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A Publishing Guide: 4 Paws Games and Publishing

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A Publishing Guide: 4 Paws Games and Publishing

Written by Vickianne Caswell

Cover Art by 4 Paws Games and Publishing

Edited by 4 Paws Games and Publishing

Formatted and Published by 4 Paws Games and Publishing

Copyright © 2016 by Vickianne Caswell

All rights reserved.

First publication

ISBN-13: 978-1-988345-29-1

Book and Illustration copyrights © 2016 by Vickianne Caswell All Rights Reserved

 

Published by 4 Paws Games and Publishing

P.O. Box 444

Humboldt, Saskatchewan, Canada S0K 2A0

http://www.4-Paws-Games-and-Publishing.ca

Publishing logo and name copyright © 2016 All Rights Reserved

 

The publisher is not responsible for the book, website or social media (or its content) that is not owned by the publisher. All legal matters are to be taken up with the author as the publisher holds no responsibilities.

 

Disclaimer

The information provided is accurate, to the best of the author’s knowledge. The information is in no way meant to discredit any other companies. It is meant as informational knowledge to help writers find the best route for their works and provide awareness of the company, 4 Paws Games and Publishing. The information provided was found on each of the sources’ websites. Future updates to this document will be provided as time allows.

While this document may be free, it is not meant to download from other sites. Please respect the work and direct people to the link instead. This will also allow them to find a newer version if they so wish.

Table of Contents

SEARCHING FOR A PUBLISHER

TRADITIONAL PUBLISHERS

SELF-PUBLISHING

ESPRESSO BOOK MACHINES

PRINT-ON-DEMAND

4 PAWS GAMES AND PUBLISHING

4 PAWS GAMES AND PUBLISHING: LOW-COST PACKAGES

4 PAWS GAMES AND PUBLISHING: PREMIUM PACKAGES

COMPARING PUBLISHING ROUTES

PUBLISHING TIPS

WRITING TIPS

30 BOOK MARKETING TIPS

WRITERSRESOURCES

DID YOU KNOW?

UPDATE HISTORY

Searching for a publisher

Always research before you sign on with someone. I’ve heard many tales of people who were sorry they signed with certain publishing companies. I started out research as well.

Originally, I had sent out a few queries to places that didn’t require an agent, need to see a market for my book or wouldn’t take talking animals (yes, some refuse). I got accepted by three companies right away. I can’t tell you how excited I was. I then thought maybe I should be checking things out more, and I was correct to do so. I found a lot of these companies had complaints or were listed as scams. Now I will not mention names, but I will tell you that one company was said to make money from the authors who had to buy the books at a high price. The others, they were in it for the money, and results weren’t always good. One apparently didn’t pay its authors their royalties; many had unsatisfied customers, and the list went on and on. It was then that I began looking into print-on-demand services and found one I liked.

It doesn’t matter where you go or who you go through, look them up, research (keywords after their names: scam, complaints, etc.) because signing up with them could be the biggest mistake of your life. The same goes for traditional publishers. It doesn’t matter who you go through, look into EVERYTHING! Even if their name doesn’t show a scam, doesn’t mean they are good. Be careful and do your homework.

What kind of things You should Consider?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Are they legit? – Do they have a business website, contact name and number?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Are there any terrible remarks about them out there (keep in mind that there are some companies out there who will try to hide it. I know of one who sues at any bad mention of their name)?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. How much will it cost you to buy books? How many do you have to buy?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. How much will you have to sell them for (look online and see what other books that size go for and remember that big places like those who make “Berenstain Bears™” etc. can afford to charge cheaper so exclude those).

*
p<>{color:#000;}. How many other books do they have out?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. What do they offer?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Do you still own the rights?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Is there a contract and if yes, is it for you?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. If a person went through the company, did they bring their next book there?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Are the prices to publish the same as others? Do they offer the same?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Never sign up with a company right away. Look into a few. BE CAREFUL! You could be giving away your dream!

Traditional Publishers

Traditional publishers are those companies you frequently see on the back cover of the books in stores. They pay you for your writing and not the other way around. A traditional publisher usually gives you an up front royalty payment. You receive no other royalties from your book until this is paid off. Royalty payments per book vary, usually around 10% of the cover price. These companies take a chance on you and your book.

Here is a list of some known publishers, what is required to submit your manuscript and the sources for this information. Below this, you will find Traditional Publishing Pros and Cons as well as a service video. Please keep in mind that the information provided below was relevant at the time this e-book was produced. In no way are we trying to tell you which way to go or that these publishers are bad. This information is here for your use to help you look into which route is best for you.

Harper Collins Canada

- Does not accept unsolicited submissions or query letters. (This means you need an agent)

Source: [+ http://www.harpercollins.ca/for-authors/submit-a-manuscript+]

Hachette Book Group

- Requires a literary agent.

Source: http://www.hachettebookgroup.com/customer-faqs/

Penguin Random House

- Does not accept unsolicited submissions, proposals, manuscripts, illustrations, artwork, or submission queries at this time. This includes submission of work previously published elsewhere.

Source: http://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/faqs/#manuscripts-how-do-i-submit-my-manuscript-or-abstract-to-penguin-random-house-for-publication-2_

Pantera Press

- They are not publishing picture or illustrated books, cookbooks, self-help books, health and well being books, travel books, poetry, play scripts, short stories, compilations, novellas, chapter books or children’s books (by children’s books, we mean books for under 12's. We are actively looking for Young Adult Fiction, for an age group 12 years +).

Source: https://www.panterapress.com.au/submit-your-manuscript

Note: As far as I can tell, this place works like a traditional publisher. I didn’t see anything about costs.

Harlequin

- Accepts certain manuscripts in the romance genre.

Source: https://harlequin.submittable.com/submit_

Peach Tree

- Does not publish historical novels (except children’s/young adult), science fiction, fantasy, romance, westerns, horror, poetry, short stories, plays, business, scientific or technical reference, or books intended specifically as textbooks.

- Send biographical material about the author (past publishing credentials, education, etc.)

Source: http://peachtree-online.com/index.php/resources/submission-guidelines/manuscript-guidelines.html

Traditional Publishing Pros

*
p<>{color:#000;}. If they take you, you are paid a royalty check up-front.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. They market your book for you.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Your book is in the bookstores, plus widely distributed for you.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Added credibility as an author.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Books are priced lower because of the large quantity of books in print.

Traditional Publishing Cons

*
p<>{color:#000;}. That royalty check has to be paid back through your sales. You won’t receive any more money until it has been.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. It can take up to 6 months after submitting your manuscript, to find out if they are interested or not.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. The process is slow so it will take a while before the book is on the bookshelves.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Royalties are anywhere from 10% of the book or $1 per book. This is lower than self-publishing and print-on-demand.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. They own full rights to the book which means they have control over everything, including whether it stays on the bookshelf. You won’t be able to publish it again.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. If your book doesn’t do well, that will go towards your credibility as an author as well.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Unless your book becomes a best seller (this doesn’t happen to most people); you will never get rich.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Some traditional publishers will not take on an author without an agent. Those that do, prefer to see what the market is out there for your book and/or a writing resume.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Traditional publishers are less likely to publish children’s books because there are so many out there, and they rarely take on a book series because they don’t want to commit to books that may not sell.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. If your first book doesn’t sell well, they won’t publish another book for you.

Things to Beware of:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Type the publisher’s name and then the word “Scam” after and read any articles you may find.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Anyone saying, “starting at $” is listing the lowest price possible which usually doesn’t fit most page counts.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Before publishing through a self-publishing company, find out what price you will have to set your book at to make money.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. There are certain companies out there who simply want your money (or there is a catch) and will make it seem like they are offering you a great deal or are like traditional publishers, but they are not.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Please note that while at the time these were published, they were true. In the future, they may change. The warnings above in no way are meant to discredit the above companies or to discourage you from publishing through the traditional route.

Self-publishing

There is a ton of self-publishing companies out there, and they all vary in price and minimum quantity of books. I’ve added a couple that we will look at as many will only quote you if you contact them. We will also go through Self-Publishing Pros and Cons as well as a service video. Please keep in mind that the information provided below was relevant at the time this information was added into this e-book. In no way are we trying to tell you which way to go or that these publishers are bad. This information is here for your use to help you look into which route is best for you.

Remember when you are self-publishing, you are putting a great deal of money into this. Unless you are paying for having your manuscript evaluated or the company provides this, you could be publishing a book that may never sell. This is not an editor’s job, so if you do pay the company for the editing, this doesn’t mean you are going to have a successful book, but rather a grammatically correct one. Get opinions before publishing your book!

Your Nickel’s Worth Publishing

Charge $50 CAD/hour. They can provide research, editing (grammatical and substantive), scanning, Photoshop work, layout, design and printer-liaison services, as well as marketing and distribution. The cost of production and editing varies, depending upon the quality of writing, the complexity of the desired layout, and the time needed to make any images ready for press.

Selling your books through them means you need to charge between $12.95-$19.95 CAD a book.

Source: http://www.ynwp.ca/index.php/faq#cost

DriverWorks Ink Publishing

Costs from $5,000 – $10,000 CAD to self-publish a book depending upon the length, amount of editing required, layout, images, full color or black and white and how many books ordered.

Source: http://driverworks.ca

[+ http://driverworks.blogspot.ca/2013/03/q-about-self-publishing.html+]

Dog Ear Publishing

Costs from $1,498 – $7,999 USD to self-publish. This includes a limited number of interior images. Depending on the package, the price can include marketing materials, a website, copyediting and a book cover, just to name a few.

Source: https://www.dogearpublishing.net/publishing-packages.php

Agora Books

Manuscript evaluations are $175 CAD. Layout and typeset is 3.5 cents per word (36,000 words x 0.035 = $1,260 for layout and typeset). This website doesn’t exactly tell you what must be done to publish through them, but it does give you prices per word for every type of job. Services offered include editing, book covers and Youtube promo videos.

Source: http://www.agorapublishing.com/self-publishing/

Xlibris

Book publishing varies from $499 USD (e-book only) – $15,299. The website also offers specialty packages. Example: Children’s – Ballad, Fairy Tale, Dreamtime packages. Those packages vary in price from $1,999 – $5,999. These packages do include some books and some marketing supplies. What a beginner to computers may not realize, is that some of their services listed, are not included in the price. One example would be the illustrations. Not to say there is anything wrong with them or their site, just a warning if you are new to computers, click on the red links to find out extra pricing.

Source: [+ http://www.xlibris.com/PublishingPackages/black_and_white.aspx+]

And [+ http://www.xlibris.com/PublishingPackages/childrens_publishing/childrens_fairytale.aspx+]

iUniverse

Package pricing varies from $999 CAD – $7,499. They offer a variety of things from website, advertising, copyright filing, book covers and more. Much of this is offered in the higher packages.

Source: http://www.iuniverse.com/Packages/StandardCompare.aspx

Dorrance Publishing, Friessen Press and Archway Publishing are just a few others who produce books at a fee.

Self-Publishing Pros

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You keep full rights to your book.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. A higher profit per book than traditional publishing.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Self-publishing is becoming more and more common.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Distribution to book stores and other locations may cost you extra.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You have to buy books in a large quantity.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Revisions usually cost extra.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Not all companies that offer self-publishing care about the outcome of the book or your profit.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You still have to do some of the selling if you want to make a profit.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Depending on who you go through, you may have to charge a high price to make a profit on your book.

Self-Publishing Cons

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You need to do a lot of the selling and promoting yourself. The majority of sales come from you and your efforts. While this can be hard, it can also be rewarding.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You may end up with a large quantity of books that never sell.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Some self-published books have to be high in price for you to make money back.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Many authors who chose to self-publish, end up with a large number of books that never sell. This can be an expensive investment and a let down.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Start-up costs are usually high and must be paid right away.

Espresso Book Machines

Espresso Machines (EBM) is a machine that does your book just like print-on-demand, in stores. You choose your options (paper size, color interior, etc.) and then upload your book, which is usually already formatted. Some places may charge to format for you. Once everything is set, the book begins printing, and you soon will have your books. Printing time depends on size of book and is usually done within an hour, depending on how many books you print. Remember that you will most likely be providing your own ISBN. If you do, you are responsible by law to provide Library and Archives Canada, a copy.

McNally Robinson

Setup prices apply and start at $24 CAD – $199. Their Premier package places your book into their stores. Make a note that there are some revision costs for some of their packages, if not most. To order books, you would pay $7 + $0.03 each. They provide you with an example on their website. If you have a 100-page book, you would pay $10 per book ($7 + $3 {0.03 × 100}). This isn’t bad, but keep in mind that the more pages there are, the higher the cost and the higher a price you will need to charge. McNally also offers to format, cover design and picture placement if you need help. There is a consignment contract (at a cost) to place your books into their stores.

Source: http://www.mcnallyrobinson.com/selfpubpricing#.V5QnrvkrKUk

U of T Bookstore

A setup fee of $60 CAD is charged. The cost for printing is $0.06 per page/impression. See the website for finer print. Books must be a minimum of 100 pages, or they charge a cover surcharge. There are books listed on their website which are available for sale, and printed through their machine. The website, also provides some information on how to format your book. You can contact them for information and support. They do not offer extra services.

Source: http://bookpod.uoftbookstore.com/self-publish.php

Windsor Public Library

This site appears to be the handiest between the three. It offers information on how to format the cover and the interior. There is a quick-start checklist and the hours of operation listed on the page as well. There is a setup fee of $20 CAD. A cover fee of $3.50 and $4 for black and white per book. There is an interior fee of $0.05 per page for black and white and $0.50 for color. They also provide you with a price estimate to help you figure it out. After the cost of $20 for setup, the cost per a 100-page book is ($0.05 × 100= $5 + $3.50 cover) which would cost you $8.50 per book. They do not offer any extra services other than scanning images for you.

Source: [+ http://www.windsorpubliclibrary.com/?portfolio=self-publishing+]

Espresso machine Publishing Pros

*
p<>{color:#000;}. It is quick. The books are printed that day, within an hour.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. There are no shipping and handling charges.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. The cost is in Canadian currency, and location may be close by.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Easy to go get some more.

Espresso Machine Publishing cons

*
p<>{color:#000;}. May have to charge a higher rate per book to cover the cost.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You have to format and upload it yourself or pay someone to format it for you.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. None of the places seem to publish them online to generate online sales and more discoverability.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You would still need to find your own way to get them into other bookstores.

Print-on-Demand

Most print-on-demand printing services are in the U.S.. It is one of the most affordable ways to get your book/e-book distributed worldwide. If you are thinking, “you get what you pay for,” think again. The books in most cases are as good of quality as those in your local store or library.

CreateSpace

CreateSpace is an Amazon.com company. There is no setup fee or charge unless you order books from them. Book prices are fairly low for printing rates. Royalties are fair and higher than most in some cases. The books are of the same quality as you would find in a bookstore. They also offer free ISBNs, free distribution some templates to help you get started, a cover creator, and plenty of visual proofing to get an idea of what your book would look like. The color and quality of a book is high, customer service is great and helpful, and they also offer paid services should you require them. Colored ink costs more to print than a black-and-white interior would. The negatives here would be, that shipping to Canada is by courier (either way) and costs fees to cross the border (I usually let the courier handle the paperwork). The other would be that the distribution royalties are lower than a few places. E-books are available to complete through their sister company, Kindle™.

Source: http://www.createspace.com

IngramSpark

This company works in USD. There is a charge for setup and a yearly fee to keep your book in the distribution market. Ingram itself is a well-known American distributor of books. They have now branched out and offer printing and a large range of distribution throughout Canada, the USA, Australia and New Zealand. They offer online tools: print cost calculator (even figures in shipping), a cover template generator and some guides. They do everything from paperbacks, hardcover, business and textbooks, and graphic novels. They offer a large range of sizes, dust jackets (hardcover only), gloss or matte finish, paper size choices, and more. The book quality is good. Printing is best in CMYK colors. Colors seem a little darker when I tried it, which may partly be because of how CMYK works and the fact that my images were not in CMYK format. They do offer the option of placing your book (for a price), in one of their widely distributed magazines. The book quality is very good, but they are still lacking in customer service. You have a better chance of getting help over the phone than by email, which is quite slow.

Source: http://www.ingramspark.com

Lulu

These guys offer discount prices on larger quantities. One good thing about them, is that they list in Canadian dollars. One 36-page color book comes to $15.95CAD while going through CreateSpace, the cost would be $3.65USD (conversions: $4.75CAD). That is a huge difference in cost. They do offer a variety of formats, such as hardcover, coil softcover, photo books, calendars, perfect bound and saddle-stitch. Services are available at a cost, to help you if you need it. You have the options of adding your own ISBN, no ISBN (no distribution this way), or use one of their free ones. Setup is free for both e-books and books, and they even have a cute thank you note area that you can add for when you sell a book. I wasn’t able to see, which places they distribute to, aside from Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Ingram. These may be the only places and by far, a lack of distribution.

Source: http://www.lulu.com

Blurb

This is another company with Canadian dollar listings. They publish photo books, trade books, magazines, and e-books. The company does offer discounts if buying in volumes, however, the costs are even higher than Lulu. Formats for covers are anything from basic to dust jackets, luster or matte, Proline uncoated, Proline Pearl Photo, and image wrap. Books are in hardcover or soft. To remove their logo, add another 25% on to the cost per book. Most of the do-it-yourself is free. There are some charges for things like converting the e-book if you want this done. Sizes for each category of book is limited.

Source: http://www.blurb.com

Print-on-Demand Pros

*
p<>{color:#000;}. If you know what you are doing, then it’s quick.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Costs vary, but you can find some with good distribution and lower costs.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. It is usually free.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Quality printing at lower the cost.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Order as many as you want.

Print-on-Demand Cons

*
p<>{color:#000;}. If you don’t know what you are doing, it will either take you some time, or you will have to pay for the service if available.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You have to do all the marketing yourself.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Some have to be shipped from the US and are in USD.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. You won’t have a bunch of books to try to sell.

4 Paws Games and Publishing

Publishing is expensive! Future authors can spend a minimum of $1000 to have their book formatted and published. The majority of the time, that doesn’t include editing, book covers or books. Most places request a minimum of 100 books be ordered. Not us. We keep our costs down by not hiring out, working online and sending out the printing through companies that don’t require a large number of books ordered. If you are finding that the cost of publishing is too high for you, then we may be just right for you. We know what it is like to be in your shoes.

Publishing through us  means full support through the process and after. We provide you with as much information and suggestions as we can. You keep 100% of the online royalties and we only receive some royalties from our own personal sales in which we mark-up your book's price by 20% (we keep that 20%). You don't have to order 100 books. Order 1, 10 or 500. You pay cost, exchange rates, plus shipping and handling. There are no hidden fees as we prefer to be honest and up front.

So why us? As it is now harder to get a publishing company interested in work, many authors are now self-publishing or Indie publishing. Fewer publishers pay you to write and when they do, there is no guarantee they will take a second book. Other publishers expect you to buy a large number of books or charge a large fee when you wish to print a small number of books. How do we know all of this? We’ve been where you are now. We offer our logo and publishing name because many people turn their nose up at self-published work, no matter how good it is. We’ve had 3 years’ experience publishing and know the ropes. We can handle everything for you, from putting your book together to managing it (taking care of royalties to ordering books for you).

How does it work? You send us a copy of your manuscript. We will look it over and decide whether to publish it. Most of the time, if the manuscript needs work, we will make suggestions and then you can come back to us. We do not publish just anything because we want you to make some money. If you require editing or illustrations, we can arrange that for you with our freelancers. Did you want one of our Low-Cost Publishing Packages or our Premium Publishing Package? You can learn more about each by visiting the Book Package Comparison. Want to know more on our Package Pricing? Our books are distributed online to a number of online stores and bookstores. See our Distribution page to learn more.

Ordering Books isn’t as much as you think. They cost an average of $5 – $9 a book plus S&H. You don’t need to charge a high price to sell your books either. We help you determine what is an average market price for your size of book. Book pricing varies between $8 – $20 depending on size.

Royalties  varies. It depends on which publishing route you have taken. The Low-Cost Publishing can be around $2+ per book. Expanded Distribution (allowing bookstores, etc. to buy at wholesale prices - generally 40% - 55% off the sale price) can be around $0.15 per book sale. The Premium Publishing can average the same or up to $5+ per book depending on the book size, etc. Expanded distribution can be around $2+ per book sale. The Premium Publishing also offers a variety of quality paper and formats for the book. The only royalties we collect are when we sell the books ourselves. We get the 20% marked up on your book.

Ownership of the works is all yours! This includes the formatted work, the book cover, you name it. If you want a copy, simply ask at anytime and we will send it by email. We can copy it onto a disk for you and send it out for $10 CAD + PST.

Not sure which way to publish with us? Let us figure out what the best route is for you by determining the royalties and cost of books for each one.

Not from Canada or the US? Don’t worry because we can still help you. We will set you up with your own account.

4 Paws Games and Publishing: Low-cost Packages

<>.
p<>{color:#FFF;}. Silver
<>.
p<>{color:#FFF;}. Gold
<>.
p<>{color:#FFF;}. Return Authors
<>.
p<>{color:#FFF;}. Package X
<>.
<>.
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<>.
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Low-Cost Distribution: E-Books

Library Lending:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Baker and Taylor’s Axis360

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Gardeners

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Library Direct

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Odilo

*
p<>{color:#000;}. OverDrive

E-Book Sellers:

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Apple/iTunes/iBooks

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Barnes & Noble

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Blio (Baker and Taylor’s)

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Chapters/Indigo (Canada)

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Flipkart

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Iktera

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Kobo

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Kindle (extra charge)

*
p<>{color:#000;}. McNally Robinson (Canada)

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Odilo

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Oyster

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Scribd

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Tolino

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Txtr

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Yuzu

Low-Cost Distribution: Books

Canada

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Amazon.ca

*
p<>{color:#000;}. McNally Robinson (online listing which can be ordered in store)

United States

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Amazon.com

*
p<>{color:#000;}. CreateSpace

Europe

*
p<>{color:#000;}. Amazon.EU

Expanded distribution for bookstores available (no guarantee they will take them) – Royalties are very low!

4 Paws Games and Publishing Premium Packages

<>.
p<>{color:#FFF;}. Pro
<>.
p<>{color:#FFF;}. Ultimate
<>.
p<>{color:#FFF;}. Return Authors
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
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Premium Distribution: E-Books

Premium Distribution: Books

Canada

*
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;background:#fff;}. Chapters/Indigo (online – can order in)

*
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;background:#fff;}. McNally Robinson (online – can order in)

United States

*
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;background:#fff;}. Via Ingram Book Group, automatically made available to more than tens of thousands of retailers, libraries, schools, internet commerce companies, and other channel partners, including Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Chapters/Indigo (Canada), and other well-known book retailers and wholesalers across North America.

United Kingdom | Europe

Australia & New Zealand

*
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;background:#fff;}. Rainbow Book Agencies

*
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;background:#fff;}. The Nile

*
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;background:#fff;}. James Bennett

*
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;background:#fff;}. ALS

*
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;background:#fff;}. Peter Pal

*
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;background:#fff;}. University Co-operative Bookshop

Comparing Publishing Routes

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.  

|<>. p<>{color:#FFF;}. Traditional Publishing |<>. p<>{color:#FFF;}. Self-Publishing |<>. p<>{color:#FFF;}. Espresso Books Machines |<>. p<>{color:#FFF;}. Print-on-Demand Publishing |<>. p<>{color:#FFF;}. 4 Paws Games and Publishing | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#FFF;}. Book & E-Book Published |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Usually Both |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Yes, but may cost extra |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. No, some will charge extra fees if they do |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Most cases, yes |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Yes | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#FFF;}. Requirements |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. An agent. Some just require a writing resume and a show of marketability as well as manuscript review |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Usually none |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. None |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. None |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Manuscript review as it needs to be marketable, but if we can, we will help you so that it is | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#FFF;}. Who Formats? |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. They do |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. They do |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. You usually format and some charge extra fees to do it for you |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. You usually format |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. We format | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#FFF;}. Second Book if the First Barely Sells? |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. No |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Usually, yes. |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Yes |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Yes |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Yes, but same requirements apply | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#FFF;}. Cost |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. None |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. $650+ |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. $20+ |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Usually none |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. $200+ | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#FFF;}. Time to Put Together |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Months – Years |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. One – Two Months |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Days |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Days |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. Approximately a Day – Week | <>. |<>. p<>{color:#FFF;}. Book Quantity Required to Buy |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. None |<>. p<>{color:#000;}. 100+ |<>. p<>{color:#000;}.  
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. None
<>.
p<>{color:#000;}. None
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.
<>.

Publishing Tips

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Never decide to sign on with a publisher because they offered you a deal, or because they look good. Always do your research first and shop around.

#
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;}. Type in the name of a publisher, and the word “scam” or “complaints” after it. If a company has results from these, read them and beware.

#
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;}. A traditional publisher will not take a second book from you if the sales from your first book don’t meet their expectations.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Self-published authors can still get published through traditional publishers if the publisher likes the book and thinks it is marketable.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. The majority of authors write for the enjoyment and not to retire on the income. In reality, that rarely happens.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Choose a font for your book that is readable.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Always have your book edited by someone who knows what they are doing. Mistakes in writing affect your book’s credibility and you as a writer.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Publishing one book won’t make you rich.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. In Canada, you should never pay for an ISBN. The publisher receives them free. The publisher is also required to place your book in Library and Archives Canada by law.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Make sure to look into the cost per book and what you would have to sell the books for before going through someone. If the prices are unreal, you will never make any money.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Find out what is controlled by the publisher and what is controlled by you. If you are paying money out, then you should control the majority.

Writing tips

#
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;}. When planning on using a quote from someone’s works, be sure to look up the copyright information.

#
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;}. Have your book edited twice before publishing your book. Even a good editor misses stuff.

#
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;}. Always have your book edited. If there are a lot of grammatical mistakes or sentences that do not make sense, you will lose readers.

#
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;}. Try not to keep your sentences too long because readers are impatient.

#
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;}. Pay close attention to punctuation, especially when it comes to commas and periods.

#
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;}. Spell-check and editing programs help, but they often miss stuff. Always read and review your work. Hiring an editor or a friend often helps to give it that final go-over.

#
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;}. Reading your work aloud is also another great way to find things that need fixing.

#
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;}. Never be afraid to research correct punctuations and grammar. Things change as years pass.

#
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;}. Look at some of your older writing. It will enable you to not only see how far you’ve come, but what you could do better.

#
p<>{color:#2A2A2A;}. If you have writer’s block, try writing something else or do something relaxing that helps get your creativity flowing.

30 Book Marketing Tips

#
p<>{color:#000;}. See how below I have my Facebook™ page, website, other accounts, etc.? Do the same in your emails.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Are you part of a group? Add your info, including book info in it where you can. Do this in forum posts, etc. to get your book noticed.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Hand out those business cards to everyone and anyone. Leave them at coffee shops & restaurants when you sit. Give it to the cashier at the checkout.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Local businesses have boards to pin things up? Pin up a business card.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. When you are ready to do a book signing, get a press release, a sell sheet and whatever other promotional materials you have. Send them out to the press and media.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Blogging/posting – Doesn’t all have to be about your book. In fact, it can bore people if it is. Share things that fit with your theme. You write romance so maybe a pretty picture quote with “love” themes. Share other romance books, especially if you have read and rated them. Share love pictures or a bit of things you love. Share a little personal stuff but not too personal. People like knowing more about the authors they love.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Review Trades. Many authors out there (especially in LinkedIn™ groups) look for review trades (especially if they are placed on Amazon™). Read their book and give an honest review for one back. Blog about it on yours while they blog about it on theirs.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Get readers to tag your page/account with a picture of them and your book. You could always offer a free e-book contest for them doing this.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Make sure your readers know your social links & website address so they can follow you everywhere.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Ask fans to post their reviews on Goodreads™, Shelfari™, Amazon™ – important book review locations.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. If you have a lot of fans, you may want to host a hangout on Google™ or a Twitter™ chat.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Make sure to answer and interact with your fans.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Offer fan incentives.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Ask fans to post character spotting.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Link with an activity that supports your cause and sell books there while donating some of the money to them.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Offer free book readings at a hospital, local community college, library, church, retirement community, coffee shop, school, locally owned bookstore, rehab center or the type of place your story is set.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Donate books to women’s shelters, hospitals, homeless shelters, retirement homes, libraries, doctor’s offices, hotels for their lobby, rehab centers, schools, or anywhere else you can think of.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Share information about your book on other pages similar to yours on social media.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Set up a book launch/reading and make sure to provide enough advertising. Event flyers in malls, libraries, bookstores and other places that would be interested in your genre of book.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Attend trade shows, events and sales that are around Christmas and that would benefit your genre.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Make sure to keep your testimonials and reviews up to date and go ahead and mention them in your posts. You have every right to be proud.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Identify your target audience and create an elevator pitch. This is a brief and focused message about your book and then summarize why it would benefit them.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. I can’t tell you how important it is for word of mouth to get out there.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Keep everything professional, including you. Remember, it is not just the book and marketing materials that sell the book but you as well when in person.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. When speaking to someone, be clear, calm and consistent. Be confident. If you have no confidence in your book, yourself or your writing skills, why would anyone consider buying your book?

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Understand that not everyone is going to be interested in your book. Don’t press them. No one likes pressure sales.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Always follow up when asked questions or when getting leads.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Enter contests.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. When promoting your book to the media, don’t just promote your book. Think of reasons why they would be interested. What makes you and your book unique? Remember, they get stories sent to them every day. It is only the interesting ones that make the cut.

#
p<>{color:#000;}. Marketing has it’s ups and downs. Don’t give up hope but don’t set yourself up for a let down by having too high of expectations.

Writers’ Resources

A great case-tool checker to see if which words in the titles need capitalizing

http://www.titlecapitalization.com

 

Registering Copyrights in Canada

[+ https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/cipointernet-internetopic.nsf/eng/h_wr00003.html+]

 

ISBN’s – Library and Archives Canada

[+ http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/isbn-canada/app/index.php?lang=eng+]

Saskatchewan Writers’ Guild

http://www.skwriter.com/

Did You Know?

*
p<>{color:#000;}. ISBN’s are free in Canada. You need to register with them and then send them one item (book, e-book, etc.) for every ISBN you use, as per law.

*
p<>{color:#000;}. The majority of authors do not make a living off of their writing.

Update History

August 3, 2016


A Publishing Guide: 4 Paws Games and Publishing

  • Author: 4 Paws Games and Publishing
  • Published: 2016-08-03 08:20:14
  • Words: 6734
A Publishing Guide: 4 Paws Games and Publishing A Publishing Guide: 4 Paws Games and Publishing