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How This Book Was Made & How You Can Make Your Own (NEW EDITION)

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HOW THIS BOOK WAS MADE

And How You Can Make Your Own

(E-Book Version)

By

Maria B. O’Hare

DiG-Press

2016

1st DiGital Edition

Copyright © 2016 All rights reserved

[email protected]

Below are a few excerpts about this book and are taken from a compilation of five writer’s comments who meet regularly to brainstorm and discuss each other’s work. The testimonials are given by writers ranging from well-established traditionally published authors to more novice writers who have not yet ventured into the world of getting their writing published.

Testimonials

This book by Maria O’Hare – encourages people to be more creative and to take more control over their own creative work after it has been produced. As a step by step guide it gives the writer the ability to become more confident about their , as to the presentation of their endeavours

This is a book about what to do with your own book, when it has been written. It is a very helpful guide-line to those who have knowledge of the internet, word documents … and in particular it gives information to those seeking a way to put their book on the world market

It strikes me that this is the work of a conceptual artist. This means, that the author is capable of the initial concept for her written work and then the vision to complete the manuscript in a new modern way – the difference between the old way of publishing and the new way of doing so has an extraordinary gap – that gap in particular is time.

What used to take months to hear from a publisher is now no longer necessary, as within hours or less this conceptual artist has shared her ability so that others may save time. .. Now with this book “How this Book was made” the writer without a controlling publisher can reach the entire world at the press of a button. This is what Maria O’Hare as conceptual artist is offering – not just to writers, but to those who have to research these elements in order to keep updating them and making improvements wherever possible from a technical point of view.

I feel there is a gap in the market and this is the type of book that fills that gap. Anyone just ready to approach a publisher would now very seriously consider the alternative as this …could change the course of people’s publishing choice

ABOUT THIS BOOK

This is a book within a book, where the book itself explains as it goes along, how it was created so that you can easily create your own. This book uses the basic tools of word-processing that most writers/researchers are usually quite familiar with: MS OFFICE and their various software programs such as Word and PowerPoint or its free Open Source equivalent: OPEN OFFICE. These tools will allow you to create your e-book interior (inside) and its cover (outside) so that you can upload your own e-books to sell world-wide with distribution to online stores such as: Amazon Kindle, Kobo, Barnes & Noble – Nook and many more outlets.

The author of this book has simply presented in one place a synthesis of everything she has learned about successful e-book publishing by becoming (inadvertently) her own publisher and ending up with an Imprint: DiG-Press which publishes in physical book format also. She does it all – well almost everything: she doesn’t do the editing, herself, and she loves the fact that it can be done with very little technical skill, using the tools already in her writer’s toolkit and ‘virtually’ for free.

From established authors wanting to dabble in the immediacy and creative freedom of e-book creation, to community projects/charities needing to raise money and awareness for some noble cause, and of course, anyone interested in simply sharing their words and stories with the world, this just might be the book that meets your need? And, besides, these days, self-published authors are more likely to be spotted by the talent scouts by putting their own books out there, than if they continue to gather dust under the bed. And I am not talking about the unpublished books!

…Now Let’s Get Ready to…

….after you read this book of course….

Table of Contents

SECTION ONEHOW THIS BOOK WAS MADE INSIDE ‘W’= ‘WORD’-TYPE-DOC WAY

STEP ONE: Get Prepared for the Nuclear Option

STEP TWO: formatting a blank document

STEP THREE: Make a backup copy of your MSS. & Nuke the copy, only if you need to:

STEP FOUR: Formatting Different Sections within the main body of text for an e-book

STEP FIVE: Modifying Headings

STEP SIX: Controlling & Viewing how your sections and Headings appear on any e-reading Device/App

STEP SEVEN: Creating a Table of Contents Automatically. or Manually Creating a TOC list

STEP EIGHT: Creating Book Marks within the document & Hyper-linking these to the Table of Contents

STEP NINE: EXTERNAL HYPERLINKS

STEP TEN: Inserting/embedding quality images in your e-book

 

SECTION TWOHOW THIS VIRTUAL COVER WAS MADE

IDEAS FOR CONCEPTUALISING YOUR BOOK COVER & SOURCING IMAGES

QUALITY OF IMAGE/S & RESOLVING RESOLUTION ISSUES

RESOLUTION DPI = DOTS OR PIXELS PER INCH AND WHAT THIS MEANS IN REALITY.

CONVERTING A LOW RESOLUTION IMAGE INTO A HIGHER ONE IN STAGES

INCREASING THE SIZE AND QUALITY VIA SCREENSHOTS, RESIZING & EDITING (THE 4 ‘PS’)

SETTING UP A COVER IMAGE IN POWERPOINT

CREATING A BLANK CANVAS

THINKING AND CREATING IN LAYERS FOR THE E-BOOK COVER

FORMATTING LAYER ONE

LAYER TWOTHE CREATION OF THE I-POD/I-PHONE TYPE BOOK COVER FRAME (used in this book’s cover).

LAYER THREECREATING THE LIGHT BLUE RECTANGLE: THE SMARTPHONE SCREEN (used in this book).

LAYER FOURINSERTING AND FORMATTING YOUR MAIN IMAGE/ILLUSTRATION/PHOTOGRAPH

LAYER FIVEINSERTING TEXT BOXES AND FORMATTING TEXT, USING SPECIAL EFFECTS AND WORD-ART

SAVE YOUR BOOK COVER SLIDE AS A SINGLE IMAGE FILE

 

SECTION THREEHOW THIS BOOK WAS MADE AVAILABLE TO THE WORLD

UPLOADING YOUR FINISHED E-BOOK TO Shakespir

E-BOOK TAX/VAT & ROYALTIES – Shakespir

E-BOOK ISBNS Shakespir

ABOUT THE BOOK & YOU IN GENERAL – No Matter where you Distribute your Book

UPLOADING YOUR FINISHED E-BOOK TO AMAZON KDP

TAX/VAT/ROYALTIES KDP

 

What Next?

About the Author

Other Publications by DiG-Press

Forthcoming books

POSTSCRIPT

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SECTION ONE: HOW THIS BOOK WAS MADE INSIDE

‘W’= ‘WORD’-TYPE-DOC WAY

STEP ONE: Get Prepared for the Nuclear Option

Basically, the surest way to create a successful e-book formatted in a word document is to get rid of any previous formatting within your manuscript. This section will show you how and tell you why this is very important. So don’t do anything just yet, until you have read this part.

Some call it the NUCLEAR method meaning to NUKE everything back to the text itself. This term and its meaning come from the style guide on Shakespir (the other major global platform for self-publishing e-books beyond Amazon KDP – Kindle Direct Publishing – although I do feel that Draft2Digital are not far behind). Using this method means your MSS (manuscript) will have simple basic text – THE MANUSCRIPT striped down to its bare bones and here is the reason why:

Instead of spending loads of time making your manuscript look beautiful in ‘Word’ or its equivalent, or if it already looks beautiful, please be aware that your digital book will not reflect all your efforts, unless you follow the steps below. This is because, a physical book or physical manuscript, being a fixed format where things are fixed on the page (although there is such a thing as a fixed format digital book used for cookery, children’s and photographic books etc – anything with lots of rich graphics), do not translate to flowable text e-books as used in this present book you are now reading. It doesn’t matter whether you are reading it on a small i-phone screen or on a large computer monitor the text should flow and align itself according to the viewer you are using. This is one of the main reasons why it is important to make a copy of your mss so that you can do something quite different with the copy to make it work as a successful flowable text e-book to be read on any device.

Although, the Nuclear Method is a useful tool to know about if all else fails, however, there is also a less drastic method given further on to bring your pre-formatted MSS (manuscript) into a prepared blank document that should keep your essential formatting intact.

TIP: If you want to explore Draft2Digial (D2D) for more immediate publishing without the Nuking method, for wide distribution in you document draft form, then just look them up on the web and take it from there. But, do bear in mind that they do not distribute to Amazon (but the rest of this book will show you how you can achieve this and much more). With this platform, you do not have to follow the specific steps below (but do read them just to give yourself an idea of the different choices). However, for book covers to upload when you are there and advice uploading your book and getting paid (SECTION TWO and SECTION of this Book) will help you greatly.

Alternatively, you could also upload a pre-prepared E-Pub to D2D and they will leave your formatting intact (if you can get your Word doc converted at the end – I will give you advice on this further on), and upload it directly with the cover set up – but this is a highly strict process and you should follow all the steps throughout this book to show you how to do this successfully.

STEP TWO: formatting a blank document

Open up whatever word-processing program you normally work in (I specifically work in MS Office Word 2007, so, if you haven’t decided what to work with yet for your book project – this might be the easiest to start with as it is specific to the instructions below). If you are working on a later version or using its equivalent: the same principles apply (things may be slightly different and some tools in different places – just work with what is most comfortable or what you can access easily).

Open up a new blank document by clicking on the ‘Start’ menu (it is usually at the bottom left of your screen) and you should see an icon for MS Word. Select this and chose ‘New Blank Doc’ or a blank document should open up automatically. This is the document that we will use to eventually paste - in a special way- the copied manuscript MSS. We are now simply preparing it so that it has the proper layout for an e-book. This is set up first selecting ‘Page Layout’ which is visible on the main MENU view.

Go to ‘Size’ and by clicking with the left mouse button (your curser should be over the downward arrow beside ‘Size’) you should see options in a dropdown menu. Select A4 (it may already be highlighted as the default – this is normal, but at least you know where to change page sizes if you didn’t before). There is no particular size for e-books as the text is flowable – it aligns itself according to what device your readers are reading the book on (e.g. i-pad, i-phone, Kindle, PC/laptop etc), so it doesn’t matter that much which size you select. I use A4 as most of us know what that looks like.

Go to ‘Orientation’ displayed above ‘Size’ using the ‘Page Layout’ menu view (in the version of Word I used to create this book). Click with the left mouse button on the downward arrow to the side of ‘Orientation’ and chose, or ‘Portrait’. Your word doc should automatically be set to this default – (portrait means that it is orientated like a portrait painting which just means the paper is longer than it is wide and landscape is wider than it is long like a landscape painting). You might use landscape only if you have a very unusual layout, but I would recommend just working in the normal Portrait orientation.

Go to ‘Margins’ (you should see a piece of paper with margin lines), again this is within the ‘Page Layout’ menu view and by clicking with the left mouse button on the downward arrow beneath ‘Margins’, choose the narrowest margin icon (‘Narrow’ is written beside it and dimensions given). Margins can mean very little in E-book format (they just stop the words/images from filling the entire screen to the very extreme edge) and narrow seem to work best as they give you the greatest amount of text within a blank page. Just ignore ‘Columns’ unless you are just doing a PDF book or a fixed digital layout.

Next, making sure that you return to the main menu ‘Home’, select ‘Change Styles’, where on this version of Word that I used to create this e-book, the ‘Change Styles’ option has two large letter ‘A’s adjacent to boxes with AaBbCcDdEe written in them to the far right of the main menu view. By clicking (left mouse button unless stated otherwise) on the downward arrow next to ‘Change Styles’ you should see a ‘Style Set’ option. Click on this and a drop down menu should open up. Scroll down until you come to ‘Simple’. Select this as it makes life much simpler in the end. This is the master format for everything you do and set from now on; it is not an essential step, but it will keep things simpler. The essence of using Word to create e-books is to keep everything as simple as possible.

Note: Word is both wonderful and horrible at the same time as it can mess up the e-book in unexpected ways that you cannot see on the screen while you are creating the document making your book look awful in the e-book format. On the other hand, if you follow these simple steps and formatting experiments, you will never know how much grief you will have saved yourself and when you use the word doc method in this very particular way to create an e-book, it is, I have come to believe, the best way to produce them.

Now that you have set the global formatting, you can start setting up the specifics for the ‘NORMAL’ preset formats (it should already be set at a default layout). If you type some random text directly into your blank document, the ‘Normal’ present should be highlighted in the main MENU‘Home’ view – (note the letters: AaBbCcDd’ with ‘Normal’ written underneath).

Now, perhaps compose a full paragraph (type something encouraging to help you achieve your publishing goals) and highlight this text. By clicking with your left mouse button at the beginning of the paragraph and still holding the button, drag the curser to the end of the paragraph. Release the button and the whole text should be in blue. If it isn’t, then repeat. You may have inadvertently released it or click on a white space. Any formatting changes that you make while this text is highlighted will change all of this text and even text that you haven’t yet highlighted. Make sure the ‘Normal’ preset box is also highlighted above in the main menu view.

Just play around with formatting this small paragraph of text and see what you can do with it until you are fully familiar with the different text layout and style options. Some of you might already be quite familiar with these formats, but, it is a useful exercise to get familiar with the nuances of the presets and how they work best for e-books. You could use ‘justified’ as an alignment rather than centred /right or left-aligned as this looks best in e-books. This book for instance, mostly aligned the text to Justified for the main body (pre-set ‘Normal’) with 12Pt for the Font Size. You could use 11 Pt, but I wouldn’t select anything much smaller than 10 Pt for the main body of text. This present book also used Times New Roman for the Font Face. The ‘Normal’ pre-set also was set to line spacing of 1.5.

All of the formatting choices that you have in the main menu view can be set for all your normal or regular (main body of text) settings. You can change the ‘Normal’ pre-set formatting setting or the formatting of any of the pre-set options in the boxes on the main menu view (they all have AsBbCcDdEe in the upper part of the box with the type of preset below) at any time. We are still in the ‘Normal’ preset, but we will return to these other presets that can be used throughout your document to make sections, headings, paragraphs, quotes etc look different shortly.

Another way to format your experimental paragraph is to again highlight it, but this time right click the mouse button whilst, hovering over the pre-set box ‘Normal’. You should see a dropdown menu. Scroll down to the ‘Modify’ option and select. This should open up the main formatting menu options for the ‘Normal’ preset (font type, size, alignment, line-spacing, italics/bold etc). Once you change any of these – all the sections throughout your document using this pre-set format will take this new formatting if you select ‘OK’. You may not appreciate this method until you are working with more than one paragraph of text.

But, when you come to paste your copied mss into this prepared document using the method outlined below, you should find that all of your text will have these recent formatting settings now embedded in the ‘Normal’ preset. Don’t worry at this stage about getting the formatting looking perfect, you can always change the look at any time using the same methods provided here. Now you can delete your experimental paragraph.

STEP THREE: Make a backup copy of your MSS. & Nuke the copy but only if you need to:

With your blank document still open, now open up another document which should also be in ‘MS Word’ or its equivalent program- your original manuscript- and copy it.

TIP: Make sure to save and store your original manuscript somewhere safe. Make backups if possible. I send myself an email of any important documents – that way I can retrieve them at a later date from hyperspace. Send to a friend or family member, they might read it for you. But again, don’t format until the very end. Even small changes can mess with all your formatting efforts.

TIP: You can keep both your copied version of the mss open and the blank document open at the same time. Just click the ‘-‘minus symbol at the top right-hand corner of your open document to shrink it. You can open (enlarge it) again by clicking the word doc icon at the bottom of the computer screen. This way you can work between the two documents just for ease during this part. Alternatively, you can have both open at once, but just click on one of them and it will come in front of the other and if you want to work on the one at the back, you click on it.

Copy your original mss by using the ‘Select All’ tool and copy. . In the ‘Home’ view menu display you will hopefully see this option to the far right in the editing box area with an arrow dropdown option beside ‘Select’. By clicking on the arrow you should have an option of ‘Select All’. Select this option and your entire document should then be highlighted (usually in blue). Right click the mouse button and from the dropdown menu select ‘Copy’.

Now expand your blank document (make it visible) or bring it to the foreground and make sure you click your mouse curser at the beginning of a blank page. Paste your copied manuscript into your blank document using the ‘Special Paste’ tool in the main ‘Home’ menu using the ‘unformatted text’ option,

The ‘Special Paste’ tool can be found in the main menu by clicking on the downward arrow under the ‘Paste’ icon (It looks like a clipboard and sheet of paper turned down on the version of Word I am using). Click on ‘Special Paste’ and different pasting options should open up in their own menu. Scroll down to: ‘Unformatted Text’. Select this and press ‘OK’ at the bottom. An amazing thing should happen. All of your manuscript should look like the short paragraph you typed out previously (it should have taken the simple ‘Normal’ setting you just formatted to look a certain way, along with the narrow margins etc). You have just nuked your existing formatting embedded within your copied mss, but kept the essential text intact so that you can begin producing your e-book. If this didn’t work first time, and you find that some of the original formatting has imposed itself on your freshly pasted copy of your mss, don’t worry, just go back to copying and pasting the original mss and follow the steps above again. There might be something you have overlooked.

Another solution is to use the ‘Select All’ for this newly pasted text (your entire manuscript copied into your preformatted blank document) and make sure to click on the ‘Normal’ preset box. Everything should then take the settings for this style. If even this fails, you can reformat the ‘Normal’ preset again by using the mouse button (right) while hovering over the Normal’ preset box, where, as you may recall from above, you will see an option for ‘Modify’. By clicking on this, a dropdown menu should appear to let you see the font type, font size, alignment, line spacing etc. You can double-check that these are the way you want your main body of text to look.

TIP: Note: if you have hyperlinks in your original mss text, these will not work once nuked if you do not have the full URL (the unique web address) visible– sorry! As someone who has learned the hard way and had more than 100 hyperlinks in my first e-book attempt which were all abbreviated by numbers and/or a short link name, I would advise you to copy and paste the actual URL in every link (you can find this by going into edit hyperlink by right clicking mouse button and selecting that option) into your ‘working manuscript’ document and saving changes. I will discuss how to copy and embed hyperlinks into your e-book further on if you need to use these, If you do copy the full URL across with your main body of text during the NUKING process, all you have to do is press the return after the full address and it should become a live hyperlink automatically again (turning to a blue colour).

For something less drastic avoiding undoing all your hyperlinks and keeping your essential formatting, copy your entire MSS, but, this time using the ‘Special Paste’ tool (this can be found in the main menu by clicking on the downward arrow under the ‘Paste’ icon), click and scroll down to: ‘Formatted Text (RFT)’. Select this and press ‘OK’ at the bottom. Hopefully, your existing format is now set up with the main body of text set to ‘Normal’ preset and any special large titles etc or distinct sections of text still retaining their overall formatting, but your copied MSS should now have the narrow margin setting and should look less elaborate than your original MSS layout and formats.

If this worked, hopefully, you will not have to resort to the Nuclear Method, but at least you know it’s there if things are not doing what they should be doing. If your copied MSS looks OK, just read the following steps as a guide to what works and what doesn’t work so well on e-books in terms of formatting and controlling what your potential readers end up reading. I would advise anyone using the Nuclear Method to follow the steps below quite closely and practice with their stripped down MSS copy in the prepared document. Otherwise, for the practice, even if you do use the RTF -Rich Format Text (special paste) option successfully, you might like to try it and experiment with some of the formatting options given below.

TIP: You are advised not to experiment with the following formatting tools directly on your RTF version of your copied and pasted MSS. Instead, either do another copy for specifically experimenting using the Nuclear Method and practice on this version by following all the steps below, or, go straight to ‘STEP FIVE: Modifying Headings’ onwards, particularly if you are already quite familiar with pre-formatted shortcuts (presets).

STEP FOUR: Formatting Different Sections within the main body of text for an e-book

Now with your copied and pasted MSS within your pre-prepared document, you can begin fine-tuning the layout and making it work the way you want readers to experience your book. Select a paragraph from your copied MSS and experiment with different formatting. Right-click the mouse button while hovering over the highlighted text you just changed and a dropdown menu should open up. Scroll down with the curser to ‘Styles’ and select ‘Update Normal to Match Selection’. This will simply change everything formatted as ‘Normal’ throughout your document to take the change that you made to a single paragraph. You can deselect the text previously highlighted by clicking on any part of the white areas of your document and of course change the entire document back to what it was by repeating the method just described.

Alternatively, you can use the ‘Modify’ option (as outlined earlier) by hovering your mouse/curser over the ‘Normal’ preset (you don’t need to have any text highlighted). Right-click the mouse button and a dropdown menu should appear. Scroll down to ‘Modify’. Select this option and in the formatting menu there reformat as you would like your entire document to appear. Once you click on ‘OK’ everything previously set up as ‘Normal’ text should take this updated format. If you don’t like what you see, simply go to the top-left of your document and next to the floppy disc icon click on the anti-clockwise arrow. This should ‘Undo’ any previous action and restore the original format. The clockwise arrow next to this is ‘Redo’ and will return you again to your last action (and each click should return you to earlier formats). These are handy tools for trying out different formats until things look the way you want.

To experiment a little more with distinct presets beyond the ‘Normal’ setting, you could highlight a piece of text that you would like to stand out from the normal body of text – perhaps some character dialogue, or a “quote”. When this is highlighted, select another preset that is different from the ‘Normal’ preset we have used up to now. Perhaps ‘No Line Spacing’ with AaBbCcDd above it might be useful as it is adjacent in most Word Doc programs to the ‘Normal’ preset box that you should be fairly familiar with by now, if you weren’t before.

You will also see by clicking on the downward arrow beside the preset boxes (to the right) at the top of the main menu ‘Home’ view many different types of preformatted dropdown options for paragraphs, quotes, emphasis, along with numbered ‘Heading’ presets which are to be avoided for now (these have a special function which I will explain further on). These presets give you different choices for formatting that can be used to affect several parts of your text consistently (they are shortcuts so that you don’t have to do distinctive formatting manually each time). You simply select and fully highlight the section of text that you want to be different from the ‘Normal’ preset and by clicking on one of the preset boxes the highlighted section of text will take that pre-set format.

For example, I have formatted the section below differently to the main body of text above to give you an example. I used the preset ‘No Spacing’ next to ‘Normal’ and reformatted it to suit the style I wanted. I could have just as easily highlighted the text I wanted to look distinct from ‘Normal’ and formatted it directly (manually), not using this preset.

By highlighting the text I wanted to repeatedly be distinct from the main body (with ‘Normal’ preset formatting) and right clicking on the different preset (not the ‘Normal’ present, perhaps the one next to it: ‘No Spacing’), I was able to format this setting to look distinct from the normal text throughout my document. After right-clicking by hovering over ‘AsBbCcDdEd No Spacing’ preset, I scrolled down to ‘Modify’. I clicked this option and the main menu for formatting this setting was displayed. For this section of text you are now reading, I simply changed the font size to Pt. 11 (the normal text is Pt. 12), I chose ‘centred’ for alignment and made the line spacing closer by choosing ‘1’ (the normal text is 1.5).

I then highlighted all the sections of normal text that I wished to take this distinct formatting throughout the document and clicked on ‘No Spacing’ for each section of text I wished to look the way these paragraphs appear. Once this is set up, you can simply change the formatting by using the shortcut described above for changing ‘Normal’ text, but this time right-click the preset (‘No Spacing’ in my case) and by selecting ‘Modify’ you can modify accordingly, and all these distinct sections should now take this modification.

Alternatively, you can highlight a section of text that you have made distinct using a particular preset and format this from the main menu view so that it looks the way you want. Then on the highlighted section of text/paragraph, right click the mouse button and scroll down the dropdown menu to ‘Styles’ and by clicking on this, an option to ‘Update to Match Selection’ should appear. By clicking on this, all your distinctive text/paragraphs throughout your copied MSS should now be updated. Basically, once you have set up your distinctive preset to the way you want and applied this to various pieces of text, you can update the formatting at any time using the methods described above.

Now that we have explored the shortcut and longhand ways of setting up different formatting styles throughout your copied MSS or for certain sections that you wish to stand out, we will look in more detail at the specifics of the formatting that are most effective in e-books and some of the limitations as well.

FONT FACES

For instance, for E-books that you create using word or any other word-type tools, the Font Face that you choose is not always directly reflected in your e-book as noted earlier. Self Publishing platforms who distribute to a wide range of retailers (most of the big names including Amazon and Apple i-store), such as LULU only have two font face options, one of which is used throughout this present book (they’ll change your file to these anyway even if you haven’t used them), but some Kindles and Kindle reading apps for your computer or mobile device will pick up more elaborate variations on fonts.

For instance, while I was exploring the different options for distributing this book on more platforms than normal for teaching purposes, I did quite an elaborate formatting and used some font types strategically with the KDP platform. There is more flexibility on their readers and apps. So it really depends on who you are distributing your e-book through. I kept it simple here so that it was a single edition readable on a diverse range of reading devices/apps and would be suitable to publish on all of the main distribution channels.

As suggested previously, with e-books, just keep it simple – it is really about reading the words with ease. It is your words, your story, and your ideas that matter most. This is just the means of making them accessible. Think of an artist getting their work framed/mounted for display in a gallery. Well, this is similar. We are attempting to present our art in an accessible and pleasing manner.

FONT SIZES

‘Font Size’

Now we will look at some font sizes that are broadly suitable for e-reader devices/apps, which should set the e-book up for reading with ease. Just to give you an example of what I wouldn’t use for the main body of text, I choose pt. 22 for the ‘Font Size’ words above. The Font Size, unlike the Font Face style for many devices/apps, is reflected directly in e-book formats as far as could be discerned prior to publishing. So Pt. 12 used for most of the main body of text throughout this present book, should look fine on most e-reader devices/apps.

Making the beginning letter of a paragraph and chapter in ‘Normal’ larger is possible but, as you may, or may not, be able to see on this e-book, having an enlarged letter ‘M’ in some cases changes the spacing of the entire paragraph on e-readers/devices and apps.

After creating the enlarged ‘M’, I simply highlighted it and reformatted its size to normal. A new paragraph – not containing the enlarged ‘M’ as done here, will also return your line spacing to the ‘Normal’ default setting Pt. 1.5 (your paragraph text lines will no longer be spaced). We’ll explore more about line-spacing further on so that you can see the difference it makes in an e-book

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TEXT ALIGNMENT

Again, depending upon the reading device/app and/or who you want to upload your books to, although you might set up your alignment to: JUSTIFY TEXT – I think that text alignment of block text (where your text is proportion out evenly from the left side to the right – giving you block text as I have used here and for much of the main body of text) is the most appropriate format for this type of e-book. However, some distributers such as LULU advice against it and some readers may default to left alignment. Don’t worry about this too much as left alignment suits most books and many novelists for example, still prefer traditional left alignment (see example below). I highlighted the individual paragraph below and manually formatted it and used single line spacing:

Left Alignment would look something like the following; (hopefully, the entire text of this book hasn’t taken the left alignment as some devices/apps may default to or you will not appreciate the difference): Remember that in order to change any individual parts of your ‘Normal’ body of text, you simply place your curser at the beginning, or end of the text you want to change (as I did to make this a different alignment to most other paragraphs throughout this e-book) and by holding down the left mouse button and dragging up or down to beginning/end of your text requiring a different format, this should now be highlighted in blue and by releasing the mouse button, and clicking on the ‘Home’ menu you can change alignment from there. This should only change the alignment (or any other formatting change) of the individual piece of text and not the rest of your document.

I simply returned to the paragraph below and this should be back to the ‘Normal’ preset. But I did highlight this normal text paragraph and changed its alignment to left align. But only this paragraph was affected: not the others. But of course, you can always set up alignment to affect more than just a single paragraph or piece of text if you want your main body of text throughout your document to look a certain way.

You do this by highlighting a single paragraph/section by using the ‘Modify’ method described earlier. Only this time, you right click on the actual ‘Normal’ preset highlighted box as well. You select the ‘Modify’ option and within this formatting menu, you can change the alignment to left-align for example as well as any other format changes. Now, all your paragraphs that have been set to ‘Normal’ should take this re-modified alignment. The other shortcut method to achieve the same is to right click (with the mouse button) on the highlighted paragraph with the new alignment (left-align) and scroll down to ‘Styles’ and select ‘Update ‘Normal’ to Match Selection’ and the entire document (main body) should take this alignment also. See other types of alignment options below:

Obviously, most people wouldn’t use Right Alignment as shown here. But you might have noticed that I used alternating right/left alignment and one centered for the testimonials at the beginning of this book.

And for the most part, we don’t usually centre our text for the main body of your document.

However, I did use this occasionally for small stand-alone pieces of text.

INDENTS – fully indented sections of text and indented paragraphs

I noticed that on some Kindle displays (apps) that even though I did not do indents for the first line of the paragraphs throughout this book, that this text was displayed with them. So bearing this in mind, you could make the beginning of each paragraph in a new chapter more interesting by indenting it, or by indenting each paragraph at the beginning as can be seen here. Usually, we would use tabs for this function, but not so with e-books. It is simply best to never use tabs and definitely don’t use bullet points. Bullet points work on some devices/apps, but not on others.

So to ensure your reader’s do not become disturbed by awful formatting issues, don’ use them. Instead, simply indent on the left and/or right and maybe use the ‘Insert’ option on the main menu beside ‘Home’ and on the far right, you should see ‘Symbol’ with a dropdown arrow. Click on this arrow and select from a range of symbols (they are typically the types of characters/symbols not readily available from using the keyboard options). Choose from different options using ‘More Symbols’. Select and click ‘Insert’ and then ‘Close’. Some e-readers/devices/apps will not display the chosen symbol properly (a small box with an ‘x’ might appear). Try different symbols until it looks right across different displays.

• Return to the ‘Home’ view on the main menu and place your curser where you want to indent or bullet type to begin.

• Repeat this method for bullet points

In order to indent a paragraph at the beginning, as I have done here, or indenting text for your bullet points, with the left mouse button grab the ‘Left Indent’ marker (top only) of the ruler bar. Drag this – (still holding left mouse button) until your selected body of text is indented the way you want (e.g. about a centimetre or 1 on the ruler bar) and now release the mouse button.

The other way to change all of your main body of text so that the indent occurs consistently in each paragraph if that is what you want throughout your book (remember we have returned to the ‘Normal’ style preset), making sure that the ‘Normal’ preset is highlighted in the main menu view, hover your mouse over this highlighted box and right click your mouse button. Select ‘Modify’ from the dropdown menu. When you click ‘Modify’ you will see all the different options to format your ‘Normal’ setting as before, only this time at the bottom left, you should see an option ‘Format’ with a downward arrow. Click on the downward arrow and a dropdown list should give you an option for ‘Paragraph’. (Tabs, fonts etc are there also). Select ‘Paragraph’ (Indents and Spacing view).

If you look further down in the menu and to the right, you should see an option ‘Special’ with a window scroll down with options for ‘First Line’ indent, or ‘Hanging Paragraph’ indent. Beside these options you will see ‘By’, meaning how much do you want to indent the first line of paragraph by? Use the arrows to decrease/increase the indent. Using this method, all of the paragraphs should automatically indent on the first line.

I only wanted a few paragraphs to be indented on the first line, so you could either use the direct method individually for each paragraph by highlighting them and sliding the top (downward) ruler arrows physically to the required indent as outlined above, or another way which can also be done for the bullet points is to again highlight the section of text requiring the special indent. Right click the mouse button over this and when the dropdown menu appears, go directly to ‘Paragraph’. All the same options for indenting the special first line as described above are there. Select ‘Special Indent’ and set ‘By’ and indent accordingly and only the selected text (paragraphs/bullet point items) should have the first line indent and not the rest of your main body of text.

.

TIP: I tried initially to set up the indents on both sides for all the TIPS sections throughout this book using the same menus described above for special first line indent, where the main body can be indented on both sides by going to the ‘Modify’ option and clicking on the bottom of the menu – ‘Format’ and selecting the ‘Paragraph’ menu, (across from special first line indent – making sure to re-set this to ‘none’) I was able to set the left indent to 1 cm and the right indent to 1 cm to match and within the document, this took effect on the document, but not on the e-book when I previewed it across different apps/devices.

I discovered that the right-hand indent had not taken at all, although the left indent was clearly seen. Then, I tried some of the presets for “Quotes” ‘intense’ and more subtle etc and the same left indent only occurred and some presets came out looking awful on certain e-readers. The moral of this story is to avoid presets that indent or have lines and borders. Just make your text stand out in another way – centred works and perhaps as done here, make your Font Size smaller, make the lines between text tighter and you might think about making the text bold or italics. In other words, format distinct pieces of text in the simplest way possible when it comes to e-books.

TIP: Never use text boxes in e-books. They simply do not work.

LINE-SPACING

Returning to block (Justified) text alignment for all other sections of my document using the ‘Normal’ preset, we will now look at line spacing between the text lines. The spaces between paragraphs, however, although these can also be adjusted such as the options to ‘decrease’ or ‘increase’ spaces, generally speaking, text will all flow together in your e-book, anyway – even if you put in lots of return spaces between sections, so don’t spend time thinking too much about the spaces in-between. . It will look quite different when uploaded to be read on an e-reader or app for a mobile or computer device. But, as noted above, the actual spaces between the lines of text within sections of text do seem to be reflected quite consistently on most e-readers.

The type of book you are writing or have written or about to publish, will suit different line spacing options. For instance, for short books with short points, you could use double spacing; or as I have used throughout most of this book for the main body of text: 1.5. Other people may prefer 1.15 or single-line spacing which is quite tight spacing. See some examples below:

You could set your line spacing at ‘1.5’ similar to what is used here which suits a non-fiction ‘how to’ book, but it may not suit a novel for example or other fiction genres. You can see how 1.5 lines spacing looks by just reading this e-book, but I have shown it below anyway, followed by some other spacing types:

Spacing…………………………………………….(1.5) ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Line spacing ‘2’ has been used in this sentence. It is only slightly different to the one above. However, when you do a whole block of text, it is fairly spaced and would only suit short documents on an e-reader……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

The line spacing ‘1.15’ is a little tighter and is probably best for long novels etc. ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Or, you could use single line (‘1’.) spacing between your lines of text…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………it is quite narrow as you should see reflected in your e-book reader.

STEP FIVE: Modifying Headings

HEADERS (Sub-Headings etc)

Now on to those Headers with special features as I noted above, these have a very specific function, apart from being used to make large chapter headings and sub-heading etc. These preset options which you should see adjacent to ‘Normal’, ‘No Spacing’ presets in this version of Word Doc I am using, can be explored by selecting the downward arrow where you should see ‘AaBbCcDdEd with Heading 1, 2, 3, 4’ etc in preset boxes. When working in your main body of text, remember that the ‘AaBbCcDdEd Normal’ present should have a colour frame around it – indicating that this is the preset you are currently using.

Do not select any ‘Heading’ presets just yet, simply bear in mind that they are an essential feature in some cases for publishing your e-book with certain platforms as you will see further on. Therefore, it is worth getting this part of e-book creation correct. It is also a very useful tool to know about as well as you will see below.

For instance, I could use ‘Heading 1’ preset for the main headings (section headings where you might use chapter headings followed by their title) and create these by highlighting the whole of ‘Section One: How This Book Was Made Inside’ and the second line: ‘W ’ = Word -Doc Way’ could be left alone and not included in this preset format. In order to set this main chapter/section up, by using the curser at the start of the first word and clicking on the left button of mouse – I dragged this to the end of whole title and released, and by keeping the title highlighted (making sure not to click on the white areas).

I then went to the ‘Home’ menu and selected from the styles boxes: ‘AaBbCcDdEd – Heading 1’ adjacent to the [* ‘AaBbCcDdEd -No Spacing’ *] preset. Once this was selected or if I hovered the curser over the preset ‘Heading 1’, then the highlighted text appeared as giant letters. My heading: ‘Section One’ would now look something like this:

SECTION ONE

HOW THIS BOOK WAS MADE INSIDE

‘W’ = Word-Doc-Way

For instance, most of us would like a large CHAPTER ONE: And Its Title, or in my case: SECTION ONE and its title, to be smaller than this and look distinct from the rest of the text as I did for the colour pinky-red. So, with the formatting: Font Size 26 pt, centred and coloured in my case for all of main sections of this book (there are only three along with the end sections about the author, other publications etc), making sure that ‘Heading 1’ is still highlighted in the box on the main menu view, I individually highlighted each main heading throughout this book to look the way I wanted. Obviously, this colouring is just to demonstrate that you can format your headings the way you want them to look

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How This Book Was Made & How You Can Make Your Own (NEW EDITION)

IS: ‘HOW THIS BOOK WAS MADE’ FOR YOU? Thank you for considering downloading this e-book – a book within a book, where the book itself explains as it goes along, how it was created so that you can easily create your own. By following the steps within this book, in the end you will be able to upload your book files to any of the main book distributors: E.g. KDP ( KINDLE PUBLISHING) and Smashwords/LULU who do all the other major online stores from: from the Apple i-store to Barnes & Noble (Nook) and KOBO to name but a few. This book will show you how: every step of the way. This book uses the basic tools of word-processing that are most familiar to writers in general and will demonstrate how these same tools can be used to fully publish with complete creative and financial freedom as well as showing you how the related MS Office tools and their Open Office equivalent can be used to produce book covers without any previous know how of graphic design. Basically, by the time you have worked your way through this ‘How To’ manual, you will know everything about doing the proper, professional formatting for an e-book, even with embedded images, along with its cover, so that it can be uploaded just about anywhere in the world for your potential readers to find with ease. ...Now Let’s Get Ready to... ....after you read this book of course....

  • ISBN: 9781370627400
  • Author: Maria B. O'Hare
  • Published: 2016-09-26 10:50:14
  • Words: 33798
How This Book Was Made & How You Can Make Your Own (NEW EDITION) How This Book Was Made & How You Can Make Your Own (NEW EDITION)