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I want to speak Chinese...NOW!

I want to speak Chinese…NOW!

 

A 1-Minute Chinese book

 

Written and published Rowan Kohll

Cover illustration by Chen Hao

 

Copyright Rowan Kohll, 2017

Shakespir Edition

 

http://1minutechinese.my-free.website/

 

Licence Notes and Legal Disclaimer:

 

Thank you for downloading this book! Please remember that it is the copyrighted property of the author, and may not be reproduced, copied or distributed for commercial or non-commercial purposes. If you enjoyed reading it, please consider leaving a review, and encourage your friends to download their own copy.

 

The information contained in this book is based on the author’s personal experiences and observations. The author does not assume any liability whatsoever for the use of or inability to use any or all information contained in this book, and accepts no responsibility for any loss or damages of any kind that may be incurred by the reader as a result of actions arising from the use of information found in this book. The author reserves the right to make any changes he deems necessary to future versions of the publication to ensure its accuracy.

 

 

Contents

 

Why you should read this book

 

How the system works

 

Hello, thank you, and goodbye!

 

Yes and No

 

Have and Haven’t

 

Good and Bad

 

Conclusion

 

Appendix: A Poem

 

About the Author

 

Other books by Rowan Kohll

 

 

Chapter 1

Why you should read this book

 

Chinese is fast becoming one of the most popular languages to learn in the world. Unfortunately, as languages go, it is a hard one to learn. Chinese comes from a completely different family of languages than English, and makes learning French, or German, or Spanish look easy by comparison.

I have seen many people experience this problem over the years I have lived in China. People who earnestly want to learn Chinese but, confronted by the sheer difficulty of the language, often simply give up – sometimes after spending months or years saying they want to learn it.

Fortunately, there is a solution: the 1-Minute Chinese books. These are a series of books designed to teach you everything you need to know about reading, speaking and writing Chinese, as swiftly as possible. They are so named because, with the special mnemonic “memory tricks” in them, you can learn to read and speak Chinese much more quickly than usual.

This book uses the same principles and with the same aim, but in a slightly different way. It’s a crash course in the language, a book you can start and finish over a cup of coffee – and then get up and be able to speak more Chinese than some people manage in years!

It could, in a way, be seen as an introduction to the 1-Minute Chinese series.

However, unlike the other books in the series, this book is not for people who want to learn Chinese, as in “spend hours studying the language” – it’s for people who want to speak it, right now. Read it, and you’ll be able to speak Chinese straight away.

This book is deliberately short and simple. I could have expanded it, adding all sorts of helpful details, tips and stories, but then it would basically have turned into the 1-Minute Chinese books which have been written already. This book is something different. It was made for the complete beginner; for the person who wants to speak Chinese as soon as possible. It was written for the person who says: “I want to speak Chinese…now!”

 

So turn the page…and you will do so!

 

 

Chapter 2

How the system works

 

The 1-Minute Chinese books use a revolutionary new method to learn the language. Traditionally, languages are learned by rote, repeating and reciting, which a slow, boring, painful process. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

The methods described in this book are called mnemonics. What are these? Mnemonics are “memory devices”. They work by “hooking ideas together” so you can remember them easily.

You probably know some mnemonics already. For example, maybe you remember your teachers in school telling you that Big Elephants Can Always Understand Small Elephants? That was a mnemonic for spelling “because”. Or that Every Good Boy Deserves Football? A music mnemonic, to remember the E-G-B-D-F order of notes on the lines of a stave); or to Never Eat Shredded Wheat, the North-East-South-West order of the points of the compass.

 

You can also use mnemonics to learn languages. It’s easy! All you have to do is link the English word to another English word that sounds like the foreign word, making a mental image or cartoon. And then, whenever you think of the foreign word, you will remember the cartoon and link it to the English meaning.

 

Let’s look at an example to see how it’s done. The French word for “fish” is “poisson”. This sounds a lot like the English word “poison”. How can we create a mnemonic link, or “memory hook” here? Just form a mental image of a FISH having a drink, and dying of POISON. Make the image as cartoonish and absurd as you like; and from now on, whenever you think of wither “fish” or “poisson” your mind will flash back to the mental image which links the two words. It really is that quick and simple.

 

And now, let’s see how we can use mnemonics to learn Chinese!

 

 

Chapter 3

Hello, thank you, and goodbye

 

I think it’s reasonable to say that these are among the first things you’ll want to learn to say in Chinese, and the ones you’ll use the most thereafter. So let’s start with them.

 

Hello is “nǐ hǎo,” pronounced, roughly, as “nee how”. How can we make this into a mnemonic? Well, just think of English words with the same – or similar – sounds, and make a funny picture out of it. Imagine that whenever two Chinese people meet, the first thing they ask about is aching joints – “HOW is your KNEE?” or “knee how?”

 

Thank you is “xiè xie” – roughly, “sh’yay sh’yay,” which sounds like “share, share.” Imagine someone being given a present of lots of money, thanking the giver, and insisting they share it. “Thank you,” he says. “Share! Share!”

 

Goodbye is “zài jiàn” – roughly, “tsai tsee-en”. This sounds a bit like the word “sightseeing”, so just imagine someone saying goodbye to you and telling you they’re going sightseeing.

 

And that’s it! You have now learned the three most useful phrases in Chinese. Congratulations!

Ready to carry on? Then – let’s learn to say…

 

 

Chapter 4

Yes and No

 

In fact, there is no word for “yes” in Chinese. You just say “it is,” rather like we do in English. This is “shì,” which sounds like the English word “sure”.

How can you remember this? Just imagine someone saying: “Are you SURE?” and you answering “YES!”

 

“No” is “bù”, pronounced “boo”. To remember this, just imagine shouting “Boo!” at someone every time you want to say no to them.

 

Although these are surely the two most useful words in the language, there is another one. Let’s learn…

 

Chapter 5

Have and Haven’t

 

The Chinese for “haven’t” is “méi yǒu”. Sounds like “mayo,” as in mayonnaise. Whenever you think of “don’t have”, just imagine using mayonnaise instead of the thing you’re lacking. “Do you have any money?” “No, I don’t have any – but I can pay with this jar of mayo!”

This is such a useful phrase in Chinese because it can be used to mean so many things. “Méi yǒu” can mean haven’t, hasn’t, isn’t, doesn’t exist, wasn’t, won’t be, and much, much more! It can be used to answer virtually any question with a negative.

Just imagine how funny it would be, carrying a jar of mayonnaise around, trying to give it to people any time they ask you for something. A silly picture? Good! That makes it easy to remember.

 

And how to say “have” (again, a word with many, many uses)? Just say “yǒu” – which sounds like the English slang greeting or affirmative “yo!”

 

So far in this book we’ve learned basic greetings, agreements and disagreements, and answers. Now let’s move on to describing things – and how useful it is to say…

 

 

Chapter 6

Good and Bad

 

If you had to choose only two adjectives to use, surely these would be the ones! Knowing how to say good and bad is all you need in many situations. And that’s the point of this whole book – the words in it were chosen to give you the best value.

 

“Good” is “hǎo” – spoken with a falling-rising inflection which makes it sound like “how?” in English. To remember it, just put those two words together and ask that most important of questions – “HOW can I be GOOD?”

 

As for “bad,” that’s very easy all you do is say “not good” – or “bù hǎo” (pronounced “boo how”), two words we’ve already learned.

 

By getting this far in the book, you have now learned more Chinese than many people learn in years of trying – and learned it a great deal more quickly!

 

Which means it’s time for us to go to…

 

 

Chapter 7

Conclusion: The End, and the Beginning!

 

And there you have it. Congratulations, you can now speak Chinese! And you will find that a little will go a long way. In the short time it took you to read this book, you’ve learned more Chinese than most other non-Chinese people in the world. You can meet and greet people. You can say what you like and don’t like. You can agree and disagree. You can in short, speak Chinese. Well done!

 

So, where do you go from here? Well, if you want to learn more Chinese (of course you do!) can I suggest that you download the other 1-Minute Chinese books (full details given at the end of this book). In them, you will find everything you need to know about speaking, reading and writing Chinese.

 

And finally, if you’ve enjoyed this and found some value in it, I’d be very grateful if you’d take a moment to leave a review saying so.

 

 

Chapter 8

Appendix: A Poem

 

There are many types of mnemonics. Poems are a very old type – the linking together or chains of sentences by rhyme and rhythm made it easier to remember songs and stories.

 

The poem below summarises the content of this book. Read it, memorise it, and you will find you’ve learned to speak Chinese!

 

 

Wǒ huì shuō Zhōngwén,” or “I can speak Chinese!”

 

First things first: we must know how

To say hello – it is: “nǐ hǎo!”

 

Next, we want to learn to say

“Thank you,” which is said: “xiè xie”

 

Then, goodbye, or see you again,

In Chinese, this is “zài jiàn!”

 

Are you certain? Yes, I’m “shì”

Because, you see “yes” rhymes with “sure!”

 

And for “no,” what should we do?

Easy – simply answer “bù!”

 

The word for “have” is “yǒu”, and so

“Haven’t” is pronounced “méi yǒu.”

 

We know “hello” is said “nǐ hǎo”

Which means “you good?” since “good” is “hǎo.”

 

This leads on to “bad” – and now

Remember that this is “bù hǎo.”

 

If you just learn this poem, then

You can say, “Wǒ huì shuō Zhōngwén!”

 

About the Author

 

Rowan Kohll was born in 1980 and grew up in Swansea, in Great Britain. After finishing his studies at University he realised he had no idea what to do next, and so took a course in teaching English, hopped on a plane to China, and found his destiny.

 

Rowan has lived in China since 2003, spending years teaching, first in English schools and then in international colleges. He is currently a teacher at Dulwich College in Suzhou. His hobbies include travelling, clowning around with balloon models, spending time with his beautiful wife Lulu and their wonderful son Jamie, enjoying Chinese food and reading science fiction.

 

You can learn more about Rowan and the 1-Minute Chinese series at

 

http://1minutechinese.my-free.website/

 

or contact him at [email protected].

 

 

Other books by Rowan Kohll

If you enjoyed reading this book then you’ll love reading 1-Minute Chinese, Books 1 and 2. Both books can be downloaded from Shakespir.com as multi-format ebooks (meaning they can be read on iPads, kindles, any other ebook reader, read as pdfs or even read online, all for free).

These two books are crammed full of tips, tricks and shortcuts to make Chinese not just easy, but fun. Look inside, and you will find:

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Cartoons that make Chinese characters simple to understand and easy to remember!

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Brilliant mnemonics that will help you to remember how to read, speak and understand Chinese – and even how to remember those frustrating Chinese tones!

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Fact files full of useful tips on the characters learned – where they came from, other words they are used in, and tips on how best to use them.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. A Chinese phrasebook that gives you the Chinese you’ll really need, along with appendices on colours and numbers, and a dozen other topics.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. An introduction to Anglicisms, including a comprehensive list of words that you can already say in Chinese, even if you don’t yet know it!

*
p<>{color:#000;}. A collection of Chinese characters that you can read just by looking at them!

*
p<>{color:#000;}. A wonderful array of two-for-the-price-of-one words to double your learning time.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Information on the very best books and online resources specially selected to help you to learn Chinese!

 

Book 1 can be found at

https://www.Shakespir.com/books/view/480744

and Book 2 can be found at

https://www.Shakespir.com/books/view/571401

 

Full links, as well as plenty of other information and resources, can be found at http://1minutechinese.my-free.website/

 

 


I want to speak Chinese...NOW!

Chinese is fast becoming one of the most popular languages to learn in the world. Unfortunately, as languages go, it is a hard one to learn. Chinese comes from a completely different family of languages than English, and makes learning French, or German, or Spanish look easy by comparison. I have seen many people experience this problem over the years I have lived in China. People who earnestly want to learn Chinese but, confronted by the sheer difficulty of the language, often simply give up – sometimes after spending months or years saying they want to learn it. Fortunately, there is a solution: the 1-Minute Chinese books. These are a series of books designed to teach you everything you need to know about reading, speaking and writing Chinese, as swiftly as possible. They are so named because, with the special mnemonic “memory tricks” in them, you can learn to read and speak Chinese much more quickly than usual. This book was made for the complete beginner; for the person who wants to speak Chinese as soon as possible. It was written for the person who says: “I want to speak Chinese…now!” So just download this book…and you will do so!

  • ISBN: 9781370254453
  • Author: Rowan Kohll
  • Published: 2017-04-03 16:35:10
  • Words: 2266
I want to speak Chinese...NOW! I want to speak Chinese...NOW!