Loading...
Menu

A-Z Of Wordpress

 

WordPress Manual

by Tremayne Curtis

Waka Internet Company
wic.com.ng

studyonline.com.ng

Copyright © 2017 Tremayne Curtis

All rights reserved

Published June 2017

Contents

Welcome 8

Introduction 9

Login 12

Dashboard 13

Dashboard Menu Options 14

Toolbar 16

Hiding the Toolbar 17

Posts versus Pages 19

Posts 19

Pages 21

Adding your Site Content 24

Adding a New Page 24

Adding a New Post 25

Adding Content with the Visual Editor 27

Switching to the Text Editor 32

Changing your Post Format 34

Reviewing Past Revisions 36

Adding Images and Other Media 38

Inserting an Image 38

Edit or Delete an Image 44

Setting a Featured Image 48

Insert an Image Gallery 49

Edit or Delete an Image Gallery 52

Insert an Audio or Video Playlist 53

Inserting Video, Audio or Other File Type 56

Embedding a Video, Image or Other Content 58

Adding HTML Links 62

Inserting an HTML Link 62

Inserting Links to Media Files 65

Editing an HTML Link 67

Removing an HTML Link 68

Editing Existing Content 70

Deleting Content 71

Fullscreen Editing 73

Saving and Publishing Content 75

Categories 77

Adding Categories within your Post 80

Tags 82

Adding Tags within your Post 84

Media Library 86

Viewing a File in the Media Library 88

Adding a File to the Media Library 91

Editing the File Properties 93

Editing an Image 96

Deleting a File from the Media Library 101

Comments 104

Replying to a Comment 106

Editing a Comment 108

Quick edit 108

Edit 109

Unapproving and Approving Comments 110

Marking Comments as Spam and Trash 111

Appearance 114

Selecting your Theme 114

Previewing and Customizing your Theme 116

Adding a new Theme 117

Customizing your Site 119

Widgets 122

Updating the Menu 124

Adding a New Menu 126

Editing an Existing Menu Item 126

Adding a New Menu Item 129

Adding a Custom Link Menu Item 130

Deleting a Menu Item 131

Managing Menu Locations 132

Header 133

Background 134

Editor 135

Plugins 136

Adding a New Plugin 137

Users 141

Adding a New User 142

Deleting a User 144

Editing your Profile 145

Tools 150

Available Tools 150

Press This 150

Categories and Tags Converter 150

Import 150

Export 151

Settings 152

General 152

Writing 154

Reading 154

Discussion 155

Media 158

Permalinks 158

Keeping your Site Updated 160

Where To From Here? 163

Welcome

It might be easier to say what this guide isn’t, rather than what it is. It isn’t an in depth look at every single function available within the WordPress dashboard. Nor is it a guide to help you develop or modify WordPress themes. My aim is to create a simple WordPress guide that will help you to get an understanding of how you use the various features within the WordPress Dashboard to keep your site or blog updated.

If you’re looking for more in-depth knowledge, there are heaps of articles in the WordPress Codex that go into more detail. This is great if you want to get really involved in developing your own WordPress theme or modifying your site with plugins, but it can be a bit daunting for those users who just want a simple guide to using the Content Management side of WordPress or just need to update their site pages every so often.

Introduction

WordPress is an Open Source software system used by millions of people around the world to create beautiful websites and blogs. It is completely customisable by the use of themes and plugins.

WordPress is web software you can use to create a beautiful website or blog. We like to say that WordPress is both free and priceless at the same time.”

Themes can be easily downloaded from the official WordPress site or from hundreds of other places around the web. The same goes with plugins, which are used to extend the functionality of your WordPress site.

As well as being a fantastic blogging and content management system, one of the huge benefits is the wealth of information out there. There’s a great community of people behind the design & development of the WordPress system itself. People from all over the world contribute their time, knowledge and skill to keeping WordPress updated and secure.

There’s also a huge number of designers, developers & bloggers who share their knowledge through blog posts, tutorials, reviews, videos and the creation of thousands of themes & plugins.

WordPress powers a staggering amount of websites. In fact, it powers over 28% of the whole web! Everything from personal blogs to large corporate websites. The following are just a very few examples of the millions of diverse sites powered by WordPress...

Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) – http://www.wnba.com
The Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) was founded in 1996, as the women’s counterpart to the National Basketball Association (NBA).

BBC America – http://www.bbcamerica.com
Presenting Britain’s best shows and groundbreaking American originals, BBC America is home to brilliant television from both sides of the pond.

The National Puerto Rican Day Parade – http://www.nprdpinc.org
The National Puerto Rican Day Parade in NYC is the largest parade in the country. The National Puerto Rican Day celebrates and honours the leaders, educators, artists, and celebrities that have left a cultural footprint on this nation.

Felicia Dayhttp://feliciaday.com
Felicia Day is a professional actress who has appeared in numerous television shows including, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Supernatural and Eureka. Felicia is best known for her work in the web video world. She costarred in Joss Whedon’s Emmy Award–winning Internet musical, Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog. She also created and starred in the hit web series The Guild.

The Official Star Wars Bloghttp://www.starwars.com/news
Star Wars is an American epic space opera franchise conceived by George Lucas. The first film in the franchise was originally released on May 25, 1977, by 20th Century Fox, and became a worldwide pop culture phenomenon. Star Wars is one of the most popular movie series of all time and the series’ official blog is powered by WordPress.

thisisFINLANDhttp://finland.fi
thisisFINLAND forms an attractive window on Finland for everyone interested in our country, its culture and its people. Produced by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland and published by the Finland Promotion Board, thisisFINLAND was originally established in 1995 as Virtual Finland.

Ladies Learning Codehttp://ladieslearningcode.com
A new Toronto-based collective of women working to empower everyone to feel comfortable learning basic, beginner-friendly technical skills in a social, collaborative way.

Login

Before you can make any changes to your site, you will need to log in. The login for your site is typically found at the following URL – http://your-wordpress-site.com/wp-admin. Obviously, replace your-wordpress-site.com with your actual domain name.

There are exceptions to this of course. For instance, your WordPress setup maybe installed in a subdirectory. For most standard setups though, you’ll find the above URL should work.

You can login to your Dashboard using either your Username or your email address associated with your account.

Dashboard

Once you’ve logged in, the WordPress Dashboard appears. This is your main administration homepage. At the very top of your Dashboard (and across every page) you will see the name of your site in the header area. In the example screenshot below (and throughout this documentation) the site name is Your WordPress Site. This is also hyperlinked to your site’s homepage. You will also see the name of the person who is currently logged in (e.g. Joe Blogg). Move your cursor over your name to reveal the Log Out link as well as a link to edit your Profile.

When new or updated features are introduced into WordPress, you’ll be shown a New Feature Pointer. This is simply to bring to your attention some feature within the Dashboard that’s been added or updated. In the following Dashboard image, the New Feature Pointer is highlighting the updated Toolbar. Click Dismiss to hide the pointer.

On most pages, just below your Username there are a couple of small inverted tabs. One called Screen Options and another called Help. Clicking either of these links will cause a panel to slide down from the top of the page. The Help link, not surprisingly, displays some help information. The Screen Options link will display various options that allow you to configure what is displayed on the current page. The details in this panel change depending on what page you’re currently viewing. As an example, on your main Dashboard page the Screen Options allow you to set which panels you’d like displayed on the page.

Dashboard Menu Options

Down the left-hand side of the Dashboard and on every page you will see your main navigation menu. This is where you’ll find all the options to update and configure your site.

Hovering your cursor over each of the main menu options will display a ‘fly-out’ menu with the various choices for that particular menu option. Once you click each of the main menu options, that particular menu will expand to show all the available options within that section (if there are any).

The main menu options and their usage are:

Dashboard

This will display your main Dashboard ‘homepage’. In the top left of your Dashboard you’ll see some brief stats on the number of Posts, Pages and Comments. If you have the Akismet anti-spam plugin activated, you’ll also see the number of Spam Comments or comments awaiting moderation.

Posts

This is where you can create a new Blog Post. You can also update your Categories and Post Tags.

Media

This is where all your uploaded images, documents or files are stored. You can browse through your Media library, as well as edit and update the files.

Pages

This is where you create and maintain all your Pages.

Comments

You can manage all your Comments within this section, including replying to comments or marking them as spam.

Appearance

This menu is where you control how your site looks. You can choose a new Theme, manage your site Widgets or Menus and even edit your site theme files.

Plugins

Plugins extend and expand the functionality of WordPress. You can add or delete plugins within here as well as activate or deactivate them.

Users

This screen lists all the existing users for your site. Depending on your Role, you can also add new users as well as manage their Roles.

Tools

This section gives you access to various convenient tools. You can also import data to your WordPress site or export all your WordPress data to a file.

Settings

This is where most of your site is configured. Among other things, it allows you to configure your site name and URL , where your Posts appear, whether people can leave Post Comments or not and numerous other settings. Most times, once your site is setup, there’s no need to change any of the settings within this section.

At the bottom of the menu you’ll see a link called Collapse menu. Clicking this will hide the menu and simply display their icons instead. Click the small arrow icon again to expand the menu.

Occasionally when you install a plugin, they will have their own configuration or setup pages. The location of these will be entirely dependent on the individual plugin but most times these pages will either appear within the Tools section, the Settings section or in a completely new menu section at the bottom of the menu.

Toolbar

The WordPress Toolbar is a way of easily accessing some of the most common WordPress features. When you are logged into your WordPress dashboard and you visit your website, you will see the Toolbar running across the top of your site. This bar only appears if you are currently logged into your WordPress site, which means that it won’t be visible to your everyday site visitors. If you are not logged in, the Toolbar won’t be displayed.

The Toolbar allows you to quickly access the following commonly used features.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Visit the WordPress.org website, Codex or Support forums

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Display your site Dashboard and other commonly used menu options that allow you to update your site Themes, Widgets and Menus

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Visit the Customizer to update various site settings and depending on your theme, update your Background and Header images

*
p<>{color:#000;}. View or Edit your blog comments

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Add a new Post, Media, Page or User

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Perform a site Search

*
p<>{color:#000;}. View or Edit your Profile and logout from the WordPress Dashboard

Hiding the Toolbar

You can stop the Toolbar from displaying by modifying the preferences associated with your Profile. Simply click on the Users link in the left-hand navigation to display the list of Users. From this list of Users, click your user name or click on the Edit link that appears beneath the user name when hovering your cursor over each row. Alternatively, click on the Your Profile link underneath the Users menu option in the left-hand navigation or within the fly-out menu.

When editing your Profile there is a Toolbar option as shown in the screen above.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Show Toolbar when viewing site – Checking this box will display the Toolbar at the very top of your website (only for the person who is currently logged in)

Posts versus Pages

WordPress is built around two basic concepts. Posts and Pages. Posts are typically blog entries. A series of articles, listed (usually) reverse-chronologically. Pages are used for more static content (i.e. content that doesn’t change or changes infrequently). An ‘About us’ page is an example of a Page on a typical website. In most cases you’ll find that the content in the ‘About us’ page doesn’t change all that frequently.

Now, you might be thinking, “but I don’t need a blog”. This might be true, but you can also use the blog concept if you have a site where you need to display your ‘latest news’ or even just company updates. Basically, any information that gets updated on a semi-regular basis can benefit from the ‘blog’ functionality. Whether that’s a traditional blog, your company’s ‘latest news’ or even just your own personal updates.

Posts

After clicking on the Posts menu option you’ll be shown a list of Posts that your site contains. Among the information displayed is the Post title, the Author, Categories, Tags, No. of Comments and either the Date Published, Date Scheduled or the Date the Post was Last Modified. The Posts screen will look similar to the screen below.

At the top of the page you can view how many Posts in total you have in your site, how many have been published by yourself or Published, Scheduled, Sticky, Pending, in Draft or in the Trash.

When hovering your cursor over each row, a few links will appear beneath the Post title.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Edit – Will allow you to edit your Post. This is the same as clicking on the Post title

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Quick Edit – Allows you to edit basic Post information such as Title, Slug, Date plus a few other options

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Trash – Will send the Post to the Trash. Once the Trash is emptied, the page is deleted

*
p<>{color:#000;}. View – Displays the Post. If the Post hasn’t been published yet, this will say Preview

Next to each Post title is a checkbox. This allows you to perform an action on multiple items at once. You simply check the Posts that you would like to affect and then from the Bulk Actions dropdown select either the Edit option or the Move to Trash option and then click the Apply button. The Edit option will allow you to edit the Categories, Tags, Author, whether to allow Comments and Pings or not, the Status and whether or not the Posts are ‘Sticky’. The Move to Trash option will move the selected items to the Trash.

You can also filter the pages that are displayed using the dropdown lists and the Filter button.

Clicking the Screen Options button at the top-right of the screen allows you to change how the Posts list is displayed. Click the List View option to display the posts in the traditional List View or click the Excerpt View option to display a short excerpt from the Post underneath the Post title. You can also hide various columns from view if you don’t want to see them. Clicking the Apply button will save your changes.

Pages

After clicking on the Pages menu option you’ll be shown a list of Pages that your site contains. Among the information displayed is the Page title, the Author, No. of Comments and either the Date Published or the Date the Page was Last Modified. The Pages screen will look similar to screen below.

At the top of the page you can view how many Pages in total you have in your site, how many have been published by yourself or how many are Published or in Draft.

When hovering your cursor over each row, a few links will appear beneath the Page title.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Edit – Will allow you to edit your Page. This is the same as clicking on the Page title

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Quick Edit – Allows you to edit basic Page information such as Title, Slug, Date plus a few other options

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Trash – Will send the Page to the Trash. Once the Trash is emptied, the page is deleted

*
p<>{color:#000;}. View – Displays the Page. If the Page hasn’t been published yet, this will say Preview

Next to each Page title is a checkbox. This allows you to perform an action on multiple items at once. You simply check the Pages that you would like to affect and then from the Bulk Actions dropdown select either the Edit option or the Move to Trash option and then click the Apply button. The Edit option will allow you to edit the Author, Parent, Template, whether to allow Comments or not and the Status of each of the checked items. The Move to Trash option will move the selected items to the Trash.

You can also filter the pages that are displayed using the dropdown list and the Filter button.

Adding your Site Content

Adding content to your site is an easy process no matter whether you’re creating a Post or a Page. The procedure for both is almost identical. Apart from how they display on your site, which was described earlier, the other main difference is that Posts allow you to associate Categories and [+ Tags+] whereas Pages don’t. What’s the difference between categories and tags? Normally, Tags are ad-hoc keywords that identify important information in your Post (names, subjects, etc) that may or may not recur in other Posts, while Categories are pre-determined sections. If you think of your site like a book, the Categories are like the Table of Contents and the Tags are like the terms in the index.

Adding a New Page

To add a new Page, hover your cursor over the Pages menu option in the left-hand navigation menu and in the fly-out menu, click the Add New link. Alternatively, click the Pages menu option and then click the Add New link underneath, or the Add New button at the top of the page. You will be presented with a page similar to the image below.

Adding a New Post

To add a new Post, hover over the Posts menu option in the left-hand navigation menu and in the fly-out menu, click the Add New link. Alternatively, click the Posts menu option and then click the Add New link underneath, or the Add New button at the top of the page. You will be presented with a page similar to the image below.

Adding Content with the Visual Editor

The editor used to enter content into your Page or Post is very easy to use. It’s much like using a regular word processor, with toolbar buttons that allow you to *Bold* () or Italicize_ () text or enter in Headings () or bullet points (). You can even use most of the basic keyboard shortcuts used in other text editors. For example: [_Shift+Enter] inserts a line break, Ctrl+C/Cmd+C = copy, Ctrl+X/Cmd+X = cut, Ctrl+Z/Cmd+Z = undo, Ctrl+Y/Cmd+Y = redo, Ctrl+A/Cmd+A = select all, etc. (use the Ctrl key on a PC or the Command key on a Mac).

When adding content to your page, the Visual Editor expands to fit your content, rather than simply scrolling. On top of that, no matter how tall the Visual Editor becomes, the toolbar buttons will be available at all times by sticking to the top of the page.

By making use of special keyboard shortcuts, adding content is now even easier. When you want to add different size headings to your content, rather than having to select the heading size from the toolbar dropdown you can now start a line with two or more hashtags (#) and once you hit Enter to go to the next line, the Visual Editor will automatically convert your text to the appropriate heading. Like headings, you can also use *** or to create an unordered list, using 1. will start an ordered list, and > will create a blockquote.

The complete list of keyboard shortcuts available are as follows;

*
p<>{color:#000;}. *** – Start an unordered list

*
p<>{color:#000;}. – Start an unordered list

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1. – Start an ordered list

*
p<>{color:#000;}. 1[*)*] – Start an unordered list

*
p<>{color:#000;}. ## – H2

*
p<>{color:#000;}. ### – H3

*
p<>{color:#000;}. #### – H4

*
p<>{color:#000;}. ##### – H5

*
p<>{color:#000;}. ###### – H6

*
p<>{color:#000;}. > – Add a blockquote

*
p<>{color:#000;}. —- – Add a horizontal line

*
p<>{color:#000;}. `..` – Convert text into code block (replace .. with your text)

At the top of the editor there are two tabs, Visual and Text (). These switch the editor view between the Visual Editor and the Text editor. The Text view will enable you to view the HTML code that makes up your content. For the more experienced users this can be helpful at times but for those not familiar with HTML tags, it’s not recommended.

When creating a new Page or Post, the first thing to do is enter in your title in the top entry field where it says Enter title here. After moving the cursor down to the editor a new Permalink is created for your page. Permalinks are the permanent URL’s to your individual Posts, Pages, Categories etc.. Though not usually necessary, you can manually edit your permalink by clicking on the actual permalink (the part after the domain name with the yellow background) or by clicking the Edit button next to it. Once you’ve modified it, click Ok to save or Cancel to cancel your changes.

At the top of the editor where your content is written, there are numerous formatting buttons. Clicking the Toolbar Toggle button () will show or hide a second line of formatting buttons which gives you extra functionality. The editor buttons perform the following functions:

table<>. <>. |<>.
p={color:#000;}.

|<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Add Media – Used to upload and insert media such as images, audio, video or documents | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Style – Used to format the Page text based on the styles used by the current Theme | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Bold – Bold text | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Italic – Italicise text | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Bulleted List – Create an unordered (bullet point) list | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Numbered List – Create an Ordered (numbered) list | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Blockquote – Used as a way of showing a quote. How this looks will be entirely dependent on the Theme that your site is currently using | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Align Left – Align text to the left | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Align Center – Align text in the center of the page | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Align Right – Align text to the right | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Insert/edit link – Used to create an html link to another page or website. If no text is selected first, the URL that you enter will also be used for the link text | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Remove link – Remove the html link from the selected link. Your cursor must be sitting on an active link for the button to work | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Insert Read More tag – Inserts the More tag into your Page. Most blogs only display a small excerpt of a Post and you’re required to click the Post title or a ‘Read more…’ link to continue reading the rest of the article. When you insert a ‘More’ tag into your Post, everything prior to the tag is considered as this excerpt. Most times you’d only use this button when you’re creating a blog Post, rather than a Page | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Toolbar Toggle – Used to show or hide the second row of formatting buttons on the editor toolbar | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Distraction Free Writing – Clicking this button will enlarge the editor so that it fills the browser window. Clicking the Exit fullscreen link at the top of the screen will reduce it back to its original size | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Strikethrough – Add a strikethrough to your text | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Horizontal Line – Inserts a horizontal line into your page | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Text color – Use to change the color of text | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Paste as text – Copying and pasting text from other sites or word processors sometimes leaves the text formatted differently to what you were expecting. The reason for this is that quite often the html tags or codes that formatted the original text are pasted along with the text itself. To avoid this, Paste as Text will strip all these formatting and html tags. The Paste as Text option acts like a toggle, staying on until you turn it off by clicking the button again or until you save your page content | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Clear formatting – Use this to remove all the formatting (e.g. Bold, Underline, text color etc..) from the highlighted text | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Special character – Used to insert special characters not easily accessible via the keyboard (e.g. ¼, ½, ¾, ©, €, ö etc..) | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Decrease indent – Removes one level of indenting | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Increase indent – Indents text by one level | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Undo – Undo your last action | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Redo – Redo your last action | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Keyboard shortcuts – Displays information about the WordPress Visual Editor along with keyboard shortcuts | <>. |<>. p={color:#000;}.
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. Visual/Text – Switches the editor view between the Visual Editor and the Text editor. The Text view will enable you to view the HTML code that makes up your content. For the more experienced users this can be helpful at times but for those not familiar with HTML tags, it’s not recommended

***

Visit: http://www.Shakespir.com/books/view/730951 to purchase this book to continue reading. Show the author you appreciate their work!


A-Z Of Wordpress

  • ISBN: 9781370154289
  • Author: Waka Internet Company
  • Published: 2017-06-18 15:35:26
  • Words: 22380
A-Z Of Wordpress A-Z Of Wordpress