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Networking Effectively: How to Build Your Network for Career Success

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[][] Cover Page

 

 

Networking Effectively: How to Build Your Network for Career Success

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contents

Cover Page 1

Letter from the Author 5

About the Author 9

Introduction 12

Who Should Be In Your Network? 13

How to Refresh and Maintain Your Network 19

What If You Haven’t Spoken To Someone In Years? 24

Is It ‘Phony’? 27

What If You Resigned From the Company? 29

What If You Were Asked to Resign? 32

What If You Didn’t Know Them Well, or They Don’t Remember You? 33

What If You’ve Been Out of the Workforce for a While? 34

The Benefits of a Maintained Network 36

Grow Your Network 41

Use LinkedIn 42

Connect With Everyone You Know On LinkedIn 43

Should You Connect With Recruiters or Headhunters Who Contact You? 46

Add New People by Joining Groups on LinkedIn 47

Use Facebook to Grow Your Network, Too 49

How to Manage Regular, Personal Contacts with a Large, Constantly Growing Network 51

How to Use Your Network to Find a New Job (and Keep It a Secret from Your Boss) 53

How to Manage Aggressively Growing Your Network If You’re an Introvert 54

Conclusion 57

If You Enjoyed this eBook, Get Our Other Career Confidential Coaching Series eBooks…. 58

BONUS SECTION 59

Sample of ‘How to Work With Recruiters’
from the Career Confidential Coaching Series 59

How Recruiters Work With Job Seekers 65

Epilogue 71

If You Liked This eBook,
Please Give It 5 Stars! 73

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[][] Letter from the Author

 

Everyone needs a network. We all need help at some point, and we’re happy to help others when we can. That’s what networking is all about. The opportunities available from a quality network are unlimited, and the investment you make in it now will pay off many times throughout your career.

Now—let me also say, I understand that many people hate networking. They believe it’s phony, or they’re unsure of themselves and how others may react, anticipating all kinds of negative outcomes.

In this book, I’m going to show you how to network genuinely and authentically, with a personal touch.

If you ever fear reaching out to others that you don’t know well, I want you to think about this parable of the Two Wolves:

 

An old Cherokee told his grandson, “My son, there is a battle between two wolves inside us all.

 

One is Evil. It is anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego. The other is Good. It is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion, & faith.”

 

The boy thought about it, and asked, “Grandfather, which wolf wins?” The old man quietly replied, “The one you feed.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This contains an amazing message for us all that can be expanded beyond what it specifically addresses. I think about it like this:

The White Wolf is good. It represents the qualities that are good, and good for us—that which will help you move forward. This would include confidence and courage (the courage to shake someone’s hand, reach out to someone from your past, call someone, or ask for what you want).

The Dark Wolf is evil. It represents the qualities that damage you and hold you back. This is the one that most of us hear from more often:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. I’m afraid I’ll look stupid.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. What if I fail?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. What if I’m not as good as I thought I was?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. What if I can’t do what I said I would do?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. What if that person doesn’t want to talk to me?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. I can’t take that chance.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. I’m too old.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. I don’t have enough experience to do that.

 

No one needs to worry about feeding the dark wolf – we hear plenty from it…all those mean little voices in our heads that make us worry or fear or pull back from things that could be amazing for us.

Consider this: You would never allow the dark wolf to speak to your child or your best friend that way, so why would you let him speak to you that way? It weakens you in your emotional foundation, and even physically affects you.

Every time you hear the Dark Wolf, you have to stop him and say something else to yourself that fights the fear. Encourage yourself. Boost yourself up. Feed the White Wolf immediately. Otherwise, the Dark Wolf will win. It will cause you not to take advantage of the opportunities in front of you, and that isn’t fair.

 

You have done a lot to create the skills and abilities you have…long hours in school and training to make you what you are now. You have potential. If you turn away from it, you will always feel the negativity from it.

If you don’t get this under control, you’ll teach it to your children.

If you look back at your parents, you may notice that one or both of them struggled with negativity and maybe you learned it from them – you have to really pay attention to this and feed the White Wolf.

Throughout this series, I’m going to remind you to feed the White Wolf.

In the comments/reviews, please let me know what you found valuable and what else you want me to write about.

If you have a story about overcoming the Dark Wolf, tell me about it.

 

 

 

 

[][] About the Author

 

 

Peggy McKee (http://www.linkedin.com/in/PeggyMckee1) is an expert resource and dedicated advocate for anyone who wants to get ahead in their career, whether it’s getting the promotion or getting the new job that puts them on the path to success.

As the CEO of Career Confidential, Peggy has coached hundreds of thousands of people to move ahead and find success in the next move in their careers. She has been named #1 on [+ HR Examiner’s Most Influential Online Recruiters list+], authored dozens of Kindle and Audible books and reports on Amazon, and spoken at events for the American Heart Association, the Executive War College, and the Basel Life Science Week on how to advance your career goals. She has been featured on Fox News Dallas about [+ how to ask for a raise+], and quoted in articles from [+ CNN+], [+ CAP TODAY+], the [+ Denver Examiner+], and more.

In Peggy’s career, she networked her way into an entry-level role at an esteemed medical company, Bio-Rad Laboratories straight out of college, and was promoted twice while there.

From there, she networked her way into another role at Chiron Diagnostics, where she became the youngest Regional Sales Manager in that company’s history, at the age of 28.

Three years later, she decided to start her own recruiting firm specializing in medical sales and marketing. Her first two customers were mined directly from her network and were approached in the direct, aggressive fashion you will learn about in this book.

After 10 years of successful recruiting (working with companies ranging from startups to Fortune 5s, including but not limited to GE Healthcare, Almac Diagnostics, and Johnson & Johnson) she founded Career Confidential, an online career and job search site that to date has 20,000 clients in 90 countries, with over 1M downloads of her materials.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[][] Introduction

 

In this book, you will learn how to network effectively for your career success. You will learn who should be in your network, how to communicate with them, how to add to your network, and how to maintain a level of interaction that doesn’t take up too much of your time, but keeps you top of mind for them.

When you network like this, you will never have to feel uncomfortable about reaching out and asking for something you need and you will always be able to open up opportunities that you wouldn’t otherwise have.

 

 

Be sure to print out your

Networking Worksheet,

to get you on your way to networking like a pro.

Download it here:

[+ https://careerconfidential.leadpages.co/networking-effectively-worksheet/+]

This worksheet will be great to have as you go through this book, to take notes on and kickstart your networking success!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[][] Who Should Be In Your Network?

Most people think of their network in much too small a scale. In reality, your network can and should be everyone you know.

For example, my first job was with Bio-Rad Laboratories as a Sales Rep, with a team of 10. Some people would think that those 10 people counted as my network, but that isn’t true. My network consisted of:

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p<>{color:#000;}. The 10 people on my team

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p<>{color:#000;}. Everyone I went to training with

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p<>{color:#000;}. The people I sat next to in the national sales meeting

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p<>{color:#000;}. The product manager

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p<>{color:#000;}. The other managers I met with

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p<>{color:#000;}. Some of the presenters at the national sales meeting (because I introduced myself to them and thanked them for the presentation)

This happened all within my first year of employment.

In my second year, I went into a product specialist role in an entirely different region, so I was able to add another layer of people to my network:

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p<>{color:#000;}. The 10 people in my region

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p<>{color:#000;}. The other product specialists in different regions

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the product management team.

This alone doubled the size of my network.

When I went to a marketing role at headquarters, I expanded it even more. Anyone I went to the lunchroom with became part of my network—along with:

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of the marketing companies who came in to speak with me

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p<>{color:#000;}. All of our competitors I spoke to at trade shows

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p<>{color:#000;}. Customers and lab supervisors I worked with or went to see or polled (we often questioned customers to make sure we knew what they were looking for)

 

Inside that organization, everyone was part of my network—everyone beside me, below me, or above me.

Outside the organization, it was even more of an open roster—

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p<>{color:#000;}. Anyone who called on me or who I called on

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p<>{color:#000;}. Vendors

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p<>{color:#000;}. Suppliers

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p<>{color:#000;}. Clients

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p<>{color:#000;}. Customers

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p<>{color:#000;}. People in my social life

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p<>{color:#000;}. People in my civic organizations

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p<>{color:#000;}. Parents of my kid’s friends

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p<>{color:#000;}. My spouse’s friends

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p<>{color:#000;}. Anyone else I came into contact with

Think about who can and should be in your network:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Colleagues (past and present)

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p<>{color:#000;}. People you worked alongside in your job

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p<>{color:#000;}. People who worked in other departments in your building

**
p<>{color:#000;}. People who worked in other divisions in your company

**
p<>{color:#000;}. People who worked in support departments

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Cross-departmental peers

**
p<>{color:#000;}. People you worked on special projects with

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Managers in other departments

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p<>{color:#000;}. Former bosses

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p<>{color:#000;}. Clients you sold to

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p<>{color:#000;}. Clients you tried to sell to

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p<>{color:#000;}. Clients you provided services to

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p<>{color:#000;}. Vendors who tried to sell you anything
(whether they were successful or not)

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p<>{color:#000;}. People you meet at a tradeshow

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p<>{color:#000;}. People you meet at company trainings

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p<>{color:#000;}. People you meet in certification classes

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p<>{color:#000;}. Acquaintances

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p<>{color:#000;}. Family

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p<>{color:#000;}. Friends

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p<>{color:#000;}. Friends of friends

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p<>{color:#000;}. People you went to school with

**
p<>{color:#000;}. High school

**
p<>{color:#000;}. College

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Advanced trainings

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Certification classes

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p<>{color:#000;}. Professors and Teachers

**
p<>{color:#000;}. High school

**
p<>{color:#000;}. College

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Company trainers

**
p<>{color:#000;}. Certification trainers

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p<>{color:#000;}. People you’ve gone to church with

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p<>{color:#000;}. People you’ve been in civic or social groups with

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p<>{color:#000;}. Friends or coworkers of your spouse

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p<>{color:#000;}. Friends or coworkers of your family members

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p<>{color:#000;}. Your children’s former teachers or coaches

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p<>{color:#000;}. Anyone you speak to on a regular or semi-regular basis

Some of the people on this list will make sense, but some probably surprise you. However, you never know who they know. I know someone who got a job through his barista. You never know.

When you really stop to think about all the people you know, there will be dozens, or even hundreds, of names on your list. You don’t need to know these people well, but you should have some sort of personal or professional connection.

Chances are that you haven’t done much to maintain all of these relationships. People drift apart, relocate, and change jobs all the time. But if you have a working email address or phone number, or if you can find them on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus, it’s easy to get in touch and refresh that connection.

The more people you have in your network, the better.

 

 

 

 

Download our

Networking Worksheet

Here:

[+ https://careerconfidential.leadpages.co/networking-effectively-worksheet/+]

Who do you know that you may have forgotten about?

Use the worksheet to start making your networking lists now!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[][] How to Refresh and Maintain Your Network

 

You make the most out of a great network when you keep it ‘fresh.’ The most important way to keep your network fresh so that it’s easily available when you need it is to check on it, or touch it, a couple of times a year—that’s all.

When you do this consistently, you cultivate a big pool of people who have your name at or near the top of their minds. If they see something interesting that relates to you in some way, they are much more likely to tell you about it. Or, if it’s you who needs a favor, you’re more likely to get it from someone you’ve kept in contact with.

How do you keep your network fresh? Twice a year, send an email to every person in your network letting them know what you’re doing with your life.

This direct contact through email is key. You can’t simply post a Facebook or LinkedIn update and call it good—it isn’t personal enough. Build the relationship through personal, direct communication. You can’t do that through status updates. You have to do it on a one-to-one basis, either with a direct message or an email.

The one exception to this rule is that you can reply, or comment on, something they have posted, because this is a direct communication with the individual, about what they said.

The good news is that this will have a big positive impact on the person you are communicating with, and it is very easy for you to do.

Your email or message can be as simple as either of these two:

 

 

 

 

 

 

You don’t have to request anything—just let them know what’s going on with you—you’ve started a new job, or you’re still working at the same company.

 

If you can, send them something they would be interested in:

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p<>{color:#000;}. the title of a book you just read and thought was great

*
p<>{color:#000;}. a link to a website or blog article that would be of interest to them

*
p<>{color:#000;}. a job lead you heard about but isn’t a good fit for you

 

Sending them something is a nice touch that really personalizes this email, and lets you do something nice for them that is completely voluntary and doesn’t take up too much of your time.

Finally, let them know that they can give you a call if they need anything: “Hey, if there’s anything you need, or any way I can help you, let me know.”

Make sure they have your current contact information (so that they can get in touch with you or refer you if needed), and always ask that they let you know if their email or phone number changes.

You can set aside a time to do this twice a year, or you can make it a part of your daily routine—whenever is convenient for you.

Just a few minutes of relationship maintenance every day will give you a big pool of people who think you’re friendly and helpful, and it will make them more inclined to help you if they see an article or a job lead that you might be interested in. You become top of mind for them, which will pull in opportunities that you otherwise would never hear about.

 

 

Successful people are simply those with successful habits.

*
p={color:#000;}. Brian Tracy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[][] What If You Haven’t Spoken To Someone In Years?

 

 

 

It’s OK. There’s no need to feel awkward. Just say:

 

See? It’s easy. You can even copy and paste this note if you like.

They will almost certainly be glad to hear from you. Everyone wants to stay in touch, but very few take the time to do it. Take that first step and it will be a very good thing.

Now, you may think all this is a good idea, but when it comes down to actually doing it, you will be fearful. Maybe it seems ‘phony,’ maybe you aren’t sure they liked you, maybe you left the company on less-than-positive terms, or maybe you don’t feel that you know them well enough to send an email.

This is a case where the idea of a negative outcome is much less than the actual reality. The worst that can happen is either that they will delete the email, or write back and tell you they don’t want to talk to you—although I’ve never seen a direct rejection like this actually happen. Most people won’t have the courage or take the time to actually write back to tell you they don’t want to talk to you, so the reality is that they may just delete it. Either way, you’re OK. If someone responds negatively, just cross them off your list.

The truth is that most people will be thrilled to hear from someone in their past. They wanted to reach out, themselves, but either were afraid to, or didn’t take the time. If you take that step, you will be rewarded.

 

 

Feed the White Wolf

 

[][] Is It ‘Phony’?

 

I have been asked if it seems phony to get in touch with someone who’s been absent from your life for a while. My answer is, “Absolutely not.”

Thinking that getting in touch with someone you haven’t spoken to in a while is phony, or expecting a negative outcome from reaching out to them is negative thinking that we all need to step away from.

I’ve had people I worked with 20+ years ago who reached out to me—in fact, one of them was someone I’d played college basketball with who was surprised to see that I was running Career Confidential. Was it phony for her to reach out to me? Not at all. It was wonderful.

Just like me, she’s been busy running a life—she’s a nurse, she has a family, she’s busy. Why would I come to her mind now? Maybe she’s looking for something for her career now that she couldn’t do before. That’s not phony at all. I’m pleased that she connected to me.

Even if we couldn’t work together professionally, I like to hear from people. The spice of life is the relationships we have with one another.

The truth is that most people fail at networking at least some of the time in their lives. Many times, I see people drop the ball on networking when they’re in a time of personal crisis—when they are having a tough time personally, sometimes they drop some of the relationship balls they should be juggling, but they just don’t have the time or the brain cells to do it. It’s not phony to get back on track.

If they don’t like you contacting them after all this time, they can just choose not to respond to you. It’s their choice.

 

 

 

 

You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.

— Dale Carnegie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

h2<>{color:#4f81bd;}.

 

 

[][] What If You Resigned From the Company?

 

They can’t hold that against you forever. People resign and move on. That’s life. They won’t take it personally. If they do, they’ll just delete your email and there’s nothing you can do about it. But they might very well be glad to hear from you.

Don’t let your negative thought process keep you from doing something that could be very good for you.

I recently spoke with a gentleman named Greg who was really troubled about sending out these emails. He wanted to do it, and knew he needed to. He’s a Six Sigma Black Belt with a lot to offer.

He wanted to get back in touch with all of the people in his network, but was held back by thoughts of:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. “Well, I’m not sure…”

*
p<>{color:#000;}. “I didn’t have a great relationship with that person…”

*
p<>{color:#000;}. “What if they don’t like me….”

*
p<>{color:#000;}. “What if they didn’t see what I did here…”

*
p<>{color:#000;}. “What if they didn’t think I brought any value…”

*
p<>{color:#000;}. …and many other doubts.

I said, “Put all that aside and let’s just message them and see what they say. If some of them don’t like you and write you back saying, ‘I didn’t like you, Greg,’ then we’ll deal with that—but, I’ve never had that happen. If they don’t want to hear from you, they will delete your email rather than tell you outright.”

So, he sent out the message and received 30 emails back that same day, all saying something along the lines of:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. [_ “Hey, I remember you from ______” _]

*
p<>{color:#000;}. “Hey, I didn’t know where you were”

*
p<>{color:#000;}. “Hey, I didn’t know you’d moved”

*
p<>{color:#000;}. “I didn’t know you were a Six Sigma Black Belt”

*
p<>{color:#000;}. “Here’s my information”

*
p<>{color:#000;}. “Let’s get together”

*
p<>{color:#000;}. and more

Greg was stunned. It felt so good for him. It was such a great experience. He had struggled with that negative thought process that turned out to be all in his head, because plenty of people were very glad to hear from him.

So, if you have a negative thought process going on, I want to encourage you, too, to let that go. Contact people. Let them know where you are. Get their information. If they don’t want to hear from you, they can tell you, or delete your email. If you don’t do this for yourself, you’re going to miss a lot of opportunities. It’s really worth doing.

 

Feed the White Wolf

 

[][] What If You Were Asked to Resign?

 

Always email the people in that company anyway. If they don’t want to talk to you, they will just delete your email.

(Most people would never move into direct conflict with you by actually telling you they don’t want you to email them. If they do, it’s still not a big deal—just delete them from your list and get on with your day.)

Sometimes, even though it didn’t work out with the company, there are people in that company who still liked you a lot, and maybe even thought you got a raw deal. They may very well be enthusiastic about your email, and even want to help you out if they can.

 

 

[* ][] [*What If You Didn’t Know Them Well, or They Don’t Remember You?]

 

Just do it. What you have to understand is that you have no risk. If that person doesn’t want to help you, they just won’t. However, I will tell you that in most cases, people do want to help others if it’s easy enough to do. They can’t help you if they don’t know what you need.

I love it when people from my past reach out to me, even if I may not remember them as well as they remember me.

I had someone who hesitated about reaching out because he thought, “What if they don’t remember me?” I said, let them figure it out. Reach out to them and see what happens.

When he did, he was astounded because there were several people that he didn’t remember that well, and didn’t have any especially positive feeling for, but they remembered things he had done that had an impact for them. They loved that he had reached out to them.

Search Tip: If you don’t have someone’s most recent email address, you may know someone else who may have it, or maybe you can contact them through an online network.

 

 

 

 

[* ][] [*What If You’ve Been Out of the Workforce for a While?]

 

If you’ve been out of the workforce in terms of years (for whatever reason—family issues, health issues, etc.), you absolutely must reconnect with your network in order to get a job. As many people as possible should know that you’re looking.

You can say, ‘Hi, I’ve taken some time off to deal with family issues, but that’s all tidied up now and I am ready to go back to work as a _______________. I wanted to reconnect with you and see how you are doing, and ask you to keep me in mind if you know of anyone who could use someone with my skill set.’

Or, you could not refer to the time you were out, and just say, ‘Hi, I am looking for new opportunities as a __________. I wanted to reconnect with you, see how you are doing, and ask you to keep me in mind if you know of anyone who could use someone with my skill set.’

Then, add them to your twice-yearly emails.

 

 

 

 

Feed the White Wolf

 

 

 

[][] The Benefits of a Maintained Network

An active, vital network gives you a wealth of expert advice on a huge variety of subjects, a source of new opportunities, and even a safety net.

It’s one of the easiest ways to stay current in your field. Your network is a huge source of information for you. When you find out what others are doing, you hear about new developments in your industry, training programs, processes, thought leaders, services, tools, and all kinds of things that help you execute your job more effectively and do what you need to do to climb the ladder.

Your network is not only a source of information about your field; it’s also a great way to get perspective on what others think about anything that’s happened. You can gain a lot of wisdom from the people in your network from their growth or mistakes. You can get advice for your career if there are people in your network you can use as mentors. You can bounce ideas off of them so you become better and stronger than you were before.

I use my network for advice on all kinds of things—from getting the name of someone to help me with a technical task to how to book my flight to Switzerland and what sights I should see while I was there.

All of these things are reasons that you should be networking—and, they even provide you with material to include in your regular emails, if you find yourself at a loss for what to say.

Lastly, if you find yourself in a job search, a maintained network will be easy to tap just by sending an email saying, “Hi! Guess what? I’m in the market for a new job. Let me know if you hear of anything.”

Example: I recently worked with a Marketing Manager who was having a hard time finding jobs and getting interviews. When we spoke, I realized she wasn’t using her network effectively. She’d worked at 3 major organizations in her career and had dealt with people at all levels, inside and outside of the organization.

I had her list out everyone she could think of—past bosses and co-workers, people who’d worked for her, vendors, clients, people she’d met through her job, and so on—she had a list of 500 people.

Some of these people she hadn’t kept up a connection with. But I had her to send an email to them anyway saying:

From that set of emails, she got a job.

This is why networks are so important. They are made up of people who know you, who have connections with others, and so their recommendations will carry weight.

Most people are happy to lend a hand, especially in this situation where it doesn’t require much effort just to pass your name along. They’re glad to help, and now they’ve banked a favor with you. And, if someone they recommend you to hires you, they’ve done that person a favor, too. Everyone wins.

 

 

Download your

Networking Worksheet

Here:

[+ https://careerconfidential.leadpages.co/networking-effectively-worksheet/+]

Become a networking pro!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[][] Grow Your Network

Not only do you want to maintain your current network and keep it fresh with these email contacts, you also want to be actively growing your network.

Everyone you meet has the potential to be a good network connection. If you meet someone and have a good conversation, follow up within about 72 hours to keep yourself fresh in their mind. Send a friendly email to say thanks, and then add them to your bi-annual email list.

Besides organically adding folks as you meet them in your life, you can take steps to build a bigger network very easily online. Social media is incredibly important for your networking success. If you aren’t there, you will miss a huge opportunity for people to find you, to recognize you, and appreciate what you’re doing.

[][] Use LinkedIn

LinkedIn is the most important place you can be online, no matter what career you’re in.

Before you do any networking on LinkedIn, make sure your profile picture is flattering and professional. This means that:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. It should show your head and shoulders

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You should be wearing business-appropriate clothing

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You should be smiling

If you don’t have a photo, add one immediately. LinkedIn is a networking site, and others are not going to want to connect with you if they don’t have some kind of a bond with you, and your smiling photo provides that initial bond.

Then, optimize your profile by going beyond your basic work history. There are sections of your LinkedIn profile where you can list honors and awards, skills, publications, and projects. Talk about your experiences with different employers in detail and give concrete examples of your skills.

The more detailed the information, the easier it will be for those new to your network to find out about you and aim any helpful information your way.

[][] Connect With Everyone You Know On LinkedIn

 

When your profile is good, start actively asking to connect with people you know.

Be careful with this—you don’t want to send blanket “I’d like to connect with you” messages to people who might not remember you or where they know you from. It’s safer to put your LinkedIn profile link in an email to them that reminds them of where you met them, or know them from, and asks to connect, like this:

“Hi, I met you at the ABC meeting, and I was hoping we could connect on LinkedIn. Here is my URL…”

Why is this safer? Let’s say you message 20 people on LinkedIn with invitations to connect. If even one or two of those people click “I don’t know this person” (which is the equivalent of spam), LinkedIn may limit the number of people you can reach out to. To avoid that possibility, send the link to your LinkedIn profile in an email.

When you are connected, begin interacting with them by commenting on things they post.

Then look at people they are connected to. See what they’re doing, and comment appropriately on their posts. This contact will help you eventually connect with them, too.

Again, you don’t want to jump in and ask to connect with people you don’t know (and who don’t know you). This runs the risk of them clicking on ‘I don’t know this person,’ which will limit your ability to message others on LinkedIn.

It’s much better to thoughtfully comment on their posts, or to find their email address (often in their profile) and send them an email directly, asking if they would like to connect with you. Identify yourself, maybe indicate who it is that you both know, and include your LinkedIn URL.

They may go ahead and send you an invitation to connect, which you can accept.

Keep in mind: If you send LinkedIn messages or invitations to connect that don’t get answered, don’t think negatively about it. Many people don’t even look at their LinkedIn messages, so it could very well be that they didn’t see yours.

Always think positively about your networking activity. Set aside any fears or doubts you have and focus on what YOU should be doing to be the kind of person you want to be and to get to where you want to go. Keep going.

 

 

 

 

Feed the White Wolf

 

 

 

 

 

 

[* ][] [*Should You Connect With Recruiters or Headhunters Who Contact You?]

This is a personal decision. You may want to look at whether or not they have very many connections already, or check out their bio to make sure they’re the real deal.

My opinion is—why wouldn’t you connect with them? If you become known to recruiters, they will probably contact you if an opportunity comes available. Why wouldn’t you at least want to know about it? But if you don’t, that’s OK.

You could, instead, write them an email to say, “I’m not sure I want to connect with you, but I do want to give you my information and get to know you. Here’s my resume. What’s the best way to contact you?” Then, add them to your networking email schedule.

 

Find Out More about Recruiters

(How to Choose One and How to Leverage Them to Get Into Top Positions in Your Field)

[+ How to Work With Recruiters Effectively:+]

[+ Get Headhunters to Market You+]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[][] Add New People by Joining Groups on LinkedIn

 

One important way to make connections with people you don’t already know and haven’t worked with is to join groups that are directly related to your industry. How can you find them?

#
p<>{color:#000;}. You can look to see which groups your connections belong to.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. You can use LinkedIn’s search function to look for groups using the words that describe your field. For example, accountants would search using ‘accountant,’ ‘accountants,’ or ‘accounting.’ Sales reps would search groups related to the type of sales they do: ‘medical sales,’ ‘software sales,’ etc. If you are transitioning to a new field, make sure to search with your new field’s terms.

 

When you join the group, begin participating in discussions with your fellow group members. Great discussions often result in invitations to connect.

You can also invite them to connect without risking an ‘I don’t know this person’:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You can join a group that they’re in and message them through the group’s ‘Send Message’ feature.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You can also go to their profile and look at their recent activity. If they’ve posted a status update or commented on something, then you can go in and comment on that. You can even go in and say, “I love this post. I’d like to connect with you here on LinkedIn. How can we do that?” They may send you an invitation, and boom—you’re good.

 

Warning

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Don’t send invitations to connect to recruiters or hiring managers of a job you’ve applied or interviewed for.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Don’t bother sending InMail. This is a very limiting feature, and you don’t need it. Find email addresses to email them directly, or message them through groups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you connect with people on LinkedIn, make a point of directly messaging them or emailing them on the schedule you’ve established.

If you want to message them but don’t know what to say, try looking for a good article online related to what they do, and just send them the link along with a “Hey, I saw this and thought of you.” They will appreciate it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[][] Use Facebook to Grow Your Network, Too

 

 

You can use similar strategies for building your network with Facebook. You can post more personal things about your life on Facebook, because it is intended to be more of a social forum, but don’t make the mistake of posting anything that would be detrimental to your career on Facebook. This includes strong opinions about politics and religion as well as pictures that show you in a less than professional light (drinking, etc.).

Facebook is a public place, and even people who try to hide some of their pictures or posts find that others can find them anyway. Make sure that your posts are “G” rated and OK to be seen by anyone.

It’s also great to post things related to your professional activities here, too, because your job is part of your life. Great things to post would be about an interesting book you’ve read, a business trip, or even questions you may have about how to do something. For example, I recently spoke at a Life Science Conference in Switzerland, so I asked my peeps about booking international travel and what sights I should see while I was there. Your Facebook friends can be a great resource for you.

 

Twitter is nice, but in my opinion, it isn’t the most effective use of your networking time.

 

 

 

 

[* ][] *How to Manage Regular, Personal Contacts with a Large, Constantly Growing Network

 

It may seem overwhelming to keep up with a large number of direct emails, but it can be much easier than you think. Whether you have 70, 700, or 7000 connections and contacts, you can manage them easily.

First, export your LinkedIn connections to your personal email address book. If you haven’t already done so, export your connections right now. LinkedIn makes changes all the time, and you can’t count on always having this ability, so do it now.

After you get them all into your address book, it’s just a matter of executing on those emails.

If you use Outlook, you can send the same email to 49 people at a time. (If you go 50 or over, you run the risk of being tagged as spam by their email servers.) Make sure you enter the addresses as bcc (blind copy) rather than cc, so you don’t advertise everyone’s email address. Every 5 minutes or so, send another batch of 49 (the spacing of your sends also limits your risk of being tagged as spam). Using this process, your total time commitment would be 12 hours.

You may have to do a few hundred a week until you get to all 7000. But just think of all the networking power you will get from those emails.

Another alternative is to get an account with a program like Constant Contact, Vertical Response, Mail Chimp or the free Sugar CRM. With an account, you can take all of those contacts, drop them into the program, and send out your message all at once, without fear of a spam tag.

However you do it, I suggest that you sort your list by category so that you can send an appropriate message, arranging them in an order that makes sense to you, such as:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. people you used to work with

*
p<>{color:#000;}. people you are connected to on LinkedIn

*
p<>{color:#000;}. people you know socially

 

 

Download your

Networking Worksheet

Here[*:*]

[+ https://careerconfidential.leadpages.co/networking-effectively-worksheet/+]

Become a networking pro!

 

 

 

 

 

 

[* ][] [*How to Use Your Network to Find a New Job (and Keep It a Secret from Your Boss)]

This is the best part of regularly sending individual, personalized emails to your network: When you want to go for a new job, your method of communication makes it easy to keep it a secret from your current boss.

When you message people directly through your groups, that is a private communication that can’t be shared publically.

When you send out your emails, you can ask the appropriate people what recruiters they could recommend to you, and then you can begin to contact those recruiters directly so that it doesn’t become public knowledge that you are communicating with them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[* ][] [*How to Manage Aggressively Growing Your Network If You’re an Introvert]

 

 

Because half of the population is introverted (I’m not one of them), I want to address what to do if you are feeling unsure about following my advice about reaching out to others. You must get over any hesitation, because your network is just as important to you as the extrovert’s network is to them.

If you hesitate to reach out to people, stop for a minute and really think about what it is that’s holding you back. What is it that you may be afraid of?

Whatever it may be, one way to get over this is to think: ‘What’s the worst thing that can happen in this situation?’ I use this myself, when I hesitate to follow through on something that I know would be good for me. I think about the worst thing that can happen and the best thing that can happen.

Let me give you an example: When I first started my business in recruiting, I wanted to go to Chris Gleason who was the CEO of Ventana Medical Systems. I knew they had tremendous turnover and I wanted to do business with them. I had to have a little conversation with myself about that. He was the CEO of a large company, and I did know him because I had worked with him over at Chiron.

I thought, “What is the worst thing that can happen?” Well, he could ignore my message—OK, that doesn’t hurt too much. He may write back and say, “I’m not interested”—not a great outcome, but not something that would damage me for life. He may push me over to someone else—OK, that could be interesting. Or, he might speak to me. When I thought about it that way, I really couldn’t figure out why I wouldn’t just do it.

From that conversation with him, I landed one of the biggest customers I’d ever had. I placed more than 100 people at Ventana Medical Systems. Chris and I developed a pretty close relationship until he passed away last year. That relationship benefitted both of us. If I had not reached out to him, none of that would have happened—not because he wouldn’t want to work with me, but because he was a very busy person. If I hadn’t reached out to him, someone else would have, and they would have gotten that business.

So, always think about the risk and then think about the opportunity. The opportunity is almost always going to be bigger than the risk. There is no question that there are friendships, opportunities, and rewards waiting for you among the people you know now and the people you will meet along the way.

In our Total Access Coaching Club, we coach job seekers every week to reach out for what they want—ask for the interview and ask for the offer. Asking directly is much bolder than what most of them are used to—but every week, we hear them tell us that it works. They come back with triumphant stories of how they got a spectacular result from taking that first step, and they are extremely happy.

Always remember that you have things to offer, but if they don’t know about you, they can’t benefit from that.

 

 

 

[][] Conclusion

 

Building and maintaining a good networking is simple:

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Reach out to your existing network and try to help them if you can.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Be friendly and enthusiastic about adding new people to your network.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Maintain a deliberate schedule of contacting your network directly and individually.

 

Doing all of these things consistently will keep your network fresh year after year, so that you have a wealth of resources at your fingertips any time and every time you need it.

[* ][] [*If You Enjoyed this eBook, Get Our Other Career Confidential Coaching Series eBooks….]

 

 

How to Ask for a Raise:

Get Paid What You’re Worth

 

Building Career Confidence:

How to Increase Your Confidence & Win at Work

 

Climbing the Corporate Ladder:

How to Get Promoted

 

How to Work With Recruiters Effectively –

[+ Get Headhunters to Market You+]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[][] BONUS SECTION

[* ][] [*Sample of ‘How to Work With Recruiters’
from the Career Confidential Coaching Series]

Contents

Cover Page 1

Letter from the Author 5

About the Author 9

Introduction 12

Who Should Be In Your Network? 13

How to Refresh and Maintain Your Network 19

What If You Haven’t Spoken To Someone In Years? 24

Is It ‘Phony’? 27

What If You Resigned From the Company? 29

What If You Were Asked to Resign? 32

What If You Didn’t Know Them Well, or They Don’t Remember You? 33

What If You’ve Been Out of the Workforce for a While? 34

The Benefits of a Maintained Network 36

Grow Your Network 41

Use LinkedIn 42

Connect With Everyone You Know On LinkedIn 43

Should You Connect With Recruiters or Headhunters Who Contact You? 46

Add New People by Joining Groups on LinkedIn 47

Use Facebook to Grow Your Network, Too 49

How to Manage Regular, Personal Contacts with a Large, Constantly Growing Network 51

How to Use Your Network to Find a New Job (and Keep It a Secret from Your Boss) 53

How to Manage Aggressively Growing Your Network If You’re an Introvert 54

Conclusion 57

If You Enjoyed this eBook, Get Our Other Career Confidential Coaching Series eBooks…. 58

BONUS SECTION 59

Sample of ‘How to Work With Recruiters’
from the Career Confidential Coaching Series 59

How Recruiters Work With Job Seekers 65

Epilogue 71

If You Liked This eBook,
Please Give It 5 Stars! 73

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

What’s the most powerful place you can be in as a job seeker? Having someone the company knows and trusts recommending you and marketing you for the job—that someone is a recruiter.

Recruiters, also known as headhunters (or sometimes, “body snatchers”) are one of the best resources on the planet for job seekers. Why?

 

Because, (1) there are many plum jobs that can ONLY be accessed through a recruiter; and (2) in a nutshell, recruiters are outstanding and focused networkers—and networking is still the most effective way to get a job.

 

Once you understand how the recruiter’s system works, you can use it to your advantage.

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. The best jobs are not on job board listings, but a recruiter knows where they are.

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. A recruiter knows the inside scoop in your industry – who’s looking, who’s growing, and who you don’t want to be within 50 yards of.

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Once you get submitted for a position, a recruiter will work with you to help you get that job.

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. If you maintain your relationship with certain recruiters, you can fast-track your career because you will hear about the best and most exciting opportunities before anyone else.

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You can get and keep an inside track in the job market, if you know how to make a recruiter love you.

 

In this book, you will learn everything you need to know about working with recruiters effectively and getting them to market you:

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Types of recruiters you should be familiar with

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. How recruiters work with job seekers

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Whether you are a good candidate for a recruiter (and how to become one if you are currently not)

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. How to find recruiters appropriate for you

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. What will make recruiters love to work with you and be enthusiastic about marketing you to employers

 

A recruiter is a facilitator, a gatekeeper, and a fountain of industry knowledge. This person can be a tremendous asset to you not just in your current job search, but also in your long-term career goals.

 

 

If opportunity doesn’t knock, then build a door.

-Milton Berle

 

[][] How Recruiters Work With Job Seekers

 

 

The business of any recruiter is to provide good candidates to companies with open job positions.

 

Recruiters make money when the candidate they provide is hired by the client company. The client (hiring company) pays the recruiting fee, and everyone wins – the recruiter gets a paycheck, the client gets an outstanding employee, and the job-seeker gets a great job.

 

In this arrangement:

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The employer is the ‘customer,’ who’s looking to buy (hire) a solution for their company’s problem (task that needs to get done).

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The recruiter is the ‘sales rep’ or ‘broker’ (a little bit like a real estate agent).

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The job seeker is the ‘product’, or the commodity in the business transaction between the recruiter and the company.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s how it works:

 

In the beginning of the process, the recruiter gets his or her marching orders from the company:

 

They want someone with X, Y, and Z qualities or experience. That’s the only kind of person (or product, if you will) they will look at.

 

If the recruiter can successfully deliver a candidate with X, Y, and Z (and even better, W—which would be a little something extra, like a skill or experience the company didn’t ask for but would benefit greatly from) and the company hires that candidate, then the recruiter gets paid.

 

Since the recruiter has his or her own rent to pay and groceries to buy, finding a candidate they can ‘sell’ to the company is the highest priority on the recruiter’s ‘To Do” list.

 

I’m telling you this so you’ll understand one very important thing: Please don’t take anything in this process personally. This is a business transaction. Don’t get your feelings hurt and certainly don’t assume that anything means you are not a worthy candidate for a job. Job searching is a numbers game.

 

So what kind of candidate tends to attract the attention of a recruiter?

 

One of my favorite ways to describe this is by telling you about the differences between a Bluefin tuna vs. a catfish.

 

I once saw a news item about the most expensive fish in the world. It sold in Japan for $1.8M. It was a Bluefin tuna.

 

Why was it so expensive? It was expensive because it was rare.

Meanwhile, my son was at his grandparents’ house having a fine time doing some fishing of his own, catching catfish…a lot of catfish.

Now, I’ve got to tell you: I love catfish, and so do a lot of people. Catfish are great. The thing about catfish is that they’re not rare; they’re easy to find. Companies can usually find catfish fairly easily. They come to recruiters for help when they need a Bluefin tuna.

 

Who is a Bluefin tuna? This is someone with qualities or experience that is more rare, or specialized, in their field. It’s a ‘special order’ candidate that the company can’t find easily on their own.

If you are currently a catfish, a recruiter is going to be less interested in you as a candidate than they will be if you’re a tuna. Do recruiters still place catfish? Yes, but less often than they place tuna.

 

And, just because you’re a catfish now doesn’t mean you won’t become a tuna later. It all depends on what experiences you have, what training you get, and what skills you develop.

 

Sometimes job seekers get upset when you send your resume to a recruiter and the recruiter doesn’t call you—even if you are a tuna. Please don’t get upset.

 

If the recruiter doesn’t call you, it usually means that they don’t have a job at that moment that you are a good fit for. Or, to be more accurate, they don’t have a job at that moment for which they think they can ‘sell’ you to the company…because remember, they must provide what the client asks for in a client. If you fit that profile, that’s great. If not, the recruiter can’t do anything about it because the recruiter’s priority is to please their customer.

However, even if the recruiter can’t place you now, that could all change next week or next month or 6 months from now. It all depends on their clients (companies and corporations).

 

Recruiters put all submitted resumes into their personal database. When a company hires them to find a candidate, they go through this database first, searching ‘their’ candidates to see who might be a potential match.

 

The recruiter’s process:

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The recruiter (through whatever arrangement they have) is tasked by the company to find a candidate for X position.

 

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The recruiter looks through their database and if they can’t find a candidate they think the company would love, they search other avenues…their networks, LinkedIn, Facebook, etc.

 

 

If you want to see the full list, go and get the book:

[+ [*How to Work With Recruiters Effectively:*+
Get Headhunters to Market You]]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[][] Epilogue

 

Now that you’ve read this, what are you going to do with what you’ve learned?

 

Use your worksheet to map out what steps you need to take now to network effectively.

 

Get it here:

 

Link

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[][] [If You Liked This eBook,
Please Give It 5 Stars!]

 

 

 

Reader reviews are so important…both for the success of this book and for me, so I know that I have given you what you need to be wildly successful.

 

If you now feel as if you can tackle networking with confidence, let me know!

 

If you put the tips and principles of this book into practice and it results in amazing networking experiences for you, let me know!

 

 

[+ Click Here to Review this Book+]

 

 

 

 

 

www.CareerConfidential.com

74


Networking Effectively: How to Build Your Network for Career Success

Do you hate networking? Do you want to learn how to network more effectively in less time? Networking Effectively: How to Build Your Network for Career Success shows you how fast and easy it is to build a quality network that will benefit you many times throughout your career. Discover: • How to Network Genuinely and Authentically Without Painful Small Talk • Who Should Be In Your Professional Network (It’s More Than You Think) • How to Keep Your Network ‘Fresh’ So It’s Easy to Tap When You Need It • How to Reach Out to People You Haven’t Spoken to In Years Without Any Awkwardness • What to Do If You Resigned (or Were Asked to Leave) • What to Say to Everyone in Your Network (Includes Sample Emails) • How to Grow Your Network by Leaps and Bounds • How to Network on LinkedIn Without the Mistakes Most People Make • How to Manage Aggressively Growing Your Network If You’re an Introvert PLUS – Download a Free Worksheet to Kickstart Your Networking Success! In just a few minutes, you’ll know how to network like a pro. BONUS SECTION: How to Work with Recruiters!

  • Author: PeggyMcKee
  • Published: 2015-10-15 19:50:46
  • Words: 8700
Networking Effectively: How to Build Your Network for Career Success Networking Effectively: How to Build Your Network for Career Success