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Fiverr Frequently Asked Questions - ANSWERED

 

Published by Maddie Green at Shakespir

Shakespir Edition, License Notes

Shakespir Edition, License Notes This e-book is licensed for your personal enjoyment only. This e-book may not be re-sold or given away to other people. If you would like to share this book with another person, please purchase an additional copy for each recipient. If you’re reading this book and did not purchase it, or it was not purchased for your use only, then please return to Shakespir.com and purchase your own copy. Thank you for respecting the hard work of this author.

Copyright © 2017 Maddie Green

1st Edition, June 1, 2017

All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiverr Frequently Asked Questions ANSWERED!

 

by Maddie “FontHaunt”

 

Includes a FREE excerpt of the INSIDER book on the Fiverr Success Management Program

Contents

Chapter One – Introduction

Chapter Two – Especially for Brand Newbies

Chapter Three – How do I Find Resources?

Chapter Four – How to Contact Customer Support?

Chapter Five – Can One User Have Multiple Accounts?

Chapter Six – How do I use Buyer Requests?

Chapter Seven – What is this Message About Buyer Requests?

Chapter Eight – What Should I Think About in Terms of Earnings?

Chapter Nine – Resources

Chapter Ten – Success Manager Book Excerpt

Chapter Eleven – Want More of the Freelancing for Fun and Profit Series?

About the Author

 

Chapter 1: Introduction

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I’ve been working on Fiverr since 2014 under the business name “FontHaunt” and have enjoyed my experience every step of the way. When I get involved in something, I love to also be involved with others who do the same thing. Fiverr is especially exciting since it’s a global community and I’ve been able to meet and work with people from all over the world. The way I usually get involved with any community is to see if there is a forum and start talking with others there. I was delighted that Fiverr had a forum. One thing I noticed, especially after a couple of years, was that newcomers to Fiverr or to the forum often asked questions that had been asked many times before. When a unique question did come along, it was usually due to some change in the platform. The search process for the forum wasn’t ideal so sometimes people did go looking for the answers first and couldn’t find them. Other times people just didn’t realize the question had been asked before, or they worried that something had changed and the old answer wouldn’t be correct anymore. That’s when it occurred to me that out of all the books I had read or sampled about Fiverr, I had never seen one that really summarized some of the common questions that Fiverr members were asking. Since I had answered a number of these myself on the forum and others had gone unanswered, I decided to begin to compile them into a document that I had no real plans for but seemed useful. The document began to grow so I had to categorize some things and before I knew it, I realized it would make a truly useful series of documents on Fiverr success. I wanted to commit some time to turning the collected information into something easy to read and search through.

 

Another thing I am a big fan of is the Nanowrimo project, otherwise known as National Novel Writing Month. (If you don’t know what that is and you are interested in writing, please go to the nanowrimo.org website and check it out! You won’t be sorry.) At the time I decide to just take all my compiled information and re-write it as a book and I saw that Nanowrimo now sponsors a “summer camp” even through July. I didn’t really have a plan for the guides and book that would become part of a series, but I did have a seed of an idea. Now I had the chance to take advantage of both things at once and not feel like I was wasting time on either! In the process of writing I felt that I could use the questions as reference material, write the answers I knew myself, and research the ones I didn’t know so I could answer those too. That is how this profect was born, and every Fiverr user who has ever read or written on the Fiverr Forum is in some way a part of the beginning of this series of guides and e-books, Freelancing for Fun and Profit. To all of you, thank you, and I hope you find this helpful. I also wish for you whatever your dream is for your Fiverr freelancing career! You can find me on Fiverr at www.fiverr.com/fonthaunt!

 

~Maddie

 

 

https://fonthaunt.blogspot.com/

http://www.fonthaunt.net

 

Chapter 2: Especially for Brand Newbies

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If you have never created a Fiverr account but are reading this book while contemplating doing so, first of all, congrats to you because you already have an edge! There will be some things in this chapter that are more difficult than you might think once you’ve already made a Fiverr account. If you do already have a Fiverr account, don’t be dismayed. Probably most of Fiverr users from level 0 to the Super Sellers created their account without knowing these things, so you can obviously succeed with this head start. Since Fiverr grows more competitive every day, though, it’s just good that you can gain a foothold by starting off with some knowledge not every newbie has.

 

Chapter 3: How do I Find Resources?

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If you want some resources that are vital to new users or veterans who rushing into things, check out the Resources section at the back of this book before you even get into the Frequently Asked Questions. The Resources will help make sure that you know how to do some of the most basic things and understand how Fiverr works.

 

Now we’ll get on with some of the most Frequently Asked Questions about Fiverr:

 

Chapter 4: How to Contact Customer Support?

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So many of the suggestions in this guide will involve the ability to contact Fiverr Customer Support, this first Q&A will focus on how to do so. You may not need to yet, but if not, you will eventually need the help of Fiverr Support if you are going to sell or buy on Fiverr! Watch for an upcoming part of this series on How to Effectively Work with the Fiverr Support Resources.

 

Q. How do I contact Customer Support?

 

A. This answer is taken from a post written by the author and posted on the Fiverr forum. It is intentionally paraphrased but is by the original author, FontHaunt. It is accurate still as of May 2017.

 

On the Support page there are help articles and information, but in the upper right is a “submit ticket” hyperlink that opens a form page. Click the drop-down box on the forum and proceed.

 

There are some email addresses for Fiverr including one for Support. I don’t recommend them because tickets get higher priority than emails. Emails can also be lost in transit.

 

There are no published phone numbers for Fiverr. If your mother is a Fiverr staff member, call her mobile. Otherwise, use the ticket system.

 

1.) Customer Support page at www.fiverr.com/support or support.fiverr.com:

 

2.) Ticket Submission Form start:

 

 

3.) Continue filling in fields until you submit. You will have the opportunity to describe the issue in detail and upload files if needed.

 

To easily find this post on the Fiverr Official Forum, search for keyword FIVERRCONTACT

Chapter 5: Can One User Have Multiple Accounts?

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According to the Fiverr Terms of Service, one user cannot have more than one account. There are people who try it and even get away with it for a while, but it’s very risky. Fiverr has ways to detect all the methods people use to create multiple accounts. If you just create two accounts on one computer and on one IP and you try to sell the same services with the same profile photo, chances are very high you’ll end up with both accounts banned. If you try to share one payment method (PayPal, Payoneer, etc.) with two accounts, this is also likely to end badly. You may not even be able to get any funds you’ve earned.

You may know some ways to avoid the obvious issues like using VPN or using a friend’s internet, but there just really is no reason to risk this. For one thing, a new user has the opportunity to create 7 gigs. A new user should be able to determine the chances for longer term success with only 7 gigs. If you can’t succeed with 7, you won’t be likely to earn much with more gigs. So, why risk it? Some of the excuses people give include things like:

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. I want to offer gigs in a totally different category

*
p<>{color:#000;}. I want to have one account for buying and one for selling

*
p<>{color:#000;}. I want to do “testing” with a second account

 

All of these can be accomplished in a different way. You can offer gigs in more than one category with just one account. Though it may be more important to center your branding later on, in the early stages this is not critical.

 

There are a few reasons someone might want to buy with a separate account. If you are trying to outsource your work, another seller might not love it when you buy their $5 logo and resell it for $10 on your account. Overall, though, this kind of outsourcing doesn’t make big bucks. (There are ways to outsource through Fiverr, but that’s a topic for another book.) If you want to hide your purchases for other reasons, you can do so by just not leaving reviews when you buy. While that might be difficult for the sellers you buy from, it is really your choice.

Testing is one of the worst reasons to use a separate account, because many sellers do this thinking it is a good idea to try to buy one of their own gigs from a different account. Fiverr sees that as review manipulation and it’s a very bad idea. Don’t do it. It is a guaranteed way to get banned and never make a dollar on Fiverr.

 

What CAN you do?

 

You can have multiple people in the same household that have different accounts. Just do so very cautiously. This can be a way to work in other categories, work as teams or just earn money separately. Don’t try it unless you have the permission of Customer Support before you even create the family 2nd account.

The primary issue is that however accounts are ultimately used the rules must be followed. In reality, sure, someone could claim their brother, sister, granny and 13 cousins and if CS gives permission and one person can manage 17 accounts, fine. It’s going to be realistically difficult to manage even 3 or more accounts while keeping the gig types different per account AND maintaining 3 payment methods or more.

 

If Fiverr gets suspicious, they don’t hesitate to look at the names and payment methods on the accounts and ask the owner(s) to provide photo ID, bank info, whatever. If that isn’t provided, any or all accounts can be banned with funds returned to the buyers. For most people it is not worth the effort, especially beyond 2-3 accounts.

 

If you really want to have different people with their own accounts on the same IP, do this:

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Contact Fiverr Customer Support first and tell them what you plan to do and what usernames will be in use.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Tell CS what categories the accounts will be in and make sure there are different services on each account.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Tell CS that you will use a different payment/withdrawal method for each account and be sure to actually DO that.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Do not EVER have a resident in the same home buy a service from another resident of that home.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Once you get permission from CS, keep screen shots. Servers can fail and various things can happen. It is best to have BOTH your ticket history and your screen shots at all times.

Chapter 6: How do I use Buyer Requests?

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Buyer Requests are misused a great deal, but for a dedicated beginner or veteran seller, they can still get you started or get you back in the game during a rough period. Many new sellers get confused about how Buyer Requests work since they think that a seller should make a post requesting that buyers purchase their services. This is one reason you see so many seller requests instead of real Buyer Requests.

 

To get to these, this is the method as of mid-2017.

 

URL: fiverr.com/users/[yourusernamehere]/requests

 

If this doesn’t work for you, just search the Fiverr Support page for information on Buyer Requests.

 

The most important thing to remember is that the sellers posting in BR may be annoying, but they really don’t cause as big a problem as many people think. It does not stop buyers from posting their own requests. When a person who is only a buyer goes to the Buying>Post a Request area, they do not see the posts from sellers, they just see their own form to fill out for a request. Even if a buyer does accidentally click on Selling>Buyer Requests, it doesn’t hurt anything. If that person is a buyer only and has nothing for sale, they will just see a fairly blank page.

 

Buyers (only) never see all those posts by sellers so it does not stop them from understanding that they can post a real BUYER request asking for people to bid on what they want to buy.

 

When you click on Buyer Requests as a seller, you should see a list of posts and some will be sellers but some will not. Like this:

 

 

You can and should utilize the real ones! If you can’t see them well in this small screenshot, just careful reading will tell you which offers or REAL BUYER REQUESTS. Ignore the ones that offer to sell you something or have nonsense wording and carefully read the ones that say things like “I need a Logo Designer” or “Looking for someone to create original content for my site.” Some days there will only be one or two good ones, some days there won’t be any. On the days that there are some, use them and craft your offer with your very BEST writing and an AMAZING offer. Don’t try to make a template that will work for every request, buyers hate that. They will see you as a spammer and they might not buy from you later if they recognize your name while going through Fiverr search. Read the buyer’s words carefully. Check any attachments available. If you realize you really cannot do the task or aren’t suited to it, don’t apply. If you can do it, write a custom offer and send it to them. Mention that you would appreciate it if they would contact you before ordering, but assume they might not, so make your offer workable.

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. This is the way that the MAJORITY of new sellers get their first order. Once you have one order and especially if you get a good review, you have a much higher chance of getting more.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. What about the budget and time mentioned in the Buyer Request? Do you have to stick to it? Should you make an offer even if the pay is terrible?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. If at all possible, you should stick to the budget and time and perhaps even offer a slightly lower price if you have no sales yet. If the buyer budget and/or time is poor, then you have to decide based on the pros and cons. Consider these:

 

 

Have you made any sales yet on any of your gigs? If not, it may be worth it to try a Buyer Request and make an offer that is so good they won’t want to refuse it. Again, ONLY do this if you can really do the job and in the time required. A late delivery or cancellation is terrible at this stage. Yes, you might have to work for nothing or even lose money on the job. If you can get the job, deliver it well and get a good review – that is an investment. Don’t be afraid to invest if you have no sales yet.

 

Have you made 1-5 sales on some gigs, but now are stuck or have 1 or more new gigs without sales?

 

If this is also true for you, it may still be worth taking chances on a gig that will pay you little and take hours of work. In those first 1-10 sales overall, the reviews are really helpful to catapult you forward. Even after you achieve level 1 at 10 sales, you’ll need 50 sales overall and getting reviews on at least half of those can be a huge boost. If you get the 50 sales within a 60 consecutive day period you will be awarded a level 2 badge. In addition, if you have 20-40 reviews out of that, buyers will see you as a little bit more proven.

 

Are you already level 2 and you have at least 75 reviews?

 

If this fits you and you are still getting a decent number of orders outside of the Buyer Request attempts, it is probably time to focus a little more on orders that are breaking even or making some money. At this stage you would ideally be doing $5 gigs only when you can do them in 5-20 minutes. If you are getting orders at the rate of $5 (about $3.90-4.00 profit) per 15 minutes this can be a very good wage in some regions of the world and at least a workable part-time wage even in some of the more costly regions of the world. Depending on your education and skills, you might be able to maintain some decent income making $8-20 in an hour of work. You do have to calculate for time spent preparing and maintaining gigs, promotion and possibly other money or time consuming factors. Nevertheless, this is the basic range where most people would feel comfortable at least knowing they are not working for free and in some cases making enough to pay for some luxuries or even life essentials. To consider where to go from here, check out the chapter on EARNINGS later in this book.

Chapter 7: What is this Message About Buyer Requests?

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Q. What is: "You must have at least 90% positive rating to make new offers"?

 

A. This answer is taken from a post written by the author and posted on the Fiverr forum. It is intentionally duplicated but is by the original author (Fiverr seller FontHaunt) so keep in mind that this is not plagiarized information. It is accurate still as of May 2017.

 

What does it mean?

 

This is a message that will show up for you if you get one or more reviews that are less than 5 stars and it pushes your overall rating below 90% positive.

If you are a brand new seller with only one 5 star review, this can happen fast. It would only take a single 1 star review to make your rating lower than 90%.

 

If you have several good reviews but then you have problems with late cancellations or a few negative reviews, that will also drop your rating too low to make bids on buyer requests.

 

How do I fix it? I need to bid on buyer requests to get sales so am I stuck?

 

To fix this you need more good reviews and there is really little other option. You are not stuck, but it might take more creative effort to get there. Buyer Requests are a common way that new sellers build up, so if you’ve lost access to them, that’s very difficult.

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Consider buying a gig from another seller and having your best gig promoted on a forum about your niche. You can also try gigs that offer to put your gig ad on their social media pages, but those work best if you can choose someone who has followers who really need your gig. If someone has a Facebook page about knitting and your gig is about logo design, putting your ad on the knitting page isn’t helpful.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Updating your gigs and making them as great as you possibly can is really important, especially if you’ve been hit by a poor review. You may be able to do this on your own, but if you are struggling, you can hire other successful sellers to help you. Some sellers offer overall gig improvement or critique packages and others offer individual services that can be helpful. Get your descriptions written perfectly and with good marketing copy. Put an awesome video on your gigs. Add FAQ's to your gigs and use packages to help your gig display in search effectively. With enough effort, you can get your percentage back up to 90% and even more.

Chapter 8: What Should I Think About in Terms of Earnings?

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As you grow your business, you may be able to increase your income by raising your prices or lowering how much time you spend on each task. If you plan to freelance as a full-time living, it is absolutely critical that you earn enough over time to put 50% of your profits into a secure savings plan of some kind. It is also wise to maintain income outside of one platform. As mentioned in an earlier chapter, your first goal is to get to the point where you can do a $5 gig (or a task that is priced in the $5 range) in about 5-20 minutes for an average profit of $8-20 per hour overall. To reiterate all of what was mentioned previously:

 

At the first stages of solid freelancing, you would ideally be doing $5 gigs only when you can do them in 5-20 minutes. If you are getting orders at the rate of $5 (about $3.90-4.00 profit) per 15 minutes this can be a very good wage in some regions of the world and at least a workable part-time wage even in some of the more costly regions of the world. Depending on your education and skills, you might be able to maintain some decent income making $8-20 in an hour of work. You do have to calculate for time spent preparing and maintaining gigs, promotion and possibly other money or time consuming factors. Nevertheless, this is the basic range where most people would feel comfortable at least knowing they are not working for free and in some cases making enough to pay for some luxuries or even life essentials.

 

So, if you plan to freelance as more than a hobby, you may want to focus on getting to at least a consistent stream of orders producing $16-40 per hour so you can save half of that.

 

By saving, you will gradually be able to put way enough money to sustain yourself at the same wage for a set period of time. If you plan to use the funds as your primary income, you need at least 3 months’ worth of savings to consider yourself at the beginning of a real freelance career. If you have enough saved to pay for all of your life essentials (bills, groceries, housing) for 3 months and something were to go wrong or you were unable to work for a while, your business can sustain itself for 2 months without any income at all. By the time you start spending that 3rd month, though, the time will truly fly and the money will drain away fast. That is assuming that your expenses haven’t changed, you’ve cut your luxuries away and have no medical or other new bills to pay. If you can’t start earning your usual amount at that point, you’ll be in trouble fast. That’s why 3 months is only a beginner level.

 

Some business schools recommend 6 months of savings to consider yourself a full-timer as a self-employed person, but 1 year is actually a more realistic goal. 6 months will obviously help more than your “beginning 3 month” goal, but you really need a year of savings to feel more comfortable. If you can sustain your lifestyle and family for 1 year without any income, you would usually have enough time to get a wage-earning job, change your freelance platforms or habits or find other ways to sustain yourself in case of a complete failure of your original business. It doesn’t matter if you’ve made $15,000 in a year on Fiverr or $1,000,000 in a year on Fiverr - the source and the money can disappear so fast that it is shocking. This book is all about succeeding on Fiverr and I believe it can be done. I would not be doing my “job” as an adviser if I didn’t tell you to expect the unexpected, though. So, make savings a habit from the very beginning and don’t ever stop saving 50% of your income. Even if you never need to rely on it due to an emergency (unlikely) you can save enough over years to actually retire! Wouldn’t that be amazing to do after a great career being your own boss? It can be done, but only with savings and preferably also interest-bearing investments.

Chapter 9: Resources

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The Fiverr Academy (Best for brand new or struggling sellers)

 

The Support Team Knowledge Base (Use search for best results)

 

The Tips for Sellers Forum Category (A good place to read tips and post tips for others)

 

The Fiverr FAQ Forum Category (Some of these are already in this book, but new ones are added almost every day)

 

The Conversations forum category (Good for general chit chat or questions that might lead to a full discussion)

 

The Rest of the Fiverr Forum

 

It’s also good to become familiar with:

 

The Fiverr Terms of Service

 

The Forum Rules

Chapter 10: Success Manager Book Excerpt

ToC

A selection of sellers on Fiverr have also grouped to discuss the new Fiverr Success Management Program. Some sellers in the group are in the program and some are not, which gives them a chance to compare what messages they receive via Fiverr inbox, email and other sources. This group is currently working on a compilation of information about this program which is not exactly a secret, but not well known as of this writing either. Although it has more than just one contributor, Maddie “FontHaunt” will be compiling the information and it’s nearly done, so keep an eye out! It will be part of the Freelancing for Fun and Profit series. The following is an excerpt from the book on this program, and the full book will have much more.

 

Introduction to the Success Manager Program

 

Do you need a Fiverr success manager? Do you have a Fiverr Success Manager? A significant number of sellers from newbies to Top Rated Sellers don’t have one or even know what the term means. What you will get in this e-book is a combination of several things. You’ll get information that Fiverr has put out about the Success Manager program, which is still handy because they haven’t exactly made it obvious. You’ll get much more than that.

 

Before going into what you’ll get in this little book, some readers may not even be aware of the Success Manager program or know what an SM is. In the earliest days of the program, it also appears that some of these were called Account Managers (referring to the management of the chosen seller’s account.) For some time some of these staff members called themselves Account Managers while others called themselves Success Managers or SM’s. In time, it seemed to stabilize and each was called a Success Manager or SM. In this book, SM will be used often to refer to a Success Manager, so SM and Success Manager are used interchangeably.

 

One of the first indicators most of us got that there was such a program was in 2016 when a forum user posted a screen shot of an email they had received. It was supposedly from Fiverr, but since phishing and other scams have happened, they assumed it was fake. Here is a transcript of that post. The username of the seller who posted it is omitted for privacy reasons:

 

May 3, 2016 (Fiverr Official Forum Post)

Today I got this email-

[Hello there!
In case we haven’t already met, my name is Rachel and I’m a Seller Success Manager, part of Fiverr’s Customer Relations team.
I am excited to welcome you to our new program, Seller Success, where you will receive an Account Manager!
As your Seller Success Manager, I will be your dedicated Fiverr representative, keeping an eye on your account to make sure that you are getting the most out of Fiverr including reaching out to you in advance for any marketplace feedback. Any Customer Support requests that you may have will be monitored by me so that we can ensure you are receiving priority service.
I will also be available not only via e-mail, but also via Skype to talk about new features and order or account questions!
If you would like to join in, I would love to schedule a 10 minute call with on Skype to introduce myself and learn more about what we can do to improve your experience on Fiverr!
I look forward hearing from you]

Anyone got the same email? I haven’t heard about it so senior’s views on this would be much appreciated.

Cheers

Some forum users were suspicious of this at first. You may notice as mentioned that the words Account Manager and Success Manager were both used which was confusing, and most Fiverr users were accustomed to thinking of Skype as a forbidden thing. In a short time, though, several other sellers admitted publicly or privately that they had received the same or similar emails to their Fiverr-connect email or to their Fiverr inbox. It was soon confirmed that some kind of program had begun, though the sellers chosen seemed to be all types. Some had less than 200 reviews, some had thousands. Some were Top Rated Sellers and some were not. They weren’t all from any particular country or region. Not all were 100% fluent in English although it did seem that those chosen were able to communicate in English well enough to benefit from the program.

A few things emerged that did connect those chosen. All of them had made some sales and had a fairly high positive rating on their completed orders. It appeared that no one was chosen who had an extremely high cancellation rate (over 75% and perhaps less.) Most, if not all, were level 2 or above although it’s possible there are some level one’s chosen. If so, we haven’t found them. All of those chosen were at least making regular sales though not all were doing incredibly high numbers. There didn’t seem to be an obvious connection to how much money they were making per week or month, though as far as we could tell, everyone chosen was making at least enough to be considered regular part-time earners. Most were very active on Fiverr and typically responded to messages in less than 4 hours on a regular basis. Not nearly all were active on the Fiverr forum, so we found those by locating forum users who knew other sellers in their region or who had met other sellers at events. We don’t have a clear idea of how many were chosen that weren’t active on some kind of Fiverr social media whether it was the LinkedIn group, the Facebook or Twitter pages or the Fiverr blog and forum.

 

I started to contact various sellers I know to find as many sellers with Success Managers as possible. Most were more than willing to share individual stories and details of what they had learned about the program and the advice they had been given. Much of it was the same across categories and seller types, though some people had detailed information for narrower purposes depending on what they had asked. A few of us started to compile broad information they had been given as well as insider information from Question & Answer sessions sellers had with their individual success managers. Some sellers did a little “spy” work by asking some specific questions that we hoped to learn about. We didn’t get everything we wanted since the Success Mangers had clearly been told to keep certain things to themselves (or they didn’t know) and sometimes we got surprising answers. Even so, we got enough actual answers to make it interesting and we found that not all sellers received exactly the same pop-ups, messages, Skype PM’s, etc. Except for one or two oddball results, we found that the answers were reasonably consistent so the majority of this book is a compilation of what we learned.

 

Who needs a Fiverr Success Manager? Well, as you’ll see when you read through, the hints given by SM’s are sometimes worded strongly. They’ve used language that indicates that sellers who follow their advice may get ahead in search results. Sellers who use none of the suggested techniques might be low in search or not appear at all. We can’t be sure how true this is, but since it’s coming directly from people who are on Fiverr staff, there is a good chance that some or all of the information they give could catapult the chosen sellers ahead. What if you AREN’T a chosen seller? If you are new or a part-timer, there is a chance you could be really serious about Fiverr but lose out because you don’t have an SM. Even if you are an established seller and you get more bulk/expensive orders BUT have slower delivery times and fewer in queue, you may be overlooked in the SM program since the chosen sellers seem to be those who sell and deliver frequently even if the orders are small.

 

By using the information here, you will know everything that our sellers found out even though you may not have a Success Manager (or SM) of your own, this is your Success Manager in a “box” since we’ll give you ever detail we can. This book is fresh content compiled from 2016 through early 2017. We hope to give all sellers who read this book a chance to benefit from exactly the same information so that even if you aren’t chosen by Fiverr, you can choose your own chance at Success!

 

If you aren’t interested in seeing all of the actual letters we were able to gather, just skip past these. Here we will show copies of multiple letters that sellers received. The earliest seems to have come May 1, 2016, so we assume the program at least went into full action around then. It may be interesting to note how much the SM’s emphasize their own importance to sellers and how many benefits sellers would get. It may also be useful to note the difference between various real SM letters. Here are some that we gathered:

 

[Hello there!
In case we haven’t already met, my name is Rachel and I’m a Seller Success Manager, part of Fiverr’s Customer Relations team.
I am excited to welcome you to our] *new program, Seller Success,_ where [[*you will receive an Account Manager!]_][
As your Seller Success Manager, I will be] your dedicated Fiverr representative, keeping an eye on your account to make sure that you are getting the most out of Fiverr including reaching out to you in advance for any marketplace feedback. Any Customer Support requests that you may have will be monitored by me so that we can ensure you are receiving priority service.[
I will also] be available not only via e-mail, but also via Skype [to talk about new features and order or account questions!
If you would like to join in, I would love to schedule a 10 minute call with on Skype to introduce myself and learn more about what we can do to improve your experience on Fiverr!
I look forward hearing from you]

___________________________________

 

“Hello there!

In case we haven’t already met, my name is Noam and I’m a Seller Success Manager, part of Fiverr’s Customer Relations team.

I am excited to announce our new program, the Fiverr Seller Success Program offered exclusively to a selected group of sellers. The program’s goal is to help sellers become even more successful on Fiverr and help them develop their business.

Benefits of the program:

Dedicated Success Manager

VIP customer support

Tips and best practices to improve quality and increase sales

Exclusive analytics and insights relating to your account

Interested? All that is left is for you to let me know if you would like to join by replying to this email!

If you do, I would like to schedule a 10 minute Skype call to talk more about how we can work together to make the best out of your experience on Fiverr. If you would like to communicate via chat or email – that’s OK too!”

 

 

Forum post by user:

 

Updates Regarding this program. MY success manager gave me some useful suggestions regarding my account. We had a 10 minute skype call . After that i got one email that was the follow up email of skype chat regarding recommendations. So basically this program is for help the sellers to get more success.

 

 

Another email received by a user who had replied “Yes” but had not received an invite to chat:

 

“Hello!

I wanted to remind you that you joined our Fiverr Seller Success Program. The Fiverr Seller Success Program offered exclusively to a selected group of sellers. We hope to help sellers enhance experience on Fiverr and help them with advantages in search placement as well as profile recommendations to bring success.

In your recent ticket, I monitored the progress to make sure that you were able to resolve your problem since you now have VIP customer support.

I would like to discuss areas relating to your account that may be holding you back. I would like to schedule a 10 minute Skype call to talk more about how we can work together to improve your analytics and increase your sales. Please reply and let me know if you plan to remain in the Seller Success program.

Chapter 2 (Success Manager Excerpt)

So, now that you’ve seen the potential benefits, this book can become your “Success Manager in a Box” as we share with you all the tips and suggestions that we compiled based on Success Manager responses to users who helped create this book. You can decide for yourself if these ideas are actually beneficial, but at the very least, you won’t be in the dark!

 

From here I will take the info gathered by the group and I will list for you all of the tips that were gathered, and when available I’ll tell you the reason the SM gave the user relating to why the tip is important. Some of this content will be blended to avoid redundancy and to protect the identity of sellers who chose to help. While a few SM names were listed in the introduction letters, from here the individual names of the Success Managers won’t be given.

 

You can either read this book through just to know what you might be missing, or you can use the summaries at the end of each chapter as a kind of workbook to go through your gigs and implement some or all of the SM ideas.

 

I was offered transcripts from some of those first and second Skype calls with SM’s. Anything that seems useful will be included here, but instead of just listing the transcripts with all the stamps and names, the information will be given according to what it applied to. Some of this will be related to specific Fiverr categories and some of it is broad. Anything that was repeated in multiple sessions will be simplified to keep this as brief and meaningful as possible.

 

Explanation of Program:

 

All the SM’s stated that they worked for the Fiverr Customer Relation’s team. Most identified themselves as both an Account Manager and a Success Manager, although it seems like in later contacts “account manager” was used less. The SM’s stated that the Seller Success program was created to help sellers who seemed to have the greatest potential for continued success on Fiverr. Little mention was made about the level of the seller, but some implied that level 2 sellers in the program might be considered for promotions if they applied the suggestions made. Some of the users who were chatting with their SM’s expressed skepticism about the usefulness of the program since they weren’t all happy with their current experiences on Fiverr. While all intended to stay with Fiverr and were earning money, some reported to their SM’s that they had trouble with PayPal chargebacks, canned responses from Customer Support and Fiverr features that seemed non-functional or didn’t result in the advantages that were promised.

The Success Managers themselves responded vaguely to many of the early questions and inquiries. There were some specifics given as follows: The SM’s across the board said attempts were being made to add to the number of CS reps and to improve the quality of CS responses. One SM stated that he was aware of problems with PayPal chargebacks and that it was discussed often by staff, but he was unable to give any specific information on how or when Fiverr might work on the issue. One area the SM’s did seem concerned about was reports of non-functional or poorly implemented features. They asked questions about the analytics page and what could be changed (far prior to the new analytics changes in 2017) as well as other specific seller pages. They responded to seller concerns about problems with inbox messages. Statements were made regarding attempts to shut down problems with sellers using false profiles to gain access to buyers and then to use the inbox as a way of quickly acquiring off-Fiverr contact info. According to one SM, the users of these fake seller accounts were not concerned about being banned because they only created a gig to get access to Buyer Requests and an available contact button. Once those sellers gained access to a buyer’s email or Skype ID, they apparently continued discussions off-Fiverr. For this reason, Fiverr intended to monitor inboxes more closely than before. I suggested that some of the sellers helping gather information might want to ask specific questions about Buyer Requests and what could be done to tame the spam. I did not receive much feedback on this and the one seller who definitely asked about it did not receive an answer.

 

Summary/Takeaways:

PayPal Chargebacks are still a problem. It is best to continue to report problems with these to Customer Support, in any offered live events with Fiverr staff, and if you do have an SM, bring this up again. Otherwise, these are a fact of business on Fiverr, so everyone should be cautious about large orders from new buyers (break up large orders into multiple small ones) and keep an eye out for red flags.

Feature Issues: Fiverr is making an attempt to address broken features or ones that are not fully functional. The SM’s are interested in these, so it will continue to be helpful to report these to CS and other staff.

Inbox Messages: It seems likely that there are some sellers abusing the inbox by using false profiles to gain access to buyer information. These false sellers have no concerns about bans since they have no intention of selling. To avoid the chances of your own account being identified as false take these steps:

Avoid words that make your inbox appear with a red outline. (Words like email, payment.)

Words that don’t result in the red outline can still get you noticed. Using phrases like “outside contact” or “contact me” seem to be some of the more problematic. Try to avoid using these kind of phrases. If necessary, use the inbox message for basic introductions to your clients and then use attachments to exchange longer pieces of information.

WARNING: Do NOT use the attachment system to abuse the real rules and offer your contact info or ask buyer’s for theirs when it isn’t related to a gig order on Fiverr. Do not discuss outside payment in attachments. If sellers begin to abuse attachments it’s possible Fiverr will remove the option for attachments outside of the order page. It’s also possible that they will increase monitoring of attachments which could be detrimental to all sellers. This is especially true for sellers who genuinely need to exchange personal data for gig reasons, like gigs requiring website credentials or email addresses acquired to create business cards.

 

Chapter 3 (Success Manager Excerpt)

These are tips that were specifically sent to my source group. The first ones will be related to setting up your Fiverr profile.

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Your profile picture should be an actual photo of you, a caricature of you, or your company logo.

 

 

There are some pitfalls to watch out for here. What the SM may not tell you is that there are some good ways to apply this and some poor ways. There are also some things to consider when deciding which of the above to choose. Let’s go over some of those.

 

Deciding on a profile picture:

 

The most-recommended choice by many Top Rated Sellers, Fiverr Ambassadors, Success Managers and other successful people is a face shot of yourself, with you smiling and in professional dress. Consider seller ozzieuk* who uses his profile picture as a big part of his brand. If you feel able to get a good photo like that, it can be a ticket to sales. Buyers like to know who they are dealing with, they like a warm welcome, and they appreciate a professional appearance. You may have specific reasons you don’t want to use a selfie, even a really good one. Some people just really, really value their privacy or have reasons not to display their real photos on Fiverr. What are some reasons people might not want to?

 

People who have a complex family or relationship situation may need to keep a lower profile online. People who are recognizable in a photo because they are well known in another field may not want to display a personal photo. People who have small children at home or some other sensitive issue may just not feel comfortable. I know this for sure after doing some research on sensitive family situations through gigs like those sold by seller FontHaunt. That’s OK.

 

If you still really want to follow the photo advice, there are some things you can do to make it work. You can hire another freelancer or get a talented friend or family member to help you with these if you don’t know how to do them on your own. There are methods that can be used to enhance a photo that will make it look great, but not make you as recognizable as you might think. Many, many sellers use these tricks without anyone even realizing exactly what they are doing. Some ways to do these include:

 

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Taking a photo at an unusual angle which obscures your identity but still shows a pleasing human appearance

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Editing a photo with artistic effects to make it look like a drawing, painting or illustration which can make it less recognizable

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Editing a photo with special effects to blur, smooth, or fade a photo so that it no longer looks exactly like other photos of you

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Using a photo of yourself with a very different hairstyle, sunglasses or glasses, a hat, or clothing items

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Using a photo of someone else – this one should really be a very last choice and shouldn’t be used in most situations. If you use a photo that is just a plain stock photo you may violate a copyright and it can make you appear dishonest when people find your picture in a simple reverse search. If you have access to photo of someone who isn’t known and doesn’t appear elsewhere online, you need to have the permission of that person to use the photo. In rare cases this might be helpful since you may have a relative who never plans to be online and takes a great picture and doesn’t mind being on your “team” as the “face” of your account. Just remember that this can come back to haunt you since people change their minds. If you build a great successful brand and that face becomes symbolic, the person could change their mind, and no matter how sure you are that they won’t, you would have trouble legally if they insist on the removal of their photo. They might decide they don’t want the recognition, they may decide to go online after all, and they may even decide to capitalize on your success by branching out into their own business venture. Be careful with this one!

 

Many sellers do use a caricature or avatar of themselves as a profile photo. This may have mixed results. If you are already a graphic designer or you sell artistic gigs, this can be a chance for you to showcase your skills. The thing is, it is not that hard to create a “cartoonized” version of a photo of yourself, but to get one that actually looks appealing is not so easy. Buyers don’t want to see a simplistic pop art character that could be anyone, because that is no better than using a stock photo of some blonde girl with a headset as a “genuine” photo. To really capitalize on a caricature, it should be something extra special. Perhaps you do have a great talent at making a simple cartoon of a photo look especially realistic or to take on a style that is unique and amazing. There is a Fiverr seller named Zeus777 who does incredible anime and other cartoon styles and I can recognize her images as her work in many cases. By using her own work as her profile photo, she actually enhances her profile with a caricature/avatar.

 

The last recommended option is to use a logo as your profile photo. There are reasons to do this and reasons not to. For example, it’s fairly easy to grab a cool looking logo from Google images and it may look amazing when you pop it into your Fiverr profile. Perhaps you even take out whatever text is on it or use one without text and add your username/brand to make it your own. It might look great. If you aren’t a graphic designer or logo designer, this might work. Even then, it isn’t recommended. Just like using a stock photo, a logo like that can be found easily and give you the appearance of dishonesty even when you didn’t intend to do anything dishonest.

 

You can also use online or offline software to create a logo. This has a similar effect and can look really good if you aren’t a designer yourself. It has the same problem, though, since software often uses well known templates. In both cases you also risk violating a copyright and getting banned on Fiverr for doing so. There are also many sellers on Fiverr who have heard that logo design is a hot field, easy, and they want to get started doing that. They pick up some free or pirated logo-creation software and they make an account. The first logo they make is their own. This will really tank your success somewhere down the road, and it’s even worse if it happens after you have 10, 50, 100 or more reviews. Buyers are become more savvy about logos and they are also becoming more jaded. Many buyers spend $5-50 on a cheap logo on Fiverr and are shocked when they get something of poor quality or taken from elsewhere. No matter how you try to spin it, taking art from someone else is stealing. If you claim to be a logo designer, you need to really learn how to use software to draw vector images and use your artistic skills to make your very own designs. That includes the design for your own logo. If you don’t know what a vector image is, you are already in trouble as a designer.

 

So, if you aren’t a graphic designer yourself but you do want to use a logo, you still want one that is original and high quality. It may sound like this is the easiest route to go, and for some people it is. You’ll just have to try and and weigh the results for yourself. You can make a stab at creating your own logo if you really do think you have the skills. Put it on your profile and see how it goes. Your Success Manager probably wouldn’t recommend this, but if you don’t have one of your own to ask, it’s really up to you. A better choice might be to hire someone to create a logo for you. There are thousands of mediocre to poor logo designers on Fiverr and dozens of really good ones. If you don’t have a lot to spend, consider just getting something very simple. A signature logo with your username on it will be unique since no one has your username but you. If you can afford something better and you want to invest in it, you might look at some of the Top Rated Seller who do logo design and try it out. Twistedweb123 is a well-known Fiverr Ambassador who sells logos, though they might not be for everyone. Take a look at the samples for him or for other designers and do reverse searches to make sure what they are selling looks original. Show some samples to your friends and family. If you know other sellers on Fiverr, ask for their opinions on samples or on a referral for a logo designer. Whatever you do, just make sure that if you use a logo, use the best quality you possible can and make SURE you are the only one using it.

 

Summary/Takeaways:

 

Fiverr prefers that you use a picture of yourself as your profile picture, but they are open to a caricature or original logo.

 

If you worry about using a recognizable photo of yourself, consider using good photo of yourself at an unusual angle or artistically rendered so that it still represents YOU but can’t be easily found in reverse searches. If you don’t even want to be recommended on the street, this can still be done!

 

[* When choosing to use a logo, be sure that yours is branded with your business name or username (often the same thing) and that it is 100% unique. Using even a bit of clipart can really put you in a bad place if someone accuses you of dishonesty or copyright violation. *]

 

WARNING: Do not try to use an easy-to-find stock photo and pretend that it’s your picture. Rookie mistake. Don’t use copyrighted photos or art as this is a Terms of Service violation and can get you in serious trouble on Fiverr.

 

[There are usernames for various real Fiverr users listed throughout this book. As long as the user is mentioned in a positive way, the username is given as it is at the time of this writing. If the author uses a negative example, the username will be altered to a fictional name to avoid putting any real seller in a negative light. There is no way to be sure that all of the sellers mentioned will keep the same account or gigs over time, so after the first mention, direct links will not be placed inside the chapters. A list of user’s mentioned will be added in an Appendix at the end of the book if you would like to find them there, or you can go to fiverr.com/username to find any seller who still has an active account.*]

 

 

I was offered transcripts from some of those first and second Skype calls with SM’s. Anything that seems useful will be included here, but instead of just listing the transcripts with all the stamps and names, the information will be given according to what it applied to. Some of this will be related to specific Fiverr categories and some of it is broad. Anything that was repeated in multiple sessions will be simplified to keep this as brief and meaningful as possible.

 

Explanation of Program:

 

All the SM’s stated that they worked for the Fiverr Customer Relation’s team. Most identified themselves as both an Account Manager and a Success Manager, although it seems like in later contacts “account manager” was used less. The SM’s stated that the Seller Success program was created to help sellers who seemed to have the greatest potential for continued success on Fiverr. Little mention was made about the level of the seller, but some implied that level 2 sellers in the program might be considered for promotions if they applied the suggestions made. Some of the users who were chatting with their SM’s expressed skepticism about the usefulness of the program since they weren’t all happy with their current experiences on Fiverr. While all intended to stay with Fiverr and were earning money, some reported to their SM’s that they had trouble with PayPal chargebacks, canned responses from Customer Support and Fiverr features that seemed non-functional or didn’t result in the advantages that were promised.

The Success Managers themselves responded vaguely to many of the early questions and inquiries. There were some specifics given as follows: The SM’s across the board said attempts were being made to add to the number of CS reps and to improve the quality of CS responses. One SM stated that he was aware of problems with PayPal chargebacks and that it was discussed often by staff, but he was unable to give any specific information on how or when Fiverr might work on the issue. One area the SM’s did seem concerned about was reports of non-functional or poorly implemented features. They asked questions about the analytics page and what could be changed (far prior to the new analytics changes in 2017) as well as other specific seller pages. They responded to seller concerns about problems with inbox messages. Statements were made regarding attempts to shut down problems with sellers using false profiles to gain access to buyers and then to use the inbox as a way of quickly acquiring off-Fiverr contact info. According to one SM, the users of these fake seller accounts were not concerned about being banned because they only created a gig to get access to Buyer Requests and an available contact button. Once those sellers gained access to a buyer’s email or Skype ID, they apparently continued discussions off-Fiverr. For this reason, Fiverr intended to monitor inboxes more closely than before. I suggested that some of the sellers helping gather information might want to ask specific questions about Buyer Requests and what could be done to tame the spam. I did not receive much feedback on this and the one seller who definitely asked about it did not receive an answer.

Summary/Takeaways:

PayPal Chargebacks are still a problem. It is best to continue to report problems with these to Customer Support, in any offered live events with Fiverr staff, and if you do have an SM, bring this up again. Otherwise, these are a fact of business on Fiverr, so everyone should be cautious about large orders from new buyers (break up large orders into multiple small ones) and keep an eye out for red flags.

Feature Issues: Fiverr is making an attempt to address broken features or ones that are not fully functional. The SM’s are interested in these, so it will continue to be helpful to report these to CS and other staff.

Inbox Messages: It seems likely that there are some sellers abusing the inbox by using false profiles to gain access to buyer information. These false sellers have no concerns about bans since they have no intention of selling. To avoid the chances of your own account being identified as false take these steps:

Avoid words that make your inbox appear with a red outline. (Words like email, payment.)

Words that don’t result in the red outline can still get you noticed. Using phrases like “outside contact” or “contact me” seem to be some of the more problematic. Try to avoid using these kind of phrases. If necessary, use the inbox message for basic introductions to your clients and then use attachments to exchange longer pieces of information.

WARNING: Do NOT use the attachment system to abuse the real rules and offer your contact info or ask buyer’s for theirs when it isn’t related to a gig order on Fiverr. Do not discuss outside payment in attachments. If sellers begin to abuse attachments it’s possible Fiverr will remove the option for attachments outside of the order page. It’s also possible that they will increase monitoring of attachments which could be detrimental to all sellers. This is especially true for sellers who genuinely need to exchange personal data for gig reasons, like gigs requiring website credentials or email addresses acquired to create business cards.

Chapter 11: Want More of the Freelancing for Fun and Profit Series?

ToC

If you’d like to read more about this program, please check out the book: “Who Needs a Fiverr Success Manager?” which will be released in the Summer of 2017. The book has a TON of information about not only how to improve your Fiverr profile, brand and success but also about what Fiverr staff seems to be looking for these days. You should be able to have this information too!

 

If you liked this little introductory book to help with basic questions, feel free to look me up on Fiverr! Honest reviews of this book here would also be greatly appreciated. If you do happen to contact me on Fiverr, mention that you read my book and I’ll be glad to answer any questions that wouldn’t violate the Fiverr Terms of Service. Take note that on Fiverr it is against the rules to give out email addresses or any other contact information, so if you get in touch please do not send me any contact info. I will be able to reply to you through messages on Fiverr or on the forum. (Forum contact is encouraged since there is more opportunity to refer you to more helpful content!) Thanks again for reading!

About the Author

ToC

Maddie “FontHaunt” Green is a freelance researcher, writer and legal terminology specialist. She has a BA degree in English, certification in NLP, a 2 year certification in Animal Science and is pursuing certification in Legal Research. She lives in Texas where she loves to hang out with her family and cats, ride horses, garden, provide services on fiverr.com/fonthaunt and of course – write, research and learn every single day!

 

 

 

Maddie’s Author Page: http://www.juniperpublisher.com/maddie

 

FontHaunt on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCc3GUCbaDy_NK4WxxoQs1Zw

FontHaunt on Blogger: https://fonthaunt.blogspot.com/

FontHaunt on Fiverr: https://www.fiverr.com/fonthaunt

FontHaunt on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FontHaunt-448621405276256/

 


Fiverr Frequently Asked Questions - ANSWERED

I am a Fiverr buyer and seller who has been watching, participating in and helping the Fiverr since 2014. As someone who cares about the community and wants sellers and buyers to succeed, I prepared this guide as a part of series for those seeking Fiverr success. This guide can help you get started or find where you lost your way on Fiverr. This guide is written from experience with information proven by real sellers who have also been active on the official Fiverr forum. There is a misconception among many new sellers that Fiverr can be an instant cash machine and perhaps that was true in it's very early days. Today it's not. What is true is that ANYONE can earn money on Fiverr, even serious money if the effort is there. This series of books on Freelancing for Fun and Profit will help you get there if you need a boost. This starter guide will help you with some Frequently Asked Questions about Fiverr. Things like: How to set up your Fiverr profile for the best results; How to avoid losing your new account by breaking the basic rules; How to budget your time and money to position yourself for success whether it's a hobby, part-time work or full-time blast! Take action now and get this easy guide and get to know the basics. The next book in the series is coming out soon, and this book even includes an excerpt from the insider book on the Fiverr Success Management program!

  • Author: Maddie FontHaunt
  • Published: 2017-06-02 19:05:25
  • Words: 10582
Fiverr Frequently Asked Questions - ANSWERED Fiverr Frequently Asked Questions - ANSWERED