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How to Create a Bestselling Idea

Introduction

Have you always wanted to be an author, writing a bestselling novel and creating a career for yourself by sitting at your computer? Do you want to create amazing books that captivate reader’s imaginations while stimulating their emotions and drawing them further into your universe? Would you rather educate them on a task or process, maybe even a historical theory that you feel is life changing and ground breaking? Do you have that idea yet or possibly a direction that you want to go with it? This is the subject, and it can do a lot for you. Once you know what avenue you want to take this journey down, the next part will become a lot trickier.

Many ideas fall apart in the conception stage, because they’re not fleshed out enough or organized properly. A best selling idea is wonderful, but you have to craft the entire story around it. The formation of things that compliment that idea is what makes it the best. Think of it like this. Thomas Edison is credited for creating the first incandescent light bulb, a revolutionary idea at its time. This object was billed to replace candles and help illuminate even the darkest of areas. The problem though, is that this light bulb is useless without electricity. While the light bulb was a great idea, the application and tools to make it succeed was the best selling idea.

That example may not have made it completely clear. For an author, a bestselling idea can come from anywhere and can be about anything, so long as it’s relevant and people want to read about it. The subject is really what they need to come up with a bestselling idea. By following the system outlined in this small book, you can convert any subject into a working novel.

This work is created by Paradigm Literary Services (www.paradigmliterary.com). The system proposed in this short work is the system used by the staff to help prospective authors turn their basic ideas into a working, literary outline. Our staff is trained to help any author turn any idea into a working outline that can be turned into a novel or manuscript.

What is a Working Literary Outline and How Does it Help?

A working literary outline is the basis that a work will flow from the start to the finish. This outline can be read by anyone to create the work that you’re after. Whether the author wants to create the work themselves or outsource to a ghostwriter, this outline will provide an easy to follow road map. This outline will be based around the overall theme and subject, bridging each point with subsequent sub points, to create a working flow for the work. Essentially, someone can see this outline and be able to follow your work without ever having to open up the pages to the manuscript.

This outline helps tremendously because it will allow you to organize your thoughts and create a template for your work. This outline is crucial for your organization, because it will allow you to write with ease, not having to backtrack to conception and rethinking your thoughts. You will be able to see potential plot holes and gaps in your story or theory, while not wasting your time creating a story that you will ultimately have to change. The working outline will save you time by keeping your story organized.

How Does the Process Start?

The best ideas that come to us are the ones that are well thought out, with very little holes that we can poke in them, but are so imaginative that we can’t think up any more questions to ask. The best ideas are the ones that captivate your imagination so much, that the reader becomes engrossed by the story.

~Chris Hamby, Executive Director of Creative Media for a Publishing Company and Literary Agent

During this portion of the work, you will see an actual diagram of the conception process performed by Paradigm Literary Services (www.paradigmliterary.com). These ideas and this outline is owned by Paradigm Literary Services (www.paradigmliterary.com) as well as the subsequent book written from it. This diagram is meant to help you understand how this process works, and if you require assistance with conceptualization, please visit Paradigm Literary Services (www.paradigmliterary.com) for more information.

To create a bestselling idea, the first thing you need is the subject that you want to talk about. If you’re focusing on fiction, the best way to start is by selecting which genre you want to write about. If you’re focusing on non-fiction, then the best way to start is by selecting what fascinates you. The subject is where everything begins. Before coming up with a setting or characters or plot devices that you really want to incorporate, the first thing that you need is a subject. There is no trick for finding a subject; select one that interests you and you will do well. If you’re interested in finance, write about something related to finance. Stick to what interests you and you will do well. With fiction, you have to be a bit more selective, opting to narrow down your subject and really get a bit more specific. Instead of saying, Romance, your subject should be, “College aged romance between people who would not typically go for one another.” From there you can build your entire story.

Once you have your subject, the next thing to do is to come up with ideas related to the subject. In this, you will essentially toss up every idea related to your subject that you can think of to make it work.

Our non-fiction subject is “Credit Repair.” We came up with several things related to this subject, including: debt collectors, debt buyers, bankruptcy, foreclosure, repossession, statute of limitations, active dept, deferred debt, secured debt, unsecured debt, credit card debt, medical debt, and debt to income ratio.

Our fiction subject is “Vampires.”We came up with an engrossing amount of things related to this topic, including: killed by the sun, harmed by vervaine, killed by a wooden stake, does not glitter, superhuman strength, turns into a bat, mortal enemy of the werewolf, drinks blood, stalks prey, natural predator, silent killer, cunning, emotional, deceptive, dangerous.

Once we have listed all that we could come up with in regards to our topic, we will start combining the ideas into broader scopes while forming the overall idea for what we want to accomplish.

Our non-fiction subject is very simple and straight forward. Credit repair combines to these core ideas: Types of debt, Negative issues on your credit score, Positives on your credit score, Consequences of nonpayment and default, and options for repayment.

Our fiction subject is a lot more complicated because ultimately, you have to narrow your scope. While the main subject is “Vampires,” you have to narrow that down just a bit because it’s so broad. We narrowed it down to a war with the Werewolves because Vampire Romance is overplayed. Because of this, we had to create a second subject for werewolves: killed with a silver stake, changes with the moon, incredibly furry, no control over transformation, harmed by wolves bane. Once we had that, we were able to combine our ideas into the plot points we wanted. Vampires stealthy attack a pack of werewolves and the battle that ensues. Predator vs Predator. Vampire working against time. Werewolf trying to stall to use the sun. There were a lot of ideas.

Once you have these points, then you can construct your map. The first thing to do is to mention how you want your work to start. The second thing to do is to figure out how you want the work to end.

In our non-fiction work, we wanted the work to begin with the reader understanding the problems of bad credit and we wanted it to end with them having knowledge that, while difficult, there is a way to fix it.

In our fiction work, we wanted the work to begin with an initial attack from the werewolf stabbing a vampire in the chest with a wooden stake, starting a war between a clan of Vampires and a pack of Werewolves. We wanted the work to end with a final showdown between the lead Vampire and lead Werewolf fighting a climactic battle of heroes before the sun comes up.

After you have those two points, you’re able to piece the rest of the work together.

In our non-fiction work, we set it up like this:

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The reader understands the problems of bad credit

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The reader learns the types of credit and what happens if you don’t pay

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The reader learns how various things effect your credit score

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The reader learns about what options he or she has in terms of repayment

In our fiction work, we set it up like this:

#
p<>{color:#000;}. A werewolf attacks a vampire and kills him in cold blood, starting a war

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The vampires send an emissary to discuss, only to be killed.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The vampires plot and attack

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Everyone is killed with the exception of the two leaders

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Epic Final Battle

From this point, you can build your outline.

How do I build a Working Literary Outline

The working outline is fairly simple from here, because all you’re doing is adding onto the bullet points you’ve already made. This is where you will start to add some of the other aspects. If you’re working on a fiction story, this will be where you come up with your characters, settings, and other plot devices that you want to incorporate to bridge each point together.

For our Vampire and Werewolf story, we’re going to skip the character creation and setting, simply because it’s not needed for this example. What we will show you is the process of how we bridge the story points together.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. A werewolf attacks a vampire and kills him in cold blood, starting a war

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Sneak attack at the Vampire base

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Werewolf stakes him from behind

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Another vampire sees him

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p<>{color:#000;}. Attacks him to scare him away

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Warns the others

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The vampires send an emissary to discuss, only to be wounded. (changed to fit better)

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Vampire leader does not want a full scale war

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Old enough to remember the last one

####
p<>{color:#000;}. Incredibly bloody

####
p<>{color:#000;}. Lost too many of his friends

###
p<>{color:#000;}. His current clan is not strong enough

####
p<>{color:#000;}. Very young

####
p<>{color:#000;}. Very naïve

####
p<>{color:#000;}. Not battle hardened or aggressive

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Emissary comes back wounded

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Wooden Stake in his lung, just above his heart

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Informs the Vampire leader that the Werewolves do not forgive

####
p<>{color:#000;}. Bad feelings still remain

####
p<>{color:#000;}. Prefer conflict over peace

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The vampires plot and attack

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Rally all of their troops

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Use what coordinates are available to attack when the moon does not hang overhead

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Everyone is killed with the exception of the two leaders

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Very bloody battle

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Every vampire and werewolf are killed with the exception of the two old nemesis

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Speech from the werewolf about how he will never live in servitude to the vampire

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Speech from the vampire about how they were created to live in servitude

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Epic Final Battle

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Vampire ends up driving a silver stake into the heart of the werewolf

###
p<>{color:#000;}. But not before he drives a wooden stake into the vampires leg

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Vampire is immobilized as the sun comes up

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Immolates

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Only his jewelry is left sitting on his ash

For our story on Credit Repair, it’s a bit more focused and centrally flowing.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The reader understands the problems of bad credit

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Tough to get a house

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Tough to get a car

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Tough to get a decent place to rent

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Tough to do anything

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The reader learns the types of credit and what happens if you don’t pay

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Unsecured

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Credit Cards

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Medical bills

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Student Loans

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Utility bills

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Pretty much any type of debt that isn’t attached to something tangible

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Can be sued in court for the delinquent amount.

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Secured

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p<>{color:#000;}. Home

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p<>{color:#000;}. Car

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Some Credit Cards

####
p<>{color:#000;}. Large fee to join

####
p<>{color:#000;}. Sometimes half of the balance to secure the card

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p<>{color:#000;}. Can lose what you secured the debt with (home, car, or deposit)

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The reader learns how various things effect your credit score

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Things that will damage it

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Everything but paying the bill on time

####
p<>{color:#000;}. Nonpayment

####
p<>{color:#000;}. Repossession

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p<>{color:#000;}. Foreclosure

####
p<>{color:#000;}. Bankruptcy

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p<>{color:#000;}. Defaulting

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p<>{color:#000;}. Things that will help it

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Showing good payment history

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p<>{color:#000;}. Showing a good debt to income ratio

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p<>{color:#000;}. Paying your bills on time

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p<>{color:#000;}. Not having too many open accounts

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p<>{color:#000;}. Not having too many inquiries

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The reader learns about what options he or she has in terms of repayment

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Pay secured debt first

###
p<>{color:#000;}. You have something to lose on the front end

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Hard to pay your bills if you don’t have a car

##
p<>{color:#000;}. Pay your up to date debt second

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Keep this in good standing

###
p<>{color:#000;}. Have to have some good to counter the bad

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p<>{color:#000;}. Talk to your debtors

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p<>{color:#000;}. In some cases, it may be better off to pay one at a time

####
p<>{color:#000;}. Too many open accounts can adversely affect your score

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p<>{color:#000;}. Make it more manageable for you

#####
p<>{color:#000;}. The debt isn’t going anywhere

#####
p<>{color:#000;}. Be smart about how you get out of this

In conclusion, once you have your subject, you can build your bestselling idea from there, just as we did here. The right idea is out there for you, you just have to make sure you put it together right.

Paradigm Literary Services (www.paradigmliterary.com) offers Author Conception services geared toward helping authors take their initial idea and subject and helping them create it into a working idea, capable of becoming something fantastic that they can be proud of. Their staff is trained to assist any author through the creative process, helping them from the start of creating that bestselling idea, to the conclusion. For more information, contact Paradigm Literary Services (www.paradigmliterary.com) .


How to Create a Bestselling Idea

  • Author: Paradigm Literary
  • Published: 2016-09-12 21:35:08
  • Words: 2286
How to Create a Bestselling Idea How to Create a Bestselling Idea