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Beer: 7 Simple Steps to Beer Brewing the Finest European Beer From Home

BEER: 7 Simple Steps to Brewing the Finest European Beer From Home

John Olson

©2016 John Olson

Table of Contents

Copyright

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER 1: An Intro to Brewing

CHAPTER 2: Off to a Fresh Start!

CHAPTER 3: Mashing It Up

CHAPTER 4: It’s Time to Separate

CHAPTER 5: Bringing to a Good Boil

CHAPTER 6: Just Be Cool

CHAPTER 7: Pitching the Yeast

CHAPTER 8: All Bottled Up

CHAPTER 9: Homemade European Beer Recipes

CONCLUSION

[] Copyright

© Copyright Beer Brewers 2015 – All rights reserved.

This document is geared towards providing exact and reliable information in regards to the topic and issue covered. The publication is sold with the idea that the publisher is not required to render accounting, officially permitted, or otherwise, qualified services. If advice is necessary, legal or professional, a practiced individual in the profession should be ordered.

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In no way is it legal to reproduce, duplicate, or transmit any part of this document in either electronic means or in printed format. Recording of this publication is strictly prohibited and any storage of this document is not allowed unless with written permission from the publisher. All rights reserved.

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[] INTRODUCTION

I want to thank you and congratulate you for downloading this book, Beer: 7 Simple Steps to Brewing the Finest European Beer Made from Home.

This book contains 7 steps to brewing the finest European beer made from home. Here, a simple step-by-step guide on all-grain brewing will be provided.

According to the Brewers of Europe, there are over 75 styles of ale and lagers, along with thousands of beer brands in Europe. That being said, you should consider adding your own flavor to the line-up.

Go ahead if you’ve always wanted to be a brewer and create your very own brew. Purchasing beer from major commercial brands, microbreweries, and pubs isn’t your only option. So long as you stick to certain instructions and read about some of the experiences of first-time brewers, making a fine, homemade, fine European beer can be yours.

Thanks again for downloading this book, I hope you enjoy it!

John

CHAPTER 1: An Intro to Brewing

You may think of brewing homemade beer for the first time as the first time you were given a driving lesson; you were both excited and anxious.

As an amateur in home-brewing, since you don’t want to have bad beer-making days up your sleeve, you need to be cautious and follow an experienced beer-maker’s tips. So long as you’re open to learning and you’re attentive to his recommended procedures, you are likely to succeed with your first-ever brew.

What Is Brewing & What Is All-Grain Brewing?

Brewing is the process of making beer with a form of starch and water. It can be accomplished simply with modern beer-making equipment in large, commercial breweries, or at home with your own batch of tools.

All-grain brewing, as its name suggests, is brewing with grains, rather than brewing with a pre-made pack of malt extracts. It is preferred by the more professional brewers and not the first-time DIY beer enthusiasts. Also, it is the better option since the aim is to make European beer. It’s not difficult, and its perks include letting you add your own personal aroma, color, and flavor to your beverage.

Throughout the book, the all-grain brewing process, in favor of malt extraction, will be the chosen approach for making homemade beer products.

What Are Malts & Hops?

Malt grains are important components of homemade beer. They are dried cereal grains that germinate when exposed to water and are subjected to further hot air. In some cases, they are also used to refer to products of the brewing process; malted milk, malted barley, and maltose are among the examples.

Meanwhile, hops are also important components of homemade beer. They are seed cones or female flowers of the plant called humulus lupulus. With them, the brew receives a variety of aromas; also, it receives a bitter, citrus flavor, which associates the drink with a unique taste.

Apart from the fact that it comes with a rich, tropical flavor, European-style beer is a preferred beverage for its exceptional anti-bacterial effects. With malts and hops in the blend, the brew becomes a therapeutic drink. Granted that it is consumed in moderation, it can serve as a treatment for insomnia, restlessness, and anxiety.

A Brief History of European Beer-Making

Back in the 1400s, some Europeans considered beer as a staple since most of them resided in regions where clean water was a challenge to find. With their situation, they began brewing beer as a safe alternative to drinking water.

Eventually, beer-making at home began to be a common activity; Europeans started to create a variety of beers with different hops and malt grains that they could find in their regions. However, in 1920, the practice, along with beer distribution, was prohibited by government agencies since overconsumption of the product could lead to ill human behavior.

It was only in the 1930s that beer (and alcoholic drinks) slowly made a comeback. European brewers, home-brewers and major breweries included, developed the art of beer-making. Now, the foundation on home-brewing started rising to the top and getting recognition for the unique flavors of European beer are inevitable for the industry.

Why Do You Need Yeasts?

Do you know that the secret of most, if not all, brewers is yeast? With it playing a major role in the beer-fermentation process, beer is as good as it tastes. Particularly, it is known to produce bountiful amounts of ethanol (alcohol) and carbon dioxide, which are elements that make the fermentation process faster.

The Brewer’s Kit

Since the beer-making process will be accomplished at home, having fancy equipment is unnecessary; however, having your own brewer’s kit is a must. You simply need a few materials that you can retrieve from your kitchen and tool shed, and you’re good to go. If you can’t find any of them, a trip to an accessory shop will do the trick.

For this course on creating homemade beer, the goal is to make 5 bottles (330 ml per bottle) of beer. If you prefer to make more, modify the ingredients by adjusting the amount of each one appropriately.

Basically, following are what you will need:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Boiling containers with detachable covers

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Beer bottles or wine bottles (5 bottles, 330 ml or 11.2 ounce each)

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Metal buckets

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Cinnamon crumbs

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Corn starch mix

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Ginger

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Hops

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Ice cubes

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Iodine

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Siphon filter and clamp

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Starter beer-making mix

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Strainer (large)

CHAPTER 2: Off to a Fresh Start!

The misconception that preparing homemade beer is laborious is usually nothing but that: a misconception.

And, while it CAN BE so, making beer even for beginners isn’t always laborious; it just depends on whether or not you are interested in finishing through. Yes, home-brewing beer is an exhausting task, but it’s a fun and satisfying task, too. When you finally grant yourself a bottle or two of your own flavored beer, the only labor you can associate with the DIY beer-making process is the labor of love.

Step 1 – Create the Starter Mix

The first step to DIY beer-making is creating a starter mix. At this point, concentrate on preparing a good base for the next series of processes. Avoid adding ingredients other than the ones below; it will only compromise your product’s quality. So you can make a beer with your preferred flavor, you need a great start.

In this step, you need:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 9 ounces malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 quarts water (preferably fresh, cold water)

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 packs instant starter beer-making mix (with billions of yeast cells)

Instructions:

#
p<>{color:#000;}. In a large boiling container, pour malt grains.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Add water.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. For about 10-15 minutes, boil mixture.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Allow to cool to 60 F.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Add instant starter beer-making mix.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Cover container and set aside.

Sanitation: Why Is It Important?

¾ of the beer-making process is about proper sanitation; if containers, siphon filters, and other materials aren’t sanitized, your brew’s flavor and quality will be affected. All equipment you’re going to use (whether they are newly purchased or not), you need to clean with soap; rinse each one well so that soap residues are removed. Afterwards, clean them again with household bleach and rinse well so no after-taste is left.

CHAPTER 3: Mashing It Up

While others find it unnecessary, many people prefer brewing beer with a mash – especially if European-style beer is the subject. Since mashing rewards home brewers with a chance to have better control and flexibility over the sweeteners that are in place, it should be included in the roster.

Moreover, although mashing is a basic process (i.e. it is defined as combining hot water and crushed grains at a high water to grain ratio), it can make your brew more flavorful. And, although nothing visible happens when the mash is made, a ton of complex chemical processes, such as the activation of enzymes, distribution of extracted sugars, and hydrolysis, has actually gone through.

Step 2 – Prepare the Mash

It’s said that mashing is a rather simple process, but its simplicity comes with an emphasis on accuracy. Proper temperature control needs to be part of the deal; in most cases, 150F is the target.

However, when it comes to brewing beer for dummies, it needs to be understood that when preparing the mash, perfection shouldn’t be the goal. A “nearly perfect” mash is good especially if it’s only your initial attempt; for instance, don’t dismiss your product a failure when the temperature reading gave you more than 10% of your target temperature. Rather than beat yourself up over a less-than-perfect result, cut yourself some slack; with experience, you’ll have a perfect mash one day.

In this step, you need:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 10 pounds grain

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 10 quarts water

Instructions:

#
p<>{color:#000;}. In a large boiling container, pour grain.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Add water.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Boil in 150F.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Allow the mixture to stay in 150F for an hour.

A Mash Test

An advantage of mashing as a step in homemade beer-making is that it turns grains into sweeteners, then sweeteners into a sweet mix. Since a hundred percent guarantee that this process took place isn’t assured to brewers, taking less than 5 minutes to conduct a mash test is the solution.

Instructions:

#
p<>{color:#000;}. In a small container, pour at least a spoonful of mash.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Add a drop of iodine powder.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. If color of mash remains, it means that the product is not in need additional sweeteners.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. If color of mash turns black, or into a darker shade, it means that the product is in need of additional sweeteners (i.e. more mashing is necessary).

CHAPTER 4: It’s Time to Separate

Separating, or lautering, is the process in brewing that involves the separation of elements in the mash. The obvious reason to get rid of grains in the product is the fact that they’re rather big; not many people would show eagerness at the offer to have a drink with them in it. For another reason, and a more important one at that, it’s meant to improve beer’s quality.

Step 3 – Strain the Mash

The separation process can be accomplished by using a large strainer. And, as was previously mentioned, its aim is for the improvement of beer quality. Particularly, the focus is on better extraction. Since the grains in the mash contain significant amounts of fatty ingredients, protein, and polyphenols, the beer-maker is allowing his strained brew’s nutrients to undergo proper nutrient modification.

In this step, you need:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Metal buckets (2)

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mash

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Strainer

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 (x 2) quarts water  

Instructions:

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Place strain on top of both metal buckets.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Gently transfer mash from container into the first metal bucket.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Let water run through the strainer into the first metal bucket.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Repeat step by gently transferring mash from the first metal bucket to the second bucket.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Finish of the process by letting water run through the strainer into the second metal bucket.

You Now Have Wort!

By removing grains from your mash, the product before you is called a beer starter or wort; it’s unfermented and non-carbonated beer. Although it’s already beer, not many brewers are willing to stop at this point. Persistently, they want to incorporate more flavour and crisp to the mix.

CHAPTER 5: Bringing to a Good Boil

Are you familiar with DMS, or Di-Methyl Sulfide?

According to experienced brewers, DMS is created every time wort is heated; when you’re in the boiling phase, it begins to come out. Since it is responsible for making beer taste somehow fruity, a beer-maker will want to incorporate it in his mix. Also, since it is responsible for adding an aroma of cooked corn in beer, he will want to keep it around since it gives the drink a distinct taste.

Step 4 – Boil Wort

Apart from the fact that DMS is released during boiling, the process is known to terminate wild yeast or any offending bacteria. It makes your brew safe for drinking.

The result of boiling wort is a sticky, delicious mess. Also, it’s tempting to have a spoonful or more of it but since it makes for a challenge to clean, make sure that when you do try, a drop or two doesn’t end up on the floor.

In this step, you need:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 ounces hops

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 cups cinnamon crumbs

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 teaspoon ginger

Instructions:

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Bring wort to a boil.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Gently add hops and stir.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Continue boiling for at least an hour.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Gently add cinnamon crumbs and ginger, and stir.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Continue boiling for about 5 to 10 minutes.

What Kind of Beer Do You Want?

At this stage of home-brewing, think about the kind you want. Since the boiling process is when you add hops (i.e. delicate flowers that contains bitter acids), it is the time to modify the amount of the particular ingredient.

That being said, do you prefer something fruity and hearty like ales? If you do, 2 ounces will suffice. And, if you want to brew smooth, crispy, and clean lagers, you may try adding an ounce or two.

CHAPTER 6: Just Be Cool

After the boiling process, you have warm, delicious wort. It may be tasty already but, it probably won’t remain like this. Slowly, the hot temperature will make way for beer contaminants and beer spoilers. If, a few minutes later, you’re wondering why a different (and sometimes foul) flavour suddenly welcomed itself, it’s because the product has been warm for a long while.

Also, do you remember the amounts of DMS that were produced during the boiling stage? Although you’re no longer subjecting the product to heat, it doesn’t mean that DMS production is over; so long as there’s warmth in the mix, the compound will continue to grow.

And, this is where the cooling process enters.

Step 5 – Allow the Product to Cool

Wort should then be cooled or prepared for the fermentation process; it will cause the cold breaks (i.e. solid materials such as tiny grains, sugars, etc.) to form and eventually, fall out of solution.

Moreover, you should cool the warm wort fast; this lets you get a head-start when creating a proper environment for yeast to grow (i.e. a useful process for the next process). Since yeast is known to thrive well in cool environments, and conversely, have a low survival rate in warm environments.

In this step, you need:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Gallons of ice cubes

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Water (extremely cold)

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Sink

Instructions:

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Fill sink with ice cubes and water.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Place metal bucket (containing wort) on top.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Using thermometer, measure temperature.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. If the thermometer’s reading is at least 70F, the correct cooling temperature is achieved.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. If the thermometer’s reading is below 70F, consider adding ice cubes and water until a 70F reading is achieved.

CHAPTER 7: Pitching the Yeast

Remember the starter mix you created in step 1? It’s now time to retrieve it.

Since you can simply pitch in yeast instantly, you may conclude that having a starter mix in place is unnecessary. However, with yeast that has been set aside for at least an hour, comes the chance to make a more powerful blend. Considering the fact that the beer in subject is European-style, a good base is instrumental in your success as a first-time home-brewer.

Step 6 – Combine Wort & Starter Mix

Incorporating the starter mix in your cool wort is important since it will terminate any fault during the previous process. Since yeast is known for its superb ability to have a battle against beer contaminants, beer spoilers, bacteria, germs, and almost any agent that could affect your brew’s quality.

While the yeast from your starter mix may be enough, you have the option to add another pack of starter mix in your brew; this emphasizes flavor. Especially if you’re the type who prefers a super tasty drink, this is a great suggestion.

In this step, you need:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Cool wort

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Starter mix

Instructions:

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Gently pour the starter mix into the metal bucket that contains wort.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Stir.

Sanitation: Is It Necessary for a Home-Brewer?

Simply put, yes, sanitation is necessary. Especially if you’re the least interested when it comes off flavors in your brew, you have to clean equipment extensively – from siphons, and bottling pieces to metal buckets, containers, and beer bottles.

You may think that the sanitation of your own tools is a waste of time since you’re their only user, and are therefore, not infected with various forms of dangerous agents; well, you’re mistaken. Usually, the invisible elements outnumber the visible ones. Keep this in mind: any equipment that your brew touches comes with the risk of compromising its quality.

CHAPTER 8: All Bottled Up

You’re almost a graduate of the process on how to make homemade beer; transferring the product into beer bottles or wine bottles is all that’s left. Since you will no longer subject your brew to boiling and cooling processes, be reminded that in this final stage, the instruction must be done carefully. Otherwise, you may not get the desired beer flavor, which means that you have to repeat from scratch.

Step 7 – Make a Corn Starch Mix & Let the Fermentation Process Begin

Since it will allow the yeast to survive and be converted into alcohol while inside a beer bottle, making a corn starch mix is useful for fermentation. Apart from the production of alcohol, it gives the beer its bubbles. After a week or two, your homemade brew is ready to drink!

In this step, you need:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Beer bottles

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Corn starch mix

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Siphon

Instructions:

#
p<>{color:#000;}. In a metal bucket, make a corn starch mix by combining corn starch and water.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Boil for 15 to 20 minutes.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Pour the mix in a metal bucket.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Using a siphon, pour 1/5 of the corn starch mix in a beer bottle. Do the same for the other 4 beer bottles.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Pour 1/5 of the wort + starter mix (from the previous procedure) in a beer bottle (on top of the layer of corn starch mix). Do the same for the other 4 beer bottles.

Fermentation Tips

As experienced brewers can understand, fermentation may be the last step in beer-making, but is an important one, nonetheless. If it isn’t done right, beer might welcome odd ingredients and be dangerous to drink.

3 tips:

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Consider adding yeast nutrients.

An option worth considering is to add yeast nutrients before you seal the beer bottle; examples of yeast nutrients are ammonia, amino acids, unsaturated fat, and B vitamins. Although the nutrients in the wort may suffice, a healthier fermentation process will take place with a little extra. Be sure, however, to add just the right amount (maximum of 1/8 of the beer bottle) since over-doing the addition is likely to make the beer’s flavor salty.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Guarantee the brew’s constant cooling.

Check the area where you plan to store beer bottles. Is it too hot or too cold? If it is, try putting ice within the area (to raise the temperature) or consider bringing in a heater (to lower the temperature). Always make sure that it remains cool at all times.

Typically, some fermentation methods require more than 5 weeks; this becomes a problem especially if in the duration, conditions within the beer storage area are prone to changes. If you need to, measure the temperature inside on a daily basis. Additionally, make sure that the environment is somewhere around room temperature or 70F.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Guard the brew against excess oxygen.

A common mistake of inexperienced home-brewers is that they feel the need to re-open beer bottles regularly when the beer is in the fermentation stage. They do this to either taste the beer, then, see whether it’s flavorful enough already or they want to check whether there’s anything wrong with it.

Since re-opening the beer bottle will make the beer prone to staling, be fairly confident that it’s going to be as flavorful as expected. Once the beer bottle has been shut, avoid tinkering with it. For instance, if you intend to have it fermented for 2 weeks, leave it be for exactly 2 weeks.

CHAPTER 9: Homemade European Beer Recipes

According to the WHO or World Health Organization, the list of the top countries with the most numbers of drinkers includes Belarus, Moldova, Lithuania, and Ukraine; these are all places in Europe.

It implies that Europeans love beer, which most probably is their kind of drink. And, as some owners of pubs and bars in various portions of the globe can attest, the craze isn’t just particularly associated with those from the continent. For many people worldwide, the preferred beer is anything heavy on the smoothness, flavor, and spiciness, as well as one with balanced water content. In other words, what folks long for are the European drinks.

So, if you’re planning a night out with colleagues, dinner party with friends, or family celebration, consider letting your peers enjoy extraordinary drinks. Rather than settle for commercial beverage, treat them to something unique: your own homemade European-style beer.

Here is a list of 10 European-style beer recipes:

1. Pale Ale Special Pond Hockey

Pale Ale Special Pond Hockey, with an original by Tim Gorman on October 30, 2004, is a beer with a strong and bitter flavor. It comes with 37% IBU bitterness and is rather dry, but it can reward a satisfying juiciness.

Batch size: 5 gallons

Boil size: 6 gallons

Color: light brown

Alcohol content: 5%

Ingredients:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 lb crystal / caramel malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 9 lb pale malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 ounces East Kent (or any English kind) hops

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 6 gallons water

Notes:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mashing – boil in 168F for 75 minutes

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Boiling – boil for 15 minutes during first session; boil for 45 minutes during second session

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Cooling – cool at around 110F to 115F

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Fermentation / carbonation & storage – 28 days

2. Olaf’s Bavarian Lager Beer

Brian Smith is the original brewer of where Olaf’s Bavarian Lager was taken. He introduced the recipe on January 18, 1998 and noted that it’s smooth, light, and a bit spicy.  

Batch size: 5 gallons

Boil size: 4 gallons

Color: black

Alcohol content: 6%

Ingredients:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 lb special malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 0.5 lb chocolate malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 0.15 lb black malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 6 lb dark extract

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 oz Fuggles (or any English kind) hops

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1.5 pkgs Munich lager

Notes:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mashing – boil in 165F for 45 minutes

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Boiling – boil for 15 minutes during first session; boil for 30 minutes during second session

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Cooling – cool at around 112F

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Fermentation / carbonation & storage – 28 days

3. Spicy Imperial Stout Mix

Based on a recipe that was introduced by Fred Bonjour on August 14, 2004, Spicy Imperial Stout Mix is an all-grain homemade brew that is quite sweet and tropical. For the original brewer, it is the ideal beer during the holidays.

Batch size: 5 gallons

Boil size: 6.5 gallons

Color: black

Alcohol content: 11%

Ingredients:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 0.25 lb special malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1.5 lb crystal / caramel malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 lb chocolate malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 lb roasted barley grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 16 lb pale ale malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 ounces Fuggles (or an English kind) hops

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 teaspoon allspice

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 teaspoon clove

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 cup cinnamon crumbs

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 tablespoon honey

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 pkgs strong ale yeast

Notes:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mashing – boil in 168F for 40 minutes

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Boiling – boil for 15 minutes during first session; boil for 45 minutes during second session

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Cooling – cool at around 68F

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Fermentation / carbonation & storage – 56 days

4. Simple Addams Family All-Grain Lager

Addams Family All-Grain Lager, derived from the original brew of the people behind Culver City Home-Brewing Supply on December 13, 2013. It has a sweet, tropical scent with a 32% bitterness.

Batch size: 5 gallons

Boil size: 6.5 gallons

Color: light brown

Alcohol content: 5.5%

Ingredients:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1.5 lb crystal / caramel malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 8 lb pale malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1.7 Ultra (or any English kind) hops

Notes:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mashing – boil in 168F for 60 minutes

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Boiling – boil for 1 hour and 5 minutes during first session; boil for 1 hour and 55 minutes during second session

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Cooling – cool at around 90F

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Fermentation / carbonation & storage – 28 days

5. Oracle All-Grain Weissbier Mix

Oracle All-Grain Weissbier Mix is based on a recipe that was first introduced by Fred Bonjour on April 27, 2005. It is a sweet and dry beer with a low bitterness percentage.

Batch size: 5.5 gallons

Boil size: 7 gallons

Color: light brown

Alcohol content: 6%

Ingredients:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 5 lb Munich malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 6 lb wheat malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 ounce Hallertauer (or any English kind) hops

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1.5 pkgs Bavarian wheat yeast

Notes:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mashing – boil in 168F for 1 hour and 45 minutes

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Boiling – boil for 15 minutes during first session; boil for 1 hour during second session

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Cooling – cool at around 112F

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Fermentation / carbonation & storage – 28 days

6. Maabarot Trappist All-Grain Specialty

Maabarot Trappist All-Grain Specialty is a brew based on the original beer of the brewers that go by the nameReshef _]and [_Roi. When it was initially introduced on November 1, 2005, it was applauded for its mild and sweet taste.

Batch size: 6 gallons

Boil size: 6 gallons

Color: light brown

Alcohol content: 8%

Ingredients:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 lb crystal / caramel malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 lb Munich malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 10 lb Pilsner malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 lb brown sugar

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 oz Hallertauer (or any English kind) hops

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 5 gallons water

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1.5 pkgs Trappist yeast

Notes:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mashing – boil in 168F for 3 hours and 35 minutes

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Boiling – boil for 15 minutes during first session; boil for 45 minutes during second session

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Cooling – cool at around 136F

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Fermentation / carbonation & storage – 28 days

7. Irish Red for St. Patrick’s Day

Irish Red for St. Patrick’s Day is based on an original European-style beer recipe from a brewer named Jay Russ. When he first made the public try it on February 20, 2003, he described it as a nice drink ideal for St. Patrick’s Day or similar festivities.

Batch size: 5 gallons

Boil size: 6 gallons

Color: light brown

Alcohol content: 5%

Ingredients:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 lb chocolate malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 lb biscuit malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 0.5 lb crystal / caramel malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 0.5 lb chocolate malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 7 lb pale ale malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 oz Fuggles (or an English kind) hops

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 pkgs Irish ale yeast

Notes:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mashing – boil in 168F for 1 hour and 15 minutes

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Boiling – boil for 25 minutes during first session; boil for 35 minutes during second session

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Cooling – cool at around 93F

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Fermentation / carbonation & storage – 28 days

8. Midnight Stout Ale Mix

Midnight Stout Ale Mix, an original brew from the folks at Shakey Dog Brewery, is a creamy beer. It was first shared on August 7, 2004.

Batch size: 6 gallons

Boil size: 7 gallons

Color: black

Alcohol content: 4%

Ingredients:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 lb white wheat malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 lb roasted barley grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 lb chocolate malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 10 lb pale ale malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 4 oz East Kent (or an English kind) hops

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 pkgs Irish ale yeast

Notes:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mashing – boil in 168F for 55 minutes

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Boiling – boil for 25 minutes during first session; boil for 35 minutes during second session

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Cooling – cool at around 112F

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Fermentation / carbonation & storage – 14 days

9. Daddy T’s Extra Strong Ale Beer

With an original brew from a contributor named Taylor, Daddy T’s Extra Strong Ale Beer makes for easy and light-hearted drinking sessions. On February 17, 2007, when the recipe was first shared, it was described as a modern drink with a fruity aroma.

Batch size: 6 gallons

Boil size: 7 gallons

Color: light brown

Alcohol content: 5%

Ingredients:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 lb roasted barley grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 0.5 lb aromatic malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 0.5 lb white wheat malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 9 lb pale ale malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 lb caramel malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 3 oz East Kent (or an English kind) hops

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 pkgs British real ale yeast

Notes:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mashing – boil in 168F for 1 hour

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Boiling – boil for 15 minutes during first session; boil for 45 minutes during second session

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Cooling – cool at around 105F

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Fermentation / carbonation & storage – 14 days

10. German Zum Uerige Clone Beer

German Zum Uerige Clone Beer, originally brewed by Tibor Seidel, is a smooth-tasting ale that many Germans favor. When it was brewed on May 20, 2004, for the first time, it was named as one of the most unique drinks in the world.

Batch size: 5 gallons

Boil size: 6 gallons

Color: dark brown

Alcohol content: 4%

Ingredients:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 9.5 lb Munich malt grains

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 2 oz East Kent (or an English kind) hops

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1 pkgs European ale yeast

Notes:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Mashing – boil in 168F for 45 minutes

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Boiling – boil for 15 minutes during first session; boil for 45 minutes during second session

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Cooling – cool at around 86F

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Fermentation / carbonation & storage – 21 days

[] CONCLUSION

Thank you again for downloading this book!

I hope this book was able to help you make a fine European-style beer. After understanding the steps in home-brewing, you can tell that although it may not be a walk in the park, the beer-making process is doable. 

The next step is to create your own homemade beer; treat your friends and family members to your personal flavored mix. Alongside, you can give them a copy of this book, so they can make their own drinks, too.

Finally, if you enjoyed this book, then I’d like to ask you for a favor, would you be kind enough to leave a review for this book on Amazon? It’d be greatly appreciated!

Click here to leave a review on Amazon.com

I want to reach as many people as I can with this book, and more reviews will help me accomplish that.

Thank you and good luck!

John


Beer: 7 Simple Steps to Beer Brewing the Finest European Beer From Home

You're About to Discover How to Make The Finest European-Style Beer in 7 Simple Steps! While others prefer to rush to supermarkets for whatever commercial beer and wine that they can get their hands on, some people choose to be brewers (and take on the challenge of homemade beer-making). Even without owning fancy beer-making machines and expensive brewing tools, they insist on learning the craft. Like them, you too can brew your own beer. And, like them, you are bound to realize how incredibly easy the process is - by checking out this DIY book on how to make European-style beer at home. Here is a Preview of What You Will Learn: - What is Brewing? Why is all-grain brewing the preferred beer-making approach for making European beer? - The home made brew and the brewer’s kit - Ale beer vs. lager beer and the dangers of beer contamination and improper beer-bottling - Mashing, separating, boiling, and other processes - The importance of yeast, malt, and hops in the beer-fermenting process - Basically, all essential information on brewing homemade beer If you’ve always wanted to make your own beer from home yet you were somehow hesitant, this book can help. From basic lessons on brewing; why an all-grain process, rather than malt extraction is preferred for home-brewing; and mashing, separating, boiling, and other beer-making processes to fermentation tips; a list of European beer recipes; and of course, a simple 7-step guide to beer and wine-making, you have the chance to create the most flavourful beer. Additionally, inside the book are a number of delicious homemade European-style beer recipes. Since you’re granted a systematic course on how to make your own brew, try surprising your peers with a delight that they can’t find elsewhere. So, in case you have a big event coming up such as a night out with colleagues, dinner party with friends, and family celebration, get your beer bottles and wine bottles ready; you’re about to find the perfect beer recipe. **** Beer: 7 Simple Steps to Brewing the Finest European Beer from Home. Get Your Copy Now****

  • ISBN: 9781310188084
  • Author: Jill Lopez
  • Published: 2016-01-21 21:05:11
  • Words: 5312
Beer: 7 Simple Steps to Beer Brewing the Finest European Beer From Home Beer: 7 Simple Steps to Beer Brewing the Finest European Beer From Home