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100 Most Frequently Used Latin Words + 1000 Example Sentences: A Dictionary of F

100 Most Frequently Used Latin Words + 1000 Example Sentences: A Dictionary of Frequency + Phrasebook to Learn Latin

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Neri Rook

 

 

 

 

Copyright © Neri Rook, 2015 all rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, scanned or distributed in any printed or electronic form without permission. Please do not make illegal copies of this book, your support for the author is appreciated.

 

Introduction

• This book contains the 100 most frequently used Latin words with 10 example sentences each.

• Sometimes an example sentence will be repeated, but with an alternate translation—so you can look at the sentence from a different angle.

• For the most part, the example sentences are ordered from easiest to hardest.

I hope that this book serves as wonderful learning reference.

-Neri Rook

 

Personal website:

http://frequencylists.blogspot.com.br/

 

 

 

 

 

Index of Words

 

[1] NON

> Liber meus non est.

[ This book isn’t mine. ]

> Hoc mihi non est.

[ This isn’t mine. ]

> Hoc tibi non est.

[ This isn’t yours. ]

> Hoc meum non est.

[ This isn’t mine. ]

> Opus meum non est.

[ That’s not my job. ]

> Pater meus non est.

[ He’s not my father. ]

> Feles non est.

[ There isn’t a cat. ]

> Horologium non meum sed tuum est.

[ This watch is not mine but yours. ]

> Hoc tuum non est.

[ This isn’t yours. ]

> Hoc Gallice non est.

[ This isn’t French. ]

 

[2] IN

> Nunc in culina est.

[ She is in the Kitchen right now. ]

> Pater meus in cubiculo suo est.

[ My father is in his room. ]

> Pater meus in horto est.

[ My father’s in the garden. ]

> Feles nostra in culina est.

[ Our cat is in the kitchen. ]

> Glossarium in mensa est.

[ The dictionary is on the desk. ]

> Bibliotheca in urbe nostra est.

[ There is a library in our city. ]

> Canis in domo est.

[ The dog is in the house. ]

> Quis in raeda erat ?

[ Who was in the car? ]

> Frater meus nunc in Australia est.

[ My brother is now in Australia. ]

> Canes in horto sunt.

[ The dogs are in the garden. ]

 

[3] EST

> Liber meus non est.

[ This book isn’t mine. ]

> Hoc mihi non est.

[ This isn’t mine. ]

> Liber meus est.

[ This is my book. ]

> Liber meus est.

[ That is my book. ]

> Hoc tibi non est.

[ This isn’t yours. ]

> Hoc meum non est.

[ This isn’t mine. ]

> Liber meus ubi est ?

[ Where’s my book? ]

> Ubi est liber meus ?

[ Where’s my book? ]

> Ubi liber meus est ?

[ Where’s my book? ]

> Liber meus ubi est ?

[ Where is my book? ]

 

[4] ET

> Ubi sunt liber et plumbum ?

[ Where are the book and the pencil? ]

> Pater mihi et mater mortui sunt.

[ My father and mother are dead. ]

> Habesne fratres et sorores ?

[ Do you have brothers and sisters? ]

> Et canes et feles et equi animalia sunt.

[ The dogs, the cats, and the horses are animals. ]

> Magnam domum et duas raedas habet.

[ He has a large house and two cars. ]

> In principio creavit Deus caelum et terram.

[ In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. ]

> In principio creavit Deus caelum et terram.

[ In the beginning God created Heaven and Earth. ]

> Duos fratres et tres sorores habeo.

[ I have two brothers and three sisters. ]

> Fessus sum et domum ire volo.

[ I am tired and I want to go home. ]

> Fessus sum et domum ire volo.

[ I’m tired and I want to go home. ]

 

[5] MIHI

> Hoc mihi non est.

[ This isn’t mine. ]

> Est mihi liber.

[ The book is mine. ]

> Hoc instrumentum photographicum mihi est.

[ This camera belongs to me. ]

> Sed non est mihi pecunia.

[ But I don’t have money. ]

> Duo flores mihi sunt.

[ I have two flowers. ]

> Raeda vetus mihi magis quam raeda nova placet.

[ I like the old car more than the new. ]

> Nomen tuum mihi non placet.

[ I don’t like your name. ]

> Cubiculum meum mihi purgandum est.

[ I have to clean my room. ]

> Hoc mihi non placet.

[ I don’t like this. ]

> Pater mihi et mater mortui sunt.

[ My father and mother are dead. ]

 

[6] MEUS

> Liber meus non est.

[ This book isn’t mine. ]

> Liber meus est.

[ This is my book. ]

> Liber meus est.

[ That is my book. ]

> Liber meus ubi est ?

[ Where’s my book? ]

> Ubi est liber meus ?

[ Where’s my book? ]

> Ubi liber meus est ?

[ Where’s my book? ]

> Liber meus ubi est ?

[ Where is my book? ]

> Ubi est liber meus ?

[ Where is my book? ]

> Ubi liber meus est ?

[ Where is my book? ]

> Pater meus non est.

[ He’s not my father. ]

 

[7] MEA

> Feles mea est.

[ It is my cat. ]

> Ubi raeda mea est ?

[ Where is my car? ]

> Ea raeda mea est.

[ This car is mine. ]

> Domus mea tua est.

[ My home is yours. ]

> A re mea hoc non est.

[ I don’t care. ]

> Ubi sella mea est ?

[ Where is my seat? ]

> Schola mea prope stationem est.

[ My school is near to the station. ]

> Soror mea pulchra est.

[ My sister is pretty. ]

> Birota tua melior quam mea est.

[ Your bike is better than mine. ]

> Raeda mea fracta est.

[ My car is broken. ]

 

[8] ANNOS

> Hic decem annos opus facta sum.

[ I’ve worked here for ten years. ]

> Quinque annos nata est.

[ She is five years old. ]

> Triginta annos natus est.

[ He is thirty years old. ]

> Filius meus decem annos natus est.

[ My son is ten years old. ]

> Nunc triginta annos natus sum.

[ I am 30 years old now. ]

> Amicus meus septemdecim annos natus est.

[ My friend is seventeen years old. ]

> Amicus meus septemdecim annos natus est.

[ My friend is seventeen. ]

> Triginta tres annos nata est.

[ She’s thirty-three. ]

> Sedecim annos natus sum.

[ I am sixteen years old. ]

> Hic decem annos opus factus sum.

[ I’ve worked here for ten years. ]

 

[9] QUAM

> Birota tua melior quam mea est.

[ Your bike is better than mine. ]

> Calamus tuus melior quam meus est.

[ Your pen is better than mine. ]

> Pater meus robustior quam pater tuus est.

[ My dad is stronger than your dad. ]

> Soror mea est minor quam tu.

[ My sister is smaller than you. ]

> Soror mea est minor quam tu.

[ My sister is younger than you. ]

> Birota vetus, sed melior quam nihil est.

[ This bicycle is old, but it’s better than nothing. ]

> Raeda vetus mihi magis quam raeda nova placet.

[ I like the old car more than the new. ]

> Hoc minus quam illud est.

[ This is smaller than that. ]

> Hic liber minor quam ille est.

[ This book is smaller than that one. ]

> Domus nova mihi magis quam domus vetus placet.

[ I like the new house more than the old. ]

 

[10] AD

> Tempus est ad scholam ire.

[ It’s time to go to school. ]

> Solis diebus ad scholam non eo.

[ I don’t go to school on Sunday. ]

> Saepe ad scholam it per pedes.

[ He often walks to school. ]

> Semel in hebdomade ad nosocomium it.

[ She goes to the hospital once a week. ]

> Semel in hebdomade ad macellum it.

[ She goes to the market once a week. ]

> Semel in hebdomade ad bibliopolium it.

[ She goes to the bookstore once a week. ]

> Solis diebus ad ecclesiam eo.

[ I go to church on Sunday. ]

> Via ad mare est.

[ This is the passage to the sea. ]

> Mater mane ad nosocomium it.

[ Mother goes to the hospital in the morning. ]

> Visne mecum ad concentum ire ?

[ Do you want to go to the concert with me? ]

 

[11] EIUS

> Hic liber eius est.

[ This book is hers. ]

> Ubi domus eius est ?

[ Where is his house? ]

> Domus eius est.

[ That is her house. ]

> Domus eius prope hortos publicos est.

[ Her house is near the park. ]

> Ubi familia eius est ?

[ Where is his family? ]

> Pater eius Iapo est.

[ Her father is Japanese. ]

> Pater eius Iapo est.

[ His father is Japanese. ]

> Amicus eius est.

[ He is her friend. ]

> Familia eius magna est.

[ His family is large. ]

> Pater eius procerus est.

[ Her father is tall. ]

 

[12] SED

> Horologium non meum sed tuum est.

[ This watch is not mine but yours. ]

> Magister non est, sed medicus est.

[ He is not a teacher but a doctor. ]

> Magister non est, sed discipulus est.

[ He is not a teacher but a student. ]

> Birota vetus, sed melior quam nihil est.

[ This bicycle is old, but it’s better than nothing. ]

> Hic liber bonus est, sed ille melior est.

[ This is a good book, but that one is better. ]

> Is non est medicus, sed magister.

[ He is not a doctor but a teacher. ]

> Non soror, sed uxor mea est.

[ She is not my sister, she’s my wife. ]

> Dives est, sed non laetus.

[ He’s rich, but he’s not happy. ]

> Non tantum medicus, sed etiam poeta erat.

[ He was a doctor; moreover a poet. ]

> Non cantor sed actor est.

[ He is not a singer, but an actor. ]

 

[13] TIBI

> Hoc tibi non est.

[ This isn’t yours. ]

> Quid est nomen tibi ?

[ What is your name? ]

> Hic est liber de quo tibi locutus sum.

[ This is the book I told you about. ]

> Haec tibi sunt.

[ These are yours. ]

> Nunc natare tibi licet.

[ You may swim now. ]

> Puella, de qua tibi locutus sum, hic habitat.

[ The girl I told you about lives here. ]

> Tres raedae tibi sunt.

[ You have three cars. ]

> Quae sententia magis tibi placet ?

[ Which sentence do you prefer? ]

> An nix tibi placet ?

[ You like snow, don’t you? ]

> Non est tibi cor.

[ You don’t have a heart. ]

 

[14] MEUM

> Hoc meum non est.

[ This isn’t mine. ]

> Opus meum non est.

[ That’s not my job. ]

> Opus meum est.

[ It’s my job. ]

> Horologium non meum sed tuum est.

[ This watch is not mine but yours. ]

> Ubi horologium meum est ?

[ Where is my watch? ]

> Ubi horologium meum est ?

[ Where is my clock? ]

> Hoc glossarium meum est.

[ This is my dictionary. ]

> Horologium meum fractum est.

[ My watch is broken. ]

> Cubiculum meum mihi purgandum est.

[ I have to clean my room. ]

> Illud glossarium meum est.

[ That’s my dictionary. ]

 

[15] TE

> Bonum est te videre.

[ It’s good to see you. ]

> Sine te nihil sum.

[ Without you, I am nothing. ]

> Nihil sum sine te.

[ I am nothing without you. ]

> Nesciebam te in hac urbe esse.

[ I didn’t know that you were in this town. ]

> Volo te hic esse.

[ I want you to be here. ]

> Ego te volo.

[ I want you. ]

> Volo te mecum venire.

[ I want you to come with me. ]

> Volo te meliorem esse.

[ I want you to be better. ]

> Nesciebam te felem habere.

[ I didn’t know you had a cat. ]

> Puto te probum esse.

[ It seems to me that you are honest. ]

 

[16] ME

> Adi me per telephonum in officio.

[ Call me at the office. ]

> Si mecum loqui vis, adi me per telephonum.

[ If you want to speak to me, please call me up. ]

> Visne me tecum ire ?

[ Do you want me to go with you? ]

> Canis me secutus est.

[ The dog followed me. ]

> Potesne me linguam Lusitanicam docere ?

[ Can you teach me Portuguese? ]

> Didymum amat, non me.

[ She loves Tom, not me. ]

> Ego dilecto meo, et ad me conversio eius.

[ I am my beloved’s, and his desire is toward me. ]

> Potesne me adiuvare ?

[ Can you help me? ]

> Potestisne me adiuvare ?

[ Can you help me? ]

> Nemo me adiuvare potest.

[ No one can help me. ]

 

[17] SUPER

> Liber super mensam est.

[ There is a book on the table. ]

> Poculum super mensam est.

[ The cup is on the table. ]

> Liber tuus super mensam scriptoriam est.

[ Your book is on the desk. ]

> Liber super mensam scriptoriam est.

[ There is a book on the desk. ]

> Malum super mensam est.

[ There is an apple on the table. ]

> Malum est super mensam.

[ There is an apple on the table. ]

> Glossarium super mensam est.

[ The dictionary is on the desk. ]

> Quid super mensam scriptoriam est ?

[ What is on the desk? ]

> Horologium tuum super mensam scriptoriam est.

[ Your watch is on the desk. ]

> Malum super mensam scriptoriam est.

[ There is an apple on the desk. ]

 

[18] UT

> Puto fore ut dilatio hamaxostichi sit.

[ It seems to me that the train is late. ]

> Puto fore ut cras serenum sit.

[ I think it will be sunny tomorrow. ]

> Nemo tam doctus est, ut is omnia scire possit.

[ Nobody is so learned that he is able to know all things. ]

> Nemo tam doctus est, ut is omnia scire possit.

[ No one is so learned that he can know all things. ]

> Rogas me, ut amem te et fratres tuos.

[ Ask me, so that I may love you and your brothers. ]

> Multa pecunia eges ut in hac schola discas.

[ You need a lot of money so that you may learn in that school. ]

> Spero fore ut frater tuus melior sit.

[ I hope your brother is better. ]

> Spero fore ut frater tuus melior sit.

[ I hope that your brother is better. ]

> Magna cum virtute pugnabunt ut castra servent.

[ They will fight with great courage to protect the encampment. ]

> Viginti aleis egebimus ut hunc ludum ludamus.

[ We’ll need twenty dice to play this game. ]

 

[19] VALDE

> Maria valde pulchra est.

[ Mary is very beautiful. ]

> Maria valde pulchra est.

[ Mary is pretty cute. ]

> Hic liber valde vetus est.

[ This is a very old book. ]

> Hoc libum valde dulce est.

[ This cake is very sweet. ]

> Hoc aedificium valde magnum est.

[ This building is very large. ]

> Haec mala valde magna sunt.

[ These are very big apples. ]

> Cubiculum valde magnum erat.

[ It was a very big room. ]

> Potio Sinensis valde bona est.

[ This is a very good tea. ]

> Nunc valde frigus est.

[ It’s very cold now. ]

> Nunc valde somniculosus sum.

[ I’m very sleepy now. ]

 

[20] EI

> Opus ei faciendum non est.

[ She doesn’t need to work. ]

> Opus ei faciendum non est.

[ He doesn’t need to work. ]

> Cubiculum Didymi ei purgandum est.

[ Tom needs to clean his room. ]

> Pecunia ei est.

[ He has money. ]

> Mater ei libum facit.

[ Mother is making him a cake. ]

> Tunica nigra ei est.

[ He has a black shirt. ]

> Potio Arabica ei non placet.

[ He doesn’t like coffee. ]

> Piscis ei non placet.

[ He doesn’t like fish. ]

> Anglice ei loquendum est.

[ He needs to speak English. ]

> Vinum ei placet.

[ She likes wine. ]

 

[21] LIBENTER

> Ad litus maritimum libenter it.

[ She likes to go to the beach. ]

> Mater mea telehorasim libenter non aspicit.

[ My mother doesn’t like watching TV. ]

> Potionem Arabicam libenter non bibo.

[ I don’t like to drink coffee. ]

> Piscem libenter non edit.

[ He doesn’t like to eat fish. ]

> Aquam cum glacie libenter non bibo.

[ I don’t like to drink water with ice. ]

> Telehorasim libenter aspicit.

[ He likes to watch TV. ]

> Puella pediludio libenter non ludit.

[ The girl doesn’t like to play soccer. ]

> Didymus imagines felium libenter aspicit.

[ Tom likes to look at pictures of cats. ]

> In horto libenter laborat.

[ He likes to work in the garden. ]

> In mari libenter nato.

[ I like to go swimming in the sea. ]

 

[22] E

> Hic pons e ligno facta est.

[ This bridge is made of wood. ]

> Haec mensa e ligno facta est.

[ This table is made of wood. ]

> Haec sella e ligno facta est.

[ This chair is made of wood. ]

> Haec mensa scriptoria e ligno facta est.

[ This desk is made of wood. ]

> Liber e charta factus est.

[ A book is made of paper. ]

> Una abhinc hora e somno experrectus sum.

[ I got up an hour ago. ]

> Una abhinc hora e somno experrecta sum.

[ I got up an hour ago. ]

> Capsa e ligno facta est.

[ The box is made of wood. ]

> Haec capsa e charta facta est.

[ This box is made of paper. ]

> Haec sella e materia plastica facta est.

[ This chair is made of plastic. ]

 

[23] HORA

> Quota hora in terra tua est ?

[ What time is it in your country? ]

> Una abhinc hora e somno experrectus sum.

[ I got up an hour ago. ]

> Una abhinc hora e somno experrecta sum.

[ I got up an hour ago. ]

> Is una abhinc hora profectus est.

[ He left an hour ago. ]

> Nunc quota hora est ?

[ What is the time now? ]

> Secunda hora pomeridiana est.

[ It’s two o’clock in the afternoon. ]

> Fore tertia hora est.

[ It is almost three. ]

> Quota hora est ibi ?

[ What time is it over there? ]

> Secunda hora antemeridiana est.

[ It’s two o’clock in the morning. ]

> Septima hora e somno experrectus sum.

[ I got up at seven. ]

 

[24] LIBER

> Est mihi liber.

[ The book is mine. ]

> Ubi est liber meus ?

[ Where’s my book? ]

> Ubi liber meus est ?

[ Where’s my book? ]

> Ubi est liber meus ?

[ Where is my book? ]

> Ubi liber meus est ?

[ Where is my book? ]

> Hic liber eius est.

[ This book is hers. ]

> Ubi est liber ?

[ Where is the book? ]

> Hic est liber.

[ The book is here. ]

> Hic liber valde vetus est.

[ This is a very old book. ]

> Hic liber de Sinis est.

[ This book is about China. ]

 

[25] CUM

> In principio cum Deo erat.

[ He was with God in the beginning. ]

> In Australiam cum familia ire volo.

[ I want to go to Australia with my family. ]

> Potionem Sinensem cum lacte numquam bibo.

[ I never drink tea with milk. ]

> Aquam cum glacie libenter non bibo.

[ I don’t like to drink water with ice. ]

> Duo cum faciunt idem, nōn est idem.

[ When two are doing the same thing, it is not the same. ]

> Loquerisne cum cane tuo ?

[ Do you talk to your dog? ]

> Parvus mus cum libo currit.

[ A small mouse runs with a cake. ]

> Didymus et Maria cum Ioanne loqui non volunt.

[ Tom and Mary don’t want to talk to John. ]

> Ego cum sorore in hortis publicis ludebam.

[ I used to play with my sister in the park. ]

> Semel in mense prandium cum patre sumit.

[ Once a month, she has lunch with her father. ]

 

[26] NATUS

> Triginta annos natus est.

[ He is thirty years old. ]

> Filius meus decem annos natus est.

[ My son is ten years old. ]

> Nunc triginta annos natus sum.

[ I am 30 years old now. ]

> Amicus meus septemdecim annos natus est.

[ My friend is seventeen years old. ]

> Amicus meus septemdecim annos natus est.

[ My friend is seventeen. ]

> Sedecim annos natus sum.

[ I am sixteen years old. ]

> Pater meus quindecim annos tantum natus est.

[ My father is only fifteen years old. ]

> Pater meus quinquaginta annos natus est.

[ My father is fifty years old. ]

> Tokii natus sum.

[ I was born in Tokyo. ]

> Quadraginta quinque annos natus sum.

[ I am forty-five years old. ]

 

[27] MARIA

> Num Maria pulchra est ?

[ Mary is beautiful, isn’t she? ]

> Cum Maria saltare volo.

[ I want to dance with Mary. ]

> Ut Maria valet ?

[ How is Mary? ]

> Et Didymus et Maria ex Australia oriundi sunt.

[ Tom and Mary are both from Australia. ]

> Et Didymus et Maria in horto opus faciunt.

[ Tom and Mary are both working in the garden. ]

> Didymus et Maria cum Ioanne loqui non volunt.

[ Tom and Mary don’t want to talk to John. ]

> Et Didymus et Maria discipuli boni sunt.

[ Tom and Mary are both good students. ]

> Didymus et Maria hic beati non sunt.

[ Tom and Mary aren’t happy here. ]

> Didymus et Maria in eadem scapha sunt.

[ Tom and Mary are in the same boat. ]

> Didymus et Maria hodie domi sunt.

[ Tom and Mary are at home today. ]

 

[28] TUUS

> Liber tuus est.

[ It’s your book. ]

> Ubi est pater tuus ?

[ Where is your father? ]

> Liber tuus super mensam scriptoriam est.

[ Your book is on the desk. ]

> Ubi iam est tuus pater ?

[ Where is your father? ]

> Ubi est canis tuus ?

[ Where is your dog? ]

> Canis tuus hic est.

[ Your dog is here. ]

> Hic canis tuus est.

[ This dog is yours. ]

> Ubi est nunc deus tuus ?

[ Where is your God now? ]

> Ubi frater tuus est ?

[ Where is your brother? ]

> Quis magister tuus est ?

[ Who is your teacher? ]

 

[29] MENSAM

> Liber super mensam est.

[ There is a book on the table. ]

> Poculum super mensam est.

[ The cup is on the table. ]

> Liber tuus super mensam scriptoriam est.

[ Your book is on the desk. ]

> Liber super mensam scriptoriam est.

[ There is a book on the desk. ]

> Malum super mensam est.

[ There is an apple on the table. ]

> Malum est super mensam.

[ There is an apple on the table. ]

> Glossarium super mensam est.

[ The dictionary is on the desk. ]

> Quid super mensam scriptoriam est ?

[ What is on the desk? ]

> Horologium tuum super mensam scriptoriam est.

[ Your watch is on the desk. ]

> Malum super mensam scriptoriam est.

[ There is an apple on the desk. ]

 

[30] EUM

> Puto eum bonum virum esse.

[ I think he is a good man. ]

> Nesciebam eum illic esse.

[ I didn’t know that he was there. ]

> Nesciebam eum Iaponem esse.

[ I didn’t know that he was Japanese. ]

> Non sciabam eum mortuum esse.

[ I didn’t know he was dead. ]

> Puto eum probum esse.

[ It seems to me that he is honest. ]

> Puto eum lenem esse.

[ I believe he is a nice guy. ]

> Puto eum fessum esse.

[ He must be tired. ]

> Omnes dicunt eum lenem esse.

[ Everybody says he’s a nice person. ]

> Hoc medicamentum eum sanare potest.

[ This medicine may cure him. ]

> Credo eum laetum esse.

[ I believe that he’s happy. ]

 

[31] LINGUAM

> Proximo anno linguam Sinensem discere volo.

[ I want to learn Chinese next year. ]

> Potesne me linguam Lusitanicam docere ?

[ Can you teach me Portuguese? ]

> Num feles linguam tuam edit ?

[ Cat got your tongue? ]

> Nescio linguam Gallicam.

[ I can’t speak French. ]

> Difficile est linguam Graecam discere.

[ It’s difficult to learn Greek. ]

> Video Volapucam linguam bonam esse.

[ I see that Volapük is a good language. ]

> Scisne linguam Zamenhofianam ?

[ Do you speak Esperanto? ]

> Scisne linguam Latinam ?

[ Do you know Latin? ]

> Artem musicam et linguam Anglicam amo.

[ I like music and English. ]

> Quis te linguam Germanicam docet ?

[ Who teaches you German? ]

 

[32] DE

> Hic liber de Sinis est.

[ This book is about China. ]

> Quid est de femina tua ?

[ What about your wife? ]

> Hic est liber de quo tibi locutus sum.

[ This is the book I told you about. ]

> Puella, de qua tibi locutus sum, hic habitat.

[ The girl I told you about lives here. ]

> Hic liber de stellis est.

[ This is a book about stars. ]

> Hic liber de vita in Britanniarum Regno est.

[ This book deals with life in the United Kingdom. ]

> Ecce urbs de qua tibi locutus sum.

[ This is the town I told you about. ]

> Malum de arbore cecidit.

[ The apple fell from the tree. ]

> Ea de arbore cecidit.

[ She fell from the tree. ]

> Liber de lege est.

[ The book is about the law. ]

 

[33] HOC

> A re mea hoc non est.

[ I don’t care. ]

> Quam longum hoc plumbum est ?

[ How long is this pencil? ]

> Estne hoc plumbum tuum ?

[ Is this pencil yours? ]

> Estne hoc plumbum tuum ?

[ Is this your pencil? ]

> Non volo legere hoc librum.

[ I don’t want to read this book. ]

> Visne mecum ad hoc concentum venire ?

[ Do you want to come with me to this concert? ]

> Quid hoc verbum significat ?

[ What does this word mean? ]

> Estne hoc verum ?

[ Is this true? ]

> Quomodo hoc libum factum est ?

[ How was this cake made? ]

> Quid hoc significat ?

[ What does this mean? ]

 

[34] UBI

> Liber meus ubi est ?

[ Where’s my book? ]

> Liber meus ubi est ?

[ Where is my book? ]

> Maria ubi est ?

[ Where is Mary? ]

> Pueri ubi sunt ?

[ Where are the boys? ]

> Scisne ubi horologium meum sit ?

[ Do you know where my watch is? ]

> Mamma, ubi linteolum meum est ?

[ Mom, where’s my handkerchief? ]

> Heri ubi eras ?

[ Where were you yesterday? ]

> Scisne ubi statio vigilum publicorum sit ?

[ Do you know where the police station is? ]

> Scisne ubi sit ?

[ Do you know where she is? ]

> Liber meus est. Ubi est tuus ?

[ This book is mine. Where is yours? ]

 

[35] DOMUM

> Tempus est domum ire.

[ It’s time to go home. ]

> Ecclesia prope domum meam est.

[ There is a church near my house. ]

> Magnam domum et duas raedas habet.

[ He has a large house and two cars. ]

> Nunc domum eo.

[ I’m going home now. ]

> Estne prope domum tuam ?

[ Is it near your house? ]

> Fessus sum et domum ire volo.

[ I am tired and I want to go home. ]

> Fessus sum et domum ire volo.

[ I’m tired and I want to go home. ]

> Fessa sum et domum ire volo.

[ I am tired and I want to go home. ]

> Fessa sum et domum ire volo.

[ I’m tired and I want to go home. ]

> Fluvius iuxta domum est.

[ There is a river beside the house. ]

 

[36] A

> Procul a domo est.

[ He is away from home. ]

> Domus mea procul a statione non est.

[ It is not far from my house to the station. ]

> Procul a deversorio non est.

[ It is not far away from the hotel. ]

> Domus eius procul a statione est.

[ His house is far from the station. ]

> Equus procul a domo est.

[ The horse is far from the house. ]

> Italia procul a Brasilia est.

[ Italy is far from Brazil. ]

> Sella procul a ianua est.

[ The chair is far from the door. ]

> Domus eorum procul a statione est.

[ Their house is far from the station. ]

> Carmen a puella scriptum est.

[ The poem was written by a girl. ]

> Hic liber a Hallo scriptus est.

[ This book was written by Haley. ]

 

[37] ANNO

> Proximo anno linguam Sinensem discere volo.

[ I want to learn Chinese next year. ]

> Tokium semel in anno venit.

[ He comes to Tokyo once a year. ]

> Pater eius praeterito anno mortuus est.

[ His father died last year. ]

> Hoc aedificium anno MCMLX aedificatum est.

[ The building was built in 1960. ]

> Duodecim menses in anno sunt.

[ There are twelve months in a year. ]

> Mater Teresa in Iugoslavia anno MCMX nata est.

[ Mother Teresa was born in Yugoslavia in 1910. ]

> Proximo anno septemdecim annos nata erit.

[ She will be seventeen next year. ]

> Proximo anno sex annos nata erit.

[ She is going to be six next year. ]

> Canicus proximo anno quindecim annos natus erit.

[ Ken will be 15 next year. ]

> Praeterito anno pater ei decessit.

[ His father passed away last year. ]

 

[38] HIC

> Canis tuus hic est.

[ Your dog is here. ]

> Quam altus hic lacus est ?

[ How deep is this lake? ]

> Quam longus hic pons est ?

[ How long is this bridge? ]

> Tibi hic manendum non est.

[ There is no need for you to stay here. ]

> Puella, de qua tibi locutus sum, hic habitat.

[ The girl I told you about lives here. ]

> Quinque plumba hic sunt.

[ There are five pencils here. ]

> Tibi hic manere non licet.

[ You aren’t allowed in here. ]

> Nunc multa aedificia nova hic sunt.

[ There are a lot of new buildings here now. ]

> Estne hic saccus Didymi ?

[ Is this Tom’s bag? ]

> Volo te hic esse.

[ I want you to be here. ]

 

[39] TUA

> Domus mea tua est.

[ My home is yours. ]

> Ubi est mater tua, puer ?

[ Where is your mother, boy? ]

> Ubi domus tua est ?

[ Where is your house? ]

> Mater tua non sum.

[ I’m not your mother. ]

> Ubi soror tua est ?

[ Where is your sister? ]

> Birota tua melior quam mea est.

[ Your bike is better than mine. ]

> Quid est de femina tua ?

[ What about your wife? ]

> Haec tua sunt.

[ These are yours. ]

> Soror tua sum.

[ I am your sister. ]

> Soror tua sum.

[ I’m your sister. ]

 

[40] SCHOLAM

> Tempus est ad scholam ire.

[ It’s time to go to school. ]

> Solis diebus ad scholam non eo.

[ I don’t go to school on Sunday. ]

> Saepe ad scholam it per pedes.

[ He often walks to school. ]

> Ad scholam it per pedes.

[ He goes to school on foot. ]

> Ad scholam eo, quia discere volo.

[ I go to school because I want to learn. ]

> Ad scholam ire volo.

[ I want to go to college. ]

> Ad scholam ire volo.

[ I want to go to school. ]

> Ad scholam ire volo.

[ I want to go to class. ]

> Quomodo ad scholam is ?

[ How do you go to school? ]

> Magistri statua ante scholam est.

[ There is a statue of the teacher in front of the school. ]

 

[41] PER

> Saepe ad scholam it per pedes.

[ He often walks to school. ]

> Ad scholam it per pedes.

[ He goes to school on foot. ]

> Adi me per telephonum in officio.

[ Call me at the office. ]

> Si mecum loqui vis, adi me per telephonum.

[ If you want to speak to me, please call me up. ]

> Avus meus miles per bellum erat.

[ My grandfather was a soldier in the war. ]

> Didymus unam horam per telephonum locutus est.

[ Tom has been talking on the phone for an hour. ]

> Num me heri nocte per telephonum adivisti ?

[ Did you call me up last night? ]

> Masako normaliter ad scholam it per pedes.

[ Masako usually walks to school. ]

> Nemo intrat in caelum nisi per philosophiam.

[ No one enters heaven except through philosophy. ]

> Post horam te per telephonum adibo.

[ I will call you in an hour. ]

 

[42] NATA

> Quinque annos nata est.

[ She is five years old. ]

> Triginta tres annos nata est.

[ She’s thirty-three. ]

> Sedecim annos nata sum.

[ I am sixteen years old. ]

> Amica mea septemdecim annos nata est.

[ My friend is seventeen years old. ]

> Amica mea septemdecim annos nata est.

[ My friend is seventeen. ]

> Tokii nata sum.

[ I was born in Tokyo. ]

> Quadraginta quinque annos nata sum.

[ I am forty-five years old. ]

> Quadraginta annos nata sum.

[ I’m forty years old. ]

> Viginti quinque annos nata sum.

[ I’m 25 years old. ]

> Viginti quattuor annos nata sum.

[ I’m 24 years old. ]

 

[43] RAEDAM

> Ego raedam non habeo, sed soror habet.

[ I don’t have a car, but my sister does. ]

> Habesne raedam ?

[ Do you have a car? ]

> Mater mea raedam gubernare non potest.

[ My mother cannot drive a car. ]

> Ea raedam gubernare non potest.

[ She can’t drive a car. ]

> Frater meus raedam gubernare potest.

[ My brother can drive a car. ]

> Novam raedam emere volo.

[ I want to buy a new car. ]

> Ea raedam gubernare potest.

[ She can drive a car. ]

> Potesne raedam gubernare ?

[ Can you drive a car? ]

> Potesne raedam gubernare ?

[ Do you know how to drive a car? ]

> Quo raedam conducere possum ?

[ Where can I rent a car? ]

 

[44] HEBDOMADE

> Semel in hebdomade ad nosocomium it.

[ She goes to the hospital once a week. ]

> Semel in hebdomade ad macellum it.

[ She goes to the market once a week. ]

> Semel in hebdomade ad bibliopolium it.

[ She goes to the bookstore once a week. ]

> Pater eius illic edit bis in hebdomade.

[ His father eats there twice a week. ]

> Praeterita hebdomade pater ei decessit.

[ Her father passed away last week. ]

> Praeterita hebdomade avum vidi.

[ I saw grandfather last week. ]

> Is mihi semel in hebdomade scribit.

[ He writes me once a week. ]

> Is mihi semel in hebdomade scribit.

[ He writes to me once a week. ]

> Ea semel in hebdomade parentibus scribit.

[ She writes to her parents once a week. ]

> Marcus bis in hebdomade teniludio ludit.

[ Marco plays tennis twice a week. ]

 

[45] IRE

> Tempus est ad scholam ire.

[ It’s time to go to school. ]

> Tempus est domum ire.

[ It’s time to go home. ]

> Tempus est ire.

[ It’s time to go. ]

> Fessus sum et domum ire volo.

[ I am tired and I want to go home. ]

> Fessus sum et domum ire volo.

[ I’m tired and I want to go home. ]

> Ita est, tempus est ire.

[ Yes, it’s time to go. ]

> Fessa sum et domum ire volo.

[ I am tired and I want to go home. ]

> Fessa sum et domum ire volo.

[ I’m tired and I want to go home. ]

> Ad scholam ire volo.

[ I want to go to college. ]

> Ad scholam ire volo.

[ I want to go to school. ]

 

[46] FELES

> Sub mensa feles est.

[ Under the table is a cat. ]

> Super mensam feles erat.

[ On the table there was a cat. ]

> Duas feles habet.

[ He keeps two cats. ]

> Et canes et feles et equi animalia sunt.

[ The dogs, the cats, and the horses are animals. ]

> Estne feles super mensam scriptoriam ?

[ Is there a cat on the desk? ]

> Estne feles super mensam ?

[ Is there a cat on the table? ]

> Estne feles sub mensa ?

[ Is there a cat under the table? ]

> Ken duas feles habet.

[ Ken has two cats. ]

> Et feles et canes mihi placent.

[ I like both cats and dogs. ]

> Canes mihi magis quam feles placent.

[ I like dogs more than cats. ]

 

[47] LIBUM

> Hoc libum valde dulce est.

[ This cake is very sweet. ]

> Hoc libum dulce est.

[ This cake is sweet. ]

> Hoc libum nimis dulce est.

[ This cake tastes too sweet. ]

> Mater mea libum facit.

[ My mother makes a cake. ]

> Mater mea libum facit.

[ My mother is making a cake. ]

> Mater ei libum facit.

[ Mother is making him a cake. ]

> Mater patri libum facit.

[ My mother is making my father a cake. ]

> Mater patri libum facit.

[ My mother is making a cake for my father. ]

> Quomodo hoc libum factum est ?

[ How was this cake made? ]

> Mamma libum facit.

[ Mom is making a cake. ]

 

[48] ESSE

> Nesciebam te in hac urbe esse.

[ I didn’t know that you were in this town. ]

> Volo te hic esse.

[ I want you to be here. ]

> Magister dixit Terram rotundam esse.

[ The teacher said that the earth is round. ]

> Terram rotundam esse verum est.

[ It is true that the earth is round. ]

> Visne esse amicus meus ?

[ Do you want to be my friend? ]

> Nesciebam tibi felem esse.

[ I didn’t know you had a cat. ]

> Nesciebam vobis felem esse.

[ I didn’t know you had a cat. ]

> Tu vis esse probus.

[ You want to be honest. ]

> Puto eum bonum virum esse.

[ I think he is a good man. ]

> Puto nimis carum esse.

[ I think this is too expensive. ]

 

[49] OPUS

> Hic decem annos opus facta sum.

[ I’ve worked here for ten years. ]

> Hic decem annos opus factus sum.

[ I’ve worked here for ten years. ]

> Soror mea opus habet.

[ My sister has a job. ]

> Filius eius in argentaria opus non facit.

[ His son doesn’t work at a bank. ]

> Frater meus in Gallia opus facit.

[ My brother works in France. ]

> In schola opus facit.

[ She works at the school. ]

> Pater meus in fabrica opus facit.

[ My father works in a factory. ]

> In argentaria opus facit.

[ He works at a bank. ]

> In argentaria opus facit.

[ He works in a bank. ]

> Pater in fabrica opus facit.

[ My father works in a factory. ]

 

[50] RAEDA

> Ubi raeda mea est ?

[ Where is my car? ]

> Ea raeda mea est.

[ This car is mine. ]

> Quis in raeda erat ?

[ Who was in the car? ]

> Raeda vetus mihi magis quam raeda nova placet.

[ I like the old car more than the new. ]

> Haec raeda sicut nova est.

[ This car is like new. ]

> Haec raeda lavanda est.

[ This car needs washing. ]

> Haec raeda celeris est.

[ This car is fast. ]

> Patris raeda nova est.

[ My father’s car is new. ]

> Cuius raeda est ?

[ Whose car is this? ]

> Unam dominam et duos canes in raeda video.

[ I can see a lady and two dogs in the car. ]

 

[51] BENE

> Anglice multos annos bene locutus est.

[ He has spoken English well for many years. ]

> Munere meo bene functus sum.

[ I did my work well. ]

> Munere meo bene functa sum.

[ I did my work well. ]

> Nesciebam canes bene natare.

[ I didn’t know that dogs swim well. ]

> Potesne bene natare ?

[ Can you swim well? ]

> Anglice multos annos bene locuta est.

[ He has spoken English well for many years. ]

> De mortuis nil nisi bene.

[ Say nothing but good things about the dead. ]

> De mortuis nil nisi bene.

[ If you can’t speak well of the dead, say nothing. ]

> Haec machinatio munere suo bene fungitur.

[ This engine works well. ]

> Haec potio Sinensis bene olet.

[ This tea smells good. ]

 

[52] NUNC

> Ubi est nunc deus tuus ?

[ Where is your God now? ]

> Frater meus nunc in Australia est.

[ My brother is now in Australia. ]

> Quid nunc vis ?

[ What do you want now? ]

> Ubi nunc habitat ?

[ Where does she live now? ]

> Maria nunc in cubiculo suo discit.

[ Mary is now studying in her room. ]

> Ianua nunc aperta est.

[ The door is open now. ]

> Muiriel nunc XX annos nata est.

[ Muiriel is 20 now. ]

> Quid Canicus facit nunc ?

[ What’s Ken doing now? ]

> Femina nunc aquam bibit.

[ The woman is drinking water now. ]

> Maria esse non potest. Nunc in nosocomio est.

[ That can’t be Mary. She’s in the hospital now. ]

 

[53] TELEPHONUM

> Per telephonum locutus sum.

[ I talked on the phone. ]

> Adi me per telephonum in officio.

[ Call me at the office. ]

> Si mecum loqui vis, adi me per telephonum.

[ If you want to speak to me, please call me up. ]

> Habesne telephonum gestabile ?

[ Do you have a cellphone? ]

> Habesne telephonum gestabile ?

[ Have you got a mobile phone? ]

> Habesne telephonum gestabile ?

[ Do you have a mobile phone? ]

> Per telephonum locuti sumus.

[ We talked over the phone. ]

> Didymus unam horam per telephonum locutus est.

[ Tom has been talking on the phone for an hour. ]

> Num me heri nocte per telephonum adivisti ?

[ Did you call me up last night? ]

> Hoc telephonum munere suo non fungitur.

[ This telephone doesn’t work. ]

 

[54] NOMEN

> Quid est nomen tibi ?

[ What is your name? ]

> Quid est nomen tuum ?

[ What is your name? ]

> Quid est nomen tuum ?

[ What’s your name? ]

> Quod est nomen tuum ?

[ What is your name? ]

> Quod nomen ?

[ What is your name? ]

> Quid est nomen huius avis ?

[ What is the name of this bird? ]

> Quid est nomen huic cani ?

[ What’s this dog’s name? ]

> Quod est nomen illius avis ?

[ What is the name of that bird? ]

> Carmen nomen Hispanicum est.

[ Carmen is a Spanish name. ]

> Hans nomen Germanicum est.

[ Hans is a German name. ]

 

[55] DUAS

> Magnam domum et duas raedas habet.

[ He has a large house and two cars. ]

> Ken duas feles habet.

[ Ken has two cats. ]

> Is duas raedas habet.

[ He’s got two cars. ]

> Unum filium et duas filias habet.

[ He has one son and two daughters. ]

> Cubiculum duas fenestras habet.

[ The room has two windows. ]

> Exedra duas fenestras habet.

[ The room has two windows. ]

> Hoc verbum duas significationes habet.

[ This word has two meanings. ]

> Habet duas filias, quae nuptae sunt.

[ He has two daughters, who are married. ]

> Horologium duas sagittulas habet.

[ A clock has two hands. ]

> Feles duas aures habet.

[ A cat has two ears. ]

 

[56] MUNERE

> Hic decem annos munere functus sum.

[ I’ve worked here for ten years. ]

> Hic decem annos munere functa sum.

[ I’ve worked here for ten years. ]

> Telephonum meum munere suo non fungitur.

[ My telephone doesn’t work. ]

> Hoc telephonum munere suo non fungitur.

[ This telephone doesn’t work. ]

> Frater meus in Gallia munere fungitur.

[ My brother works in France. ]

> Haec machinatio munere suo bene fungitur.

[ This engine works well. ]

> Hic munere fungor. Hospes non sum.

[ I work here. I’m no guest. ]

> Telephonum munere suo non fungitur.

[ The telephone doesn’t work. ]

> Horologium munere suo non fungitur.

[ The watch doesn’t work. ]

> Radiophonia munere suo non fungitur.

[ The radio doesn’t work. ]

 

[57] MARIAM

> Didymus nesciebat Mariam in urbe esse.

[ Tom didn’t know that Mary was in town. ]

> Didymus nesciebat Mariam filios habere.

[ Tom didn’t know that Mary had children. ]

> Et Mariam et Ioannem conveni, cum Londinii eram.

[ I met Mary and John when I was in London. ]

> Cum Londinii eram, Mariam et Ioannem conveni.

[ I met Mary and John when in London. ]

> Didymus Mariam osculatus est.

[ Tom kissed Mary. ]

> Didymus Mariam consecutus est.

[ Tom chased Mary. ]

> Didymus heri Mariam per telephonum adivit.

[ Tom called Mary up yesterday. ]

> Didymus nesciebat Mariam Gallice loqui posse.

[ Tom didn’t know that Mary could speak French. ]

> Didymus nesciebat Mariam discipulam lycei esse.

[ Tom didn’t know that Mary was a high school student. ]

> Didymus Mariam per telephonum adivit.

[ Tom called Mary. ]

 

[58] EAM

> Credo eam plus quam quadraginta annos habere.

[ I think she is over forty years old. ]

> Scisne eam in ecclesia esse ?

[ Do you know she’s in the church? ]

> Credo eam plus quadraginta annos natam esse.

[ I think she is over forty years old. ]

> Nesciebam eam filium habere.

[ I didn’t know that she had a child. ]

> Puto eam bonam saltatricem esse.

[ I think she is a good dancer. ]

> Nesciebam eam infantem habere.

[ I didn’t know that she had a child. ]

> Nesciebam eam aegram esse.

[ I didn’t know she was ill. ]

> Puto eam iratam esse.

[ She must be angry. ]

> Credo eam maiorem quadragenaria esse.

[ I think she is over forty years old. ]

> Ain’ vero ? Nesciebam eam sororem tuam esse.

[ Really? I didn’t know she was your sister. ]

 

[59] LIBRUM

> Puer librum legens est Ioannes.

[ The boy reading a book is John. ]

> Non volo legere hoc librum.

[ I don’t want to read this book. ]

> Cur hunc librum emere vis ?

[ Why do you want to buy this book? ]

> Parvum librum tuum video.

[ I see your little book. ]

> Parvum librum tuum video.

[ I can see your little book. ]

> Eum legentem librum vidi.

[ I saw him reading a book. ]

> Hunc librum emere non possum. Nimis carus est.

[ I cannot buy this book. It’s too expensive. ]

> Unus tantum ex viginti discipulis librum legit.

[ Out of twenty students, only one has read the book. ]

> Ioannes est puer qui librum legit.

[ John is the boy who is reading the book. ]

> Proximo anno hunc librum legere poteris.

[ You will be able to read this book next year. ]

 

[60] PULCHRA

> Maria valde pulchra est.

[ Mary is very beautiful. ]

> Maria valde pulchra est.

[ Mary is pretty cute. ]

> Maria pulchra est.

[ Mary is beautiful. ]

> Maria puella pulchra est.

[ Mary is a beautiful girl. ]

> Soror mea pulchra est.

[ My sister is pretty. ]

> Iaponia pulchra terra est.

[ Japan is a beautiful country. ]

> Maria femina pulchra est.

[ Mary is a beautiful woman. ]

> Maria pulchra erat.

[ Mary was beautiful. ]

> Haec domus pulchra est.

[ This is a beautiful house. ]

> Vita pulchra est.

[ Life is beautiful. ]

 

[61] PATER

> Ubi pater meus est ?

[ Where is my dad? ]

> Ubi est pater tuus ?

[ Where is your father? ]

> Ubi iam est tuus pater ?

[ Where is your father? ]

> Pater meus robustior quam pater tuus est.

[ My dad is stronger than your dad. ]

> Nunc pater meus foris in horto est.

[ My father is out in the garden now. ]

> Quod facit pater tuus ?

[ What does your father do? ]

> Estne pater in culina ?

[ Is Father in the kitchen? ]

> Vir acta diurna legens pater eius est.

[ The man reading a newspaper is his father. ]

> Cur pater meus in culina est ?

[ Why is my father in the kitchen? ]

> Dominus Fuscus est pater eius.

[ Mr Brown is her father. ]

 

[62] LOQUI

> Soror tua Anglice loqui non potest.

[ Your sister can not speak English. ]

> Si mecum loqui vis, adi me per telephonum.

[ If you want to speak to me, please call me up. ]

> Difficile est tribus linguis loqui.

[ It’s hard to speak three languages. ]

> Gallice loqui non possum.

[ I can’t speak French. ]

> Gallice neque legere neque loqui possum.

[ I can’t read French, nor can I speak it. ]

> Is Anglice loqui non potest.

[ He can’t speak English. ]

> Ea Gallice loqui potest.

[ She can speak French. ]

> Num difficile est Anglice loqui ?

[ Is it really that hard to speak English? ]

> Potesne Anglice loqui ?

[ Can you speak English? ]

> Quinque linguis loqui potest.

[ He can speak five languages. ]

 

[63] MEI

> Libri mei non sunt.

[ They aren’t my books. ]

> Ubi libri mei sunt ?

[ Where are my books? ]

> Fratres mei sunt.

[ They are my brothers. ]

> Amici matris meae amici mei sunt.

[ My mother’s friends are my friends. ]

> Hic liber est mei patris.

[ This book is my father’s. ]

> Parentes mei e Sinis oriundi sunt.

[ My parents are from China. ]

> Domus patris mei est.

[ This house is my father’s. ]

> Ille amicus fratris mei est.

[ He is my brother’s friend. ]

> Parentes mei mortui sunt.

[ My parents are dead. ]

> Hi libri mei sunt.

[ These are my books. ]

 

[64] UMQUAM

> Deum nemo vidit umquam.

[ No one has ever seen God. ]

> Fuistine umquam in Iaponia ?

[ Have you ever been to Japan? ]

> Fuistine umquam in Gallia ?

[ Have you ever been to France? ]

> Fuistine umquam in Europa ?

[ Have you ever been to Europe? ]

> Fuistine umquam in India ?

[ Have you ever been to India? ]

> Fuistine umquam Novi Eboraci ?

[ Have you ever been to New York? ]

> Fuistine umquam in Canada ?

[ Have you ever been to Canada? ]

> Fuistine umquam in Africa ?

[ Have you ever been to Africa? ]

> Fuistine umquam in hac villa ?

[ Have you ever been to that village? ]

> Fuistine umquam in America Foederata ?

[ Have you ever been to the United States? ]

 

[65] MEAM

> Ecclesia prope domum meam est.

[ There is a church near my house. ]

> Clavem meam invenire non possum.

[ I can’t find my key. ]

> Mensam meam video.

[ I see my table. ]

> Linguam meam amo !

[ I love my language! ]

> Rosam meam video.

[ I see my rose. ]

> Matrem meam amo.

[ I love my mother. ]

> Coronam meam video.

[ I see my crown. ]

> Patriam meam amo.

[ I love my homeland. ]

> Noli id super mensam scriptoriam meam ponere.

[ Don’t put it on my desk. ]

> Clamavi ad te, audi vocem meam.

[ I cried out to you, hear my voice. ]

 

[66] PROPE

> Schola mea prope stationem est.

[ My school is near to the station. ]

> Domus mea prope stationem est.

[ My house is near the station. ]

> Domus eius prope hortos publicos est.

[ Her house is near the park. ]

> Schola nostra prope stationem est.

[ Our school is near the station. ]

> Sella mea prope ianuam est.

[ My seat is near the door. ]

> Puer prope ianuam est.

[ There is a boy near the door. ]

> Domus mea prope ecclesiam est.

[ My house is near the church. ]

> Ecclesia prope domum meam est.

[ There is a church near my house. ]

> Sella prope fenestram non est.

[ The chair is not near the window. ]

> Domus eius prope mare est.

[ Her house is near the sea. ]

 

[67] MARIAE

> Nix Mariae placet.

[ Mary likes snow. ]

> Didymo et Mariae una filia et duo filii sunt.

[ Tom and Mary have one daughter and two sons. ]

> Et Didymo et Mariae pelliculae antiquae placent.

[ Tom and Mary both like old movies. ]

> Parentes Mariae in magna domo habitant.

[ Mary’s parents live in a big house. ]

> Didymo et Mariae duae feles sunt.

[ Tom and Mary have two cats. ]

> Parentes Mariae in maxima domo habitant.

[ Mary’s parents live in a monster house. ]

> Et Didymus et Ioannes Mariae placent.

[ Mary likes both Tom and John. ]

> Et Didyme et Mariae non places.

[ Tom and Mary don’t like you. ]

> Didymus Mariae librum de Australia dedit.

[ Tom gave Mary a book about Australia. ]

> Didymo et Mariae nulli liberi sunt.

[ Tom and Mary don’t have any children. ]

 

[68] TERRA

> Iaponia pulchra terra est.

[ Japan is a beautiful country. ]

> Quota hora in terra tua est ?

[ What time is it in your country? ]

> Italia est pulchra terra.

[ Italy is a beautiful land. ]

> Estne terra an urbs ?

[ Is that a country or a city? ]

> Omnia in Terra atomis facta sunt.

[ All things on the Earth are made of atoms. ]

> Fiat voluntas tua sicut in caelo et in terra.

[ May your will be done on Earth as it is in Heaven. ]

> Iaponia terra insularis est.

[ Japan is an island country. ]

> Senex cecidit in terra.

[ The old man fell down on the ground. ]

> Germania terra frigida est.

[ Germany is a cold country. ]

> Germania terra frigida est.

[ Germania is a cold land. ]

 

[69] DIE

> Homines ex Iaponia oriundi ter in die edunt.

[ The Japanese eat three times a day. ]

> Praeterito Solis die ad hortos publicos ivi.

[ I went to the park last Sunday. ]

> Praeterito Saturni die ad hortos publicos ivi.

[ I went to the park last Saturday. ]

> Hoc medicamentum bis in die sume.

[ Take this medicine twice a day. ]

> Hoc medicamentum ter in die sume.

[ Take this medicine three times a day. ]

> Proximo Solis die Novum Eboracum ibit.

[ She will leave for New York next Sunday. ]

> Roma uno die aedificata non est.

[ Rome was not built in a day. ]

> Eam bis in die videmus.

[ We go to see her twice a day. ]

> Medicamentum ter in die sume.

[ Take the medicine three times a day. ]

> Pater meus Saturni die vacat.

[ My father is free on Saturday. ]

 

[70] ORIUNDUS

> E Sinis oriundus sum.

[ I am from China. ]

> E Gallia oriundus est.

[ He is from France. ]

> E Brasilia oriundus sum.

[ I’m from Brazil. ]

> Ex Australia oriundus sum.

[ I come from Australia. ]

> Ex India oriundus non sum.

[ I am not from India. ]

> E Columbia oriundus sum.

[ I am from Columbia. ]

> E Ruthenia oriundus sum.

[ I am from Russia. ]

> Dominus Wang e Sinis oriundus est.

[ Mr Wang is from China. ]

> Ex Aegypto oriundus sum.

[ I am from Egypt. ]

> Ex America Foederata oriundus non sum.

[ No, I’m not from the United States. ]

 

[71] POTIONEM

> Thomas potionem Arabicam tantum bibit.

[ Tom only drinks coffee. ]

> Puella potionem Sinensem bibit.

[ The girl is drinking tea. ]

> Dominus Smith potionem Arabicam bibit.

[ Mr Smith is drinking coffee. ]

> Mane potionem Arabicam bibo.

[ I drink coffee in the morning. ]

> Velisne potionem Sinensem an potionem Arabicam ?

[ Would you like some tea or some coffee? ]

> Vir et femina potionem Sinensem bibunt.

[ The man and the woman drink tea. ]

> Didymus mane Potionem Sinensem semper bibit.

[ Tom always drinks coffee in the morning. ]

> Velisne mecum potionem Sinensem bibere ?

[ Won’t you have some tea with me? ]

> Visne me potionem Arabicam parare ?

[ Do you want me to make coffee? ]

> Didymus potionem Arabicam non bibit.

[ Tom doesn’t drink coffee. ]

 

[72] SUO

> Pater meus in cubiculo suo est.

[ My father is in his room. ]

> Maria nunc in cubiculo suo discit.

[ Mary is now studying in her room. ]

> Maria in cubiculo suo discit.

[ Mary is studying in her room. ]

> Telehorasim in cubiculo suo aspicit.

[ He is watching TV in his room. ]

> Maria equo suo equitare amat.

[ Mary loves to ride her horse. ]

> Telephonum meum munere suo non fungitur.

[ My telephone doesn’t work. ]

> Hoc telephonum munere suo non fungitur.

[ This telephone doesn’t work. ]

> Haec machinatio munere suo bene fungitur.

[ This engine works well. ]

> Telephonum munere suo non fungitur.

[ The telephone doesn’t work. ]

> Horologium munere suo non fungitur.

[ The watch doesn’t work. ]

 

[73] SUNT

> Ubi sunt liber et plumbum ?

[ Where are the book and the pencil? ]

> Pueri ubi sunt ?

[ Where are the boys? ]

> Ubi mala sunt ?

[ Where are the apples? ]

> Libri mei non sunt.

[ They aren’t my books. ]

> Ei tres sunt fratres.

[ He has three brothers. ]

> Pulchra sunt.

[ They are pretty. ]

> Ubi libri mei sunt ?

[ Where are my books? ]

> Canes in horto sunt.

[ The dogs are in the garden. ]

> Duo flores mihi sunt.

[ I have two flowers. ]

> Fratres mei sunt.

[ They are my brothers. ]

 

[74] SUM

> Hic decem annos opus facta sum.

[ I’ve worked here for ten years. ]

> Non sum medicus.

[ I’m not a doctor. ]

> Mater tua non sum.

[ I’m not your mother. ]

> Liber sum.

[ I’m free. ]

> Nunc triginta annos natus sum.

[ I am 30 years old now. ]

> Discipulus non sum.

[ I’m not a student. ]

> E Sinis oriundus sum.

[ I am from China. ]

> Per telephonum locutus sum.

[ I talked on the phone. ]

> E Sinis oriunda sum.

[ I come from China. ]

> E Sinis oriunda sum.

[ I am from China. ]

 

[75] SUB

> Feles sub mensa est.

[ The cat is under the table. ]

> Canis sub mensa est.

[ There is a dog under the table. ]

> Feles sub sella est.

[ The cat is under the chair. ]

> Feles sub mensa scriptoria est.

[ There is a cat under the desk. ]

> Malum sub mensa scriptoria est.

[ There is an apple under the desk. ]

> Canis in capsa sub mensa erat.

[ The dog was in a box under the table. ]

> Feles sub lecto est.

[ There is a cat under the bed. ]

> Estne feles sub mensa ?

[ Is there a cat under the table? ]

> Nihil novi sub luna.

[ There is nothing new under the moon. ]

> Aliquid sub lecto est.

[ There’s something under the bed. ]

 

[76] MENSE

> Hic semel in mense venit.

[ He comes here once a month. ]

> Londinium semel in mense it.

[ He goes to London once a month. ]

> Proximo mense Aprili decem annos natus erit.

[ He will be ten next April. ]

> Natalis mea mense Novembri est.

[ My birthday is in November. ]

> Semel in mense prandium cum patre sumit.

[ Once a month, she has lunch with her father. ]

> Ea mihi semel in mense scribit.

[ She writes to me once a month. ]

> Proximo mense sedecim annos natus ero.

[ I will be sixteen years old next month. ]

> Proximo mense sedecim annos nata ero.

[ I will be sixteen years old next month. ]

> Ioannes parentibus semel in mense scribit.

[ John writes to his parents once a month. ]

> Is parentibus semel in mense scribit.

[ He writes to his parents once a month. ]

 

[77] EX

> Haec puella ex Iaponia oriunda est.

[ This girl is from Japan. ]

> Poculum ex auro factum est.

[ The cup is made of gold. ]

> Vinum ex uvis factum est.

[ Wine is made from grapes. ]

> Unus ex raedis eius caeruleus est, ceteri rubri.

[ One of her cars is blue and the others are red. ]

> Et Didymus et Maria ex Australia oriundi sunt.

[ Tom and Mary are both from Australia. ]

> Homines ex Iaponia oriundi ter in die edunt.

[ The Japanese eat three times a day. ]

> Uxor mea ex Algeria oriunda est. Algeriana est.

[ My wife is from Algeria. She is Algerian. ]

> Didymus Bostoniae habitat ex quo natus est.

[ Tom has lived in Boston since he was born. ]

> Unus tantum ex viginti discipulis librum legit.

[ Out of twenty students, only one has read the book. ]

> Esne ex Austria an Australia oriundus ?

[ Do you come from Austria or Australia? ]

 

[78] AB

> Terra mea procul ab Iaponia est.

[ My country is far away from Japan. ]

> Filia sua ab ea rapta est.

[ Her child was snatched away from her. ]

> Talis puer ab omnibus amatur.

[ Such a boy is loved by everybody. ]

> Rex Darius profligatus est ab Alexandro Magno.

[ King Darius was defeated by Alexander the Great. ]

> Ars ab omnibus amatur.

[ Art is loved by everybody. ]

> Audio te semper amatum esse ab hoc viro.

[ I hear you have always been loved by this man. ]

> Hic liber ab adultis saepe legitur.

[ This is a book often read by adults. ]

> Num epistulam ab eo accepisti ?

[ Have you received a letter from him? ]

> Num litteras ab eo accepisti ?

[ Have you received a letter from him? ]

> Didymus ab angelo tactus est.

[ Tom was touched by an angel. ]

 

[79] MEAE

> Amici matris meae amici mei sunt.

[ My mother’s friends are my friends. ]

> Haec imago photographica sororis meae est.

[ This is a picture of my sister. ]

> Luna vitae meae es.

[ You are the moon of my life. ]

> Imago photographica sororis meae est.

[ That’s a photo of my sister. ]

> Pictura familiae meae est.

[ This is a picture of my family. ]

> Ubi alae meae sunt ?

[ Where are my wings? ]

> Ubi claves meae sunt ?

[ Where are my keys? ]

> Libum malorum uxori meae valde placet.

[ My wife likes apple pie a lot. ]

> Scalae meae fractae non sunt.

[ My ladder is not broken. ]

> Bracae meae sunt.

[ Those are my pants. ]

 

[80] MEO

> Illud verbum in glossario meo non est.

[ The word is not in my dictionary. ]

> Munere meo bene functus sum.

[ I did my work well. ]

> Munere meo bene functa sum.

[ I did my work well. ]

> Cur cibus in armario frigidario meo non est ?

[ Why is there no food in my refrigerator? ]

> Telehorasis in cubiculo meo est.

[ There is a television in my room. ]

> In horto meo multae arbores pomiferae sunt.

[ In my garden many trees are bearing fruit. ]

> Ego dilecto meo, et ad me conversio eius.

[ I am my beloved’s, and his desire is toward me. ]

> Pediludium patro meo non placet.

[ My Dad doesn’t like soccer. ]

> Quid sacco meo accidit ?

[ What happened to my bag? ]

> Musica patro meo non placet.

[ My father doesn’t like music. ]

 

[81] EMERE

> Raedam emere non potest.

[ He isn’t able to buy a car. ]

> Novum instrumentum photographicum emere volo.

[ I want to buy a new camera. ]

> Novam raedam emere volo.

[ I want to buy a new car. ]

> Hoc glossarium emere volo.

[ I want to buy this dictionary. ]

> Cur hunc librum emere vis ?

[ Why do you want to buy this book? ]

> Novam birotam emere volo.

[ I want to buy a new bicycle. ]

> Hanc caltulam emere vis.

[ You want to buy this skirt. ]

> Ubi tesseras emere possum ?

[ Where can I buy tickets? ]

> Novum computatorium emere volo.

[ I want to buy a new computer. ]

> Stolam emere volo.

[ I want to buy the dress. ]

 

[82] PUER

> Ubi puer est ?

[ Where is the boy? ]

> Ubi est mater tua, puer ?

[ Where is your mother, boy? ]

> Bonus puer es.

[ You are a good boy. ]

> Bonus puer es.

[ You are a nice boy. ]

> Quis est puer in flumine natans ?

[ Who is the boy swimming in the river? ]

> Parvus puer canem amplexus est.

[ The little boy embraced his dog. ]

> Thomas puer aureus est.

[ Tom is a golden boy. ]

> Is est puer quem heri vidi.

[ This is the boy whom I saw yesterday. ]

> Thomas puer improbus est.

[ Tom is a bad boy. ]

> Thomas puer probus est.

[ Tom is a good boy. ]

 

[83] MENSA

> Sub mensa feles est.

[ Under the table is a cat. ]

> Feles sub mensa est.

[ The cat is under the table. ]

> Glossarium in mensa est.

[ The dictionary is on the desk. ]

> Canis sub mensa est.

[ There is a dog under the table. ]

> Feles sub mensa scriptoria est.

[ There is a cat under the desk. ]

> Haec mensa e ligno facta est.

[ This table is made of wood. ]

> Malum sub mensa scriptoria est.

[ There is an apple under the desk. ]

> Canis in capsa sub mensa erat.

[ The dog was in a box under the table. ]

> Haec mensa scriptoria e ligno facta est.

[ This desk is made of wood. ]

> Haec mensa scriptoria fracta est.

[ This desk is broken. ]

 

[84] SAEPE

> Mensis Ianuarius saepe frigidissimus est.

[ January is usually the coldest month. ]

> Vitam brevem esse saepe dictum est.

[ They often say that life is short. ]

> Vitam brevem esse saepe dictum est.

[ It is often said that life is short. ]

> Eum saepe video.

[ I often see him. ]

> Eum saepe video.

[ I see him often. ]

> Tempore aestatis in flumine saepe natabamus.

[ In summer, we used to go swimming in the river. ]

> Tempore aestatis in flumine saepe natamus.

[ In the summer, we’re used to going swimming in the river. ]

> Hic liber ab adultis saepe legitur.

[ This is a book often read by adults. ]

> Parva scintilla saepe magnam flammam excitat.

[ A small spark often kindles a large flame. ]

> Maria saepe caltulas longas gerit.

[ Mary often wears long skirts. ]

 

[85] CULINA

> In culina est.

[ It is in a kitchen. ]

> Nunc in culina est.

[ She is in the Kitchen right now. ]

> Feles nostra in culina est.

[ Our cat is in the kitchen. ]

> Is in culina est.

[ He’s in the kitchen. ]

> Estne pater in culina ?

[ Is Father in the kitchen? ]

> Cur pater meus in culina est ?

[ Why is my father in the kitchen? ]

> Estne culter in culina ?

[ Is there a knife in the kitchen? ]

> In culina est, quia cenam parat.

[ She is in the kitchen because she’s making dinner. ]

> Mater in culina cibum parat.

[ Mom is preparing a meal in the kitchen. ]

> Multae blattae in culina sunt.

[ There are many cockroaches in the kitchen. ]

 

[86] POCULUM

> Hoc poculum mihi placet.

[ I like this cup. ]

> Visne poculum ? Unum super mensam est.

[ Do you want a glass? There is one on the table. ]

> Affer medicamentum eius et poculum aquae.

[ Go get her medicine and a glass of water. ]

> Ea mihi poculum potionis Sinensis attulit.

[ She brought me a cup of tea. ]

> Semper poculum lactis bibo antequam durmo.

[ I always drink a glass of milk before going to bed. ]

> Affer mihi illud poculum lactis.

[ Bring me that glass of milk. ]

> Da mihi poculum aquae.

[ Give me a glass of water. ]

> Affer mihi poculum aquae.

[ Bring me a glass of water. ]

> Affer mihi poculum lactis.

[ Get me a glass of milk. ]

> Da mihi poculum potionis Sinensis, quaeso.

[ Please give me a cup of tea. ]

 

[87] AN

> Habesne calamum an plumbum ?

[ Do you have a pen or pencil? ]

> Habesne calamum an plumbum ?

[ Do you have a pen or a pencil? ]

> Estne terra an urbs ?

[ Is that a country or a city? ]

> Estne calamus an plumbum ?

[ Is this a pen or a pencil? ]

> Utrum magis tibi placet ? Mala an musae ?

[ Which do you prefer, apples or bananas? ]

> Estne dulce an acerbum ?

[ Is it sweet or sour? ]

> Visne viride an caeruleum ?

[ Do you want the green or the blue? ]

> Utra magis tibi placent, mala an aurantia ?

[ Which do you like best—apples or oranges? ]

> Velisne potionem Sinensem an potionem Arabicam ?

[ Would you like some tea or some coffee? ]

> Esne ex Austria an Australia oriundus ?

[ Do you come from Austria or Australia? ]

 

[88] ARABICAM

> Potionem Arabicam libenter non bibo.

[ I don’t like to drink coffee. ]

> Potionem Arabicam non amat.

[ He doesn’t like coffee. ]

> Potionem Arabicam non bibo.

[ I do not drink coffee. ]

> Potionem Arabicam non bibo.

[ I don’t drink coffee. ]

> Thomas potionem Arabicam tantum bibit.

[ Tom only drinks coffee. ]

> Dominus Smith potionem Arabicam bibit.

[ Mr Smith is drinking coffee. ]

> Mane potionem Arabicam bibo.

[ I drink coffee in the morning. ]

> Potionem Arabicam bibo.

[ I drink coffee. ]

> Potionem Arabicam amo.

[ I love coffee. ]

> Velisne potionem Sinensem an potionem Arabicam ?

[ Would you like some tea or some coffee? ]

 

[89] TENILUDIO

> Eo tempore teniludio cum Ioanna cotidie ludebam.

[ In those days, I played tennis with Jeanette every day. ]

> Marcus bis in hebdomade teniludio ludit.

[ Marco plays tennis twice a week. ]

> Amici mei teniludio non ludunt.

[ My friends don’t play tennis. ]

> Velisne teniludio Solis diebus ludere ?

[ Would you like to play tennis on Sundays? ]

> Femina teniludio libenter ludit.

[ The woman likes to play tennis. ]

> Tempore pomeridiano teniludio ludam.

[ I will play tennis this afternoon. ]

> In lyceo teniludio ludebam.

[ I used to play tennis in high school. ]

> Kumi nunc teniludio ludit.

[ Kumi is playing tennis now. ]

> Nancy teniludio non ludit.

[ Nancy doesn’t play tennis. ]

> Ubi teniludio ludis ?

[ Where do you play tennis? ]

 

[90] ANGLICE

> Soror tua Anglice loqui non potest.

[ Your sister can not speak English. ]

> Is Anglice loqui non potest.

[ He can’t speak English. ]

> Num difficile est Anglice loqui ?

[ Is it really that hard to speak English? ]

> Potesne Anglice loqui ?

[ Can you speak English? ]

> Is paululum Anglice loqui potest.

[ He can speak a little English. ]

> Loquerisne Anglice ?

[ Does he speak English? ]

> Loquerisne Anglice ?

[ Do you speak English? ]

> Non solum Anglice sed etiam Gallice loquitur.

[ She speaks not only English but also French. ]

> Omnes in orbe terrarum Anglice loquuntur.

[ The whole world speaks English. ]

> Parentes mei Anglice non loquuntur.

[ My parents don’t speak English. ]

 

[91] HORTIS

> Multi pueri in hortis publicis sunt.

[ There are many children in the park. ]

> Multi homines in hortis publicis sunt.

[ There are many people in the park. ]

> Nimis multi in hortis publicis sunt.

[ There are too many people in the park. ]

> Estne therotrophium in hortis publicis ?

[ Is there a zoo in the park? ]

> Ego cum sorore in hortis publicis ludebam.

[ I used to play with my sister in the park. ]

> Tres pueri in hortis publicis ludebant.

[ Three children were playing in the park. ]

> Multi pueri in hortis publicis ludebant.

[ Many children were playing in the park. ]

> De hortis et montibus nostris scribam.

[ I am going to write about our parks and mountains. ]

> Cum liberis in hortis publicis ambulo.

[ I’m walking in the park with my children. ]

> Pueri in hortis publicis ludebant.

[ The children were playing in the park. ]

 

[92] MAGIS

> Raeda vetus mihi magis quam raeda nova placet.

[ I like the old car more than the new. ]

> Domus nova mihi magis quam domus vetus placet.

[ I like the new house more than the old. ]

> Quae sententia magis tibi placet ?

[ Which sentence do you prefer? ]

> Lac mihi magis quam sucus placet.

[ I like milk more than juice. ]

> Canes mihi magis quam feles placent.

[ I like dogs more than cats. ]

> Panis mihi magis quam oryza placet.

[ I like bread more than rice. ]

> Utrum magis tibi placet ? Mala an musae ?

[ Which do you prefer, apples or bananas? ]

> Aurantia mihi magis quam mala placent.

[ I like oranges better than apples. ]

> Mala mihi magis quam aurantia placent.

[ I like apples more than oranges. ]

> Aurantia mihi magis quam mala placent.

[ I prefer oranges to apples. ]

 

[93] IAM

> Ubi iam est tuus pater ?

[ Where is your father? ]

> Is uxorem iam habet.

[ He’s already married. ]

> Cur ad me iam non scribit ?

[ Why doesn’t he write me anymore? ]

> Acta diurna hodierna iam legi.

[ I have already read today’s paper. ]

> De eo iam scripsi.

[ I have already written about it. ]

> Satur iam sum, gratias.

[ I’m already full, thank you. ]

> Satura iam sum, gratias.

[ I’m already full, thank you. ]

> Ne sollicitatus sis, id iam refeci.

[ Don’t worry, I have already fixed it. ]

> Ne sollicitata sis, id iam refeci.

[ Don’t worry, I have already fixed it. ]

> Opus iam finivi.

[ I have already finished the job. ]

 

[94] SE

> De se ipso locutus est.

[ He talked about himself. ]

> Ea dixit se laetam esse.

[ She said she was happy. ]

> Inter se osculati sunt.

[ They kissed each other. ]

> Ioannes et Maria inter se amabant.

[ John and Mary loved each other. ]

> Didymus dixit se fessum esse.

[ Tom said he was tired. ]

> Credit se esse centrum Universi.

[ He thinks that he’s the centre of the universe. ]

> Parentes inter se amant.

[ Both of my parents love each other. ]

> Tom dixit se Francogallica loqui non velle.

[ Tom said he didn’t want to speak in French. ]

> Puto Didymum se vulneravisse.

[ I think Tom injured himself. ]

> Nicholas et Maria inter se amant.

[ Nicholas and Maria love each other. ]

 

[95] ORIUNDA

> E Sinis oriunda sum.

[ I come from China. ]

> E Sinis oriunda sum.

[ I am from China. ]

> E Gallia oriunda est.

[ She is from France. ]

> Haec puella ex Iaponia oriunda est.

[ This girl is from Japan. ]

> Ex Australia oriunda sum.

[ I come from Australia. ]

> Ex India oriunda non sum.

[ I am not from India. ]

> E Columbia oriunda sum.

[ I am from Columbia. ]

> E Ruthenia oriunda sum.

[ I am from Russia. ]

> Ex Aegypto oriunda sum.

[ I am from Egypt. ]

> E Somalia oriunda est.

[ She’s from Somalia. ]

 

[96] QUIA

> Laetus sum, quia femina non sum.

[ I’m happy because I am not a woman. ]

> Ad scholam eo, quia discere volo.

[ I go to school because I want to learn. ]

> In culina est, quia cenam parat.

[ She is in the kitchen because she’s making dinner. ]

> In balneo sum, quia manus lavo.

[ I’m in the bathroom because I’m washing my hands. ]

> Tata in culina est, quia coquit.

[ Dad is in the kitchen because he’s cooking. ]

> Raeda meritoria vectus sum, quia pluebat.

[ I took a taxi, because it was raining. ]

> Manus lavo, quia sordidae sunt.

[ I am washing my hands because I have dirty hands. ]

> Ad convivium ire non potuit, quia aegrotabat.

[ Because he was ill, he could not go to the party. ]

> Intrare non potui, quia porta clausa erat.

[ I couldn’t enter because the door was closed. ]

> Aquam bibo, quia sitio.

[ I’m drinking water because I’m thirsty. ]

 

[97] LIBROS

> Bonum est multos libros legere.

[ To read a lot of books is a good thing. ]

> Habesne duos libros ?

[ You have two books? ]

> Multos libros habet.

[ She has plenty of books. ]

> Duos libros habes.

[ You have two books. ]

> Duos libros habeo.

[ I have two books. ]

> Duos libros habeo.

[ I’ve got two books. ]

> Aliquos libros habet.

[ She has a few books. ]

> Multos libros habes.

[ You have many books. ]

> Robertus multos libros in cubiculo habet.

[ Bob has a lot of books in his room. ]

> In bibliothecam it ut libros legat.

[ He goes to the library to read books. ]

 

[98] ID

> Pone id super mensam.

[ Put it onto the table. ]

> Potesne id facere ?

[ Can you make it? ]

> Bellum placet solum eis, qui id non viderunt.

[ The war is liked by only those who haven’t seen it. ]

> Noli id super mensam scriptoriam meam ponere.

[ Don’t put it on my desk. ]

> Frater tuus id non emet.

[ Your brother will not buy it. ]

> Diploma meum quaero. Vidistine id ?

[ I’m looking for my passport. Have you seen it? ]

> Si satis pecuniae haberem, id emere potuerim.

[ If I had enough money, I could buy it. ]

> Si rogabit, id dabo; si non, non.

[ If he asks, I will give it; if not, not. ]

> Noli id emere, quaeso.

[ Please do not buy it. ]

> Ne sollicitatus sis, id iam refeci.

[ Don’t worry, I have already fixed it. ]

 

[99] MEDICUS

> Pater meus medicus est.

[ My father is a doctor. ]

> Pater meus medicus est.

[ My father’s a doctor. ]

> Magister non est, sed medicus est.

[ He is not a teacher but a doctor. ]

> Non sum medicus.

[ I’m not a doctor. ]

> Is non est medicus, sed magister.

[ He is not a doctor but a teacher. ]

> Quid medicus dixit ?

[ What did the doctor say? ]

> Is medicus non est.

[ He is not a doctor. ]

> Non tantum medicus, sed etiam poeta erat.

[ He was a doctor; moreover a poet. ]

> Is medicus est.

[ He is a doctor. ]

> Is non est medicus, sed doctor.

[ He is not a doctor but a teacher. ]

 

[100] SINENSIS

> Magister Sinensis est.

[ The teacher is Chinese. ]

> Hic vir Sinensis est.

[ This man is Chinese. ]

> Amica mea Sinensis est.

[ My girlfriend is Chinese. ]

> Potio Sinensis valde bona est.

[ This is a very good tea. ]

> Uxor mea Sinensis est.

[ My wife is Chinese. ]

> Potio Sinensis non placet mihi.

[ I don’t like tea. ]

> Potio Sinensis mihi placet.

[ I like tea. ]

> Haec potio Sinensis valde fervens est.

[ This tea is very hot. ]

> Potio Sinensis optimus est.

[ This tea is very nice. ]

> Dominus Wang Sinensis est.

[ Mr. Wang is Chinese. ]

 

 


100 Most Frequently Used Latin Words + 1000 Example Sentences: A Dictionary of F

  • Author: Neri Rook
  • Published: 2015-09-12 20:35:09
  • Words: 14437
100 Most Frequently Used Latin Words + 1000 Example Sentences: A Dictionary of F 100 Most Frequently Used Latin Words + 1000 Example Sentences: A Dictionary of F