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Block-Busters! 36 Exercises To Break Your Creative Blocks

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Block-Busters!

36 Exercises to Break Your Creative Block

By Gregory F. Huff

Shakespir Edition

Copyright 2016 by Gregory F. Huff

Shakespir Edition, License Notes:

This ebook is licensed for your personal use only. This free ebook may not be re-sold or given away to other people. If you would like to share this book with another person, please direct that person to Shakespir.com so they can download their own copy. The content of this book has been excerpted from the author’s original title, Pause. Reflect. Create! A Daily Devotional For Inspired Creativity & Personal Transformation, which is also available for purchase at Shakespir.com. Thank you for respecting the hard work of this author.

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means – for example, electronic, photocopy, recording – without prior written permission of the author. The only exception is brief quotations in printed reviews.

Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture is taken from the New King James Version, Copyright 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

This publication is designed to motivate, encourage, educate, and inspire whoever reads it, for self-help informational purposes only. It is sold with the understanding that neither the author nor the publisher is engaged in rendering legal, medical, therapy, counseling, or other professional services to the reader. Liability for use (and consequences thereof) of suggestions from this book lies solely with the reader. Neither the author nor the publisher takes any responsibility for any possible consequences by the reader from the application of any information in this book. If expert advice or counsel is required, the services of a competent professional person should be sought.

To Julia

Table of Contents

duction

About the Author

Connect With Me

Introduction

Philippians 4:13 ~ I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.

Stuck. That is one word every creative person wants to avoid, especially on a deadline. But there are times when you simply feel totally uninspired. There are plenty of reasons for this state of mind, many I’ve already mentioned, such as fear, meaningless work, fatigue, distractions, etc. It could even be the frustration of feeling obligated to finish a creative project you didn’t really want to do in the first place. Or perhaps you don’t know how to tell when your creative work is “finished,” so you tend to overwork it and ruin the results. In spite of all those things, what it may boil down to is a lack of clarity about your creative voice. Who are you on paper, on canvas, in dance, in music, etc? If you don’t really know your creative voice, how will you know what to say? Do you believe your own press, or is that simply puffery to flatter your ego and impress people? Not knowing your creative voice would definitely be a major block to your creativity.

Let’s focus for a moment on some solutions you can implement to help break up those creative blocks into smaller, more manageable stepping stones:

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p<>{color:#000;}. What makes you unique? What makes your world your world? Give yourself permission to be your most authentic self, and create from that vulnerable place.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Trust your instincts to use the right voice for the right situation; your topic will tell you.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Silence your negative inner critic. Just create and don’t criticize how it looks, reads, sounds, etc.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Read books on your craft for inspiration and to learn something new.

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p<>{color:#000;}. If you’re stuck, walk away from your creative project and come back later with fresh eyes. Maybe even take a nap and sleep on it. God just might give you the answer you need while you’re sleeping (Job 33:14-18).

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p<>{color:#000;}. Don’t let the seed of paralysis take root. Counter that with the truth: “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me (Philippians 4:13), God has made me more than a conqueror (Romans 8:37), and I will overcome this creative block.” Then start doing it.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Be willing to make mistakes; the life lesson you learn from the mistake may be more valuable than not trying at all, or having it work out perfectly.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Create an “Inspiration Cookbook: Purchase or make a notebook that you will use exclusively for writing down the ingredients of creativity: thoughts, dreams, lyrics, poems, creative ideas, inspiring Bible verses or quotes, observations on life, thumbnail sketches or doodles, etc. One of these items may eventually yield the fruit of inspiration during your next dry spell. My inspiration cookbook has been in the works for many years. In it I have drawings, music, newspaper clippings, songs, poetry, dreams, one sentence ideas, short stories, dramas, etc. Several of these ideas have made it out of the cookbook and onto paper or on canvas, so I have definitely seen the benefit of having such a book. (2 Timothy 1:6)

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p<>{color:#000;}. Keep a file of pictures that trigger thoughts and ideas.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Re-envision the blank canvas in front of you: instead of seeing it as blank, envision that it is welcoming you to start the creative process. It is giving you the opportunity to explore, experiment, and play. It isn’t judging you; it is accepting you, beckoning you to express yourself and giving you the freedom to make mistakes during the process. It has no expectation of you other than for you to be open to the opportunity to create.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Write down the conversation going on in your head right now and try to write a solution or make it into a dialogue.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Take a walk in nature to clear your mind.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Try charades – get your point across without using words. Dance it out or act it out.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Use your creativity to describe a vivid dream, and change the ending to the dream.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Keep a blank page by your creative work so you can write down and release all your frustrations about the work.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Make time for play! Play will help loosen you up. As a way or starting the work, play with crayons, clay, finger paints, glitter, macaroni, and glue. Just make a mess to release your stress. You just might like the results, but the results aren’t what you’re after; the play’s the thing that’s important! Maybe even use those art supplies that you’ve been saving for a “special” project. What could put them to better use than play? Allow yourself to have fun, mess it up, color outside the lines, etc.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Remind yourself of what helped you overcome the same block in the past, and incorporate that into breaking through your block now.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Make up a character and have your character solve the problem from their point of view.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Do a cluster exercise. Write down the word or subject you are stuck on in the center of the page and circle it; then follow the directions for the cluster exercise below. It can help you figure out how to say something that captures the essence of your point.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Try doodling exercises: put on some music and doodle your thoughts about the music. Try doodling using only one color. Try doodling by slowly dropping a long piece of string or yarn onto a piece of paper and allowing it to fall wherever it wants to. Try doodling with your eyes open and your eyes shut, using 2 or 3 different colors. Take 3 colors that you don’t use often and use them to doodle for 5-10 minutes while blindfolded or in the dark.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Write a poem. It can be a way of brainstorming with words, much like an artist brainstorms ideas by creating thumbnail sketches. Poems can be a “snapshot” of your mind at a given moment. By looking at that snapshot, you may see something develop into a working idea.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Keep a creativity jar with folded slips of paper that have all the above ideas written on them, and randomly take out a slip of paper from the jar as needed.

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p<>{color:#000;}. Play a creative game, such as Pearl Cards storytelling game by Freeman Ng, Creative Whack Pack by Roger von Oech, or Thinkpak: A Creative Brainstorming Card Deck by Michael Michalko. These games can help you unblock and think outside the box.

These tips are designed to inspire your own ideas on how to break creative blocks and get back into your creative zone. What is the creative zone? It’s that mysterious place where your creativity flows openly and freely, without hindrance or rejection. Ideas turn into concepts that generate meaningful images. In the creative zone, “the canvas can do miracles,” to quote a 1970s Christopher Cross song. The creative zone can even induce a manic, trance-like state, in which time disappears and you become totally one with the creative process. And yet, the journey into the creative zone can be difficult at best. We decide we are not worthy of the zone and it flees from us, only to return seemingly by chance. For many years, the journey into the creative zone for me was like peeling an onion. First, I desperately needed order, in order to start the creative process. Everything had to be tidied up in the room, my to-do list completed, all my errands and chores done, etc. Next I had to overcome excuses that prevented me from starting the work: I don’t have the reference pictures I need, I don’t have time now since it took too long to tidy up, I don’t have the right supplies, etc. Once I got past those issues, I had to confront whether or not I was good enough, or had enough skill to execute the work in the manner I had imagined it. Finally, with all the barriers removed, I was released into the creative zone. And by golly, nobody had better interrupt me, since I worked so hard to get there! : )

All those layers melted away once I discovered I could stay in the zone continuously in spite of “interruptions.” One way I could stay in my creative zone was by praying about it. I gave my issues and excuses to God, and as He dealt with them His truth set me free. I regularly ask for His help with ideas. I also stay in the zone by keeping my materials at hand and ready for immediate usage. I do a little bit of the creative work daily rather than waiting for a good chunk of time to devote to it. That way when I do have more time I’m further along with the work.

By doing these things I perceived I don’t have to be totally held captive by my creativity in order to accomplish great things. I can be available to others while I’m in the zone, yet continue to stay focused on the creative work. As a result, my “canvas” is doing miracles in ways I never thought possible. Try it! Use this book as a reference guide whenever you get stuck, and see what possibilities open up for you.

I would like to thank and acknowledge the following people who have made meaningful contributions to my life as a part of writing this book: First and foremost, thank you Father God, Jesus, and Holy Spirit, the true sources of my inspiration. Thanks to all my family and friends who supported this endeavor. Thank you to the teachers who inspired me: Sr. Jeanette De Sena, Lisa McWilliams, George LaTorre, and many others.

This book is dedicated to the memory of my brother Christopher, who would be so proud of his little brother, and to the memory of Pastor Gregory Thompson.

Special thanks to John Tkacz, whose partnership is an essential and supportive part of my life. And thank you for reading this book!

-Gregory F. Huff

Return to Table of Contents

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Think about a creative block or important decision you are facing in your life at this time. Now, imagine that your best friend is facing the exact same issue. If your friend came to you for advice, what would you suggest? Think of at least 5 suggestions to offer your friend, and write them down. Review your suggestions and ask yourself, “Can I apply this advice to change my own situation? If so, how?”

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Bible Treasure Hunt – See if you can find the verses in the New Testament that relate to these topics. Then write your answer in the spaces below:

The Parable of the Lost Coin ________________________________________________

The Parable of the Prodigal Son _____________________________________________

The Raising of Lazarus from the dead _________________________________________

The shortest verse in the Bible _______________________________________________

The Book of Life _________________________________________________________

The Wise Men ___________________________________________________________

Jesus’ baptism by John _____________________________________________________

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Think about one of your favorite praise or worship songs. Once you recall the melody and lyrics, try making up a new verse to sing with the melody of the song. You might incorporate Scripture, testify about His goodness, or simply sing, “Hallelujah, praise God” to the melody.

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Dress up and use the “good china” to eat your dinner tonight. Take out that expensive writing pen and use it to write a note to someone you love today. Use those expensive creative supplies today that you have been saving for a special occasion. Today is that special occasion! Don’t take another moment for granted!

CREATIVE EXERCISE: ADD YOUR NAME TO JEREMIAH 29:11-13

“For I know the thoughts that I think toward you ____________, says the Lord,

thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope. Then ____________

shall call upon Me and go and pray to Me, and I will listen to ________________. And

_____________ will seek Me and you will find Me, when you search for Me with all

your heart.”

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Imagine you are building your own tower of Babel. What would it look like? What is it made of? What foundation is it built upon? Take a moment to review several years of your creative work. What themes, images and concepts keep surfacing over and over again? What do they tell you about the way you think, the things you believe, your walk with God? What impression are you trying to make, and is that the impression that people are actually getting from your creativity? How would changing or eliminating certain themes from your work make if different? Try making one change to see the difference, and write about the experience.

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Close your eyes and imagine yourself doing one thing that you enjoy the most. Maybe it’s painting by a babbling brook. Maybe it’s watching your 5 year old giggle and dance. Think about it. Now, imagine God being a part of that moment. How would His being there enhance your joy? How would you invite Him to be a part of it?

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Using the guidelines above, find a verse in the Bible that you can use to create your own Selah Moment. The verse should be a promise you can stand on or something that reveals more about your identity in Christ.

CREATIVE EXERCISE

You know the feeling: here you are again, staring intently at the blank canvas, the empty stage, the blank page in front of you. You have done all you know to do to motivate yourself. You have tried everything to come up with a new idea, but the creative well seems dry, cracked like the parched earth during a drought. And it seems that your walk with God has become that way also. Your praise and prayers bounce off the ceiling back down to you. What can you do? Try this: put on a piece of classical music and allow it to paint pictures on your mind. I suggest one of these: The Birds by Respighi, Symphony Number 6 by Beethoven, Symphony Number 1 by Brahms, or Piano Concerto Number 21 by Mozart. You may find these works free online, or borrow them from your local library, or maybe even purchase them for your collection. Write down the words that come to your mind as you listen to the music, and see how those ideas might be used in your creative work. Allow the music to trigger memories that you could develop creatively. Allow God to speak to you through the music. Look at the words you have written down and see if you can find them in a Bible concordance. Then read the verse that corresponds with the word; it may inspire your creativity. Or you may even take your list of words to the library or internet, find a dictionary of quotes, and discover quotes that use the words you have chosen.

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Using the words you just wrote down while listening to classical music, do a “cluster exercise:” write one of the words in the center of a blank sheet of paper and circle it. Think about other words related to that word in the circle. Write the other words around the circle, circling each word and drawing a line from each circle to the center circle. Now choose one of the circled words and begin writing and circling words associated with that circled word, drawing a line from each new circled word to the circled word you chose. After doing this for a while, review what you have written. Do any of the words you wrote spark new creative ideas for you? Can you connect the words in an interesting way to write a story, paint a picture, create a dance, or make some other form of creative work?

CREATIVE EXERCISE

House of Prayer: According to 1 Corinthians 3:16, we are God’s temple (His house), and in Isaiah 56:7 God wants His house to be a house of prayer. Take out a sheet of paper and draw a picture of what your “house of prayer” looks like. Is it in a state of disrepair: leaky roof, broken windows, missing doors, etc. Or is it well kept, with only a shingle or two missing from the roof? What kind of foundation is it built on (Matthew 7:24-27)? What kind of weather is there? Draw an obstacle to your house of prayer. What is the obstacle doing to your house? What do you need to do to prevent the obstacle from destroying your house? How would your house look different once the obstacle is defeated?

CREATIVE EXERCISE

What would your ideal day look like? Can you account hour by hour what you’d like to be doing? Write it down. Now think about your current schedule of responsibilities, obligations, work, chores, etc. How can you start to incorporate more of what you’d like to do into your schedule? What tasks can you successfully delegate, to make room for what you’d like to do?

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Review your creative goals for this year. Have you been as committed to them as you planned? Were your goals attainable and realistic? Did some parts of your goal become meaningless to you? How can you reevaluate your goals so that you can accomplish what you had set out to do for this year?

CREATIVE EXERCISE

With some construction paper, crayons, markers, tape and scissors, create a mask that represents a lie that you believe. What would the lie look like, and how would you wear it? At what times would you wear it? What color is it? Will you keep the mask, or discard it? Write about the experience in your journal.

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Think about a time when your inner critic said something negative and you responded by agreeing with it instead of fighting back. Now, write a dialogue between you and your inner critic, thinking of ways you could counter what it says by applying truth or facts (like the conversation above). Are you able to disarm your inner critic’s argument? Why does your inner critic’s opinion seem so reasonable in the first place?

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Use your creative ability to visualize your fallow ground. How would you draw it, dance it, act it out, sing about it, write about it? What would it look like before it gets broken up, how would it react when it is being broken up, and what feelings would you demonstrate after breaking it up? What would you say to the ground in order to break it up?

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Play with clay: Clay can help relieve stress. Take a small lump of clay in your hand and just spend some time molding it, shaping it, with your eyes closed. Note how the clay feels in your hands, and moisten it with a little water if it is stiff. Now open your eyes and imagine that God is molding you and shaping you into what He wants you to be. Imagine that God is rearranging the situations in your life the same way you are shaping and molding the clay. Write about the experience in your journal. Don’t have any clay? Don your rubber gloves, get a little dirt from outside and make some mud instead!

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Take a look through your creative work and the works of other artists you own, and ask God to reveal areas of shame (if there are any). See if you are able to keep any work to be used as a testimony of where God brought you from. If not, say a prayer as you destroy or discard the work. A sample prayer might be: “Lord, I thank you for destroying the root of shame and its influence in my life through this object. Thank you for your freedom, replacing my shame with being vulnerable and open before you in your presence. In Jesus’ Name, Amen.”

CREATIVE EXERCISE: ADD YOUR NAME TO ISAIAH 41:10

Fear not, ______________________, for I am with you: be not dismayed, for I am your God. I will strengthen you _________________________; yes, I will help you; yes, I will uphold you, ______________________________, with the right hand of my righteousness.

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Think about a situation where you are not forgiving a person, organization, or yourself. How does it make you feel? Create a picture of yourself bound by unforgiveness. What does that look like? Are you bound by ropes, chains, or other things that may symbolize unforgiveness? Now create a picture of yourself totally set free from unforgiveness. What would that look like? What is your body language, your facial expression when you are totally free? How are you relating to others, and how are they relating to you when you are free? Write about the experience. What positive, practical steps can you take to find freedom from unforgiveness? What one step can you take today?

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Review your current networking tools for effectiveness. What is the focus of your website? Is it easy to use? Are your resume, brochure, and business cards up to date? Are there any contacts you need to follow up on? Don’t overwhelm yourself by doing everything all at once. Prioritize and take small steps every day to accomplish your networking goal.

CREATIVE EXERCISE

As you read Psalm 23, what things come to mind? Take a pencil and doodle what you imagine as you read the verses. Perhaps you will draw many images, perhaps only one. Just keep your focus on the Lord, and listen to the quiet as you draw. How does God look to you as a shepherd? What does your valley of the shadow of death look like? What is on the table that is set before you? What is your emotional or abstract response to the verses? Your drawing does not have to be a literal interpretation; it could just be a representation of how the verses make you feel. What would other verses in the Bible look like if you doodled them?

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Visualize your creative goals on paper. (for example: you might draw or write a description of yourself accomplishing your creative goal.) Next, think about what stumbling blocks lay in your way to achieving that goal and write each one down on a separate sheet of paper, in large letters (for example: rejection, fear of success, lack of resources, etc.). Now, place your creative goals sheet on one side of the room on the floor. Then lay your stumbling blocks on the floor in such a way that they create a path that goes to your creative goals sheet. Finally, firmly and deliberately, step on each stumbling block and declare it to be a stepping stone that brings you closer to your creative goal, until you reach your create goal sheet. Pick up your creative goals sheet and write on the back of it about the experience of stepping on your stumbling blocks to get to your goals.

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Your surroundings are worth documenting. Why not make a visual or written record of your creative space? Isn’t it neat to see the paintings of the studios of various famous artists, or hear writers describe the place that inspires them the most? You can do that too! Make your image of your creative space your time capsule. It’s part of your history; why not record it for future generations to appreciate? It will mean even more if you treat it like a still life; a snapshot in time that is as messy or as neat as it always is. Try it.

CREATIVE EXERCISE

When was the last time that you said thank you to someone and really meant it? Why not take a moment right now to write a note to someone, expressing your thanks for their kindness? Think about what makes that person a meaningful part of your life and let them know how you feel. You never know how much that will brighten someone’s day (and yours).

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Make a recording of yourself reading all of the Selah Moments in this book, with soft music playing in the background. Then at a time when you need to be replenished, listen to it and let it minister to you.

CREATIVE EXERCISE: WRITE YOUR NAME INTO PSALM 1:1-3

“Blessed is _____________________, who walks not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor stands in the path of sinners, nor sits in the seat of the scornful; but ________________ ‘s delight is in the law of the Lord, and in His law _______________________ meditates day and night. ________________________ shall be like a tree planted by rivers of water, that brings forth its fruit in its season, whose leaf shall not wither; and whatever ____________________ does shall prosper.” Consider: How does Psalm 1:1-3 compare to Jeremiah 17:8?

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Plant a seed. Get a small pot, some dirt, and get a packet of seeds from your local store. Water, and watch your plants grow from day to day. Let their growth inspire you to grow steadily each day, watered by God’s Word for nourishment. Enjoy the journey of the seeds’ growth without focusing on what plant the seed will eventually become.

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Time for a stretch! When was the last time you enjoyed a full body stretch, accompanied by a few deep breaths? Stretching and changing your breathing is a way of slowing down so you can refocus and redirect your mind. Try it, it is absolutely invigorating. While you’re at it, incorporate an ergonomic exercise: flex those fingers and arms, exercise those eyes. If necessary, take a nap. You know you need one. Could it be a lack of sleep that’s been making you feel irritable? A 15-30 minute nap can be beneficial to your health, restful to your mind, and energize your creativity. It may even help release the creative solution you’ve been looking for.

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Do you get enough credit for what you’ve accomplished throughout your day? Does anyone recognize the good that you did today? At the end of the day, make a list of the good things you accomplished. You probably did more than you realize. Try this for a week; then take a look at your lists at the end of the week. What good tasks do you repeat every day? By looking at these lists, what qualities stand out as your strengths?

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Go online, to your local drug store or photo processing store and pick up a photo snow globe. This is a snow globe that you can put a photograph inside and the snow will swirl around it. Or you may choose to recycle a clear glass jar from your cabinet. Take a photograph of yourself doing your creative work: writing at your desk, singing, dancing, creating art, whatever your creative work is. If you are using the photo snow globe, place the photo of yourself inside the globe. If you are using the glass jar, put glue on the front of the photo and glue it onto one side of the jar, pour some glitter inside the jar, fill the jar with water, glue around the inside of the lid of the jar and screw the lid on tight. Take a look at the snow globe and shake it up. Imagine that the snowflakes or glitter represent the things that are troubling you or weighing you down. Notice that in the photo you are still being creative in spite of all that stuff swirling around you. Determine in your heart that you will now do the same. You can still be creative in spite of whatever’s going on in your life.

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Get a stopwatch or use a clock, a small notebook and a pencil. Go outside to a large, clear area. Count down 5 seconds on your clock and then run as fast as you can in a straight line for about 50-100 feet. Look at your watch and record how many seconds it took for you to run. Now walk back to where you started to run. Count down 5 seconds on your clock and run in the same direction, this time with your head turned BACKWARDS the same distance. When you stop, record how many seconds it took you this time. Did it take you longer because you were looking back? Did you keep looking backwards as you ran, or did you turn around frequently to see where you were running? Did you wind up in the same spot as when you ran the first time? What can you learn about how looking back hinders your ability to see the prize set before you (1 Corinthians 9:24)?

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Look in the mirror and say aloud to yourself: “I will take charge of my creative life. I will be honest to admit when there is a problem, and take action to solve it. I will apply to the problem my understanding of the creative process, and maintain a Godly perspective while considering all the factors that contribute to the situation. I will learn to distinguish between solvable problems, and difficulties that have to be accepted. I will manifest the personality traits that will make me an effective steward of my creative gifts with integrity. I will train myself to daily incorporate principles of creativity coaching, so that I am ready to meet the challenges of the creative process and the creative lifestyle.”

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Listen to “God of the Moon & Stars” by Kees Kraayenoord, “Invisible” by Hunter Hayes, & “Don’t Try So Hard” by Amy Grant. What kinds of emotions do these songs stir in you? How can you apply what you heard to being a creative missionary? Write it down.

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Write a love letter to yourself – Has it been awhile since anyone said anything positive to you about you or your creativity? Take a moment to write a love letter to yourself! Remind yourself of the great qualities you have as a creative person. Remind yourself that your creativity matters and has meaning. Tell yourself how much you appreciate your own personal style and uniqueness. Invite God into the process. Tell yourself the words you long to hear, and refer to it as often as you need to, to encourage yourself.

CREATIVE EXERCISE

Use your creativity to illustrate what it would look like for you to be totally surrendered to God. What would your body be doing? How would others be responding to you? What would be the story being told about your life at that moment? How will you capture the essence of your changed self through your creative expression?

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Thanks for reading my book. If you enjoyed it, please take a moment to leave me a review at your favorite retailer.

Thanks!

Gregory F. Huff

About The Author

Gregory F. Huff is a published artist who resides in New Jersey. He earned a Bachelor of Arts in graphic design from Richard Stockton College of NJ, and has studied fine arts at the School of Visual Arts in NY. He utilizes a variety of media in his work, including oils, watercolor, scratchboard, loom knitting, collage, and photography.

Connect With Me

On Facebook at www.facebook.com/artmangreghuff

On LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/artmangreg

On Twitter at https://twitter.com/ArtmanGreg

By e-mail at [+ [email protected]+]

By my blogs at:

http://creativedecisionstoday.blogspot.comCreative Decisions Today – encouragement for your creative journey through relevant articles about the creative process, interviews with creative people, and creativity tips  designed to get those creative juices flowing. Share about your experiences with reading Pause. Reflect. Create!

http://artmangreg.blogspot.com/Artman Greg’s Scratch Pad – follow the creative endeavors I am pursuing, from photography, writing and fine art.

http://loomdude.blogspot.com/Loom Dude – Lots of fun loom knitting projects I am creating; most with patterns and details on how they were made.

http://gregs20wishes.blogspot.com/Greg’s 20 Wishes – Join me as I fulfill 20 of my most creative, meaningful and inspiring personal wishes.

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Block-Busters! 36 Exercises To Break Your Creative Blocks

  • Author: Gregory F. Huff
  • Published: 2016-07-16 22:05:08
  • Words: 5644
Block-Busters! 36 Exercises To Break Your Creative Blocks Block-Busters! 36 Exercises To Break Your Creative Blocks