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Princess Daisy

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Princess Daisy’s Wish

Mary K. Smith

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Shakespir Edition

Copyright © 2015 Mary K. Smith

All rights reserved. Graphics and images used in this book are licensed and © Dollar Photo Club. This book is a work of fiction. No part of this book or this book as a whole may be used, reproduced, or transmitted in any form or means without written permission from the publisher.

Shakespir Edition, License Notes

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Table of Contents

Princess Daisy’s Wish

More Books by the Author

[] Princess Daisy’s Wish

Once upon a time, in a beautiful kingdom far away, lived a lovely young princess named Daisy. She had long golden hair, big blue-violet eyes, and a whole wardrobe full of lovely gowns, capes, tiaras, and slippers to choose from each day.

You might imagine that such a princess had everything she could ever want, but this was not the case with Princess Daisy. In spite of her beautiful clothes, her golden canopy bed, her pure-white horse named Ivory, and a thousand other royal pleasures, Princess Daisy’s fondest wish was unfulfilled—she wanted a mother.

You see, Princess Daisy’s mother had died shortly after Daisy was born, so Daisy had been raised by her father, the king, and her nursemaid, Heidi. Daisy loved her father and Heidi dearly—but she couldn’t help wondering what having a mother might have been like.

Sometimes, when Daisy was all alone, riding Ivory through the peaceful pastures or picking flowers in the luxurious castle gardens, she would imagine that her mother was there beside her.

“Daisy!” her mother would say. “You’re such a wonderful horseback rider; Ivory is lucky to have a girl like you!” Or, “Daisy, that’s enough roses now. If you pick any more, the whole bush will be bare!”

During these moments, it seemed to Daisy that her daydreams were reality, and she was happier than she’d ever been. But soon enough, it was time to return Ivory to the stables or to take her flowers inside, and then Daisy would remember the truth: that she had no mother at all.

The summer Daisy was twelve, life in her usually peaceful kingdom became hectic and frightening. The neighboring kingdom had declared war on Daisy’s father, and now he had to organize his army and prepare them for battle.

Daisy knew that the king himself must lead his chariots and horses into battle, and she was afraid that her father would be injured in the fight. Even worse, he might lose his very life, and Daisy couldn’t bear that!

“Father,” she begged him, “please don’t go to war! I need you!”

The king hugged Daisy gently. “There, there, Princess,” he said. “I must stand up and fight for the sake of my kingdom. It’s the responsibility of any good king. But I’ll come home without a scratch, you’ll see!”

Daisy hoped with all her heart that her father was right. Just the same, she couldn’t help but worry. The morning the king departed to lead his troops into battle, Princess Daisy felt lonelier than she’d ever felt in her life. Heidi tried to comfort her, but Daisy just wanted to be left alone.

She escaped into the castle gardens, where she sat at the foot of an ancient tree and sobbed. She was frightened, so alone. If only her mother were here right now. She’d know what to do and say to comfort Daisy.

But as hard as Daisy tried to imagine her mother there with her this sad afternoon, she could not. This only made her sob all the harder.

I want a mother, Daisy thought. It’s not fair that I don’t have one! Why did mine have to pass away? Didn’t she know I would need her?

As the princess continued to sob, one of her teardrops landed on a golden flower bud at her feet. This flower was unlike any of the others—for, as Daisy watched in astonishment, it opened and blossomed before her very eyes. Then a small, delicate fairy flitted out of its center!

Daisy stopped crying and just stared. “Who are you?” she asked in a trembling voice.

The fairy, who had huge blue eyes and shiny rays of hair the same color as honey, smiled gently. “Why, I’m Bloom,” she said. “The Flower Fairy of Wishes—and I’ve come to grant yours!”

Daisy gasped. “Do you mean that…that I can have anything I ask for?”

“Anything at all,” replied Bloom. “But I can grant only one wish.”

That was fine with Daisy. She knew what she wanted more than anything; she’d known it her entire life—a mother! She was just about to open her mouth and tell that to Bloom, when the fairy continued to speak.

“You have twenty-four hours to make up your mind,” Bloom said. “Once you figure out what your wish is, I’ll meet you here at the same time tomorrow, and I’ll grant it for you.”

Daisy did not want to wait a whole day! “But I know what I want now!” she insisted.

Bloom shook her pretty little head. “I’ll see you tomorrow, Princess Daisy.” And with that, she was gone.

For the rest of the day, Daisy could not stop thinking about Bloom. This time tomorrow, she would have a mother!

As she ate dinner that evening, the princess overheard Heidi and some of the servants talking in the kitchen, discussing the war.

“War is a terrible thing,” Heidi said sadly. “And this battle is particularly gruesome—so many are being killed. I pray every moment for the king’s safety.”

“He has a strong bodyguard,” the cook reminded Heidi. “I don’t fear for him as much as I do for the innocent peasants of our kingdoms. Their homes and families are being torn apart by the war. Their children are in danger because they live so near the battleground. They have no place to go. It’s a terrible shame.”

Daisy was so upset by this whispered conversation that she couldn’t finish her meal. She retired to her bedchamber early and tossed and turned all night long. Images of gruesome battles flashed through her mind. She worried about her father. When she did sleep, she dreamed of poor peasants and their children fleeing for safety.

The next morning, Daisy rushed to the garden. She couldn’t wait to see Bloom!

When the tiny fairy finally appeared, Daisy told her, “I’ve made up my mind.”

Bloom smiled gently. “Your wish is my command, Princess Daisy.”

Daisy took a deep breath, closed her eyes, and said, “I wish for the war between the kingdoms to end, so that my father and his army and the peasants in the villages will be safe.”

“That is your wish?” asked Bloom. “To have peace between the kingdoms?”

“That is my wish,” answered Daisy.

And just like that, Bloom vanished, and Daisy heard the merry clip-clop of horses’ hooves returning from battle! Her father led his army in the direction of the castle.

When the king saw Daisy, he dismounted his horse and swung her into his arms. “Peace has been restored between the kingdoms!” he announced.

Daisy couldn’t stop hugging her father. She was so happy to have him here with her, safe and sound, and to know that the lives of hundreds of soldiers and peasants had also been spared because of her wish. As much as Daisy longed for a mother, she realized that the lives of human beings—and the father she loved—were much more important!

But the king had an unexpected surprise for Daisy. Just then, a stately pink carriage pulled by two white horses pulled up to the front of the castle. A footman opened the door, and a beautiful woman stepped out.

Daisy recognized her at once as the dignified and kind-hearted duchess of a kingdom miles away. She had spoken with the duchess many times, during the Christmas Ball and other such celebrations and festivities. Daisy had always admired and respected the duchess, so she was happy to see her again.

And she was happier yet when her father announced his decision to marry the lovely, sweet duchess! Daisy was going to have a mother, after all!

Oh, what a wonderful day it had been. Both of her wishes came true!

Every day, consider others—

The needs of sisters, friends, and brothers,

And when you help them meet their needs,

Your own dreams will come true indeed!

[] More Books by the Author

 

 

 


Princess Daisy

Daisy is a princess that has everything you could imagine! She has everything except for the one thing that she wants dearly.. her mother. Daisy's mother died shortly after she was born. All of Daisy's life, she has wondered what it would be like to have a mother. One day, Daisy is granted a wish by the Flower Fairy of wishes. What do you think Daisy will wish for? Find out what happens next... -Excellent for beginning and early readers -Great for reading aloud with friends and family -Illustrated storybook great for a quick bedtime story This book is especially great for traveling, waiting rooms, and reading aloud at home. Scroll up and click 'buy' and spend some quality time with your child!

  • Author: Hey Sup Bye Publishing
  • Published: 2015-10-14 16:50:07
  • Words: 1488
Princess Daisy Princess Daisy