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HOW TO BUILD AND OPERATE A CONTENT MARKETING MACHINE

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How To Build and operaTe a

Content Marketing MaChine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4 The Content
p((((((((((<>{color:#000;}. 3 Marketing

Machine

 

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eBook Created by Kapost in partnership with MarKeto

the Content Marketing MaChine

TaBle of ConTenTs

 

Introduction 3

The Machine 4

Plan 6

Marketo Machine 8
Sidebar: Kelly Services 9

Team 11

Marketo Machine 13
Sidebar: AT&T 14

Ideas 15

Marketo Machine 16

Production & Distribution 17

Marketo Machine 20
Sidebar: Original9 21

Audience Development 24

Marketo Machine 26
Sidebar: Distilled 28

Conversion & Nurturing 30

Marketo Machine 32

Measure & Optimize 33

Marketo Machine 34
Sidebar: Monetate 35

Building Your Own Machine (versus Renting Someone Else’s) 37

Worksheets 38

Plan 39
Team 46
Ideas 47
Production & Distribution 48
Audience Development 52
Conversion & Nurturing 54

inTroduCTion

The markeTing world has been turned upside down. It was not many years ago that marketers were still focused on interruption marketing: trying to place their product message in front of prospects’ attention to generate leads and customers. But through the Internet, this has quickly changed, and marketers recognize they must practice the opposite. Now, in order to create the relationship and earn the permission to sell to prospects, companies must produce relevant thought leadership content, not only content about their own product.

 

The critical ingredient to creating engagement, trust, and thought leadership positioning is content. Content is what attracts prospects at the top of the funnel and content is what nurtures leads down the funnel.

 

Marketers now understand that brands must become publishers. The “why” of content marketing is no longer in question. But marketers are still asking “how?” How can marketing departments generate the high quality and quantity of content necessary to succeed in the new marketing era?

 

This eBook will explain how marketers can build and operate a Content Marketing Machine that outputs compelling, relevant content that attracts leads at the top of the funnel and leads them down it. The eBook outlines a Content Marketing Machine framework developed by Kapost, the leading provider of content marketing software. It then profiles how Marketo, one of the pioneers of content marketing and one of its leading practitioners, operates its own content marketing both at the top of the funnel and moving down it, using its own marketing automation software to promote content and nurture leads. The eBook also provides perspectives from other content marketing leaders on the different stages. Lastly, the eBook concludes with worksheets that walk step-by-step through the process of building and running your own Content Marketing Machine.

THe MaCHine

FirsT, let’s take a look at an overview of the machine, all of its components, smokestacks and parts, so that you can see the big picture of what you’re going to build and operate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Content Marketing Machine

© 2012 Kapost |^ ^www.kapost.com Marketo | www.marketo.com 4

MaCHine overview

 

Here’s a description of the different components of the machine:

 

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p<>{color:#000;}. Plan: Create a strategic structure for your content marketing

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p<>{color:#000;}. Team: Assemble the group to manage your content marketing operation

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p<>{color:#000;}. Ideas: Generate a steady flow of ideas for your content

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p<>{color:#000;}. Production and Distribution: Assemble your content and distribute it across the web

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p<>{color:#000;}. Audience Development: Generate traffic to your content

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p<>{color:#000;}. Conversion & Nurture: Convert visitor to leads, nurture them to opportunities

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p<>{color:#000;}. Measure & Optimize: Analyze and improve performance Now we’ll review each component in detail, starting with the Plan.

 

 

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The oBjecTive of the Content Marketing Machine is to output content that pulls prospects from where they are today, moves them through the buying process, and converts them to closed customers. The Plan stage breaks that objective down into its component parts defined by persona and buying stage, and lays out a strategy for each part.

 

First, consider your overall topic positioning. What exactly should you create content about? The answer is lies somewhere between the interests of your customers and your unique expertise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SWEET SPOT

 

 

 

 

So your content—at least at the top of the funnel—should focus on this intersection, called your “Sweet Spot.”

This sweet spot serves the following purposes:

 

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p<>{color:#000;}. It pulls in prospects, because the content addresses their interests

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p<>{color:#000;}. It is a subject matter that your organization knows and has authority and credibility around

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p<>{color:#000;}. While the top of funnel content here is not about your product, it is pointing toward your product and thus directs prospects to their journey down the funnel

 

Next create a matrix with your buyer personas across the X-axis and your buying stages across the Y-axis. This structure demystifies content marketing into a very simple approach: each piece of content should have an objective of attracting a persona to a stage and moving them on to the next. Complete your grid by answering the following questions for each cell:

 

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p<>{color:#000;}. What are the persona’s issues and concerns at this stage?

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p<>{color:#000;}. What questions does the persona need to answer at this stage?

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p<>{color:#000;}. What topics and categories would answer these questions?

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p<>{color:#000;}. What are some sample headlines and titles for the content in this topic?

 

Summarize your answers to these questions in their proper location in the grid. Once completed it will look like this:

 

 

 

 

So through this process you’ve built out the framework that will drive your machine. But too many marketers make this a one-time exercise that then gets put on the shelf. Instead, make it a living document and see your first Content Plan as your first hypothesis. Your focus as you move forward should be to gather feedback and data that better informs your understanding of your personas’ needs at different stages and evolves your Plan into an ever-more effective structure for your efforts. (We’ll discuss this more in the Measure & Optimize section).

plan: MarKeto MaChine

 

markeTo targets a set of senior-level personas for its content. Each piece of content it produces speaks to one or more of the following personas:

 

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p<>{color:#000;}. Marketing Operations Practitioner

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p<>{color:#000;}. VP of Marketing / CMO

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p<>{color:#000;}. VP of Sales

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p<>{color:#000;}. CEO

 

Marketo also organizes its content by buying cycle stage, using these categories:

 

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h6(((<>{color:#000;}. Early:

Prospect has no indicated interest in Marketo; content must be about prospect interests

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p<>{color:#000;}. Mid:

Prospect has indicated some interest in Marketo; is being nurtured though marketing automation

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h6(((<>{color:#000;}. Late:

Prospect has strong interest in Marketo; is being managed by Sales team

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h6(((<>{color:#000;}. Post Purchase:

Prospect is a Marketo customer; goal is customer satisfaction and Marketo brand advocacy

plan sideBar: Kelly serviCes

 

With 15 years experience in the human resources and workforce consulting space, Todd has overall responsibility for thought leadership and global marketing initiatives at Kelly Services. Kelly provides staffing, outsourcing and consulting services, generating $5 billion in revenue annually.

 

Below Todd shares how he and Kelly use personas & buying stages to create their content marketing grid.

 

In an organization the scale and complexity of Kelly, we have a wide range of products and services targeting very different audiences. For some idea of how broad this range is, think of a graduate scientist looking for work. Now think of a pharmaceutical company CEO looking to gain greater agility through a global talent supply chain of 100,000+ people. Both are key audiences for us, but with very different profiles, objectives, pain points and content consumption habits.

 

To understand how we use personas and buying-stages to frame our content, let’s focus on a specific offering –in this case addressing a B2B audience looking for staffing solutions in the call center industry.

 

As a starting point, we might develop say four core buyer personas for such an offering. This would likely include HR, Contact Center Operations, Technology and C-suite. Each of these core personas could be broken down based on role seniority (entry-level through to VP) or a more specific area of focus (i.e. within the C-suite, differentiate between CEO, CFO, COO, etc).

 

So—depending on the program objectives, budget and resources, a core group of four personas may in fact represent say 12 more nuanced role-based personas. A simple rule of thumb for determining if it’s worth developing content for a more-targeted niche is whether or not you can identify differences between the pain points, knowledge needs and buying behavior of each role type. If you can’t, then your content isn’t going to be unique enough to justify creating a different stream.

 

For simplicity’s sake with this example let’s stick to the four core personas. Keeping it straightforward with three buying stages, a basic content matrix for a pre-purchase audience may start to look like this:

 

 

 

 

In each box, the specific Pain Points, Topics, Messages and Content Pieces are identified to ensure a targeted approach is appropriately addressing each audience. For example, HR and Contact Center Ops contacts may have a common problem of sourcing employees for a hard-to-commute- to location; the C-Suite may have a problem with expiring tax credits on overseas operations. An

IT manager may be attracted by content discussing smooth integration of new systems; a CFO by reduced cost, risk and increased agility and transparency; an HR manager by the promise of better sourcing, training and retention of employees.

 

The content matrix is a very simple but effective way of mapping the process. By successfully identifying a range of unique – and common – issues such as these, content can be developed to speak directly to a market need.

 

 

Sample Grid Cell:

 

Persona: Contact Center Ops VP

Buying Stage: Consideration

 

Pain Points:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Difficulty in Sourcing Quality Staff

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p<>{color:#000;}. High Turnover of Existing Employees

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p<>{color:#000;}. Constant Pressure to Improve Call Quality & Productivity

 

Messages:

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p<>{color:#000;}. Alternate Staffing Models

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p<>{color:#000;}. Developing Agent Productivity

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p<>{color:#000;}. Improving Workplace Flexibility

 

Topics / Content Pieces

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p<>{color:#000;}. Case Studies – Virtual Workforces

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p<>{color:#000;}. Case Studies – Outsourcing / Partial Outsourcing

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p<>{color:#000;}. Video Series – Alternate Staffing Models, Features & Benefits

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p<>{color:#000;}. Whitepaper – Using an At-Home Workforce as a Virtual Swat-Team

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p<>{color:#000;}. Article Series – Making the Call: Improving Productivity & Customer Satisfaction Through Workforce Strategies

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p<>{color:#000;}. eBook – The Staff Retention Habits of Great Call Centers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Content Marketing Machine

© 2012 Kapost |^ ^www.kapost.com Marketo | www.marketo.com 10

2 TeaM
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ok, you’ve goT a Plan. But who is going to execute on it? Begin by looking at your plan’s grid. Who are the right people to produce this content?

 

For most organizations, this is going to be a mix of internal contributors and external freelancers. Few people know the ins and outs of your sector like your own employees. Furthermore, no content builds the relationship and trust between prospects and your brand better than content coming authentically from your team. So you’ll want to recruit a good number of internal contributors.

 

At the same time, content marketing requires a significant quantity of content, and few internal teams abound with content producers. So most content marketing operations blend internal contributors with external freelancers, particularly for graphical and video content.

However, no matter what your team composition is, there is a critical role in the form of the Managing Editor. Many stakeholders provide inputs and extract outputs from the Content Marketing Machine, but marketing departments need at least one person whose primary responsibility is to man its controls and be accountable for its results. The Managing Editor runs the Editorial Calendar, manages content production and distribution, supervises the development of an audience, coordinates with the wider demand marketing / marketing automation team, and monitors the machine’s metrics. Often the Managing Editor comes from a journalism, PR / communication or copywriting background. No matter what, if a marketing department does not have an appointed Managing Editor, they do not have the commitment to build a real Content Marketing Machine, and will end up with more of a content marketing small appliance, like a toaster, and be disappointed with the results.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Content Marketing Machine

© 2012 Kapost |^ ^www.kapost.com Marketo | www.marketo.com 12

TeaM: MarKeto MaChine

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Visit: http://www.Shakespir.com/books/view/713693 to purchase this book to continue reading. Show the author you appreciate their work!


HOW TO BUILD AND OPERATE A CONTENT MARKETING MACHINE

The Marketing World has been turned upside down. It was not many years ago that marketers were still focused on interruption marketing: trying to place their product message in front of prospects’ attention to generate leads and customers. But through the Internet, this has quickly changed, and marketers recognize they must practice the opposite. Now, in order to create the relationship and earn the permission to sell to prospects, companies must produce relevant thought leadership content, not only content about their own product.The critical ingredient to creating engagement, trust, and thought leadership positioning is content. Content is what attracts prospects at the top of the funnel and content is what nurtures leads down the funnel. Marketers now understand that brands must become publishers. The “why” of content marketing is no longer in question. But marketers are still asking “how?” How can marketing departments generate the high quality and quantity of content necessary to succeed in the new marketing era? This eBook will explain how marketers can build and operate a Content Marketing Machine that outputs compelling, relevant content that attracts leads at the top of the funnel and leads them down it. The eBook outlines a Content Marketing Machine framework developed by Kapost, the leading provider of content marketing software. It then profiles how Marketo, one of the pioneers of content marketing and one of its leading practitioners, operates its own content marketing both at the top of the funnel and moving down it, using its own marketing automation software to promote content and nurture leads. The eBook also provides perspectives from other content marketing leaders on the different stages. Lastly, the eBook concludes with worksheets that walk step-by-step through the process of building and running your own Content Marketing Machine.

  • ISBN: 9781370257300
  • Author: HaiDang14
  • Published: 2017-03-24 18:05:17
  • Words: 10190
HOW TO BUILD AND OPERATE A CONTENT MARKETING MACHINE HOW TO BUILD AND OPERATE A CONTENT MARKETING MACHINE