Loading...
Menu
Ebooks   ➡  Nonfiction  ➡  Business & Economics  ➡  Marketing

50 Big Tips on how to Improve your Youtube Channel

p<>{color:#000;}.

Table of Contents

How to Use…….……………………………………………………………………………………………4

Intro……….…………………………………………………………………………………………………4

Tip 1: Find your Target Audience…………….……………………………….………………………….5

Tip 2: Create Your Value Proposition………………………………………………………………….…6

Tip 3: Create Your Channel Header Image………………………………………………………………6

Tip 4: Create A Channel Trailer………………………..………………………………………………….7

Tip 5: Create Channel Sections…………………………………………………………………………..7

Tip 6: Channel title………………………………………………………………………………………….8

Tip 7: Create a Channel Icon………………………………………………………………………………9

Tip 8: Creating Thumbnails………………………………………………………………………………10

Tip 9: Branding Consistency…………………………………………………………………………….11

Tip 10: Mobile Users………………………………………………………………………………………12

Tip 11: About Page……………………………………………………………………………………….13

Tip 12: 100 Ways to Promote without any Money…………………………………………………….15

Tip 13: Connect your Social Medias to your channel…………………………………………………15

Tip 14: Promoting Your Social Medias in your Descriptions ………………………………………..16

Tip 15: Looking out for current and upcoming Trends……………………………………………….17

Tip 16: Publishing your Contents consistently…………………………………………………………17

Tip 17: Publishing Frequency……………………………………………………………………………18

Tip 18: Video Predictability………………………………………………………………………………19

Tip 19: Video Length………………………………………………………………………………………19

Tip 20: Invideo Programming……………………………………………………………………………20

Tip 21: Watermarks……………………………………………………………………………………….21

Tip 22: Video Intro Branding……………………………………………………………………………..21

Tip 23: Average Retention Report………………………………………………………………………22

Tip 24: Outros or End Cards…………………………………………………….………………………23

Tip 25: How to Hook the Viewer……………………………………………….……………….……….24

Tip 26: A must have Tool……………………………………………………………………….………..25

Tip 27: Video Titles……………………………………………………………………………..…………26

Tip 28: Descriptions………………………………………………………………………………………27

Tip 29: Tags Optimization………………………………………………………………………………..28

Tip 30: Channel Keywords………………………………………………………………………………29

Tip 31: Categories………………………………………………………………………………………..30

Tip 32: Captions…………………………………………………………………………………………..31

Tip 33: Playlists……………………………………………………………………………………………32

Tip 34: Collaborations…………………………………………………………………………………….33

Tip 35: Getting the Word Out ……………………………………………………………………………35

Tip 36: Video Tone………………………………………………………………………………………..36

Tip 37: The 7 Elements of Branding…………………………………………………………………….37

Tip 38: Annotations……………………………………………………………………………………….40

Tip 39: Interactive Cards…………………………………………………………………………………41

Tip 40: Asking Questions…………………………………………….…………………………………..43

Tip 41: Respond to All Comments………………………………….……………………………………43

Tip 42: Channel Feed………………………………………………………………….…………………..44

Tip 43: Youtube Live………………………………………………………………………………………46

Tip 44: Watch First Time Viewers Watch your Videos………………………………………………….47

Tip 45: Improve your Audio………………………………………………………………………………..47

Tip 46: Improve another person’s Channel………………………………………………………………47

Tip 47: Use Social Blade…………………………………………………………………………………..48

Tip 48: Join Forums………………………………………………………………………………………..48

Tip 49: Do not use Sub4Sub or Buy Views……………………………………………………………..49

Tip 50: Always Strive to get Better……………………………………………………………………….49

About the Author……………………………………………………………………………………………51

How to Use

While I recommend you read the Tips in order, you don’t necessarily have to. Although at times, some Tips may require you have completed a previous Tip. Take your time with these tips, even if takes you a month or two. If you want success, don’t take shortcuts.

Intro

Hi I’m Aaron Tupaz, founder of Positively Brainwashed and I’ve been a Youtuber for close to a decade.

Youtube has evolved a long way since then and I have gathered many advice and tips from experience and experts to help those who want to improve their channel.

To begin, ask yourself this question. When you come across a YouTube video that intrigues you to learn more about its creator and their other videos, what’s the first thing you usually do? You probably do what most viewers do, and that is go to their channel and start browsing. You probably have questions like, “Who is this person? Are their other videos similar to the one I just watched? Is this a channel worth following and investing my precious time?”

The reality is that this is very typical behavior. There are some viewers who click the subscribe button pretty liberally, but those viewers usually don’t turn into engaged subscribers. It’s the viewers who go to your channel and make an investment by spending some time on a couple other videos before subscribing — those are the subscribers who become loyal and valuable fans.

So the common sense thing to do is to design your channels specifically for this audience of people: non-subscribed viewers who have probably never heard of you and are checking out your channel for the first time. Existing subscribers don’t visit your channel that often, and why should they? There’s little motivation drawing them to your channel page like there is for non-subscribed viewers.

This Book will give you 50 Tips on how to build a better channel, and ultimately leading to more views and subscribers. Which is what we want right?

Tip 1: Find your Target Audience

Any good channel strategy must start with a clearly defined target audience. These are the people you are trying to reach with your videos. You probably have an idea of who they are based on the videos you’re already making, but the key here is to make them clearly defined.

For example, being a gamer on YouTube with the understanding that other gamers will like your videos is nice, but it’s way too broad. What kind of gamers are you targeting? What are they looking for online that other gaming enthusiasts aren’t looking for?

A good way to find your target is think of the pain that you’re trying to solve. What problems do you want your videos to solve?

Make sure you choose a target audience that is not too broad and be careful choosing one that’s too narrow.

3 Steps to Start Defining Your Target Audience

[+ Know Your Target Audience: 10 Questions to Ask+]

How to Define your Target Market

Tip 2: Create a Value Proposition

A Value Proposition is the value that you propose to give and deliver to your target audience Have a main message that you will repeat often in all or most of your videos, images, advertisements.

For my channel, Positively Brainwashed, the main message is “Brainwash yourself to success.” I show it in almost all my intros of most of my videos. I also have 2 other messages, “Obtain Endless Motivation” and “Maximize Productivity”

You will need to know your target audience before you create your message. So make sure you complete Tip 1

[+ Creating a Value Proposition+]

[+ How to Develop a Compelling Value Proposition+]

The Few Sentences You Need to Dominate Your Market

Tip 3: Create a Channel Header Image

They say first impressions are what matters. The first impression any new viewer will have of your channel is from the header image. Your header will subconsciously communicate a lot about you and your channel in one glance. Since it’s at the top of the page and is the first thing everyone looks at, it must be the first tool used to draw the viewer in to your channel.

That means using the image to intentionally and clearly tell viewers what your channel is all about and, most importantly, tease the value proposition. Showing off your cool artwork and design skills is fine and all, but if it doesn’t reinforce the message of your channel, who it’s for, and why it’s valuable, then it may actually work against you.

As you can see in my example, I included my Value Propositions, which gives the viewers an idea what my channel will help them. It tells them what pain and problem I can solve.

 

So you should come up with ideas on how you can create a channel header to communicate your Value Propositions.

 

How to create a Channel Header

 

Tip 4: Create a Channel Trailer

 

The channel trailer can be the first or second impression of your channel, depending on what catches your audience’s attention. Ideally, your channel trailer should communicate to the audience why your channel matters and what Value Propositions you will deliver.

Here is my Channel Trailer: How to have Endless Motivation

 

In general your Channel Trailer should be short and be captivating. Most new viewers to your channel has a low attention span. After all, there are millions and millions of other channels on Youtube they could be spending their time on. You should end your channel trailer with a strong call to action to get them to Subscribe. You can even just literally tell your audience to subscribe. It might sound to you like you’re annoying them or being pushy, but you’ve already told them what value you’re going to give.

 

Create a channel trailer for new viewers

 

Tip 5: Create Channel Sections

 

The next big impression a channel gives to a new viewer is the video sections beneath the trailer. After pitching what the channel is about, who it’s for, and why it’s valuable in the header image and trailer, this is the channel’s opportunity to give the viewer a few solid examples of that. The viewer is thinking, “Okay, I get it. Now show me.” Put your best foot forward!

Often channels will showcase the default sections, including, Popular Videos, Recent Videos, and a couple random playlists. However, your most recent video may not be your best, and even though you have a couple popular videos, they may actually perform very poorly in converting new viewers into subscribers.

Instead, consider creating a custom playlist and title it something like, “New to Video Creators? Start Here!” Hand-pick the videos that are displayed in that playlist and the order in which they are displayed.

You can see in the picture that right under the trailer, I created a “New Here?” section

[+ Creating Sections+]

Tip 6: Channel Title

 

The channel title is one of the channel’s branding elements that most creators quickly overlook. It often defaults to the creator’s name or the brand’s name. That makes sense and in many cases is exactly the correct title to use. However, let’s not quickly jump to that assumption for every channel.

The channel’s title shows up in many places across YouTube, including the Related Channels featured across the site, video comments, search results, Featured Channels lists, and many other places. It’s to your benefit to craft a title that’s both descriptive and enticing.

Personally, I chose Positively Brainwashed because my name Aaron Tupaz didn’t mean much. This isn’t the right strategy for everyone. It’s completely appropriate for many creators to brand their channel by their own name or their company name and build a reputation around that. It really depends on your goals and how you want to position yourself on YouTube. The point is, put some thought before just choosing a channel title.

To change your YouTube channel name, simply change your Google+ profile or page name and the update will be reflected on your YouTube channel. Go to your Google+ profile or page, click on your name, and type in the new name you want to use.

[+ View & edit your Google+ profile +]

[+ Creating your own Google+ page +]

 

Tip 7: Create your Channel Icon

 

The channel icon is the image that represents your channel across all of YouTube. On your actual channel page, it’s featured in the upper-left corner. Whatever image you use with the Google+ page or profile that’s connected to your YouTube channel is the image that will be used for your channel.

This little guy is actually much more significant that you might think because it shows up in more places around YouTube than any other branding asset on your channel. It’s displayed beneath every video, with comments, with other related channels, in search results, and more.

For channels that primarily feature a main character or two, using a face may be very appropriate. In fact, pictures of faces can sometimes attract more attention because they feel personable. We always connect more naturally with a person than we do with a logo, so consider using that to your advantage. Plus, as much as we hate to admit it, we all jump to a lot of conclusions about someone based on the way they look.

But what if your channel doesn’t feature a person? What if it’s just fast cars, goofy puppets, or cute animals? Should you just use a logo of some kind or what?

Yeah, sure, you could use a logo. Some sort of graphic or image that reflects your content is fine, but think of ways to make it unique. For example, if your channel is about cats, resist the urge to use a simple photo of your cat and call it good. That’s a guaranteed way to make your channel blend in with the other cat channel icons on YouTube. What about the cat in your image is intriguing? What does it communicate about the cats on your channel? What is enticing about the image that teases the bigger story of your channel’s value proposition?

Whatever image you use, remember that this is a very small icon in most places around YouTube. It gets as small as 32×32 pixels when it appears next to a comment you replied to, so make it something that’s clearly distinguishable even at a very small size. That means zoom in close on your face if you’re using a picture of yourself and don’t use any tiny fonts that will look like mush when it’s small.

So look at your own channel’s icon. Does it accurately represent your content? Is it clearly visible even when it’s very small? What stands out about it that might entice someone to click if they saw your comment on someone else’s video or saw it show up as a related channel on YouTube?

Tip 8: Creating Thumbnails

Having captivating Thumbnails is one of the most important things with generating more views. It might be more important than the video content itself.

There’s several ways to use custom thumbnails. Often creators just pick an image from the video that they feel represents the video well and is also enticing for click-throughs and upload that. That’s a great strategy, but also consider branding your thumbnails with a semi-transparent overlay on the left side of the image (not the bottom-right corner since that is covered by the video’s duration). Not only does this help your channel page feel like a unified experience, but it will also make it easier for subscribers to easily pick out your videos from an often-cluttered subscription feed.

Experimenting with many different thumbnails, I found having big readable fonts to be a really important.

~ Creating Custom Thumbnails~

Tip 9: Branding Consistency

Can you imagine looking online for a good book to read and coming to a website like the image below? In today’s Internet world, how likely are you to pull out your wallet and make a transaction with this site? Probably not very likely. It doesn’t look too attractive nor credible. You’d think, “There’s probably better sites out there for what I’m looking for.”

This was Apple’s website about 20 years ago. If it still looked like this, the company probably wouldn’t be performing the way it does today.

Consistent branding across all assets on the channel is so important. The channel must feel like a unified, cohesive experience, not a lot of different random videos on a page.

Are the same colors being used across the channel? Do the fonts work well together? Is the messaging the same? This includes the header image, channel icon, thumbnails, channel description, trailer, trailer description text, and the videos themselves.

So look over your channel’s design from the perspective of a first-time viewer. Maybe this person has seen one or two of your other videos, but other than that knows very little about you and your videos. What does your channel communicate to this person overall, both consciously through your branding and subconsciously through the design? Make any updates you deem necessary to strengthen your branding’s consistency across the channel, including updating thumbnails, branding graphics, and more.

[+ Branding and the Importance of Consisting Design+]

Tip 10: Mobile Users

Mobile viewing is a rapidly growing part of the online video industry. Many YouTube channels see the vast majority of their views coming from mobile devices, smart phones, and tablets. In fact, as of 2016 mobile views make up over 50% of YouTube's global watch time with the average mobile viewing session lasting more than 40 minutes. The number of hours people spent watching videos on mobile is up 100% year over year (source: YouTube).

Because of this, it’s important that your channel’s branding assets scale across all devices. All text and images need to be legible and clear on all screens, including iPhones, Android phones, iPads, Kindle tablets, and more. Zoom in on smaller details so they’re more clearly visible, make sure the audio is clear for tiny little mobile speakers, and again, make any text clearly legible. One thing I always do with thumbnails is scale it down to 120×90 to see if everything still looks okay.

Check your YouTube analytics to see how many of your viewers are watching on mobile devices. To do this, go to your YouTube analytics. Click on Devices in the left sidebar and it’ll show you how many mobile phone and tablet viewers you’ve had for the last 30 days. (You can adjust the date range in the upper- right corner of the analytics screen.)

Open a browser on your own phone and tablet
and type in your channel’s URL. If you don’t
have access to a smart phone or a tablet,
borrow a friend’s and take a look at how it appears. Is your text readable? Are your images and icons clearly distinguishable? Is important text truncated due to the smaller screen size?

[+ 5 Tips for Optimizing Videos for Mobile Viewers+]

 

[+ 5 Youtube Video Optimization Tips+]

 

Tip 11: About Page

An advantage of optimizing your About page is that the first couple lines of text are always appearing in more and more places around YouTube. Hover cards are one such example.

Your About Page should describe your channel and entice your target audience. It should communicate your channel’s value proposition. Although it’s already visible in the channel’s header image, consider reinforcing it in the About page, as well. It should also share your posting schedule.

Most importantly, as you write, include a few keywords in normal, conversational English (or whatever language is spoken on your channel). Be sure to write this text for people, not for search engines. This is not a place to cram every keyword you think might be relevant to your channel. Google is smart, so write as if you’re writing for humans. Otherwise Google will figure out

Keep in mind you only have an 985 character limit, so put your most important info an teaser text first, and fill in the rest until your run out of space.

Your about page can be found under your channel header image

Or if you’re still not sure, [+ About your Channel+]

Tip 12: 100 Ways to Promote without any money

Robert Blake has written an amazing article on [+ 100+ Ways of Marketing Yourself & Your Business with No Budget +]

This is a must read.

Tip 13: Connect your Social Medias to your Channel

 

Perhaps while you were working on your About page you noticed there’s a space on it where you can promote your other social links and profiles. If you haven’t already filled out this section, it’s important to do.

While many creators also opt to promote their other social profiles directly in their videos, that doesn’t fit everyone’s content. At the very least, include it on the About page, which will also let you overlay some of the social links over your header image.

To do so, click on “Edit Links” On the top right of your Channel Header Image

Tip 14: Promoting your Social Medias in your Descriptions

Go back to all your previous videos and promote your social media.

But for future uploads, it’s better if you just include it in your description default. To do that go to “Video Manager” and then click “Channel” and then “Uploads”

You can change other default settings here like your tags.

Tip 15: Looking out for current and upcoming Trends

Pay attention to upcoming holidays like Christmas, Easter Thanksgiving, Halloween, and Valentine’s Day. Consider if you can make content revolving them.

Besides holidays, there’s always hot topics, like politics, issues, upcoming movies and much more.

Pay attention to the trending hastags in various social medias and consider using them

Use Google Trends and see what’s trending now. Consider making videos that might hit some trends that growing with great momentum. This can introduce your videos to new audiences.

Tip 16: Publishing your Contents Consistently

The first thing to address when it comes to the channel experience is your publishing consistency, which refers to when new videos are published on your channel. When possible, videos should be published on the same days each week so subscribers know when to expect new content.

Television and radio have learned that this is critically important. Can you imagine trying to keep up with a TV show if it aired on Thursday night, then Tuesday morning the next week, skipped two weeks, and then aired on a Saturday afternoon? Of course not. Now, for them, part of the necessity of scheduling is due to the limitations of the medium, which we don’t necessarily have on YouTube, but that doesn’t mean that publishing consistency is any less important. A schedule helps dedicated fans be able to make your channel part of their weekly rhythm, just like they do with their favorite television shows.

However, if consistently hitting a specific time of day stresses you out, I don’t think it’s absolutely necessary. You should definitely have a set day when you publish videos, but if it comes out at 10:00am one week and 3:00pm the next week, it’s not the end of your YouTube career. That said, if you can hit a designated publishing time each week, it’s ideal. Definitely go for it and put a system in place that makes it less stressful.

But what happens if life happens and you end up missing a week? Should you pretend that nothing happened and keep going? Or maybe put video up a day later to make up for it? It depends on your content and audience, but usually it’s best to apologize for it in some way, whether it’s on your other social accounts or in next week’s video. It preserves your relationship with your dedicated viewers and lets them know that missing a week isn’t some sort of new posting schedule, but was just a hick-up. If you tell them the story of why you missed, it can sometimes even further humanize you and make it that much easier for viewers to feel like you’re one of them: a person who makes mistakes, messes up, and has other life responsibilities outside of YouTube.

The other common scenario that interrupts your publishing consistency is if you know ahead of time that you’ll be missing a few weeks of videos due to travel, vacation, school, or something else. In that case, just let your viewers know ahead of time how long it will be before they can expect another video.

The main principle here is to communicate well with your subscribers. Help them make it easy to integrate your videos into their weekly rhythm.

[+ How to automatically publish and schedule videos at a specific time+]

Tip 17: Publishing Frequency

Publishing consistency, which is Tip 16, refers to when you’re publishing new videos. It’s not to be confused with publishing frequency, which refers to the number of videos that are being published each week.

It’s usually not wise to upload 4 videos one week, then just 1 video the next, and then 9 the next. This makes a poor channel experience for viewers. It’s important to note that publishing frequency is not suggesting there’s a right amount of videos to publish each week.

[+ Frequency key to video marketing dominance [study]+]

Tip 18: Video Predictability

We’ve established that your videos should be published around the same time each week, that the posting schedule should be clearly communicated, and that the video frequency should be about the same each week. These all contribute to a positive channel experience, but so do the videos themselves.

For starters, videos should be of similar length each week. They don’t need to have the same exact time code, but their length should consistently be within a few minutes of each other in order to contribute to a predictable channel experience for subscribers.

If your weekly videos are typically 2 or 3 minutes long, having an occasional 12 minute video is fine, but at that point the style and content is probably very different than your 2-3 minute videos. There’s nothing wrong with this unless your videos start to feel a bit random with different lengths, different styles, and different types of content.

There’s an important exception to this: each series on your channel should have a similar video length, not necessarily every video. For example, your reviews could all be roughly 5 minutes, your blogs 10 minutes, your announcements 7 minutes and so on. You can occasionally make other exceptions, but the point is to try to keep things consistent. You may have viewers who have routinely dedicated a certain amount of time for your videos each week and you don’t want to go over.

Tip 19: Video Length

So how long should your videos really be. Well first it depends on your content. There are some studies that suggest it should be short like 2-3 minutes. But newer studies have shown that in the past 5 years, viewers are staying more engaged with videos past that length. So take as much time as you need to make your point or tell your story but don’t take a second longer than what is necessary. Use your judgment.

Tip 20: InVideo Programming

A user doesn’t have to be directly on your actual channel page to start experiencing your channel. How you craft and design your videos plays a bit role in the perception viewers have of your channel as a whole.

One such way to start reinforcing the channel experience is to use a feature on YouTube called InVideo Programming. If you’re not already familiar with this feature, it gives creators the ability to feature a video and/or their channel icon at some point in every video across their entire channel.

When in doubt, your trailer is usually a good pick to use as your featured video. But it’s really up to you.

To set your Featured video, go to “Video Manager,” then click on “Channel” and then “Featured Content.” I personally set mines to display at the end of the video, but you can choose the custom time as well.

Tip 21: Water Marks

Similar to the tip above, you can display your watermark.

To get your watermark to display, go to “Video Manager,” then click on “Channel” and then “Branding.”

For the watermark, use a transparent PNG or GIF that’s mostly a light or dark color. Otherwise, it can be hard to see as the scene in your videos changes beneath it.

Be careful that your watermark doesn’t block and important contents on your videos. It is very small, so consider if it’s worth having or more of an extra unnecessary distraction.

[+ ~A Step by Step guide~+]

Tip 22: Video Intro and Branding

A lot of YouTube channels use branded intros, but many don’t use them well. Creators think branded intros either add a bit of credibility to their content or makes their channel feel more professional or something. Sometimes this is true, but most of the time you may be actually detracting from the channel experience by adding content to the video that actually doesn’t really add any value for the viewer.

Maybe you’ve noticed that many top YouTube creators with millions of subscribers don’t use intros. Using one clearly isn’t a requirement for credibility nor professionalism, but should you still use one for your channel?

Maybe. It depends on whether or not it’s clearly adding additional value to the viewer or if you’re using to try to extract more value for yourself.

For example, if the intro is basically your logo bouncing around the screen like a DVD player that’s been on pause for too long, it’s not adding any value to the viewer. You may think it’s cool, but a logo by itself is unnecessary and may annoy your actual subscribers who have to sit through it time and time again. Worse yet, lame intros can often cause a high abandonment rate, in which case you should find other ways to reinforce your brand identity.

A good idea is to open your video by peaking the audience. You can do this by teasing them what the video is about, or perhaps put a scene right before the climax and then introduce your brand. In general your brand shouldn’t take more than 5-10 seconds, unless you know what you’re doing. This is a good time to say or display your value proposition. The value proposition reminds your subscribers what your channel is about and lets new viewers know what your channel will provide for them.

Tip 23: Average Retention Report

Contrary to popular belief, views are no longer the most important thing for ranking high in the searches. With the popularity of people buying views, or using sites that exchange views or other tactics to increase them, Youtube has made average view time for each video more important. If you have a video that’s 10 minutes long but people leave before 3 minutes, that won’t be as good as a video that’s 2 minutes long and the audience stays for the whole thing.

To read your Average Retention Report go to “Video Manager,” Then “Analytics,” and then click “Audience Retention”

~ Learn how to read your Retention Report~

Tip 24: Outros or End Card

When your video ends, the viewer has two options: they can either leave YouTube or click on another video, either from the related videos or in their subscriptions. Neither one of those options are good for you as the creator.

If they watch your video and leave YouTube, it’s a bad signal to Google if too many people do it. They want viewers to stay on their platform as long as possible, so if your video is the end of the viewing session for a lot of viewers, your video will be ranked lower in search results.

So it’s important to keep people watching videos, but you don’t want them to click on a random related video and leave your content either. While it’s better than having the viewer leave YouTube completely, you’ve also lost further opportunities for engagement on your videos and increased watch time, the primary influencer of how a video ranks in search results.

End cards are a strategy for keeping viewers watching more of your videos by using annotations to link to your other content.

It’s important to have a strong call to action to encourage viewers to subscribe. I personally use an animated hand to click on it. I have 4 clickable videos and an image that encourages the viewer to comment. This is how I build community. I have 5 social media images displayed on the right. Although I chose not to make them clickable, the viewers can look through my descriptions to connect with me via those platforms. You can get very creative with your outros and what it links to. Some create a random a call to action that links the viewer to a random viewer or to some other content.

If you don’t already have an end card, take some time today to design one. It doesn’t have to be fancy or anything. Just a simple place to encourage people to subscribe and highlight some other videos is great.

It’s also noteworthy to learn how to read your annotations report to learn how your audience is interacting with your outros and other annotations you use throughout your videos.

[+ Reading your annotations Report+]

~ 10 Ways to Create YouTube Video Intros & Outros~

Tip 25: How to Hook the Viewer

Due to the almost unlimited distractions on YouTube to click to other videos, the first 15 seconds of any video must be intentionally crafted to hook the viewer and hold their attention throughout the duration of the video. That’s why two days ago I mentioned that I always start my videos teasing what the video is about and why it’s valuable. The first 15 seconds must answer for the viewer, “Why should I watch this? What value will this bring to me?”

Of course, it’s not appropriate in every style of video to have a talking head pop on the screen and try to convince viewers that they should stick around, but however you do it, answering those questions in the mind of the viewer is very important. The vast majority will not have the patience to sit around and wait to see if a climax builds toward the end of the video. You have to intentionally hook them fast.

Here’s a couple methods for hooking viewers for different types of content

How-to video: Start by showing the viewer the end result of what you’re going to teach them.

Episodic content: Start with a quick recap of the climax from the previous episode.

News video: Start by teasing the big story that’s strategically placed at the end of the video after other news stories have been covered.

Comedy video: Open the video with a punch line or a question that creates intrigue.

Prank video: Start by showing someone’s extreme reaction and a bit of the prank that caused it, then show the video of the backstory that led to those reactions.

Go back and watch the first 15 seconds of a couple of your most recent videos. How might a viewer answer the questions, “Why should I watch this? What value will this bring to me?” for each of those videos?

Go back to Tip 23 to review about audience retention. Pay attention if there is a big drop in your attention during the beginning. This might be because your intro is not hooking the audience.

Once again, ~ Learn how to read your Retention Report~

Tip 26: A must have Tool

Head to Tubebuddy and download it right now if you haven’t done so. Many of the future tips might rely on this. Even with the free version alone, it can do wonders. I will only be discussing the free features in this guide, but I encourage you to research the paid plans. Many top Youtubers use it.

Tip 27: Video Titles

The poor performance of a great video is often directly related to its title

The title may be even more important than the actual content itself because, combined with the thumbnail, it’s the first thing the viewer sees about your video. It’s how they will decide to click on your video in the first place. Even videos that are relatively weak perform extremely well just because the title sets it up for success.

Now be careful creating titles simply so people are likely to click on it. It goes without saying that the title should go with the content of the videos. You will damage your channel’s audience retention score if people are just disliking your videos within seconds and then leaving. Consider balancing out, creating titles for reach and titles for retention. When you already have a big subscribers group, retention becomes more important.

You can even resurrect older videos by changing their titles.

So what are examples of great Titles? Go to “Tag explorer” on your Tubebuddy. Click on the Tubebuddy icon on the top right

Write something on the search bar and Tubebuddy will give you an overall rating on how useful this tag is based on search volume and competition. Ideally you want to find tags that searched often but have low competition. But I also use these to create my titles.

I usually just go on my Youtube search bar and type something like, “How to be more” and then look at the popular searches. These are what I type in the Tubebuddy searchbar in “Tag Explorer”

Tip 28: Descriptions

After the title comes the description text. This is simply where you get a chance to describe the video to both Google and viewers. A couple things to keep in mind as you craft your description text:

It should go without saying, but the description text of every video should accurately describe the content of the video. Anything that’s misleading may cause your video to perform poorly or, worse yet, be flagged and removed from YouTube altogether.

Use any related keywords in normal, conversational English (or the language of your video). Listing keywords and tags, or repeating them in an unnatural sense inside sentences is unnecessary and even counter-productive. Google is smart: it can read on a 6th grade level, so don’t use blocks of keywords in your description.

The first two or three sentences carry the most weight in the search algorithm and on YouTube and Google it appears as the snippet text next to the video in search results, so careful consideration should be given to the first few lines of the description text. For that reason, avoid starting your description with URLs or standard text that you use across all your videos. Instead, reinforce the title’s main keywords here, but again, only as it naturally flows in normal conversational English. And write text that is enticing and lets potential viewers know that this is the video they’re searching for.

I personally just rewrite the title of my video as the first line of my description

After a few sentences that describe the video, post any appropriate links that you either reference in the video or use as annotations. Since annotations don’t work on mobile devices, it’s helpful for mobile viewers if they can simply go to your description text to tap the link there instead.

You should include your value proposition, share your posting schedule and give the proper credits, especially with contents you have permission to use but don’t have the full copyrights.

You can go to your channel’s default settings so you don’t have to write the same long descriptions again and again for each video and just make the necessary adjustments.

~ Google’s recommendations for titles, descriptions and thumbnails~

Tip 29: Tags Optimizations

The first mistake creators make is not using enough tags. You should be using the max.

Going back to using “Tag Explorer” (See Tip 27), collect as many good tags with the highest ratings as possible. Make a lot of compound tags by using quotation marks around your tags. If your video is called, How to get more Views on Youtube consider using tags like “How to get more views on Youtube,” “Getting more views on Youtube,” “How to increase views on Youtube.”

Another good tip is go to the videos of your competitions and use Tubebuddy to look at the tags of your competition. Click on “Tags” right below the video.

If your competitions who rank high on Youtube’s search engines have poor tagging, then you have a much better chance to pop up on top. I have put videos on the top of certain popular searches with only 100 views, surpassing videos with tens of thousands due to good researched tags.

You may consider trying to revive your old videos by changing their tags. Although the reality is, the first 48 hours seem to be the most important for where your video will rank in the searches long term. New videos get a temporary advantage.

Tip 30: Channel Keywords

Channel keywords are exactly what you think they are: words that help give context to Google about your channel as a whole. Just like tags,
it influences how your channel
ranks in search results. Think of
them as sub-categories or
keywords that describe your channel.

However, unlike video tags where you can either separate them with commas or by simply hitting enter on your keyboard, channel keywords are separated by spaces. That means if you have a phrase you want to be treated as a single keyword, you have to wrap it in quotes. In other words, “Positively Brainwashed” is two separate keywords and “video creators” is one keyword

Since it’s a bit difficult to write your channel keywords in the tiny box they give you, open up a text editor like Notepad (Windows) or Textedit (Mac) and write your space separated tags in a new document. YouTube will accept a pretty large number of keywords, so write a bunch of them.

Once you have written your channel keywords, go to you channel’s advanced settings. Find the Channel Keywords box near the top of the page and copy and paste your keywords into the field provided. Then scroll down and click the blue Save button

Tip 31: Categories

Select what category best suits your channel. If there’s a person browsing each of the applicable categories, which person would be most likely to watch my video? Is it the person who’s browsing the Education category, the Howto & Style category, or the Sports category?

With that said, I personally don’t think it makes a big
difference. It’s possible that a video’s category
influences how it shows up as a related video on
YouTube, but other than that, I’m not sure it influences too much about your video anymore. When YouTube had a heavier focus on ranking top videos in each category, it mattered, but no one browses videos by category anymore.

Still, YouTube asks for the information, so it’s best to give them the best category possible.

If you’ve been using YouTube’s default category for each of your videos, update them with categories that are more applicable to your content. To do that, go to “Video Manager” and click Edit next to the videos you want to update. Then click the “advanced settings” tab and then change the category.

For more detailed instructions go to [+ Change video information & settings+]

Tip 32: Captions

A caption file contains the text of what’s said in a video and gives viewers the ability display that text on screen, synchronized with the video they’re watching.

Of course, this has a lot of benefits for those who are hearing impaired (or those with broken computer speakers, I suppose), but there are also some discovery benefits to it.

Captions are helpful in optimizing videos for search because they provide YouTube and Google with more context about your video. Instead of taking a guess and generating a terrible automated caption file, when you provide an accurate one for Google it helps the search giant know exactly what content your video contains.

A common misconception is that caption files help your videos rank better in search results. This is indirectly true in the sense that it can influence what your video ranks for, but not necessarily how high up in the search results it’s ranked. That’s determined by many other factors, like the amount of watch time your video has accumulated.

When it comes to your videos, should you take the time to type a transcript of your videos and upload it to YouTube? Maybe. If you’re already scripting your videos anyway, it’s definitely worth it to take a few extra minutes to make any necessary tweaks to ensure the transcript matches the video, and then upload it to YouTube. YouTube will accept your transcript, automatically sync the timing to your video, and convert it to a captions file for you.

In addition, adding captions in additional languages can help viewers enjoy your content who don’t speak your language.

This page explains the difference between a captions file and a transcript. It also gives you the [+ step-by-step instructions on how to add captions+] and transcripts to your videos on YouTube.

You can also outsource your captions. You can login to CaptionsForYouTube.com with your YouTube account, select the videos you want to be captioned, and they’ll create manual, human-created captions you. When it’s finished, they’ll sync the captions back to your YouTube video for you so you never have to think about it again.

Tip 33: Playlists

While the videos in a playlist may not necessarily rank well on their own, a playlist of videos can sometimes outperform the individual videos themselves. That’s why writing solid metadata for playlists is important and can bring a lot of views to a series of videos.

When a playlist in highlighted in search results, it displays how many videos are in the playlist, the playlist’s title, the name of the channel that created the playlist, the titles of the first two videos in the playlist, and the thumbnail of the first video in the playlist.

Not only do playlists potentially bring new exposure to our videos in search results, but sending viewers into “playlist mode” displays a list of other videos in the playlist next to the video that’s playing. This can help keep viewers on your videos longer.

Personally, whenever I share a video, I usually share the “playlist mode” link that sends viewers into this view because of the extra potential for them to watch my other videos in the playlist.

To do this, simply go to your playlist, click on the video you want to share, and use the URL you see in the address bar of your browser. Alternatively, when watching the video from your playlist, you can find the playlist mode URL by clicking on the Share tab beneath the video.

Another great feature of playlists is the ability to make a series playlist, which basically turns the playlist into an official series for the videos it contains. This has some pros and cons.

On the downside, it means that videos in that playlist cannot be added to any of your other playlists. However, on the upside, whenever someone is viewing a video that’s in a series playlist, the very first video at the top of the recommended videos is the next video in the playlist. Personally, I feel the benefit outweighs the potential drawbacks and put almost all of my videos into a series playlist.

To do this, go to your channel’s playlists and click edit next to the playlist you want to modify. At the top is where you can give the playlist a good title and description that you’ve optimized both for reach and retention. Inside that view is where you can also rearrange videos, manually add new ones, add public notes for each video, adjust the start and end time for each video, and much more, but what we’re interested in is the Settings tab at the very top. Click it and the first checkbox is the option to, “Set as official series playlist for these videos.” Check it and click Save. And now your playlist is a series playlist that will feature the next video in the playlist at the top of the related videos for every video in that playlist.

[+ How to create, edit, and delte Youtube Playlists+]

[+ How to share your playlist+]

[+ Privacy settings for your playlists+]

[+ How to Embed a Playlist into your blog+]

Tip 34: Collaborations

Teamwork makes the dream work. Partnering with others is usually a good strategy for life in general, but it’s especially true when it comes to YouTube growth. But also like real life, we probably don’t do it as much as we know we should.

Collaborating with other YouTube creators is valuable because, when you appear in each other’s videos and cross promote each other, it introduces each of you to a new subscriber base. It’s been very successful for many creators and can boost viewership and subscribers for both channels, especially when the two channels share the same target audience.

First, just appearing in another creator’s video and telling their subscribers that you have a YouTube channel will not get them to check it out. Viewers just think, “Yeah, good for you. I have a YouTube channel, too. So what?”

You have to keep your value proposition in mind and present yourself and your channel in a way that will cause the other creator’s viewers to actually care about you and your content. If you can’t get them to care about you or your value proposition, the collaboration was a waste of time for all parties involved.

Second, when you reach out to another creator to collab (as they call it in YouTube world), contact them with an idea for the collaboration. This is especially true if you’re reaching out to a bigger channel. Don’t just say, “Hey, I’m Carol! Wanna collab with me?” Actually pitch your idea for the collaboration. And the less work the other party has to do, the better. This will make it easier for them to say yes.

Finally, if you’re reaching out to a larger channel that has no prior relationship with you, the best way you can get them to agree to a collaboration is if you can offer some sort of value to them and their community that the creator doesn’t have access to on their own. For example, if you write music and perform on your channel, offer to write an original track for the other creator to use in one of their videos. Or, if you have some skills with visual effects, create an asset they can use in an upcoming video. Most of the time when these creators see that you have talent that can offer value to one of their videos, they’ll love to work with you in exchange for giving you a shout-out.

Other ways to collaborate

- Feature each other’s channel in your end cards

- Tweet each other’s videos

- Link to each other’s videos in the descriptions

Depending on your niche, not all of these ideas will be appropriate, but you get the idea. Find a few other creators and grow together. That way, when one channel picks up a few subscribers, all the others have a greater chance of picking up those same subscribers, too. 
If you’re new to YouTube or don’t know anyone who could grow with you, start by finding a few other channels who are in a similar place as you that you think could be a good fit together. Then start engaging with those creators regularly. Comment on their videos, reply to their tweets, and start building a relationship. As the relationship grows over time, do a collaboration or two and eventually work to the place where all of you can continually support each other.

[+ Examples of how others have done collaboration videos+]

Tip 35: Getting the Word out

If you have videos you want people to see, it might be encouraging to hear that there are many high-traffic websites and blogs out there that are looking for videos to share. The only thing you have to do is make quality content that those sites want to share and then get it on their radar. Easy, right? Not really, but the payoffs can definitely be worth it.

There’s two approaches to seeding your videos. The first is the normal approach you might be thinking of as you read this: make a video, publish it to your channel, and then send it out to various blogs and websites hoping one of them shares it with their community. This approach can be successful, but you almost definitely have to build a relationship with the site’s authors first. That’s why it’s often smarter to start with smaller blogs and websites. As you start small and grow, your channel will grow with it and, over time, you’ll have the numbers that will get the attention of the big sites.

When taking this approach, don’t underestimate other online communities, too, like Facebook groups, Facebook pages, Google+ communities, and online forums. Join a couple of them and, if you really enjoy one of them in particular, reach out to one of the admins of the group to introduce yourself. Maybe share what you like about the group so far, too. Those relationships can go a long way in tight, online communities.

The second approach is kind of a cross between seeding and collaboration. Instead of making a video and hoping someone shares it, reach out to a blog’s author or online community’s administrator and pitch a video idea that could be valuable to their community. If they like it and express interest in seeing a video like that, go ahead and make it as quickly as possible and send them the YouTube link. If the video is good, almost every time that author or administrator will post the video for you! Given that person’s reputation with the community, this will always work better for your video than if you posted it yourself.

So go start building relationships with other online communities! Start by searching Facebook and Google+ for a couple groups and communities that are relevant to your content. Join them and start interacting. When it becomes appropriate to do so without violating any community guidelines (either written or not), share one of your videos. Also consider showing one of your videos privately to an administrator. If it’s valuable, sometimes they’ll share it for you.

Search the web for a few blogs and online forums that might be interested in your videos. Subscribe to them and follow their work. Over time, do your best to contribute value to those communities through comments, posts, sharing their content, and, of course, sharing your own videos with them.

Youtube’s tips for [+ getting the word out+]

Tip 36: Video Tone

Overall, the tone of your videos should feel like the channel is fostering a community of people around its content. The goal is to make viewers feel like they’re a part of something bigger, like they have some sort of relationship with you and the other viewers. As soon as they feel like they’re simply a statistic, a number in a pool of subscribers, the communal feeling begins to quickly dissipate.

Now, there’s a difference between having a lot of subscribers and having a community. Many channels on YouTube have millions of subscribers with very little community, and many smaller channels have a very tight-knit community. But the strength of the community is not tied directly to how many subscribers a channel has — it’s tied to the values of the creator. Creators who tend to use YouTube as a place to get attention and be famous have much different communities than creators who are sincerely trying to give of themselves for the sake of others.

So consider watching a few of your latest videos and pay attention to the tone and overall vibe. I know this is a hard thing to do because each of us think all our videos are great and awesome. And honestly, they might very well be great and awesome, but let’s not blindly make that assumption. How would you describe the tone of your videos? Do you feel like you’re hitting the kind of tone you’re trying to achieve? How conducive is this tone for building the kind of community you have in mind?

You can also ask a friend to give you some feedback about the tone of your videos. Better yet, ask your friend to invite one of their friends over who’s never seen your videos and is in your target audience. Get their overall feedback about the tone of your videos.

Tip 37: The 7 Elements of Branding

I highly recommend you read [+ Primal Branding: Create Zealots for Your Brand, Your Company, Your Future+] by Patrick Hanlon. Patrick Hanlon looks at top brands that have a massive and loyal following and asks, “Why do people care so intimately about

those brands?” He analyzed each of them and broke down the answer into seven elements. The great thing is that his principles apply just as easily to a YouTube channel as they do to brands.

We’ll briefly look at some of them here today, but you should definitely read his book for a better understanding of how all this works.

Here’s the 7 pieces of the primal code that “create zealots” for your channel, shared with permission from the author:

Creation Story: Telling viewers your creation story
is the crucial first step in providing answers to why
people should care about you. It’s the backstory of
who you are, where you came from, how you go to where you are today, and any adversity you had to overcome to get here. The creation story helps set up the further pieces of the primal code because it provides context and meaning.

Make a video that creatively tells your creation story. Why did you make your channel? What inspired you? Consider linking to it. Tell your creation story as new people discover your channel.

The Creed: The creed is the singular notion that you want people to believe. For example, in America the country’s creeds includes things like, ”All men are created equal.”

A belief statement for your channel is so important because, if you’re trying to build a community, people always bond together more easily and quickly over shared beliefs than anything else. This is true both online and offline. Big differences that would usually cause division are pushed aside when a shared belief is identified and then made actionable with a shared vision. Your Creed is tied to your value propositions.

The Icons: Visual icons should attract attention and assert values of authority, leadership, and confidence. And they should provide relevance and summon feelings for the brand.

Make sure your brand is associated with your channel. Another tip is to consider making your brand an object that can be triggered in your viewer’s day to day life. For example, I use an Alarm Clock to brand my Infinite Loop System for Endless Motivation. Every time a user of mine sees an Alarm Clock, which is probably everyday, they are reminded of my brand. I also teach the acronym ADESIRE to help my viewers remember the system. So whenever my audience has a desire, which happens through the entire day, they’ll think of my brand.

The Rituals: Rituals are the repeated interactions that people have with your channel. They seem like regular, ordinary events in their daily routine, but are turned into special moments that makes your channel stand out.

Be intentional about making rituals a part of your channel. We discussed this a bit when we talked about things like publishing consistency, frequency, and predictability. It’s part of why making your channel become a ritual in your subscribers’ weekly routine is so important.

My Infinite Loop System is a daily 7 step ritual. Wake up, listen to your alarm clock, listen to you daily affirmations, expand your mind, schedule your day’s plan for the day, initiate and take actions, reviews your tasks and then evaluate and evolve.

The Pagans: Part of saying who you are and what you stand for is also declaring who you are not and what you don’t stand for. Doing so defines your pagans, or non- believers, which is important in defining who you are. As a creator, once you understand who the pagans are — those who do not and perhaps never will understand you — you open up new opportunities to be who you are and who you have the potential to become.

I know each of us loves the idea of having everyone on YouTube subscribing to our channel, but that hasn’t happened for anyone ever. In fact, according to Hanlon, you actually need pagans because it’s critical in helping your own community bond together. But for that to happen, you must first know what you believe and what you stand for in order to have any nonbelievers in the first place. The saying is true, “If you don’t stand for anything, no one will stand with you

An example of adversity solidifying a community happened in 2013 to a popular YouTuber named Joey Graceffa. He parked his car in front of a man’s driveway and left. When he returned, he realized his car had been towed and promptly made a video saying some very unkind things about the man. But a few days later, the man made his own video about the parking incident. He made fun of Joey, responded to the things Joey said about him in his video, and revealed the “truth” of what actually happened. The video quickly went viral, causing Joey’s fans to instantly bond together over the “unfair treatment” while his pagans united together in laughter. Because of the adversity, Joey’s community is now stronger and tighter now than it ever was before. Hopefully your community will bond over a more noble cause.

The Sacred Words: All belief systems come with a set of specialize words that must be learned before people can belong. If you know the language, you belong. A classic example is

Starbucks (“Triple, Venti, Soy, No Foam Latte,” “Quad Grande, Non Fat, Extra Hot Caramel Macchiato Upside Down”)

So come up with your own sacred words for your community.

The Leader: Vision is the most powerful ingredient to being successful. That doesn’t mean keeping people revved up — it means keeping people, period. The equity in your YouTube channel is your people, and it’s your job to give them a vision of where the community is going and why it’s going there.

Remember, you are the leader for your channel’s community! As the leader, are you standing for something? Are you setting a vision for something that’s so big that the only way to accomplish it is for you and your community to link arms together? (Personally, I can’t change nearly as many lives through YouTube on my own as I could if I train thousands of other creators and we do it together.)

As Hanlon says in his book, “The leader’s quest in primal narrative frequently becomes mythic simply because that is the most powerful form of storytelling.” This can be especially true on YouTube where viewers are subscribing to a leader’s story. Where is your story leading your audience? What vision have you set for them?

These seven pieces of the primal code make up only the first section of Hanlon’s book. Section two discusses how we all want to be a part of something larger than ourselves and how to create a belief system that attracts a community. Then the final section discusses how we communicate the pieces of the primal code through our brands. I highly recommend you read the whole book and come up with your own ideas for how you integrate the principles into your YouTube efforts.

Buy the Book, “Primal Branding,” read it, and apply it to your channel

Tip 38: Annotations

After a pretty long day yesterday, let’s take a lighter approach today and talk about YouTube annotations.

I’ll assume most of you know what these are, but very briefly, they let you make certain parts of your video semi-interactive by adding little notes or square boxes around things in the video. These boxes can be linked to other videos, a different part of the same video, a subscribe box, playlists, channels, or even your own website.

Annotations can be a powerful tool in crafting effective videos for audience development, but there’s two big mistakes a lot of creators make that hinder their effectiveness.

The first mistake is creating your video, uploading it, and then thinking about annotations. When you do this, your annotations often look like interruptions on the screen that viewers quickly close. Rather, annotations are most effective when they are designed to be a part of the video, usually as spotlight annotations with both an on-screen and audible call-to-action to click. Your end card is a good example of this. The annotations should almost be invisible to the viewer other than to signal that a certain part of the video is interactive.

The other mistake is using them primarily to move viewers off of YouTube and to your website. As we eluded to a few weeks ago, the problem with this is that it will both lower the “watch time” of the video and end a viewer’s watch session on YouTube. Both are signals to Google that lower the video’s SEO value. It’s okay to use external annotations and call-to-actions that send people away from YouTube, but only do so as long as it makes good business sense to do so.

If you have older videos on YouTube that are still getting views and should point people to newer or updated versions of the video, update those old videos with note annotations the link to the updated videos.

Toward the end of some of your popular videos, add annotations that encourage people to click and watch another video that’s related to the one they’re watching. It’s best if you link that annotation to one of your own related videos.

~ How to create and edit annotations~

~ How to use annotations to link to your website~

Tip 39: Interactive Cards

Annotations that you learned on Tip 38 don’t work on mobile devices. If someone is watching your video through the YouTube app on an iPhone, Android tablet, or even natively in a mobile browser, your annotations will not show up, thus rendering them useless to half of your potential audience. This is due to the fact that annotations are based on Flash technology, which is not supported on mobile devices.

Second, let’s just be honest — they’re kind of ugly. I mean, they work, but they don’t scream, “I look totally professional!”

Third, the click-through rate on annotations is typically pretty low. Yesterday’s teaching will set you up to get the highest click-through rate possible, but if your click rate percentage is floating in single digits, you’re doing about average.

Interactive Cards is YouTube’s response to the aging Flash technology that supports annotations and the low click-through rates.

When you add an interactive card to a video, a small icon of the letter “i” appears in the upper-right corner of the video. It’s invisible until the user moves their mouse over the video somewhere. Then it appears and is available for the viewer to click at any time while watching the video. All the Interactive Cards (i.e. links to other content) you’ve added to the video then appear at once as a sidebar down the right side of the video.

The idea behind Interactive Cards is to create a consistent interactive experience across all devices. That way interacting with a video on a mobile device is the same for the viewer on a desktop. People know how it works and it’s the same no matter where they watch your video.

The way YouTube does this is to give you the ability to determine at what point in the video you would like a title to pop out in the video from the “i” in the upper-right corner of the video. The card slides out, sits there for 5 seconds, and will slide back to being invisible if it’s not clicked within 5 seconds. Of course, the viewer can bring it back simply by clicking the “i” icon in the upper-right corner of the video.

Similar to annotations, you can link interactive cards to other YouTube videos, playlists, your website, certain online merchants, crowdfunding sites, YouTube channels, and more.

Keep in mind that because cards stay open for 5 seconds, you shouldn’t have two cards appear any closer than 7 seconds apart. I recommend leaving at least 15 seconds between two interactive cards.

Also, you can only have a maximum of 5 interactive cards per video, so use them wisely.

If you know of any videos on your channel that have important annotations that you want a viewer to click, update that point in the video with an interactive card so mobile viewers can still interact with the video.

[+ Youtube’s guide to learn more about interactive cards+]

Tip 40: Asking Questions

Most of the time there are viewers who would gladly interact and comment, but they don’t really feel like they have anything to say. They watch your video and at the end think, “Hmm… that was nice,” and move on. Once that happens, you’ve lost a potential opportunity to connect with that viewer.

One very effective way to entice these viewers to interact with you is to simply ask a question. Viewers who are opinionated or who just like to talk will comment with or without your invitation, but a question helps pull in many of the viewers who would otherwise not have anything to say.

Questions spark a conversation and encourage people to talk.

When you ask a question, though, the viewer has to feel like you genuinely care about their response. The best way to do that is to actually reply to each of their comments with a thoughtful response.

Also, try to avoid yes or no questions because that doesn’t really lead to a conversation. Ask open-ended questions and opinion-based questions, ones that lead to users sharing their stories and perspective on the matter.

Finally, don’t ask too many questions. If you ask them to talk about 14 different things, then you’ll end up confusing a lot of people and they won’t know what to talk about first. Stick with one or two questions to keep the conversation pointed and focused.

Tip 41: Respond to all Comments

You need to respond to all comments. This is especially important when you don’t have a huge community yet. This includes not just on your youtube videos, but in your social media platforms as well. Now once you do start growing a big community, you will reach a point you no longer have time to comment and make contents, let alone live your life outside of Youtube. When you have read this point, consider making a video that answers the common questions and to spend some time commenting right after you have uploaded a video. So once you have uploaded a video, return to it within an hour and respond to all the comments. This lets people know that you at least try to engage your audience and gives an incentive for people to comment early as soon you upload something. Commenting lets the people know that you’re a person and that you care about your community.

By default, Google+ organizes YouTube comments to show “Top Comments” first, comments Google thinks you’ll be most interested in.

[+ 5 Ways People Build Successful Relationships on Social Media+] [+ Instructions to moderate Youtube comments+]

[+ Building Relationships by Proactively Initiating a Dialogue on Social MediaChange your Google+profile notification settings+]

[+ Update the notification settings for your page+]

Day 42: Channel Feed

You’re most likely familiar with your profile’s feed on Facebook. It shows a list of everything you’ve posted and shared with your friends. Your YouTube channel actually has a feed that works very similarly to your Facebook feed. Curating it can be a tremendous asset in helping you foster community and for keeping your viewers engaged.

Similarly to Facebook, YouTube has an All Activity Feed compiles all the shared activities across from all the channels you subscribe to and places it into one news feed. It’s a great way to discover new content that other channels you subscribe to are liking and subscribing to.

I’ve benefited many times from other popular YouTubers liking one of my videos. If they’re sharing that activity to their channel feed, it introduces my video to all their subscribers who are browsing the All Activity feed. A few years ago when the ShayTards liked one of my family’s videos, it brought about 6,000 new viewers within a couple hours. Likewise, when VSauce liked one of my client’s videos, that activity introduced our video to tens of thousands of new viewers. Utilizing the All Activity feed for your channel can be very beneficial, as well.

Personally, I’m choosing to share my uploads, likes, and playlist updates to my channel feed. That means when I upload a video, my subscribers get notified. After a few days, when that activity has passed through their feeds, I sometimes go back and like my video by giving it a thumbs-up. That activity is now shared to my channel feed and resurfaces it in the All Activity feed, introducing it to subscribers who may have missed it the first time.

Are you wondering what your channel’s activity feed looks like? To see all your activity, simply go to your YouTube channel and in the address bar add /feed to the end of your channel’s URL. (i.e. http://www.youtube.com/user/USERNAME/feed).

Whether or not you share channels you subscribe to is up to you. If that box is greyed out, go to your channel’s privacy settings and uncheck the box to keep your subscriptions private. While you’re there, uncheck the box to keep your likes and playlist updates private, too. (In case you’re very active on YouTube and worried about over-sharing, YouTube groups similar actions together in the All Activity feed, so no need to worry there.)

Tip 43: Youtube Live

Whether you get all professional with YouTube Live and stream events from multiple camera angles or simply jump into a Google+ Hangout On Air with a webcam, there’s nothing that compares to the live interaction between you and your viewers. Try to hold a live Google Hangout or through some other platform with your audience at least once a month. You can also use Periscope or Balb.im.

Note that Google+ Hangouts On Air are always changing, so please read these links before hosting your first event. The directions I listed above may not even be valid anymore by the time you read this. The links below should always be updated with the latest information, though.

YouTube has a series of videos that teaches both some basic and advanced [+ best practices for Hangouts+] On Air and YouTube Live.

Here’s Google’s guide on, “Getting Started with Hangouts On Air.”

If you want to stream an event that requires a bit more than someone sitting in front of a webcam, then consider YouTube Live. Here’s an introduction on [+ how to use YouTube Live+].

I recommend checking Ronnie Bincer if you want to keep up with the latest updates, changes, and techniques for hosting Google+ Hangouts On Air. For Youtube Live, check out Bern Rexer.

Tip 44: Watch First Time Viewers Watch your Videos.

This can be a little strange and scary, but you can learn so much from it. Watch their body language, what their eyes are doing, what makes them smile, angry, frustrated and more. Then ask them about their opinions, what they liked, disliked, and where you can improve.

Side note: It’s one of the ways I also get certain friends to watch my videos. Instead of telling them to watch it and how great it is, I ask them for their opinions. This is more appropriate for people and friends you look up to.

Tip 45: Improve your Audio

As you become more serious at becoming a Youtuber, having good audio in your video becomes even more important. There are a lot of software out there to edit your audio, including free ones like Audacity. I personally edit my videos and audio using Screenflow. Screenflow allows me to adjust my volume, remove background sound, automatically reduce the background music when someone is talking and much more. Some say that if the video quality of your video is lacking a little, it’s more forgivable if you have good audio. You might also consider investing on a good microphone. But for those on a tight budget, I recommend this [+ Mini Lapel Microphone+] for only $6.50. The sound quality is great given the price.

Tip 46: Improve another Person’s Channel

The goal here is to analyze other channels and learn as much as you can. Just as learning another language helps you better understand your own language, so analyzing someone else’s channel can help you learn more about your own channel. Improve big channels, small channels, those in your niche, and those that are completely different from yours.

Tip 47: Use Social Blade

Visit SocialBlade.com~, type in your channel name or ID or anyone else’s for that matter in the search and get access to all sorts of statistics. If you do not know what your channel ID is, it’s the long string of characters after “channel”~

For my case, my channel ID is UCmr4gE4e5JTdTZd_ukWPDWg

Anyways Social Blade can help you track your overall subscribers rank across Youtube, as well as your View rank. It can help you find similar channels to yours. It can also give you a side by side comparison stats to any other channel out there. Also, it can make predictions how your subscriber counts, given the current rate your gaining or losing them.

Tip 48: Join Forums

I recommend you join the Yttalk forum~. It’s the #1 unofficial Youtube forum. It’s great friendly community of Youtubers like you. It’s a place to learn tips, find collaboration partners, get your channel reviewed and much more. And once you have made enough posts (they’ll monitor your first handful to make sure you’re not spamming), you can post your videos on their video sections.~

You should also join other forums where your target audience might hang out. Look out especially for forums that allow you to embed your videos on your signature. But don’t be a spammer, and contribute to the community.

Tip 49: Do not use Sub4Sub or Buy Views

Even though it might sound good or tempting, it can ruin your channel and all your hard work.

For starters, Sub4Subs can ruin your ratio of subscribers and view counts. These people who you agree to sub4sub with you will probably never watch any of your videos, and many will unsubscribe from you at a future date. Many don’t even subscribe to you using their true channel.

Now there are many problems gaining views using a third parties, whether you buy them or use a traffic exchange site. Firstly, many of those sites will indeed increase your views, but only temporarily as Youtube will catch on in a few days and remove them. In addition, many of these sites where even though you are exchanging views from a real person, that person won’t be watching you’re entire video. They will watch the minimum amount and then move on the next, ruining your audience retention average. And even if you find a way to beat Youtube’s security, you are risking everything. As you get bigger on Youtube, security will become more strict. If you are caught doing these methods, you can lose the ability to monetize and earn money from Adwords or gain Partnership from a Network. You will have a near impossible chance to get your account monetized again. So don’t let all your hard work go to waste.

Tip 50: Always Strive to get Better

No matter how far along in your Youtube journey you are, always find new ways to improve you channel, videos and your marketing strategy. It doesn’t matter if you have 0 subscribers or 100 million, always be a student. Keep learning from the leaders out there. But remember this, it is wise to respect your leaders, but never worship them. Know that you can surpass, and know that you can go beyond”

Bonus Tip : Focus on Spreading the Message

Most of the top Youtubers out there were never driven by fame and money. They simply had a message and were determined to spread it. Focus on spreading your message, and the views and subscribers will naturally just come

Lastly, being a Youtuber will be like a roller coaster with its ups and downs. Hopefully thanks to this book it’ll be mostly ups. Try to remember to have fun and push through the tough times. It’ll be worth it in the end.

I hope that these 51 Tips have been helpful for you. If they have, recommend them to friends and other Youtubers who you think may benefit from it. Also you can email me at [email protected] and share your testimonials

About The Author

table<>. <>. |<>.
p<>{color:#000;}.

|<>. p<>{color:#000;background:#fff;}. After years of reading self-help books, attending seminars of famous motivational speakers and entrepreneurs, Aaron still occasionally fell into phases of unproductive behaviour. He kept asking myself how can I solve this problem. With a background in Computer Science and Psychology, Ihecame up with the Infinite Loop System. His dream is to spread this system to as many people as possible and change the world.

If you have any questions feel free to contact me at [email protected]

 

|

LET’S CONNECT!

FACEBOOK Google~+~ Pinterest Twitter Instagram

Website: http://PositivelyBrainwashed.com

Sharing This Resource

There was a lot of work that went into putting this document together. I can’t tell you how many countless hours were spent compiling and writing the information this resource contains. That means that this information has value, and you, your friends, neighbors, and co-workers may want to share it.

The information in this document is copyrighted. I would ask that you do not share this information with others – you purchased this book, and you have a right to use it on your system. Another person who has not purchased this book does not have that right.

Aaron Tupaz


50 Big Tips on how to Improve your Youtube Channel

Do you have a message you want to spread to the world? Do you have a business or product you want to share? There's numerous reasons to start a Youtube channel. If you would like to learn 50 Big Tips on how to grow your channel that I learned from top Youtube experts, then this is the book for you. I've seen the information contained in this book sold for $30 or more. I'm sharing it for free. Take advantage of it.

  • Author: Aaron Tupaz
  • Published: 2016-04-30 20:35:13
  • Words: 13397
50 Big Tips on how to Improve your Youtube Channel 50 Big Tips on how to Improve your Youtube Channel