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First Date Small Talk Guide: Communication Fundamentals Course Introduction

First Date Small Talk Guide

Communication Fundamentals Course Introduction

By

Zane Rozzi

Copyright 2016 Zane Rozzi. All rights reserved.

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Your level of success in realizing results is dependent upon a number of factors including your skill, ability, knowledge, effort, persistence, and a variety of other personal attributes. Because those factors differ between individuals, neither the author nor publisher can guarantee your success or any specific result. You alone are responsible for your actions and results in life and business. Any forward-looking statements contained within this publication are simply opinion and therefore not guarantees or promises of actual performance or results. Neither the author nor publisher make any guarantee you will achieve any specific results. Individual results are not guaranteed and will vary.

Neither the author nor publisher shall be liable for any losses, liabilities, or damages, including but not limited to indirect, special, or consequential damages, resulting directly or indirectly from the use of any information contained in this publication.

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Table of Contents

About Zane Rozzi

To Be Confident, You Need a System You Can Trust

Small Talk Versus Serious Discussions

How to Always Have Something Interesting to Say

How to Always Be an Interesting Conversationalist

Always Give Other People Expandable Topics

Accept Everything

Have Good Responses Prepared for the Obvious Questions

Talking about Your Interests That No One Else Cares about

An Example of the Significance of Body Language

Your Body Language Speaks First

Bonus 1: How to Extort People without Any Evidence of Extortion Taking Place

Bonus 2: Take Advantage of People’s Inability to Properly Weigh Consequences

Bonus 3: Make People Enthusiastically Accept Severe Negative Consequences

The Entire Communication Fundamentals Course

References

About Zane Rozzi

Zane Rozzi is a successful entrepreneur. He is also well known in the field of executive development. Zane Rozzi has a large and loyal following as a pickup artist who teaches others the keys to success in attracting the opposite sex. He designed and produced the popular and highly praised Communication Fundamentals course.

www.zanerozzi.com

To Be Confident, You Need a System You Can Trust

The following section is from the Communication Fundamentals course module 3, section 2, subsection 2. The entire course is available at: www.zanerozzi.com The Communication Fundamentals Course is highly praised and popular with both of Zane Rozzi’s fan bases: Executives looking to improve their people skills; and people interested in making a great impression with the opposite sex.

You are already a great speaker. You can hold your own while talking with friends and family. You’re not nervous, and you don’t doubt yourself. You’re not afraid to talk with friends and family and you don’t need to build yourself up to do it. You’re not even worried about what to say next. The conversation just flows naturally. You probably don’t even have to think about it. You just do it.

You’re also not concerned with whether or not your friends and family are judging you while you’re speaking. Your mind is not racing trying to figure out if you’re making a great impression. You’re not second-guessing what you’re about to say. You’re relaxed while speaking. You trust the conversation will go just fine. You know you’ll say the right thing.

You need to apply that same ease of speaking to a different situation: Speaking to new people.

Good communicators seem like they’re having a conversation with a friend. That’s also the way they make their audience feel while listening. They make it seem natural and effortless.

You’ll be armed with everything you need to make the same impression by the time you’re done reading this module. You’ll have the tools and strategies necessary to speak to new people effortlessly. Knowing you’re equipped with the right tools, and knowing how to use them, will give you the confidence you need to succeed.

That confidence will allow you to focus on the task at hand. You’ll know you will do the right thing and make a great impression. That high level of confidence also removes your fear, self-doubt, and tendency to second-guess yourself. You’ll trust yourself to do everything right. That trust will make you look confident and capable while making what others fear look natural and effortless. That makes a great impression.

Small Talk Versus Serious Discussions

The following section is from the Communication Fundamentals course module 2, section 1, subsection 1. The entire course is available at: www.zanerozzi.com The Communication Fundamentals Course is highly praised and popular with both of Zane Rozzi’s fan bases: Executives looking to improve their people skills; and people interested in making a great impression with the opposite sex.

Learning to make the distinction between small talk and serious discussions is one of the most important aspects of learning to hold friendly and entertaining conversations. The rules for pleasurable small talk are different from the rules for serious discussions. Using rules from one type of conversation on the other makes it nearly impossible to achieve your goals.

Small talk is the subject of this module. This module focuses on the rules and skill set used to hold polite, friendly, and entertaining conversations; the type of conversations that improve your relationships with other people. People attending parties, conferences, and other social events engage primarily in small talk. People attend social events to meet new people, build existing relationships, and have a good time. Each of those goals is best achieved with pleasant small talk. The light and friendly conversation between friends and acquaintances is primarily small talk. It is small talk that entertains people. In contrast, engaging in a serious discussion in the middle of a party puts a damper on everyone’s mood.

Serious discussions include business negotiations, legal arguments, debates, and any other discussion where the outcome has serious consequences. You can identify a conversation as a serious discussion when there is a valid reason and strong motivation for people trying to win an argument, prove a point, or persuade other people. Business negotiations and legal discussions follow a different set of rules than small talk. You’ll rarely see people laughing and having fun while engaged in a serious discussion.

In contrast, the primary purpose of small talk is to make people enjoy themselves by laughing and having fun. It’s easy to see why small talk is the conversation of choice when your goals are to build relationships and have fun.

People engage in small talk to establish a relationship before beginning serious business negotiations. They know the new relationship will smooth out the negotiation process. It helps them understand each other and see things from each other’s point of view. It also gives them something to fall back on if the negotiation becomes tense because they’ve gained familiarity and built trust.

How to Always Have Something Interesting to Say

Most people can only hold a conversation for a few minutes before they run out of things to say. After a few minutes, they are faced with the dreaded awkward silence. Many of those people have even read several books on communication skills. However, none of the books they’ve read have been successful in teaching them communication skills which actually work for them. Consequently, those people don’t realize they are inundated with vast amounts of information they can use to keep a conversation going. Despite all of the tips and tricks they’ve read, they still lack the skills to recognize and use all of the information they have available to them in every single conversation.

Let’s examine the parts of a conversation which the Zane Rozzi Communication Fundamentals Course refers to as conversation starters. Every conversation is filled with conversation starters. In fact, it’s nearly impossible to speak a sentence without providing conversation starters. The problem is, people who have never completed effective communication skills training lack the skills necessary to recognize and use all of the conversation starters they are presented with.

The best communicators always make effective use of conversation starters. In doing so, their conversations seem to flow naturally. The reason their conversations seem to flow naturally is because this is in fact the way conversations do flow naturally. A conversation that is flowing well does so because the conversation participants are making effective use of each other’s conversation starters.

The easiest way to describe conversation starters is to simply state they are nouns or verbs. You might remember from school, sentences typically contain both a subject and a predicate. The subject of the sentence is who or what the sentence is about. The subject is typically a noun. The predicate typically contains a verb applied to the subject. Such as, something the subject has done. The term ‘conversation starters’ is befitting because each of those nouns or verbs can be used to start a brand new tangent to your conversation; just like a new chapter in a book or a new scene in a movie.

Let’s see if you can identify the conversation starters in the following conversation. Let’s say you ask a woman what she did yesterday. She replies, “I went to the mall and bought a new dress.” Did you recognize the conversation starters in her response?

There are three conversation starters in her response: Went, which is a verb; mall, which is a noun; and dress, which is a noun. Bought is also a verb, but it doesn’t give you as much to work with as the other three conversation starters. If you have Academy Award winning creativity, feel free to use bought as well.

Using only the information contained within her response, you could easily carry on a conversation for over 30 minutes using only tangents directly linked to those three conversation starters. But, in real life, holding a conversation is much easier than that. In a real conversation, you’re never limited to using only the conversation starters contained within one sentence. Each tangent you explore from those conversation starters provides you with a whole new set of conversation starters. You can use a tangent derived from one conversation starter to obtain at least three new conversation starters. You can then use each of those three conversation starters to get at least three more. In doing so, the amount of information you have to work with grows exponentially.

As you can see, you quickly develop a vast amount of information to work with. Each additional sentence you elicit from another person provides you with additional conversation starters to work with. If you know how to effectively use conversation starters, you could very easily carry on a conversation forever.

There is a very basic formula to take advantage of conversation starters supplied both by yourself and others. All you need to do to keep the conversation moving forward is to develop a question related to any of the conversation starters. The easiest way to do so is to develop a question starting with who, what, where, when, why, or how.

Let’s go through some examples of ways you could keep the conversation given above moving forward.

Once she replies, “I went to the mall and bought a new dress.” You could expand the conversation with questions such as, “Who did you go with?” “What time did you go there?” “Where is the mall?” “When is the best time to go to the mall?” “Why did you choose the mall?” “How did you get to the mall?” “What style is the dress?” “How many stores did you go to before you found that dress?” “Which store did you buy the dress at?” “Where are you going to wear the dress?” “How long did it take you to find the right dress?” “What colour is the dress?” “Which designer did you choose?”

You’re by no means limited to questions beginning with who, what, where, when, why, or how. Any question about those conversation starters is fair game. Consider some other possibilities, such as, “Is there a special event you bought the dress for?” “Is that the only thing you bought while you were at the mall?” “Do you need to get anything to go with the dress?”

Obviously, you wouldn’t use every single one of those questions in a conversation. That would be an extremely boring conversation because it would go into much greater detail than necessary about the mall and the dress. It wouldn’t take long for that conversation to become awkward and tired.

Many people grasping at straws on first dates make the mistake of beating to death one or two conversation starters. Their conversations awkwardly limp along as it becomes obvious they are strained while trying to think of things to say. Their dates awkwardly look around the restaurant as they wait for the next question related to the only conversation starter those people were able to grab on to. It’s painful to watch; and I’m sure it’s even more painful to be one of those people. From the look on his date’s face, you can almost read her mind as she starts thinking, one more question about that damn (dress) and it’s fake emergency time.

People are more fickle than ever. Our attention spans are only getting shorter. A beautiful woman has a world of choices available to her. If you can’t entertain her, she’ll find someone who can.

As a skilled communicator, you would only use one or two of those example questions. Then, when she responds to your questions, she would supply you with new conversation starters to work with. You would then repeat this technique using those new conversation starters. As she keeps providing you with new conversation starters, you continue applying this technique. That keeps the conversation moving forward based upon new conversation starters instead of tiring out the first set of conversation starters you were provided with. Keeping the conversation moving forward with new conversation starters keeps the conversation spontaneous and entertaining.

As you can see, with new conversation starters continuously coming into your conversation, a skilled communicator could easily use this technique to carry on a conversation forever. There’s no reason for an awkward silence.

Let’s say you can’t think of a question related to any of the conversation starters included within someone’s last sentence. You’re never limited to only their last sentence. You can go back to conversation starters supplied in any of their previous sentences or any of your previous sentences. You need only indicate you are going back to something discussed earlier in the conversation. You do so by using phrases such as, “You mentioned,” “You were talking about,” or, “You said.” Those phrases indicate you are going back to something that was said earlier. For instance, you could say, “You said you went to the mall yesterday, which stores did you take a look through?” Or, “You said you bought a dress yesterday, did you see anything else nice while you were at the mall?”

Using this technique, any conversation starter included in any sentence of your conversation is fair game. After 10 minutes of conversation, you could have hundreds of conversation starters available to work with. With that amount of information available, a skilled communicator could easily keep a conversation going forever.

You might find yourself having an awkward conversation with someone who is really shy and hardly saying anything. Consequently, they are giving you very few conversation starters to work with. If the conversation doesn’t go smoothly, it’s still your fault. Having a shy conversation partner should not pose any problem whatsoever. A skilled communicator would always know the proper questions to use to elicit conversation starters from other people; even people who are shy and reluctant to disclose information. There should be no reason why you would ever end up in a situation where you don’t have enough conversation starters to work with. If you’re having trouble eliciting conversation starters from others, you need to work on improving your communication skills.

If you need examples of questions you can ask to elicit conversation starters, the Zane Rozzi Communication Fundamentals course includes many example questions you can use in your conversations. The at-home version of the course is available at: www.zanerozzi.com

How to Always Be an Interesting Conversationalist

The following section is from the Communication Fundamentals course module 3, section 6, subsections 1-9. The entire course is available at: www.zanerozzi.com The Communication Fundamentals Course is highly praised and popular with both of Zane Rozzi’s fan bases: Executives looking to improve their people skills; and people interested in making a great impression with the opposite sex.

Be an Optimist

I recommend never lying. Lies are always uncovered. It’s best to be honest right from the start. Keep that in mind while reading the following section.

After reading the following section, you’re going to change from a person who gives abrupt answers and minimal details, to a person who goes into great detail while describing yourself. You’re also going to change into a very committed optimist—if you aren’t already.

There are many interesting things going on in your life. You need to properly describe those things using all of the details they deserve. Those things might seem routine to you, but they are not routine to everyone. Everyone has a different routine.

It’s important to be optimistic and proud of who you are. Show yourself the respect you deserve. People enjoy being around others who are positive and confident. Positive and confident people can brighten other people’s mood. Your glass is not only half-full, it’s also filled with your favourite drink.

Don’t Be the Average Boring Person

One of the most common conversation starters is a variation of “How’s it going?” The variations range from “How are you?” to “How was your day?” The most common response is a synonym of good, such as: great, fine, or well. That is a very average and boring response. People can predict it before they even ask you the question.

Other variations of the question focus more on activities such as “What have you been up to?” Again, the most common responses can be predicted before the question is even asked. The most common responses include: not much, the usual, and same thing—different day.

Those short answers make you sound average and boring. They make you sound like a person who never has anything interesting happening in his or her life. Moreover, those short responses add no information to the common pool. They do nothing for moving the conversation forward. Those abrupt responses only bounce the conversation back to the people who asked the questions. You give them nothing to expand upon. But more critically, you give them nothing that catches their interest.

From now on, you’re going to stand out from the crowd. You’re not going to give the same predictable responses as everyone else. Now, when someone asks you “How was your day?” or “What did you get up to today?” you’re going to use that question as an opportunity to make yourself sound interesting.

When people watch a movie, they want to see characters who are more interesting than the average people they are surrounded with in everyday life. There’s nothing exciting or entertaining about a regular average life. Most people are accustomed to ordinary average lives because they live that type of life. A movie about that type of life would have absolutely no entertainment value. It would be a terrible movie.

When people watch a movie, they want to be entertained by the characters. They want to see people who are more interesting than the people who surround them in everyday life. They want to see interesting people doing interesting things. The point of watching a movie is to be entertained. People hope watching a movie will allow them to experience people and events that are more interesting than anything going on in their own lives at that moment.

So what does that have to do with saying the right thing? You want to avoid sounding boring and average. Make yourself stand out from boring and average people. Make your conversations interesting and entertaining. Think, if the way you’re about to describe your day’s events were a movie, would other people recommend that movie to their friends?

People want to be around other people who are interesting. Being around interesting people makes their own lives more interesting.

Be entertaining. People will be encouraged to keep the conversation moving forward if they are interested in the subject matter of your conversation. People will ask you questions if you’ve caught their interest. They’ll be eager to learn more about the interesting things going on in your life. Questions keep the conversation moving forward.

Being a VIP

Realistically, your average days are probably just as average as most other people’s average days. Even so, you’ve got much more material to work with than you think. Remember, you’re not going to lie, but you are going to give detailed descriptions and be an enthusiastic optimist.

If you woke up early, say you woke up early because you have a busy day ahead of you. Unless you spent all day lying awake in bed, you probably did something throughout the day. Doing something, anything, is busy enough to say you had a busy day. You were busy doing something. As you’ll realize in the rest of this section, your average day is actually quite busy. You actually get quite a bit done, even if it all seems boring and routine to you.

If you left your house at all, it wasn’t just a boring routine trip, you were out running errands. You were taking care of things that needed to be done.

If you worked today, don’t just say you worked all day and leave it at that. Talk about what you did at work. Talk about how you met with an important client (all clients are important). Tell people about the big sale you closed. Talk about the work you put in on a very important project. Tell others about how you delivered an outstanding presentation at work. Talk about how you wowed everyone at a meeting. Tell others you had an important meeting with management. If you have the potential to be promoted if your current project is a success, tell people about it. Talk about the excellent work you did throughout the day. Talk about any compliments people gave you while you were at work. Talk about how the work you did today is building up to a bigger project you’re taking on next week.

You should never say something as plain and boring as you worked today. You didn’t just sit and stare at a wall at work. Always tell people about all of the exciting and interesting things you did while you were at work. Always give details and always be an optimist.

You might have gone for your usual lunch with your coworkers. On Wednesdays, that’s the half-priced pasta special at the café next door. Nothing about that lunch seems special to you. You’re used to it because you do it every week. But when telling others about it, go into detail and be an optimist. Tell people how you went for lunch at the place with the best fettuccine in town. Or at least, your favourite fettuccine in town. If the coworkers who joined you at the café are your friends, tell people you met up with friends for lunch at your favourite café. You’ll sound popular and outgoing.

You could also tell people you went to the coolest little café with the neatest decor. Or, you went to the café with the best view of downtown from the outdoor patio tables. Tell people about every positive thing that café has to offer. Act like the manager of that café trying to persuade new customers. The more interesting you make that café sound, the more interesting your lunch sounds, and the more interesting you sound by association. You can always use the power of association to make yourself sound more interesting by making the places you go and the things you do sound more interesting.

If you spent a few hours of the day at home, you probably weren’t just staring at a wall. You were probably doing something. What you were doing is probably a hobby or some other activity you find entertaining. Tell people about the exciting activity that was important enough for you to spend some of your valuable time on it. Tell people about anything you’ve accomplished with that hobby and any projects you’re currently working on. Also tell people about projects you plan to take on in the future. Tell people about your hobbies that allow you to fill your time doing something productive and developing important skills.

You might have spent your time at home doing chores. You can put a positive spin on that too. Don’t say you didn’t do anything all day. Tell people you spent time cleaning and doing chores. That makes you sound like a responsible person who understands chores need to be done. You demonstrate you have no problem taking care of what needs to be done. You didn’t waste the entire day sitting around at home doing nothing. Don’t make it sound like you did. Take advantage of the opportunity to be an optimist about doing chores and give the impression you’re a person who recognizes when something needs to be done and has no problem doing it.

Maybe you spent all day at home reading a book or watching TV. Don’t sound like the average boring person who sat on the couch bored all day. Don’t just tell people you read a book or watched TV. Instead, tell people you read a great book about such and such topic. Tell them a bit about the book. Make the book sound as interesting as possible; like the sales pitch on the back of the jacket trying to sell copies of the book. If you watched TV, tell people you were watching one of your favourite TV shows. Tell them what the TV show is about and why it’s so great.

The key is to make it sound like whatever you did was worthwhile entertainment—a valuable use of your precious time. Avoid sounding like you had absolutely nothing to do, so you were forced to do whatever you could just to kill time. Talk about the book or TV show as if it deserves a spot in your busy schedule because it is a worthwhile work of art or entertainment.

If you were involved in the arts in some way throughout the day, tell people about it. Tell people about the art you created. Describe your project in detail. Tell people about the process and how you got interested in that type of art. Tell people how you developed your skills in that art.

Also tell people about the art you’ve experienced. Tell people what you liked about it and why you’re drawn to that kind of art. You can also talk about other places you’ve experienced that kind of art.

Important People

Important people are busy. They don’t have time to be bored. So if you want to sound important, you shouldn’t have time to be bored either. As discussed above, when describing your day, it should always be action-packed. Your days should be filled to the rim. Make it sound like you are accomplishing a lot and making good use of your time on earth. You’re taking care of things that need to be done. Also make it sound like you’re experiencing all of the joys of life.

Don’t make it sound like you’re wasting your life away by doing “Not much.” or “The same old thing.” If it sounds like you’re wasting your days, other people won’t be attracted to spend their time with you. Do you think people want to waste their own days by spending time with you while you waste your days? No, they don’t. People want to spend their time with people who are interesting so their own lives will be more interesting. Think back to the type of movies people want to watch. They want to experience life with characters who are more interesting than they are. That makes their own lives more interesting. Thus, you want to be an interesting character.

Think of a few of your favourite celebrities. Now, take a moment to picture what each of your favourite celebrities is doing right now. What do you think those celebrities are doing? Chances are, you didn’t picture them sitting at home on the couch. You probably pictured them out at some exciting location doing some exciting activity. You probably pictured them experiencing the good life. You probably caught a glimpse of the lifestyles of the rich and famous.

You never know what those celebrities are really doing. They could actually be just sitting at home on the couch. But, that’s not what you picture than doing. You think of those celebrities as interesting and exciting people. Because of that, you assume those celebrities must be doing interesting and exciting things. It makes sense doesn’t it? Interesting people are likely to be doing interesting things, aren’t they?

What I’m recommending you do takes advantage of that assumption. But, you’re taking advantage of it by using it in the opposite direction. You’re making it sound like you are always doing interesting and exciting things. Other people know interesting people do interesting things. So they assume, since you’re doing interesting things, you must be an interesting person.

Talk about Current Events

High-achievers are always up-to-date on current events. They need to know what’s going on around them to make the right decisions.

Being up-to-date on current events also shows you are not a self-centred person because you realize there are lots of important things going on around the world that are affecting many people. Things which you are not a part of. Thus, it shows you know you are not the centre of the universe. Some people fail to demonstrate that positive attribute by always finding some way to relate the current events back to them personally. They always find a way to make the conversation focus on themselves.

Being able to speak about current events also makes you an interesting conversationalist. It gives you a lot of timely and relevant material to work with while talking with others.

Successful People Take Care of Themselves

Most highly successful people take care of themselves. They understand the importance of continuous self-improvement. They know, if they want to perform better tomorrow than they did today, they have to be better tomorrow than they were today. As such, they are continually doing things to improve themselves.

Demonstrate you have the desire for continuous self-improvement—one of the most important characteristics of successful people. Wanting to improve yourself is an attractive quality. For both business and personal reasons, people want to surround themselves with others who are continually trying to improve themselves. People who continuously improve themselves tend to be high-achievers. Most interesting and exciting things are accomplished by high-achievers—not the people who sit around at home doing nothing.

You should sound like an interesting and exciting person other people want to have in their business and personal lives. Be someone who is interested in making tomorrow better than today. That’s an attractive quality, because everyone hopes their future will be better than the present. No matter how good the present is, people always want more. By demonstrating you’re continuously improving yourself, you encourage people to believe their lives will be better tomorrow than they are today by spending time with you.

VIPs Know It’s Important to Refresh

Maybe you really did do absolutely nothing all day. You just relaxed around the house. You can still find a way to put a positive spin on that. Go into detail and be an optimist.

You can talk about how you had such a busy week that you needed to take time today to refresh and renew yourself. You could also say you took time today to refresh and renew yourself because you know you have an extremely busy week ahead of you.

Everyone knows you can’t be going nonstop all of the time. You’ll burn out. You need to balance times of extreme activity with times of relaxing and renewing yourself. You’ll come back refreshed and ready to perform better than ever.

The key is to make it sound like you planned time in your busy schedule specifically to relax and renew. You demonstrate that you recognize spending time relaxing is important to living a balanced life. For that reason, you made sure you prioritized time to relax. That optimistic point of view sounds a lot better than what might have really happened: You couldn’t think of a single interesting thing to do so you lounged around the house all day.

Which person would you rather get to know? Someone who couldn’t think of a single interesting thing to do all day, so they lounged around the house. Or, someone who has such a busy and exciting life they needed to plan a down day to renew and refresh. A day to revitalize so they can continue performing at the best of their abilities and succeed in the days ahead.

Take Time Out Of Your Busy Schedule for Other People

By following the advice given above, you’ll sound like a real mover and shaker. Like someone who always has a lot of interesting and important things on the go. All of it is true, you’re describing the events of your life using all of the details they deserve and from an optimistic point of view. Your schedule will seem completely filled with exciting stuff that makes for an interesting life.

If the person you’re talking to is important to you, and you want to make a really good impression, you’ll prioritize time in your busy schedule for him or her. Be careful you don’t sound arrogant while you do this. It’s easy to cross the line and go overboard. Use care to find the right balance. Don’t make it sound like you’re bragging about having such a busy schedule. Make it sound like you’re just being honest.

Make sure you communicate the message the other person is genuinely important to you so you’re going to make sure you have time to spend with him or her. Imply spending time with him or her is extremely important to you and will bump any less important things taking up time in your schedule. You need to send the message as busy as you are, spending time with that person is a priority in your life, so you’ll make time to spend with him or her. Highlight how important spending time with him or her is to you.

Whatever you do, be certain you avoid making it sound like spending time with the other person would inconvenience you because you’re so busy. That’s the opposite of the message you want to send. The message you want to send is: It doesn’t matter what you have planned, you’re going to make time for the other person. Demonstrate you value his or her company.

An Important Reminder

The following information is so important it bears repeating.

It’s important to be optimistic and proud of who you are. Show yourself the respect you deserve. There are many interesting things going on in your life. You need to properly describe those things using all of the details they deserve. Those things might seem routine to you, but they are not routine to everyone. Everyone has a different routine.

It’s important to remember, being an optimist, and describing your daily activities in full detail, does not mean lying about things that did not happen. You’re simply giving yourself the credit you deserve. You’re making your life sound as interesting as it really is. You’re not shortchanging yourself by skipping over important details or being a pessimist when describing your daily activities.

People enjoy being around others who are positive and confident. Positive and confident people can brighten other people’s mood.

Be confident while describing the positive things that happen in your life. Show yourself respect. Be proud of the company you work for, be proud of the people you know, be proud of the groups you’re a part of, be proud of your city, and most importantly, be proud of yourself.

Always Give Other People Expandable Topics

The following section is from the Communication Fundamentals course module 2, section 3, subsection 2. The entire course is available at: www.zanerozzi.com The Communication Fundamentals Course is highly praised and popular with both of Zane Rozzi’s fan bases: Executives looking to improve their people skills; and people interested in making a great impression with the opposite sex.

A conversation stops, and turns into an awkward silence, when no one can think of anything to say. It’s unnecessary for that to happen. Minimize the chance of the conversation stopping by ensuring other people always have something they can expand upon. When people ask you questions, or any other time you contribute information to the common pool, be sure your response always includes at least one conversation starter. Your conversation starters provide interesting details that other people could expand upon or ask questions about. Never give an abrupt response. A limited response restricts other people’s ability to continue the conversation by expanding upon the conversation starters or asking you questions about the conversation starters.

The conversation will seem very one-sided if you’re doing all of the talking. Including conversation starters in all of your responses allows other people to do their share of the work in keeping the conversation going. Giving other people material to work with takes some of the pressure off of you because you don’t always need to be the person who thinks of something to say next. It’s not solely up to you to keep the conversation going. Everyone involved in the conversation should contribute to keeping the conversation going.

Everyone contributes to the conversation in two ways. Adding information to the common pool to help others and using information from the common pool to move the conversation forward. People can use the information from the common pool to expand upon it directly, ask the contributor questions about it, or be inspired by it and think of a related topic.

Problems arise when other people ask primarily closed-ended questions. A closed-ended question is typically answered with one word. For instance, yes, no, or naming something, someone, or someplace are all typical answers to closed-ended questions. Your response to a closed-ended question is typically a specific piece of information, which usually means your answer will be short and contribute limited information to the common pool. The people asking the question receive very limited information to expand the conversation further. Their typical response is either to give their answer to the same closed-ended question or to ask another closed-ended question.

It’s up to you to recognize when a conversation turns into an interview because someone is using a closed-ended question and response cycle. You need to break the pattern, or make an effort upfront to prevent the cycle from starting.

You should always find ways to include extra conversation starters in your response to closed-ended questions. You begin with the typical closed-ended question response by answering their question directly. Then expand upon it using a transition. You’re limited only by your own creativity when finding ways to expand your response to a closed-ended question.

You expand your response by including additional details. You could include additional details by adding what influenced your opinion, what led up to the event in question, what you did after the event in question, and how the subject matter of the question is similar to or different from something else you’ve experienced. You could also include additional details by giving examples, talking about similar situations, or relating your response to another topic.

For example, someone might ask: “What is your favourite food?” That is a closed-ended question. The typical response will be short, perhaps even only one word, simply naming your favourite food. That response would provide very little in terms of conversation starters. Your response needs to be expanded by including additional details that can be used as conversation starters.

You could expand your response by including the first time you tried your favourite dish, countries you’ve travelled to that specialize in the dish, the best restaurant in the city to try the dish, some of the key ingredients in the dish, any special preparation required to make the dish, and your own special twist on the dish. Any of those expansions adds significantly more information to the common pool than simply naming your favourite food. You’ve provided other people with many opportunities to continue moving the conversation forward by discussing travelling, restaurants, cooking, or anything else that your response inspires them to say.

People might ask you a question where your response will contain specialized information not everyone will understand. This can happen when people are asking about some aspect of your profession or hobbies. You might be involved in activities that require specialized training or knowledge. As a result, giving a straightforward response would provide information very few people understand. In that case, you need to translate your response from the specialized to the general. You need to explain your response in a way that’s understandable to the general public.

You could explain your response by comparing it to familiar situations or providing easy to understand examples. You could then expand your response further by relating the specialized knowledge to topics that interest the general public. People are only able to expand upon information they understand. Ensure any conversation starters included in your response are usable by making sure others understand them.

Accept Everything

The following section is from the Communication Fundamentals course module 2, section 3, subsection 6. The entire course is available at: www.zanerozzi.com The Communication Fundamentals Course is highly praised and popular with both of Zane Rozzi’s fan bases: Executives looking to improve their people skills; and people interested in making a great impression with the opposite sex.

When engaged in small talk, you’re not trying to negotiate a business deal or win a legal argument. If your goal is light and friendly small talk, you want to accept everything other people say. You also want to avoid saying anything that could cause a disagreement or escalate to an argument. The purpose of small talk is to have fun and enjoy your conversation with other people. You don’t need to worry about who’s right and who’s wrong. Winning an argument has no place in social conversations. Different people will have different opinions. Different opinions add variety to conversations.

Accepting what other people say does not necessarily mean you agree with it. You can accept it as a valid point of view and simply someone else’s opinion. Accept what other people say as if it’s the best solution for them, or entirely correct given their point of view. Other people believe their point of view is correct just as strongly as you believe your own point of view is correct. Accept the opinion of other people by acknowledging it in a positive or neutral way. Don’t tell other people they are wrong or try to influence them.

You validate other people’s point of view when you accept it. People feel comfortable talking with you when you validate their point of view. There is no confrontation or feeling of insecurity when people feel validated. The conversation will feel relaxed and enjoyable when everyone involved feels accepted. Everyone involved in the conversation should be able to feel comfortable expressing their own opinion and point of view without having to fear being judged or rejected.

If you do agree with other people’s opinion, you can express your agreement and be enthusiastic while acknowledging it. Doing so builds rapport by expressing a common belief. Agreement puts everyone on the same team. People feel understood when you express agreement with them. Agreement allows you and other people to build a relationship through your shared belief or point of view.

Have Good Responses Prepared for the Obvious Questions

The following section is from the Communication Fundamentals course module 4, section 1, subsection 15. The entire course is available at: www.zanerozzi.com The Communication Fundamentals Course is highly praised and popular with both of Zane Rozzi’s fan bases: Executives looking to improve their people skills; and people interested in making a great impression with the opposite sex.

There are a number of questions most people ask when engaged in small talk. You can expect to be asked those standard small talk questions about yourself. For instance, the two most common standard questions: “What do you do?” And, “Where are you from?” You can predict the standard questions in advance. There are also standard questions pertinent to the event. For instance, when attending a special interest event, such as an industry association meeting, people will ask the standard questions: “What is your specialization?” And, “How long have you been in the industry for?” You should be able to predict the standard questions pertinent to the event if you’ve been to a similar event in the past.

Predicting those questions ahead of the event allows you to prepare answers in advance. You can often develop a better response at your own pace ahead of time than you can on the spot while you’re nervous or under pressure. Knowing your response ahead of time also allows you to practice delivering the response. Preparing responses in advance allows you to have highly polished responses for the questions you know you’re likely to be asked. Highly polished responses ensure you make the right impression. Your time spent developing good responses should pay off well because you’ll likely be asked the same common questions multiple times at a large event.

Develop responses that make you seem interesting, but don’t brag or make yourself look arrogant. Most of the typical small talk questions are closed-ended questions. They ask for specific facts or bits of personal information. Responding to closed-ended questions with specific bits of information provides little opportunity to move the conversation forward. Your planned responses should include multiple conversation starters you can add to the common pool in addition to the response required by the question. Give people a response packed full of interesting bits of information they can expand upon.

For instance, if people ask you where you’re from, don’t just tell them the name of the city. Tell them interesting facts about the city, how long you’ve lived there, why you live there, what you like to do there, something about the people there, information about the local sports teams, what the nightlife is like, the music scene, the arts scene, or anything else you think the other person will be able to use to move your conversation forward.

Talking about Your Interests That No One Else Cares about

The following section is from the Communication Fundamentals course module 4, section 2, subsection 17. The entire course is available at: www.zanerozzi.com The Communication Fundamentals Course is highly praised and popular with both of Zane Rozzi’s fan bases: Executives looking to improve their people skills; and people interested in making a great impression with the opposite sex.

There are many subjects about which you are very passionate. Those subjects might take a considerable amount of your time, and thus, be a large part of your life. Your extensive experience with those subjects has made you an expert. You could go on for hours sharing your expertise. Because those subjects are so important to you, it’s easy to overestimate how important those subjects are to others.

Something very important to you could be meaningless to others. Other people might have no knowledge of the subject and no interest in learning about the subject. Consequently, other people could be bored discussing the subjects you are very passionate about. When people are bored, they’ll begin looking for ways to escape the conversation.

Going on about topics other people aren’t interested in shows you’re not able to perceive the feelings of others. You also send the message discussing what’s important to you is more important than ensuring other people enjoy your company. The best conversationalists are able to see how their conversation partners are reacting to the topic of conversation. They pay careful attention to others’ level of engagement. They forgo their own enjoyment of sharing everything they know to ensure other people are enjoying the conversation. The most interesting conversationalists won’t hesitate to change the subject from something that interests them to something of interest to other people the moment they recognize other people are bored. They go out of their way to ensure others are having fun.

To be an interesting conversationalist, forgo discussing subjects that are only important to you. Instead, find the subjects others are passionate about. Allow others to enjoy their conversation with you by discussing their interests.

An Example of the Significance of Body Language

The following section is from the Communication Fundamentals course module 5, section 6, subsection 1. The entire course is available at: www.zanerozzi.com The Communication Fundamentals Course is highly praised and popular with both of Zane Rozzi’s fan bases: Executives looking to improve their people skills; and people interested in making a great impression with the opposite sex.

To give an example, consider what you think when you ask someone: “How are you doing?” Then they reply: “Good.” But their body language and tone of voice give you the impression everything is not good. You sense they are actually feeling sad or upset. The verbal part of their message is not consistent with the nonverbal aspects of their message.

Which aspect of that person’s message do you believe? Do you believe the words that tell you everything is good, or do you believe the nonverbal aspects that tell you something is troubling them? Most people will believe the nonverbal aspects over the verbal aspects and know something is troubling that person, which is consistent with research that shows over half of communication is nonverbal.

Also consider how you recognize people are being sarcastic. If you were to take a sarcastic remark made by someone, write it on a piece of paper, then give that piece of paper to a third person to read, the third person would misinterpret the remark because reading only the words gives no indication the words were spoken with sarcasm. The information indicating the remark was spoken with sarcasm is relayed through body language and tone of voice. Words spoken with sarcasm have a completely different meaning. You’re only able to interpret the true meaning when you also consider the nonverbal aspects of the message.

Your Body Language Speaks First

The following section is from the Communication Fundamentals course module 5, section 6, subsection 2. The entire course is available at: www.zanerozzi.com The Communication Fundamentals Course is highly praised and popular with both of Zane Rozzi’s fan bases: Executives looking to improve their people skills; and people interested in making a great impression with the opposite sex.

Your body language is the very first element of your communication to other people. It creates the first impression you make with others before you have the chance to speak. Your body language speaks not only to the people directly in front of you, but also to anyone else in the room able to see you. You are making your first impression with others from across the room.

Everyone knows the significance of a first impression. It’s other people’s first experience with you. It’s what other people use to assess and assume what kind of person you are as quickly as possible. People base the rest of their interaction with you, or the decision not to interact with you, upon that first impression. They’re trying to take mental shortcuts by making as many assumptions about you as possible using the limited information they have. They are trying to know more about you than they really do.

Some people don’t like to admit the assumptions they’ve made based on their first impression of you are wrong. They’ll try to find additional information to support their first assumptions about you. They don’t give equal weight to information that could prove vs disprove their first assumptions. People don’t like to be wrong. They especially don’t like to admit they’re wrong. Consequently, it can take a lot of contradictory information to change someone’s opinion of you after their first impression.

It is, therefore, very important to make the right first impression. Ensure your body language makes the first impression you want to give others.

Bonus 1: How to Extort People without Any Evidence of Extortion Taking Place

The following is a bonus chapter from my bestselling book, 48 Ways to Control People: How to Leverage the Way the World Works for Your Own Gain. That book is volume 1 in the highly acclaimed two-volume series, How to Leverage the Way the World Works for Your Own Gain.

If you put someone in an awkward and indirectly intimidating—not directly intimidating—situation, they’ll be too dumbfounded to escape the situation. Accordingly, they will comply with your requests so they can be released from the awkward and indirectly intimidating interaction. The indirect intimidation allows you to deny any coercion took place. Since there were no overt threats, the extortion can easily be disguised as an innocent interaction with the other person. Despite being able to deny the extortion, the extent to which you can coerce others using this technique can be significant.

Homeless people use this technique very effectively. They know, if they just sit quietly on the sidewalk meekly holding out a hat, most people walk right past them. If they call out, “Spare change please,” they can get a few people to stop and donate money. If they can single out people from the crowd and talk to them directly, even more people will donate some money. But the real money is made when they use this technique. Not only do they get more donations, the average value of each donation goes up significantly.

Here’s how homeless people use this technique: They take advantage of someone who is separated from the crowd and stopped somewhere waiting. For instance, someone waiting at a street corner for a traffic light to change so they can walk across the street, or someone waiting at a public transit stop. The homeless people approach those people while they are waiting and ask them for spare change. When those people see a rough looking homeless person standing in front of them, and feel like they have nowhere to go because they are stuck there waiting, they will often comply with the homeless person’s request for a donation. They give him what he wants just to get rid of him so they can end the awkward and slightly intimidating interaction. Those same people, had they saw that homeless person sitting on the sidewalk, would have walked right past him without donating any money. But now, they feel forced into giving him a donation just to end the awkward and slightly intimidating interaction. They pay him so they can escape the awkward and indirectly intimidating situation.

The homeless people are not robbing those people. So those people cannot claim they have been extorted. After all, those people could have easily said no or walked away. But their mind was already set on waiting there until an event took place, such as the traffic light changing or public transit arriving. Thus, once this rough looking homeless person confronts them, they feel trapped and intimidated. So they pay him to get rid of him.

When you look at what happened from a psychological point of view, it’s easy to see these people have been intimidated and extorted into giving a donation. But when you describe what took place, a humble—but rough looking—homeless approached someone and simply asked for a donation, it’s hard to claim any sort of extortion took place. It’s easy to make the argument the people could have simply said no, as there was no threat of force. It’s also easy to make the argument the people could have simply walked away as the homeless person was not restraining them or blocking them from leaving. Yet, psychologically, the people feel trapped and intimidated. They feel intimidated even though they could’ve said no or walked away at any time.

Those two parallel realities of the situation are what makes this technique so effective. You can use this technique to coerce what you want out of people without being accused of extortion.

Many people in positions of power take advantage of this technique as well. But they do so in a slightly different way. The psychological effects, however, are the same. People in positions of power ask their staff for personal favours, for instance, asking subordinates for a ride from work to pick up their personal vehicle at the shop. The employees feel they cannot refuse their boss; even though their boss has no authority over them to ask for personal favours outside of work.

Many new employees fall victim to another version of this technique when it’s applied by their coworkers. New employees, wanting to make a good first impression, feel like they can’t say no. They don’t want to create a bad first impression by denying others help or refusing others’ requests. Many people take advantage of this and offload many of their most unpleasant chores on the new employees, and the new employees feel like they are not able to say no. This happens with requests from their peers—people who have no authority to assign the new employees new duties.

The new employees could easily refuse, but they don’t because they don’t want to create a bad first impression. This also happens with requests outside of work duties, such as managing a work social club or other volunteer positions. People even take advantage of the new employees for personal favours, such as asking the new employees to donate to causes they support or to join groups they are a part of. People know the new employees feel they can’t say no during their first few weeks on the job.

When someone is new to any group, and trying to make a good first impression with the rest of the group, that’s your chance to offload your worst chores. You can finally unload the chores someone stuck you with during your first week.

This technique is so effective because, if you were to look at a transcript of what was actually said, you’ll see only a polite request for a favour. However, there is a lot going on below the surface. There are significant psychological effects in play. The people feel as if they cannot refuse. They are forced into doing something they would not have volunteered to do. Find ways you can put people into these types of situations and you can get almost anything you want from them.

Bonus 2: Take Advantage of People’s Inability to Properly Weigh Consequences

The following is a bonus chapter from my bestselling book, 45 More Ways to Control People: How to Leverage the Way the World Works for Your Own Gain. That book is volume 2 in the highly acclaimed two-volume series, How to Leverage the Way the World Works for Your Own Gain.

Most first world countries have a ridiculous number of laws in place which protect people from themselves. These laws are in addition to the laws which protect the rest of humanity from the few bad people. These are laws which try to protect the 80% from their own poor decisions. These laws were set up by the 1% to protect the 80% like a parent setting up rules to protect a child from dangers the child is not capable of properly evaluating.

For example, most first world countries have several laws regarding safety equipment. Not only safety equipment that protects the public from the actions of others, but safety equipment that specifically protects the individual wearing the equipment. Things like seatbelts, helmets, fall protection harnesses, and hearing protection. We also have a number of laws which attempt to protect people from very damaging and highly addictive hard drugs. We are interfering with natural selection for the greater good. These laws are necessary as a consequence of a few aspects of human psychology.

First, the 80% will enthusiastically agree to suffer very serious long-term consequences in exchange for small short-term gains or pleasures. Laws are set up not only to protect the 80% from making those poor choices, but also to protect taxpayers from the burden of saving those people once they’ve suffered the long-term consequences; consequences they’ve incurred to receive short-term gains or pleasures.

The first problem is, most people are too short-sighted. They’re not able to properly weigh future consequences. Something way off in the future seems very small and much less severe than it really is. Most people have trouble understanding the full extent of things that are far off in the future.

There’s also a second—and perhaps more important—aspect of human psychology at play here. When people take high-risk actions, there is often two separate elements of chance in play. First, the short-term gains or pleasures are 100% certain. Second, the future pain or negative consequences are not 100% certain. The 80% knows, if they take a risky action, they are guaranteed to gain the short-term benefits or pleasures, but it’s not guaranteed they’re going to have to pay the price later down the road.

This is where the 80%’s lack of rationality betrays them once again. They have the, it’s not going to happen to me attitude. The majority of the 80% believes they are going to be included in the lucky few who do not suffer the long-term consequences of their risky actions. Even if the statistics are high, such as 90% of people will face the consequences of their actions, people will focus entirely on that 10% chance they will not have to face the consequences. They are certain they will be in that 10%.

Laziness and procrastination also come into play. Especially for things like safety equipment. If people’s safety equipment is on the other side of the job site, and they just have to make one quick cut, or just climb a scaffolding for one quick minute, or just dispense 1 ounce of a chemical, they think there’s no need to walk all the way across the job site to get the proper safety equipment. They don’t want to go through all the trouble of putting on safety equipment to perform only 30 seconds of work. After all, fetching and putting on the safety equipment would take several times as long as the task they’re going to perform wearing the equipment. That laziness, combined with their, it won’t happen to me attitude is the cause of many workplace accidents.

All people focus on is the benefit they receive now, or the hassle they can avoid now. People always push problems into the future. They procrastinate any way they can. They can avoid the hassle of safety equipment now, and any problems they might incur would have to be suffered in the future. Future problems carry much less weight than current benefits. There is also, of course, the chance that no future problems will arise, which makes the risk-to-reward ratio appear even more favourable.

The facts given above are not even the most ridiculous part of this phenomenon. The most ridiculous part is, while the 80% are so inclined to risk very severe consequences to make something easier or more pleasurable for themselves in the short-term, they are not willing to take risks to make things drastically better for themselves in the long term.

Taking a risk, such as stepping out in front of the crowd to start a business, or asking a beautiful person out on a date, terrifies people who would willingly risk their lives to save 60 seconds of effort required to put on a safety device.

To understand this, you can apply all of the above facts in reverse.

First, the benefits are long-term. Long-term benefits are much less enticing than short-term benefits. Long-term benefits are harder to visualize and understand. Long-term benefits appear smaller than they are because they are far off into the future.

Second, the future benefits are uncertain. There’s a chance the business would fail or the beautiful person would reject them and there would be zero future benefits. Even if the odds of success are 90%, and the odds of failure are 10%, people have a terrible fear they’ll find themselves included in the 10% that fails. Now, when it comes to good luck, they are also of the opinion, it’s not going to happen to me. They believe they will not be one of the people who finds success.

Laziness and procrastination also come into play. To receive long-term benefits, people would have to put in hard work and effort upfront. They would have to overcome their fears and put in the work necessary to get the desired results. It’s much easier for them to keep the status quo; to simply walk right past that beautiful person or avoid all the effort and stress of starting a new business. Laziness thwarts these people once again.

Once this has been clearly laid out, it’s easy to see why the 80% seem to have the worst ‘luck.’ They make extremely poor choices. They make many choices loaded with a high probability of negative consequences in the future, but very few choices loaded with a high probability of positive benefits in the future. Once the future arrives, they have to pay for all of their poor choices. Everyone has to pay the piper. Moreover, since they were too afraid to take risks for their own gain, they don’t have any benefits coming their way to offset the consequences of their poor choices.

Remember these facts when you’re making your own decisions. Don’t take unnecessary risks and you won’t face unnecessary negative consequences. But do take risks that can make your life much better in the future.

How to use this knowledge to your advantage when controlling other people is described in detail in the section titled, “Make People Enthusiastically Accept Severe Negative Consequences.”

Bonus 3: Make People Enthusiastically Accept Severe Negative Consequences

The following is a bonus chapter from my bestselling book, 45 More Ways to Control People: How to Leverage the Way the World Works for Your Own Gain. That book is volume 2 in the highly acclaimed two-volume series, How to Leverage the Way the World Works for Your Own Gain.

Before reading this section, be sure to read the section titled, “Take Advantage of People’s Inability to Properly Weigh Consequences.” That background information is essential to understanding this technique.

If you want to persuade someone to do something, front-load all of the benefits in the agreement. Arrange the agreement so that people will be certain to experience 100% of the benefits instantly, but won’t face any of the negative aspects of the agreement until far off into the future. People won’t be able to properly weigh future negative consequences against present benefits. If the benefits and negative consequences are equal, the current benefits will seem much larger than the future consequences. You can also use this illusion to stack up many negative consequences far off into the future, making them appear shrunken in size. Negative consequences far off into the future will easily appear to be offset by benefits experienced instantly upon agreement, which appear magnified in size.

As you can see, to convince people to take some sort of action, you should frame your request in a way that places 99% of the emphasis on the short-term gains they will experience right now. Instant gratification is king. Be sure to emphasize all of the ways people will gain instant pleasure by agreeing with you. Include the negative aspects of the agreement, incurred in the future, only in the fine print.

Instant gratification is everything. The 80% hardly care about gains they’ll receive way off into the future. They are only concerned with what they can enjoy right now. Keep this in mind when trying to persuade them. Future gains, no matter how great, have hardly any motivational value. How do we counteract this?

You must find ways to move the gains forward. If the gains can’t be moved forward, you must develop new gains that can be experienced instantly and include those instant gains in the deal. Even if you have to increase the selling price to include new short-term gains, people’s focus on the short-term gains will blind them to the price increase.

If you want people to do something unpleasant for the long-term, lock them into a commitment with a very enticing benefit they get to experience upfront. Offer bonus incentives which can be enjoyed right now in exchange for signing up for a long-term contract. Entice them with something they get to enjoy before they have to fulfil their end of the agreement. Give them instant gratification for agreeing to do what you want them to do.

You can make the agreement even more enticing by pushing their end of the agreement even farther into the future. That makes their end of the bargain seem smaller and less painful. The further you can move their obligations into the future, the larger you can make those obligations. Pushing negative consequences into the future creates the illusion the consequences are smaller than they really are. The 80% are not able to properly weigh consequences that are far off into the future.

You can make the agreement even more enticing by adding an element of chance to their obligations. You can get an even higher level of agreement by offering the possibility the 80% could partially, or entirely, escape their obligations. For instance, offering a 2% chance their obligations will be greatly reduced or completely eliminated. People severely overestimate their chance of being included in the lucky 2% who will be released from their obligations.

Remember, benefits lose their lustre as they are moved off into the future, and consequences lose their sting as they are moved off into the future; particularly when dealing with the 80%. Also remember, people severely overestimate their chance of being in the minority who win benefits and avoid consequences.

Consider the following example of these principles: A much larger portion of the world’s population than you might expect would probably accept $1 billion today in exchange for being killed a year from today so that a wealthy person in need of organ transplants could harvest their organs. You might even have caught yourself thinking, would a year be enough time to spend all of that money? People would justify their choice to take the money and be killed as sacrificing themselves for a noble cause—dying so that someone else could live. People often hide the real reason they’re doing something behind a publicly expressed reason that sounds good.

As much as people would like to sound noble, the money is the real reason they are doing it. Consider this: Would those people prefer to be killed in one year and save 50 people for $50, or to save one rich person for $1 billion?

If you extended the time to death from one year to five years, you would get an even larger proportion of the world’s population accepting the deal. The exact same consequence, further away, loses some of its sting.

You could further increase the number of people willing to accept the agreement by including an element of chance in the bargain. For example, if you change the terms of the agreement to include a miniscule chance, say 1%, that the billionaire could be cured by other medical means and not need the organs. Most people will severely overestimate the probability they will realize that 1% chance and not have to give their life. The 1% chance will be overpowering. People will drastically overvalue it. They don’t consider death is still a near certainty. Instead, they’re overly optimistic about their chance of survival.

The thing you might find most surprising is, you’re likely to get a higher proportion of young people accepting the offer than old people. Young people with significantly more than five years left in their natural lifespan. The reason for this is, young people, on average, are significantly more prone to accept long-term consequences to receive short-term gains. Young people take many more risks and are primarily focused on the present. They’re much more susceptible to the lure of instant gratification.

Just look how late in life people start saving for retirement. You can’t use increased earning power as you age as an excuse for this behaviour. That argument is severely flawed. Most people don’t start saving for retirement until at least 10 years into their working lives.

Consider the following example: A person starts their working life working for $25,000 per year. Then, over the course of a decade, they slowly work their way up to a salary of $50,000 per year. After that decade, they might begin saving for retirement. Coincidentally, they have more earning power at that time. However, a young professional might start their working life earning $50,000 per year right out of university. They have the same earning power as the person who spent a decade working their way up to that level. The young professional, however, is unlikely to immediately start saving for retirement—even though they obviously have the earning power to do so. The young professional will also wait until they have been working for over a decade before they start saving for retirement. Earning power is irrelevant.

You might also try to argue the young professional needs to buy a house and a car and incur other start of adult life expenses. Those arguments are also invalid. The young professional could easily have chosen to live the lifestyle of the person making $25,000 per year and save the excess for retirement. But, hardly any young people are ever willing to sacrifice short-term benefits to receive benefits way off into the future. They want a nicer new car, a bigger new home, exotic vacations, fancy electronics, and other forms of pleasure right now. A more comfortable retirement is much too far off into the future to have any weight in their decision process.

If you want people to make sacrifices, or take risks to make their future better, you have to provide some sort of incentive upfront to make them take action. Future benefits hold hardly any motivational power. You have to give them instant gratification in exchange for making the sacrifice or taking the risk.

If what you want people to agree to do has no instant benefits, you could include new instant benefits by inflating the price of whatever you’re offering to include the cost of the benefits you give people upfront. Most people will enthusiastically pay more for instant gratification.

The Entire Communication Fundamentals Course

Purchasing this course in the at-home format is thousands of dollars cheaper than attending the seminar.

Available at: www.zanerozzi.com

00 Welcome to the Communication Fundamentals Course 1

00.01 The At-Home Version of This Course 2

00.01.01 You’ll Never Again Fear Social Interaction 4

00.01.02 Your Life Could Have Been so Different Today 4

00.01.03 New Opportunities Will Become Available to You 6

00.01.04 Learn the Communication Mistakes You’ve Been Making 7

00.01.05 The Results You’ll Get 8

00.01.06 Who This Course Is for 11

00.01.07 Why You Need to Complete This Course 13

00.01.08 In Today’s World, Everyone Is Connected 14

00.01.09 What You’ll Learn 15

00.01.10 The Modules Work Together Synergistically 17

00.01.11 You’ve Decided You Are Not Going to Be Average 18

00.01.12 You’ve Decided You Are Not Going to Fail 19

00.01.13 You’ve Decided You Are Very Serious about Improving Yourself 19

00.01.14 You’ve Decided You Are Going to Change Your Life 20

00.01.15 Your Confidence Will Skyrocket 21

00.01.16 Learn How Successful People Operate 22

00.01.17 You Are Who You Hang out with – Attract the Best 23

00.01.18 Your Existing Relationships Will Be Much Stronger 24

00.01.19 The Best Communication Secrets Will Be Revealed 25

00.01.20 Why You Need to Get Started Right Now 26

01 Overcoming the Fear of Approaching New People 28

01.01 Make the First Move or Lose out 29

01.01.01 The Invisible Barrier 29

01.01.02 Approach Who You Want to Approach or Lose out 34

01.01.03 Your Reasons for Approaching Other People 36

01.02 How Fear Works in Your Mind and Body 38

01.02.01 We Have a Strong Negative Bias 40

01.02.02 What Is Fear 41

01.03 How You’re Making the Problem Worse 43

01.03.01 Imaginary Vicious Cycle 43

01.03.02 Real Vicious Cycle 44

01.03.03 We Fear Lack of Control 46

01.04 More Ways You’re Making the Problem Worse 51

01.04.01 You’re the Only One Who Knows 51

01.04.02 You’re Much Harder on Yourself than Other People Are 53

01.04.03 People Are Nice Because They Don’t Want to Embarrass Themselves 54

01.05 What’s Holding You Back 58

01.05.01 Identify Your False Beliefs 58

01.05.02 Imagine the Worst That Could Happen 59

01.06 How to Use Fear so It Works for You Instead of against You 64

01.06.01 Your Fear Response Changes Your Body 64

01.06.02 Fear Versus Excitement 67

01.07 The Most Important Secret about Approaching New People 69

01.07.01 The Middle Ground between Perfect and Failure 69

01.07.02 Before and after 72

01.07.03 Our Negativity Bias Is at It Again 75

01.08 How Successful People Are Different 79

01.08.01 Action Eliminates Fear 79

01.08.02 Fear Disappears 80

01.09 What Successful People Do 84

01.09.01 Overcoming Fear Is Not Automatic 84

01.09.02 Reverse Your Thinking 84

01.09.03 How to Completely Forget about Feeling Nervous 87

01.10 More Things You Can Do Right Now 90

01.10.01 Eliminate Unjustified Fears That Are Holding You Back 90

01.10.02 Define What You’re Really Afraid of 91

01.10.03 Realize You Can’t Predict Everything 92

01.10.04 Realize You Can’t Control Everything 94

01.10.05 See Fear As a Guide 95

01.11 If Your Fear Is Much Worse Than Normal, Do These 8 Things 97

01.11.01 Getting Started Overcoming Your Fear of Approaching New People 99

01.11.02 Step One 100

01.11.03 Step Two 100

01.11.04 Step Three 102

01.11.05 Step Four 103

01.11.06 Step Five 104

01.11.07 Step Six 105

01.11.08 Step Seven 106

01.11.09 Step Eight 111

01.11.10 You Are Now Ready to Go for It 113

02 Small Talk, Flirting, and Networking 115

02.01 The Importance of Small Talk 116

02.01.01 Small Talk Versus Serious Discussions 116

02.01.02 Hating Small Talk 118

02.01.03 Small Talk Is Essential to Starting and Building Relationships 118

02.01.04 Using Small Talk to Assess People 119

02.01.05 Examples You Can Use 120

02.02 Start a Conversation – Opening Lines 121

02.02.01 Anything Is Better Than Silence 121

02.02.02 People Will Make Whatever You Said Work 122

02.02.03 Introductions 124

02.02.04 The Formula for Opening Lines 128

02.02.05 The Event 131

02.02.06 Common Interests of People at the Event 134

02.02.07 The Venue 136

02.02.08 The Theme of the Event 137

02.02.09 The Entertainment 137

02.02.10 Other People at the Event 138

02.02.11 The Food 139

02.02.12 The Host 140

02.02.13 Travel to the Location 140

02.02.14 The Honoree or Beneficiary 141

02.02.15 Event Speakers and Their Topics 142

02.02.16 Anything You Can Both See 143

02.02.17 News Events of the Day 145

02.02.18 Other Things You Have in Common 146

02.03 Keep a Conversation Going – Part I – Skills and Techniques 148

02.03.01 The Key to Keeping a Conversation Going 148

02.03.02 Always Give Other People Expandable Topics 151

02.03.03 When You Don’t Know What to Say Next 155

02.03.04 Talk about Subjects of Interest to Other People 159

02.03.05 Learn about Other People 160

02.03.06 Accept Everything 164

02.03.07 Special Interest Websites and Magazines 166

02.03.08 When People Introduce a New Word into Your Conversation 168

02.03.09 How to Change the Subject to Your Interests Using Transitions 170

02.03.10 The Boomerang Question 172

02.03.11 Anything Happening in the Room 173

02.03.12 Things You Have in Common with People 175

02.03.13 Good Questions 176

02.03.14 Other People’s Day so Far 179

02.03.15 Make a Game of Guessing Others’ Situations 180

02.03.16 Going from Specific to General or from General to Specific 181

02.04 Keep a Conversation Going – Part II – Topics of Conversation 183

02.04.01 Read up on the News 183

02.04.02 Don’t Try to Fake Knowledge 186

02.04.03 Learn the Right Questions to Ask for Each Topic 187

02.04.04 Personal Details about Other People 188

02.04.05 Listing Their Favourites in Various Categories 191

02.04.06 Work or School 192

02.04.07 Entertainment 193

02.04.08 Sports 194

02.04.09 Vacations – Past and Future 195

02.04.10 If You Could… 196

02.04.11 The Best Way to Improve Anything 197

02.04.12 What’s Your Opinion on… 197

02.04.13 Organizations and Causes They Support 197

02.04.14 What Has Changed with People You’ve Met before 198

02.05 The Best Ways to Suggest a Follow-Up Meeting or Second Date 199

02.05.01 Finding Good Follow-Up Events on the Spot 202

02.05.02 Discussing Entertainment News and Future Events 203

02.05.03 Be As Specific As You Can 204

02.05.04 Suggest Going to One of Your Favourite Places Discussed Earlier 205

02.05.05 Suggest They Show You Their Favourite Places 206

02.05.06 Suggest They Teach You an Activity They like 206

02.05.07 Challenge Them at an Activity You Both like 207

02.05.08 Suggest You Teach Them an Activity You like 208

02.05.09 Make an Effort to Meet up at the Next Event 209

02.05.10 Suggest You Work on Something Together 209

02.05.11 Suggest You Investigate Something Together 210

02.05.12 Suggest Trying Something New Together 211

02.05.13 Suggest You Work on Improving a Skill Together 211

02.05.14 Go to a Place Neither of You Have Been before 212

02.05.15 Suggest They Help You with Something or You Help Them with Something 213

02.05.16 Staying in Contact 214

02.06 Ending a Conversation 216

02.06.01 What Not to Say 216

02.06.02 What to Say 217

03 Always Have Something to Say 220

03.01 Introduction: Rules of the Communication Game 221

03.01.01 Popular People 222

03.01.02 They’re Not Actually That Smooth 223

03.01.03 The Perfect Quotable Response 224

03.01.04 People Expect the Conversation to Flow Naturally 225

03.01.05 Everyone Can Recognize Communication Mistakes 225

03.01.06 Everyone Meets People Who Are Not Skilled Communicators 226

03.01.07 A Barrier between You 227

03.02 Make the Right Impression 228

03.02.01 The Desire to Look Good Can Make You Nervous 228

03.02.02 To Be Confident, You Need a System You Can Trust 232

03.03 The Secret to Speaking to New People 234

03.03.01 Think Back to the Last Time You Heard Someone Speak 234

03.03.02 The Way You Felt 236

03.03.03 Different Expectation Levels 237

03.03.04 How Different Forms of Communication Rank 239

03.03.05 The Expectation of Quality for You when Approaching New People 241

03.03.06 Meeting Expectations Is Good, Exceeding Them Is Exceptional 244

03.04 Speaking to New People Effortlessly 246

03.04.01 Lessons from Improv Theatre 246

03.04.02 The Amateur 247

03.04.03 You Don’t Need to Apologize 249

03.04.04 Your Current Impromptu Speaking Skill Level 252

03.05 Confidence Boosting Cheats 254

03.05.01 Impromptu Speaking Doesn’t Have To Be Impromptu 254

03.05.02 Know Your Audience and What They Want to Learn Ahead of Time 256

03.05.03 Preparing Stock Bits of Information 258

03.05.04 Prepare, but Don’t Memorize 258

03.06 How to Always Be an Interesting Conversationalist 260

03.06.01 Be an Optimist 260

03.06.02 Don’t Be the Average Boring Person 261

03.06.03 Being a VIP 263

03.06.04 Important People 268

03.06.05 Talk about Current Events 270

03.06.06 Successful People Take Care of Themselves 270

03.06.07 VIPs Know It’s Important to Refresh 272

03.06.08 Take Time Out Of Your Busy Schedule for Other People 273

03.06.09 An Important Reminder 274

03.07 Accomplishing Your Relationship Goals 276

03.08 The Pareto Principle (80/20 Rule) Applies to Relationships 279

03.08.01 Trying to Please Everyone 282

03.09 How to Respond to… 287

03.09.01 People Who Brag 287

03.09.02 Deception 289

03.09.03 The Politician’s Answer 291

03.09.04 Topics You Don’t Want to Talk about 294

03.10 How to Approach Others to Start a Conversation 297

03.10.01 Who to Approach 297

03.10.02 Groups to Approach 299

03.10.03 How to Join a Group 301

03.10.04 Join the Conversation When You Join the Group 303

03.11 How to Practice Without Other People 305

03.11.01 All Skills Require Practice 305

03.11.02 Three Weeks Is Often Enough 306

03.11.03 Your Improvements Will Be Obvious and Encouraging 307

04 Building Rapport and Using Proper Manners 310

04.01 Good Conversation Habits That Make a Great Impression 311

04.01.01 Be Positive 311

04.01.02 Give Compliments 312

04.01.03 Make Other People Feel Important 313

04.01.04 Always Assume the Best of Other People 314

04.01.05 Own Blame and Share Credit 316

04.01.06 Dressing for the Event 318

04.01.07 A Friend Can Say Good Things about You to Others 319

04.01.08 Get into the Right State of Mind 321

04.01.09 Remember One Detail about People the Next Time You See Them 322

04.01.10 Making People Comfortable Helps You Forget You’re Nervous 324

04.01.11 Soften Your Opinion 325

04.01.12 Remembering Names 326

04.01.13 Communicating Using Technology Versus in Person 328

04.01.14 Where to Practice Your Communication Skills 330

04.01.15 Have Good Responses Prepared for the Obvious Questions 331

04.01.16 Be Excited to Meet People 333

04.01.17 Involve Everyone 335

04.01.18 Focus on the People You’re with 337

04.01.19 Think: “What If the President Said That?” 339

04.01.20 Let Other People Save Face 342

04.02 Bad Habits That Kill Conversations and Push People Away 346

04.02.01 One-Upping 346

04.02.02 Talking about Yourself 348

04.02.03 Bragging 350

04.02.04 Overusing Clichés 351

04.02.05 Complaining 352

04.02.06 Blaming 355

04.02.07 Interrupting 356

04.02.08 Being a Know-It-All 357

04.02.09 Offering Unsolicited Advice 360

04.02.10 Working the Room at a Social Event 361

04.02.11 Asking for Free Professional Advice 363

04.02.12 Gossiping 365

04.02.13 Using a Cell Phone 366

04.02.14 Making Jokes at the Expense of Others 369

04.02.15 Telling Inappropriate Jokes 372

04.02.16 Trying to Teach People a Lesson 374

04.02.17 Talking about Your Interests That No One Else Cares about 375

04.02.18 Sharing Too Much Personal Information 376

04.02.19 Asking Others to Share Too Much Personal Information 379

04.02.20 Arguing 380

04.02.21 Having to Be Right or Get the Last Word 382

04.03 Building Rapport and Developing a Relationship 384

04.03.01 Mirror Their Emotion 384

04.03.02 Use Quotes to Bond 386

04.03.03 Make Yourselves into a Group 387

04.03.04 Give Insider Information to Make Yourselves into a Group 389

04.03.05 Accept Other People’s Point of View 390

04.03.06 Assume the Best of Other People 391

04.03.07 Use the Same Vocabulary as Other People 393

04.03.08 Make People Feel Comfortable 396

04.04 A Quick and Easy Way to Be Popular 398

04.04.01 What Was Your First Interaction with Them like? 399

04.04.02 What Is Every Interaction with Them like? 400

04.04.03 What Do They Do That Makes You like Them? 400

05 Alpha Person Behaviours and Body Language 403

05.01 The Importance of Nonverbal Communication 404

05.01.01 Your First Impression Is Made from across the Room 404

05.01.02 Your Body Language Tells People How to Treat You 407

05.01.03 You Can Be Anyone You Want to Be 409

05.01.04 The Alpha Person Is Attractive to Everyone 410

05.01.05 Alpha People Are Very Important to Our Society 411

05.02 The 61 Alpha Person Characteristics and Behaviours 415

05.02.01 Keep Your Head up 415

05.02.02 Never Cross Your Body Parts 415

05.02.03 Claim More Space 416

05.02.04 Don’t Use Shields 416

05.02.05 Never Fidget 417

05.02.06 Always Look Relaxed 417

05.02.07 Ignore Distractions 418

05.02.08 Never Jump to Attention 418

05.02.09 Move Slowly, Calmly, and Deliberately 419

05.02.10 Be Rock Solid and Composed at All Times 419

05.02.11 Always Go First 420

05.02.12 Always Be in Front 420

05.02.13 Lead by Example 421

05.02.14 Always Take the High Road 421

05.02.15 Don’t Fear Judgment 422

05.02.16 Have a Firm and Confident Handshake 422

05.02.17 Don’t Fear Touching Other People to Express Yourself 422

05.02.18 Don’t Cringe When Others Touch You 423

05.02.19 Be Dependable 423

05.02.20 Stand up for Your Friends While They’re under Fire 423

05.02.21 Never Stab Anyone in the Back 424

05.02.22 Always Tell the Truth 424

05.02.23 Be Direct 425

05.02.24 Take a Stand and Make Your Opinions Known 425

05.02.25 Defend Your Ideas and Beliefs 426

05.02.26 Be Humble 426

05.02.27 Don’t Seek the Approval of Others 427

05.02.28 Make Sure Others Know You Always Finish the Fight 427

05.02.29 Be Comfortable Holding Eye Contact 428

05.02.30 Walk Tall 428

05.02.31 Walk like a Healthy Warrior 429

05.02.32 Always Keep Your Hands Out Of Your Pockets 429

05.02.33 Be Well-Groomed 430

05.02.34 Be Optimistic 430

05.02.35 Never Fear Failure 430

05.02.36 Never Get Embarrassed 431

05.02.37 Disclose Your Own Mistakes 432

05.02.38 Accept Responsibility for Your Actions 432

05.02.39 Be Upfront about Your Faults 433

05.02.40 Don’t Complain about Trivial Things or Things That Can’t Be Changed 433

05.02.41 Talk about Solutions — Not Shortcomings 434

05.02.42 Don’t Criticize Others 434

05.02.43 Never Make Fun of Others 434

05.02.44 Never Intentionally Embarrass Others 435

05.02.45 Treat Everyone with Respect 435

05.02.46 Help Others When You Can 435

05.02.47 Be Generous with Your Time, Skills, and Resources 436

05.02.48 Do Nice Things for Others 436

05.02.49 Always Be Comfortable 436

05.02.50 Have Exceptional Social Skills 437

05.02.51 Be Decisive 437

05.02.52 Take Action 438

05.02.53 Don’t Fear Responsibility 438

05.02.54 Don’t Be Afraid to Say No 438

05.02.55 Don’t Let Other Alpha People Intimidate You 439

05.02.56 Take Risks 439

05.02.57 Ask for What You Want 439

05.02.58 Approach Anyone You Want 440

05.02.59 Be Responsible for Your Own Life 440

05.02.60 Be Confident — Not Cocky 440

05.02.61 Speak on Your Own Terms 441

05.03 Nonverbal Communication Can Make or Break You 442

05.03.01 Eye Contact 443

05.03.02 Smile 444

05.03.03 Posture 445

05.03.04 Open Posture 447

05.03.05 Fidgeting 450

05.03.06 Their Body Language 451

05.03.07 Adapt to Other People 453

05.04 Traditional Body Language Books 455

05.04.01 What Most Body Language Books Teach You 455

05.04.02 Don’t Waste Time Learning Individual Gestures 456

05.05 Trying to Use Traditional Body Language Books Backwards 458

05.05.01 The Intended Users of Traditional Body Language Books 458

05.05.02 Interviews and Interrogations 460

05.05.03 Out of Sync Gestures 461

05.05.04 False Expectations about Using Traditional Body Language Books Backwards 462

05.05.05 Why Body Language Books Work without Everyone Reading Them 463

05.06 The Significance of Body Language 465

05.06.01 An Example of the Significance of Body Language 465

05.06.02 Your Body Language Speaks First 467

05.06.03 People Use Mental Shortcuts to Make Life Easier 468

05.06.04 Mental Shortcuts Used with Body Language 470

05.07 Body Language Can Make You a Leader 473

05.07.01 They Might Not Even Realize They’re Doing It 473

05.07.02 Body Language Identifies the Real Leaders—Not Who Has the Title 475

05.07.03 Subconscious Assessments Affect Conscious Opinions 476

05.08 How to Instantly Demonstrate You’re a Leader 478

05.08.01 How to Tap into Your Subconscious 479

05.08.02 Your Subconscious Mind Is Accurate and Perfectly Timed 483

05.08.03 Examples of the Power of Your Own Belief 484

05.08.04 When It Counts 487

05.09 Exercises to Demonstrate You’re a Leader 489

05.09.01 Unleashing Your Subconscious Mind 489

05.09.02 Imagine You’ve Already Accomplished What You Want to Accomplish 491

05.09.03 Imagine You’re Onstage Winning an Award 492

05.09.04 Imagine Everyone Knows You for What You Want to Be Known for 493

05.09.05 Imagine You’re a Celebrity 494

05.09.06 Imagining What Other People Have Felt 495

05.09.07 Making It Work 496

05.09.08 Imagining As If Determines Your Body Language 497

05.10 Conclusion 499

Purchasing this course in the at-home format is thousands of dollars cheaper than attending the seminar.

Available at: www.zanerozzi.com

Modules Available Now:

Module 1 – Overcoming the Fear of Approaching New People

Module 2 – Small Talk, Flirting, and Networking

Module 3 – Always Have Something to Say

Module 4 – Building Rapport and Using Proper Manners

Module 5 – Alpha Person Behaviours and Body Language

Future Course Modules to Be Made Available in At-Home Format:

Module 6 – Dressing to Reduce Your Flaws and Enhance Your Strengths

Module 7 – Developing Confidence that Shows

Module 8 – Persuading People

Module 9 – Reading the Opposite Sex’s Interest Signals

Module 10 – Conducting Interviews to Extract Important Information

Module 1 – Overcoming the Fear of Approaching New People

Purchasing this course in the at-home format is thousands of dollars cheaper than attending the seminar.

Someone has to make the first move to start a conversation. Most people fear making the first move; so the onus is on you. People who hesitate are stuck with whoever is willing to approach them—if anyone has the courage to do so.

You’ll learn not only how to conquer the fear of approaching new people, but also how to conquer any other fear holding you back in other areas of your life. You’ll learn how to confidently take risks so you can enjoy future gains in your business, social, and romantic lives.

Fear is responsible for more crushed dreams than any other problem people might encounter. People who don’t take action because they were too afraid never live a life where they’ve accomplished all of their dreams.

Module 2 – Small Talk, Flirting, and Networking

Purchasing this course in the at-home format is thousands of dollars cheaper than attending the seminar.

Skilled communicators always seem to know exactly what to say next. The skilled communicators’ comments go over well not because they are genius, but because they follow the rules of conversation. That gives people what they are expecting and seems like exactly the right thing to say.

You’ll go through opening lines, entertaining others, building a relationship, arranging a second meeting, then saying goodbye. You’ll know how to respond to any comment or question sent your way.

You’ll find many examples of opening lines you can use to start a conversation and discussion questions you can use to keep a conversation going. But, most importantly, you’ll learn the skills to develop your own opening lines and conversation topics.

Module 3 – Always Have Something to Say

Purchasing this course in the at-home format is thousands of dollars cheaper than attending the seminar.

Many people struggle with finding the right thing to say. This module helps you eliminate that problem. You’ll learn how to keep new ideas flowing so you can speak easily without awkward silences. Doing so allows you to confidently start and continue a conversation with anyone you chose.

These skills will not only make you an excellent conversationalist, but also make you a great impromptu speaker. Any time someone asks you a question, or asks you to speak about a topic, you’ll be ready to exceed everyone’s expectations. You’ll be armed with everything you need to deliver outstanding presentations with no preparation. You’ll have the tools and strategies necessary to speak impromptu on any topic.

Module 4 – Building Rapport and Using Proper Manners

Purchasing this course in the at-home format is thousands of dollars cheaper than attending the seminar.

You’ll learn the good communication habits that make others see you as an excellent communicator. Everyone expects others to have these traits. You’ll recognize them as positive character traits possessed by people you admire.

You’ll also learn the bad communication habits that annoy, offend, and bore people. Reviewing the bad habits will help you pinpoint why you dislike many of the people who annoy you. They probably don’t even know they have those bad habits. Their bad communication habits can make it impossible for many people to like them.

Building rapport is essential to moving any business or personal relationship to the next level. You’ll learn several techniques you can use to quickly increase the level of rapport between you and others.

Module 5 – Alpha Person Behaviours and Body Language

Purchasing this course in the at-home format is thousands of dollars cheaper than attending the seminar.

Your nonverbal communication is making your first impression with other people long before your first words to them. When you walk into a room, everyone sees you and receives your nonverbal communication. They use that first impression of you to size you up, decide where you fit into the social hierarchy, and to decide whether or not you might be someone interesting to them for business, personal, or romantic reasons.

If you don’t immediately transmit nonverbal communication that interests other people, they’ll quickly overlook you as just another random person in the room.

The opposite is also true. If you’re communicating nonverbal information that appeals to other people, you will be attracting people from all sides of the room.

Available at: www.zanerozzi.com

About Zane Rozzi

Zane Rozzi is a successful entrepreneur. He is also well known in the field of executive development. Zane Rozzi has a large and loyal following as a pickup artist who teaches others the keys to success in attracting the opposite sex. He designed and produced the popular and highly praised Communication Fundamentals course.

www.zanerozzi.com

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First Date Small Talk Guide: Communication Fundamentals Course Introduction

Zane Rozzi is a successful entrepreneur. He is also well known in the field of executive development. Zane Rozzi has a large and loyal following as a pickup artist who teaches others the keys to success in attracting the opposite sex. He designed and produced the popular and highly praised Communication Fundamentals course. Not knowing what to say to make a good impression is people’s number one fear on first dates. This book will help you eliminate that fear. You’ll always know what to say to make a great impression with your date, or anyone else you speak with. You’ll learn the basics of small talk, how to always have something interesting to say, how to always be an interesting conversationalist, how to give other people conversation material they can work with so you don’t have to do all of the talking, good conversation manners, an important cheat used by top politicians to make yourself sound very polished, and the importance of body language so you don’t focus all of your attention on what you’re saying and unknowingly display poor nonverbal communication. Make a great impression and ensure your next first date is a success by applying the straightforward advice in this book. This book also contains three bonus chapters from Zane Rozzi’s bestselling How to Leverage the Way the World Works for Your Own Gain series. The first from 48 Ways to Control People and the second two from 45 More Ways to Control People. This book is an introduction to Zane Rozzi’s popular and highly praised Communication Fundamentals course. Course details are included at the end of this book.

  • Author: Zane Rozzi
  • Published: 2016-09-18 19:35:11
  • Words: 17372
First Date Small Talk Guide: Communication Fundamentals Course Introduction First Date Small Talk Guide: Communication Fundamentals Course Introduction