords and key phrases for various industries.

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#FFF;}. ACCOUNTING: |<>.
p<>{color:#FFF;}. ADMINISTRATIVE: | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#13AB67;}. Accounts Receivable/Accounts Payable

Accounting Software

*
p<>{color:#13AB67;}. Lotus 1-2-3, QuickBooks Pro

Benefits Administration

Collections

Departmental Budgeting

Profit and Loss Reports |<>.
p<>{color:#2D3047;}. Customer Development

Database Administration

Front-end Operations

Multi-line Communication System

Data Processing |

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#FFF;}. HUMAN RESOURCES: |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. OFFICE MANAGEMENT: | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#13AB67;}. Affirmative Action

EEO Regulations

Employee Orientation

Employee Training

Employee Relations and Mediation

Labor Relations

HR Program Development

State and Federal Rules and Regulations

Staffing and Scheduling Requirements |<>.
p<>{color:#2D3047;}. Business Development

Contract Negotiations

Departmental Operating Budget

Employee Relations

Logistic Operations

Performance Evaluations

Departmental Policy and Procedures |

 

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#FFF;}. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY/INFORMATION SYSTEMS: |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

PURCHASING/PROCUREMENT: | <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#13AB67;}. Client/Server Environment

Programming

Database Management Systems

Software and Network Operations

System Maintenance and Upgrades

End-User Software Applications

Hardware and Software Troubleshooting

Technical Support

Internet/Intranet

Web Server Applications |<>.
p<>{color:#2D3047;}. BidNet Interface

Back Orders

Business-to-Business (B2B)

Buyer Relations

Cash Control

Containerization

Import/Export

Just-In-Time (JIT)

Loss and Damage Claims

Production Control

Repairable Assets

Supply Chain Operations and Management

Tariffs, Claims, and Rates

Transportation Negotiations

Transportation Logistics |

For more keywords and key phrases, read several job descriptions and take note of common terms used in each description. It is important that you incorporate these keywords into your resume in a way that is relevant to your experience. It is also imperative that you do not exaggerate your experience for the sake of having a keyword, as the level of experience you have will be apparent in the interview.

[] ACTION WORDS

Now that we’ve given you some keywords and key phrases to help make your resume more searchable, let’s list some words that will help make your resume stand above the others. Keep in mind that certain words tend to be overused. These include the following: motivated, innovative, managed, synergy, creative, passionate, track record/proven track record, driven, successful, extensive experience, go-to person, team player, strong communication/customer service/organizational skills.

Instead of filling your resume with tired old buzzwords that will earn your resume a spot in the trash pile, mix it up a bit and substitute with the following:

FOR INNOVATORS:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. TIRED BUZZWORDS: improved, organized, streamlined

*
p<>{color:#000;}. BETTER WORDS: clarified, integrated, debugged, regulated, modified, overhauled, restructured, transformed, fabricated

FOR MONEY SAVERS:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. TIRED BUZZWORDS: saved, improved

*
p<>{color:#000;}. BETTER WORDS: enhanced, stimulated, capitalized, influenced, arbitrated, boosted, expedited, solved, reconciled, negotiated

FOR COMMUNICATORS:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. TIRED BUZZWORDS: wrote, relayed, spoke

*
p<>{color:#000;}. BETTER WORDS: corresponded, composed, illustrated, lobbied, synthesized, discussed

FOR MANAGERS:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. TIRED BUZZWORDS: motivated, enforced, managed, led, organized

*
p<>{color:#000;}. BETTER WORDS: chaired, orchestrated, advised, delegated, commissioned, collaborated

FOR SALES AND MARKETING:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. TIRED BUZZWORDS: win-win, team player, outside the box, proactive, self-motivated

*
p<>{color:#000;}. BETTER WORDS: landed, quadrupled/tripled/doubled, pioneered, marshaled, delivered, coordinated, built, commanded, sustained, transformed

Chapter 4
Formatting Your Resume

Depending on your career level, work experience and target industry, some resume formats may work better than others at emphasizing your accomplishments and experience. The bottom line is to get that interview. There are three types of resume formats: chronological, functional, and hybrid.

The most frequently used format is the chronological resume. This is where everything is listed in reverse chronological order, meaning the most recent job/accomplishment first. The functional resume focuses on emphasizing the skills of the applicant. This format is especially useful for people with gaps in their work histories – such as stay at home moms re-entering the workforce, and those who took a work hiatus to go back to school. The hybrid format highlights relevant skills while documenting work history. It lists skills and experience first, then employment history is listed in reverse chronological order.

If you are a creative professional (designer, artist, writer, photographer, etc.), the visual presentation of your resume is just as important as the content. You want a resume that strategically distinguishes your personal brand. As such, you have the versatility to veer away from the three most frequently used formats previously mentioned and design a resume that conveys your creative genius. CakeResume will help you create a unique and vivid resume in minutes that will differentiate you from other creative professionals and enable you to highlight your talent and creativity without going overboard…. because even in the creative industry, too much of something is simply that – too much.

Some resume formats to consider if you are a creative professional:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Microsite

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Microsites are perfect for interactive designers. You can create a one-page microsite to display your resume. You can tailor your portfolio work to the target company or market.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Infographic

**
p<>{color:#000;}. For advertising and marketing executives, the infographic is a visually attractive format to present data and information about yourself.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Video

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Video formats are not new, but can add an air of distinction to your resume. A video captures your personality and enthusiasm about the job opportunity.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Package

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Retailers can capitalize on this format by presenting their resume as a box or bag that contains all the relevant “product” (i.e. you) information inside the package.

[] CHRONOLOGICAL RESUME EXAMPLE

As the most conventional format for resumes, most veteran HR professionals prefer the Chronological Format, as it accommodates candidates from all industries and all levels of experience. It is the perfect resume format to illustrate a vertical career progression.

The following is a chronological resume template from MS Office:

[] FUNCTIONAL RESUME EXAMPLE

Unlike the conventional chronological format, functional resumes enable you to highlight your strengths more effectively, by grouping them into relevant categories. For example, if you were applying for a marketing position and would like to emphasize your background in sales and customer relations, you can group your relevant experience under the appropriate heading, as the example below illustrates:

Sales and New Account Development

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Developed new distribution outlets for (product) in (state, district, region)

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Increased advertising revenue through market research and promotion

Customer Relations

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Coordinated product information and distribution for 40 field sales representatives and major accounts

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Served as vendor representative for Company XYZ

You may want to have a functional resume if:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You are in a career transition. Switching industries necessitates that you highlight your relevant and transferable skills rather than list your work history in chronological order.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You have employment gaps. A functional resume can deflect attention from gaps in your work history. It enables you to control what the potential employer sees – i.e. what you bring to the table.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You have minimal experience. If you are fairly new to the job market, you may want to use a functional resume to group your skills acquired from various internships, volunteer work, and extracurricular activities.

Functional Resume Template from MS Office:

[] HYBRID RESUME EXAMPLE

A hybrid resume lets you detail both your skills and experience, while supporting it with a chronological listing of your work history. This versatile format allows you to tailor the content to the job easily. It is particularly useful for experienced professionals who have attained many years of work experience, and freelancers who have a varied work history.

 

[] CREATIVE RESUME EXAMPLE

The resume below is a sample customizable resume template for a creative professional from CakeResume that is formatted to be viewed on various platforms, including mobile. All resumes can also be downloaded, shared, sent, and printed to ensure your resume is seen by the right people at the right time.

Chapter 5
Submitting Your Resume

It may sound a bit silly, but before you submit your resume, please proofread it. Don’t just spell-check. Really READ it. You spent a lot of time and effort writing this document. The least you can do is make sure that every word, every letter, every punctuation mark belongs where it is. It needs to be absolutely perfect. After you proofread your resume, send it to a friend or relative or even a professional to review, because sometimes, more heads are better than one when it comes to identifying the simplest spelling and grammatical errors.

Follow this checklist to submit your resume:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Follow instructions to a T. If the job posting says, “type the word, ‘octopus’ in the subject line of the email, then please type the word, “octopus” in the subject line. If you don’t, you risk your resume being filed in the trash for not following simple directions.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Send your resume to the correct person. This may sound like it should be intuitive, but you’d be surprised with the number of resumes that get stuck in the webisphere because the applicant didn’t follow one simple direction.

**
p<>{color:#000;}. You can take this a step further by finding the hiring manager’s name and email and sending the resume directly and/or adding their email to the CC file when submitting your resume.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Convert your resume into a PDF file. This is to preserve the formatting in your resume. When you send a Word file, you risk the chance of having your resume display differently on the recipient’s computer. Likewise, never send a plain text resume, unless specifically requested by the employer. Plain text resumes never look as polished and organized as a formatted one.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Keep a plain text copy of your resume for Web-based submissions…because you never know when someone will ask for that .txt file.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Embrace creativity to attract the hiring manager and/or HR professional’s eye, but don’t go overboard with making it look special. A sans serif font such as Calibri (this font) or Arial (this font) can make a huge difference in the appearance of the document.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS submit a cover letter unless the employer specifically requests that you do NOT. The cover letter can be in the body of the email itself, or attached as a separate document. Submitting a cover letter gives you the opportunity to elaborate on your experiences and interests in the position. It also enables you to showcase your writing ability, highlight your strengths, and shows that you are serious about obtaining the position. Furthermore, it enables you to take control of the follow-up call process – in the closing section, you can specify a time and date that you will call.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. NEVER submit extra documentation unless it is specifically requested in the job description. Sending unsolicited writing samples, letters of recommendation, transcripts, and other supporting documentation is unnecessary and shows that you did not read or understand the requirements for application and may result in disqualification from the job.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Update your profile on LinkedIn and other professional social media sites. Make sure that the messaging in your resume matches that of your profile. Check job titles and dates as any inconsistencies will raise a red flag.

[] YOUR COVER LETTER

The typical cover letter has 3 main parts: the greeting or introduction, the body, and the closing, which always ends in a compelling call to action.

THE INTRODUCTION:

Whenever possible, always indicate how and where you came upon the job description. Did you:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Respond to an advertised opening (cite website, job board, etc.)

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Identified the company through research

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Read about the company in a publication (online or traditional: mention blog, online journal, journal, magazine, etc.)

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Received a referral from Ada Applebottom from Company Cool

THE BODY

*
p<>{color:#000;}. This is where you do your magic. Highlight your qualifications and strengths as they relate to the opportunity in question. Amplify or augment information contained in your resume instead of just reiterating it verbatim. Include a couple of personal qualities that would be viewed as beneficial by the hiring manager or HR representative.

THE CLOSING

*
p<>{color:#000;}. The closing: If the position was unadvertised and the resume is unsolicited, indicate that you will follow up in a few days. If you are responding to an advertised position, indicate you are looking forward to the opportunity to discuss how you can contribute to the success of the organization.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. It is critical that you balance the tone of your cover letter. You want to be professional yet cautiously assertive. While a resume does not include personal pronouns, a cover letter does. However, do keep in mind to focus on the employer’s needs rather than your own. So instead of writing why you want the job, show what you have to offer.

[] COVER LETTER BODY TEMPLATE SAMPLE

This sample is from MS Word and has been slightly modified:

[_Dear [Recipient Name]: _]

[Name of reference] suggested I contact you regarding the open [job title] position.

[_As you will see from the enclosed resume, my education and professional experience make me an excellent candidate for the position. I have more than [number] years of experience in the field of [area of expertise], with a demonstrated ability to perform well under pressure, and consistently deliver business results. _]

[_I am eager to put my expertise in [area of expertise], my proven commitment to excellence, and my strong communication skills to work for a team like yours at [Company Name]. _]

[_I will follow-up with you on [date] in the hope of scheduling an interview, but please feel free to contact me in the meantime at [phone number] or [email]. _]

[_Thank you very much for your consideration. _]

Best regards,

SIGNATURE HERE

[Your Name Typed]

Chapter 6
You’ve Applied for The Job…. Now, What?

What happens after you submit your resume? Does it fall into a bottomless vortex? Well, if you haven’t done your homework, yes it does. Since you’ve gotten to this point in the book, I’m hoping that you’ve read the previous chapters and have actually done the work to ensure that your resume catches the attention of the HR professional and makes it to the hiring manager.

What happens on the employers’ side of the equation?

Since the employer posted the job, hundreds – if not thousands of resumes will be sent in response to the posting. Most of these resumes will fall into a black hole. Some will make it through to the hiring manager. Those that are easy to read and look aesthetically pleasing and organized will be read by the hiring manager. Everything else goes to…. you guessed it…the trash.

After the hiring manager narrows down the pool of applicants to a more manageable number, each resume will be read and scrutinized for content. Those that fit the qualification criteria and seem compelling will be called in for an interview. Depending on the industry and job position, you may be asked to provide samples. Be ready. The faster your turnaround time, the better. If the employer finds your samples satisfactory, you will be called in for an interview.

[] THE INTERVIEW

When you get invited for an interview, follow these tips:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Research the company, hiring manager, and job opportunity

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Prepare questions for each interviewer

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Review common interview questions and prepare your answers

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Prepare to answer any question about your resume

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Dress for success – wear a suit, tie, jacket, professional dress. You can ask the person calling you to set up the interview appointment about the expected attire for the interview.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Arrive on time for the interview – or a little bit early (15 minutes, tops)

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Don’t act desperate. It won’t benefit you.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Greet everyone warmly, and smile.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. During the interview, be authentic, upbeat, focused, confident, candid, and concise. Don’t go off on tangents. Keep your answers succinct.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Keep in mind your body language. Don’t’ touch your face, chew gum, fidget, or mumble.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Always ask insightful questions at the end of the interview.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Sell yourself, then close – ask what the next steps are, when to expect the decision to be made.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Always send a thank you note and/or email. It shows courtesy and is always appreciated by the interviewers.

AND THAT’S IT!

JUST WAIT FOR THE CALL. YOU’LL GET IT!

GOOD LUCK!

 


Resumes Theat Will Land You the Interview: An Easy to Follow Guide

Most people don’t think about updating their resumes until they are downsized and are in desperate need for another job. Unfortunately, uncertainty is a certainty in the job market, and it is to your advantage to keep your resume updated and maintained as a smart career management strategy. Whether you’re simply updating your resume or actively looking for a job, writing a resume is a daunting and stressful task – but it doesn’t have to be. All it takes is for you to be organized. We’re here to help. Your resume is the foundation of your brand and is your primary marketing tool. A well-written resume can be adapted to become your social media profile. It can open doors to opportunities you didn’t imagine possible – just as a poorly written resume can close the doors to opportunities that you may deserve. Before you sit down and write your resume, there are a few preparatory steps you need to do to make the writing process easier and to ensure that you have a streamlined and well-organized document. After all, your resume is arguably one of the most important documents you own. It can make the difference between landing your dream job and settling for a job that barely pays the bills.

  • ISBN: 9781370355990
  • Author: Trantor Liu, Jr
  • Published: 2016-10-26 09:35:15
  • Words: 4920
Resumes Theat Will Land You the Interview: An Easy to Follow Guide Resumes Theat Will Land You the Interview: An Easy to Follow Guide